Amelia’s Magazine | Vita Gottlieb: London Fashion Week S/S 2015 Catwalk Review

vita gottlieb - llfw - ss15 - jenny robins
Vita Gottlieb by Jenny Robins.

She may only have been creating collections for a few seasons, but Vita Gottlieb has already honed her look to great effect. For her S/S 2015 collection Microworld Vita found inspiration at the bottom of the sea; in the peachy hues of coral reefs and the creature filled waters of the far deep. A sensation of floating was achieved by the use of gossamer light asymmetric panels of georgette, juxtaposed against graphical black blocks on slouchy tees and swing skirts. Signature prints were created from the swirling botanical illustrations of Ernst Haeckel and worked well with stripes of contrast bias binding and delicate layered waist ties. Lacey laser cut gloves, smokey eyes, high hair and spike heeled metallic sandals gave a glamorous edge to everyday pieces, as Vita Gottlieb once more successfully married the avante grade with the wearable.

Scroll to the bottom to watch the video of the show.

Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon
Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern
Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern.

Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 show video from Vita Gottlieb on Vimeo.

Categories ,Catwalk review, ,Ernst Haeckel, ,Fashion Scout, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Jenny Robins, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Microworld, ,S/S 2015, ,SS15, ,Vita Gottlieb

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Amelia’s Magazine | Zeynep Tosun: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink.

Last week I ran an exclusive preview on Zeynep Tosun because last season her collection was one of my highlights. For Spring/Summer she did not disappoint, leaping into warmer weather with a range of summery fabrics that included sporty netting, floaty chiffon and swinging panels of silk in a gossamer light colour palette of creams, dove grey, mint, on trend powder pink and caramel, accented with glossy navy and black. Out of three Turkish designers showing in London this season she was the only one not to be inspired by the effects of recent turmoils on home soil, instead inspiration was taken from the androgynous sexuality of the 1920s and transformed into a series of sport luxe garments fit for the modern day minx. The flared cut of the cape was a key shape, with capelets integral to tops and dresses, as were peek-a-boo cutout details, revealing appealing glimpses of belly and back. Delicate glass beads provided a focal point for evening wear, either fringing the sides of net panels or cascading in geometric designs down the front of slinky dresses. Styling by Tamara Cincik was kept simple: sleek ponytails were accessorised with sultry eyes and simple rope flip flops. Keep your eyes on Zeynep Tosun, she’s making big waves over at Fashion Scout.

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink.

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Isabelle Mattern
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Isabelle Mattern.

Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014. All photography by Amelia Gregory and Tim Adey.

Categories ,1920s, ,catwalk, ,Dom&Ink, ,Fashion Scout, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,review, ,S/S 2014, ,Tamara Cincik, ,Tim Adey, ,Turkish, ,Zeynep Tosun

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week AW15 Fashion Illustrations

Vivienne Westwood Red Label LFW by Sara Netherway
Vivienne Westwood Red Label AW15 by Sara Netherway.

This year, instead of accompanying individual show reviews with fashion illustrations I decided to do something a bit different and open up the brief: inviting illustrators to send me their interpretation of any look from any of the London Fashion Week shows that took place, whether on or off schedule. Here are the results, all in one place. I hope you enjoy them!

Temperley-by-Emma-Farrarons
Temperley AW15 by Emma Farrarons.

SophiaWebster AW15 by_KatSquire_03
Sophia Webster AW15 by Kat Squire.

Minnan Hui AW15 Karolina Burdon
Minnan Hui AW15 by Karolina Burdon.

BURBERRY by EUGENIA_TSIMIKLIS_LO
Burberry AW15 by Eugenia Tsimiklis.

Sophia Webster AW15 by Kat Squire
Sophia Webster AW15 by Kat Squire.

Burberry AW15 by Eugenia Tsimiklis
Burberry AW15 by Eugenia Tsimiklis.

Antonio Berardi by Jordana Globerman
Antonio Berardi AW15 by Jordana Globerman.

Sophia Webster AW15 by Kat Squire
Sophia Webster AW15 by Kat Squire.

MATTHEW_WILLIAMSON AW15 by EUGENIA_TSIMIKLIS_LO
Matthew Williamson AW15 by Eugenia Tsimiklis.

Burberry Prorsum by Jordana Globerman
Burberry Prorsum AW15 by Jordana Globerman.

AW15 London Fashion Week Alice Temperley 480pix by Kasia Dudziuk
Alice Temperley AW15 by Kasia Dudziuk.

Orla Kiely AW15 by Lydia Coventry
Orla Kiely AW15 by Lydia Coventry.

Minnan Hui AW15 by Isabelle Mattern2
Minnan Hui AW15 by Isabelle Mattern2
Minnan Hui AW15 by Isabelle Mattern.

Vivienne Westwood Red Label by Sara Netherway
Vivienne Westwood Red Label AW15 by Sara Netherway.

Phoebe English by Laura Wilson
Phoebe English AW15 by Laura Wilson.

Daisy Steele Holly Fulton AW15
Holly Fulton AW15 by Daisy Steele.

Mary Katrantzou AW15 by  Iris van Gelder LFW
Mary Katrantzou AW15 by Iris van Gelder.

Categories ,A/W 2015, ,Antonio Berardi, ,AW15, ,Burberry, ,Daisy Steele, ,Emma Farrarons, ,Eugenia Tsimiklis, ,Fashion Illustrations, ,Iris van Gelder, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Jordana Globerman, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Kasia Dudziuk, ,Kat Squire, ,Laura Wilson, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lydia Coventry, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Matthew Williamson, ,Minnan Hui, ,Phoebe English, ,Sara Netherway, ,Sophia Webster, ,Temperley, ,Vivienne Westwood Red Label

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Amelia’s Magazine | Hana Cha: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Hana_Cha-by-Isabelle_Mattern
Hana Cha by Isabelle Mattern.

Korean designer Hana Cha (yet another London College of Fashion graduate) stuck to monochrome for her collection with Ones to Watch at Fashion Scout, concentrating on subtle textures such as applique stars, dip dye, rough edges and sweeping tassels to provide interest. She worked in sheers, glosses and satins, accessorised with wrist bands and even a studded baseball cap.

Ones to Watch hana cha SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch hana cha SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch hana cha SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch hana cha SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Hana Cha S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

A glossy plasticised minidress that a sexy nurse might have worn was made demure by a wide buckled belt and a sweeping skirt formed of dangling threads. An oversized white suit with wide trousers worn with gold heels brought an early 80s lounge elegance to the show, but plenty of asymmetric details and elongated back flaps ensured this was thoroughly up to date. The collection finished with a stunning black column dress; white threads dangling from the neckline an impractical but stunning addition that swayed hypnotically as the model moved.

Categories ,Fashion Scout, ,Hana Cha, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Korean, ,lfw, ,London College of Fashion, ,Ones To Watch, ,S/S 2013

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carmen: A Life in Fashion at the Fashion Space Gallery


Carmen Dell’Orefice by Joanna Gniady

I can’t bear having my photograph taken. That’s why I’m not a model. That’s the only reason. But imagine having your photograph taken consecutively for sixty years, by some of the greatest photographer that ever lived. It’s quite the achievement when you really think about it.

I’m taking about Carmen Dell’Orrefice, affectionately referred to as ‘the world’s most enduring supermodel’. A new exhibition at the London College of Fashion‘s Fashion Space Gallery proves why Carmen deserves that accolade.


All photography by Matt Bramford

It’s rare to find exhibitions that celebrate the career of a model rather than the photographers that document them. In recent years, grand masters like Avedon and Penn have been honoured with mammoth exhibitions, so this collaboration between LCF and David Downton is a welcome break, and it’s been put together with feeling (Dowton is a close personal friend of Dell’Orefice) and no stage of her career is left unrepresented.


Carmen Dell’Orefice by Celine Elliott

Carmen Dell’Orefice was born on Welfare Island in 1931 to an Italian father and Hungarian mother. Her first modelling duty was at the age of 13 – Carmen is now 80 and still modelling. As she moved around the room, talking to Colin McDowell, Frances Corner OBE (head of the LCF) I simply couldn’t take my eyes off her. She’s one of those lucky buggers that have matured with grace and elegance and maintained her unique looks without going anywhere near Wildenstein.

Looking around the room at the works is like an encyclopaedia of the great fashion photographers – Penn, Beaton, Coffin, Avedon, Derujinsky, her second husband Richard Heimann, Parkinson; it’s wonderfully exhausting. Reporductions of Vogue and Harper’s covers are mounted on some walls, while others hold photographs ranging from her frolicking in the Bahamas (shot by Parkinson) and basking in Hawaii (shot by Derujinsky).

The crescendo is a stunning selection of portraits commissioned especially by LCF and photographed by Ali Mahdavi. I’ve purposefully omitted any images of these photographs in the hope that you’ll go along and view the exhibition yourself. They are fresh and classical at the same time – there’s something intimately special about them. Please go.

Categories ,Carmen Dell’Orefice, ,Cecil Beaton, ,Clifford Coffin, ,Colin McDowell, ,David Downton, ,exhibition, ,fashion, ,Fashion Space Gallery, ,Frances Corner OBE, ,Gleb Derujinsky, ,Harper’s Bazaar, ,Irving Penn, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Norman Parkinson, ,photography, ,review, ,Richard Avedon, ,Richard Heimann, ,vogue, ,Wildenstein

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Amelia’s Magazine | Curating Yamamoto: An interview with Ligaya Salazar, the V&A’s Yohji Yamamoto exhibition curator


Illustration by Jo Cheung

So after a rollercoaster six days, website online Menswear Day and London Fashion Week drew to a close with hip-store Kokon To Zai’s label, this web dosage KTZ, viagra and what would be my final show of this season. I absolutely loved what they did last season, and I couldn’t wait to see what they’d come up with next.


All photography by Matt Bramford

A heavily policed front row meant me and illustrator Gareth took seats on the second, but I managed to get on the end so that my pictures would make it look like I was Frowing all along. I was bloody exhausted and feeling very sorry for myself, and I couldn’t help but wish that they’d just get on with it and stop papping people wearing pig masks. My legs wobbled and I struggled to keep my eyes open, but when the music started and the first look appeared, I quickly forgot my woes.


Illustration by June Chanpoomidole


Illustration by Thomas Leadbetter

Memphis-inspired fashion? I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. A pumpin’ soundtrack blasted from the PA system as gorgeous models (more women than men, but who cares?) sashayed up and down the length of the BFC tent. Stripes were a plenty on figure-hugging dresses with sweetheart necklines that feature extra flaps in that Pop Art/Memphis splatter pattern. Vibrant primary colours made black dresses playful: such a sophisticated, considered collection expertly styled by wonder-styilst Anna Trevelyan.

A whole load of other influences filtered into this power collection – the womenswear referenced power dressing from the 1980s (think Dynasty) and Mondrian’s prints; the menswear also digging up the eighties with (faux!) fur lapels and broad shoulders.


Illustration by Abby Wright

I have to admit, I did prefer the womenswear – it was far more wearable for fashion-forward ladies and it oozed sex appeal with dresses cut above the knee and details in all the right places to emphasise the curves. The menswear featured striped balaclavas topped with pom-poms, acrylic brooches which referenced the womenswear, over-sized imposing puffa jackets and graphic-print trousers. But it’ll be the womenswear that cements Kokontozai’s place as one of London’s hottest design duos.


Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Huge orb-like creations were worn on wrists, picking out patterns from lapels. And, oh, the cuts! Dynamic pieces of fabric were layered onto classic tailored pieces to give them a seriously sexy aesthetic. This was a collection that was playful but sophisticated at the same – a really difficult challenge to pull off.


Illustration by Valerie Pezeron

I loved EVERYTHING about it. I can’t put it into words, so just have a look at the pictures. Oh, and read Amelia’s more comprehensive and articulate review here!

You can see more from Jo Cheung, June Chanpoomidole, Abby Wright and Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!



Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

This spring, visit this the V&A presents a unique exhibition dedicated to the Grand Master Japanese couturier, Yohji Yamamoto. The exhibition will celebrate his life and work, and is the first of its kind in the UK. 30 years after Yamamoto debuted in Paris, the V&A has brought together rare examples of his visionary designs.

Watch the video for an exclusive interview with the exhibition’s curator, Ligaya Salazar. You can also read some of Salazar’s thoughts below, too.

On process
With this project I started roughly two and a half years ago to work on the idea and the concept behind the exhibition, it’s also a very particular project because you are working with a living designer who you are doing a single retrospective with, working with their team very closely, so in terms of curating, there is much more of a dialogue there than you would probably normally have with a slightly more thematic show.

The focus was more on to find a concept that would work for him, as a designer, because Yohji Yamamoto is very special in the deign world in terms of the way he approaches designing, so the way you want to show his work should be quite different as well… I spent more time looking at ways of displaying his work, ways of showing his work…

On garment selection
I had the incredible honour to be able to go into both his Paris and his Tokyo archives; the Tokyo archives no curator had ever been to and I had all of his archive to look at and to choose from, which made the editing process incredibly hard. It is something you spend a long time doing, talking to Yohji’s team, talking to the designer, making sure you have covered the iconic parts of his career, but also choosing pieces that are most emblematic of the themes that you want to bring out. I stated with an object list that was about six hundred pieces, and that was already a selection of the pieces I saw in the archive and then I had to bring it down to ninety; it was a long and arduous process.

On themes
Because it is an installation based exhibition, there isn’t a prescriptive story to tell, or a chronology, it was much more about how people would encounter the garments. For the first time what we are doing is to show everything on open display, on the same height as the viewer, so you are meeting your other, rather than looking up and behind glass. It’s a very different experience of the clothes.

Yohi Yamamoto is at the V&A and at The Wapping Project until 10th July 2011. Look out for a full review coming soon!

See more from Natascha Nanji here.

Categories ,couture, ,Cromwell Road, ,Curator, ,exhibition, ,fashion, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,japan, ,japanese, ,Ligaya Salazar, ,london, ,Natascha Nanji, ,paris, ,Retrospective, ,tokyo, ,va, ,video, ,Yohji Yamamoto

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Amelia’s Magazine | Butterflies, Swans, Stars and Tiaras: An interview with beaded jewellery designer Clara Francis

Clara Francis Necklace by Rebecca May Ilustration

Clara Francis Necklace by Rebecca May Illustration.

Clara Francis and I first spoke about doing an interview when she had just given birth to her youngest and I was pregnant with Snarfle… but somehow life as a new mum got in the way and it’s only now, two years later, that I have finally been able to catch up with this super talented jewellery designer. Clara is self taught in the virtually lost art of beading, producing beautifully intricate but bold pieces that seem to take on a life of their own. Here she talks candidly about the swap from acting to making, how motherhood has changed her life, and her excitement about the production of a new bridal collection. She’s a total inspiration.

Clara Francis by N. Sukandiwirya

Clara Francis by N. Sukandiwirya.

Can you tell us a little about your early life, where did you grow up and what was it like?
I was born in miserable suburb of North West London in a street right next door to Brent Cross Shopping Centre. Spent the majority of my youth there pilfering and gobbing on peoples heads walking on the floor below… went to the local comprehensive where I proceeded to only be interested in art and squandered what little brain I had. Decided pretty early on that I wanted to be an actress and went to The Central School of Speech and Drama and studied there for three years. During my 20′s I worked pretty much solidly as an actress, mainly theatre and a little bit of tv and film. But I found the periods of unemployment deeply depressing and hated that I was solely reliant on other people to give me work. I was too thin skinned to be an actress…
 
Clara Francis beaded jewellery butterfly headband

All photography of model wearing Clara Francis jewellery by Matilda Hill Jenkins.

Clara Francis BUG_BUTTERFLY_FLOWER bead necklace

What were the first crafts you got involved with as a child in the 80s?
My cousin Marion in Paris has a jewellery business called Françoise Montagne and she would send me over boxes of these beautiful vintage French beads – all the ones lying about in her studio that she didn’t need anymore… how lucky was I? So I would fashion my own jewellery even then. Also my mum was very crafty and taught me to knit and crochet very young. She was always making me clothes and I remember girls laughing at me on the bus on the way to school in my very obvious home knit jumper and scarf combo… this was the 80’s and it was all about the label and the bling!!!
 
Clara Francis beaded jewellery white butterfly headband

Clara Francis necklace by Lucy Eves

Clara Francis necklace by Lucy Eves.

Where and how did you first discover the art of beadwork?
In the bead shop in Kentish Town I saw racks of tiny japanese glass beads in hundreds of incredible colours and finishes. I enquired as to what one does with them and then went to the library and took out any book I could find on beadweaving and taught myself. Once I had taught myself the basic beading stitches I decided I wanted to created my own rather than work with other peoples’ designs. I absolutely love blending all the colours together… it’s like painting with beads.

Clara Francis by Stella Pong

Clara Francis by Stella Pong.

What experience did you have of market stalls before you set up shop in Spitalfields market?
My step father had market stalls all over London selling make up and cosmetics and often things that fell off the back of a lorry (once we had to sell 3 legged tights and umbrellas that you wore on your head!??) so I would work for him at Wembley Market every Sunday all through my teenage years. I couldn’t have hated it more but in retrospect I feel it taught me loads about how to sell to the public, people skills and even how to dress for cold weather!!! And most importantly I learnt the art of a good display… his mantra was ‘flash means cash‘!!!
 
Clara Francis beaded jewellery red choker

Clara Francis by Maia Fjord

Clara Francis by Maia Fjord.

How did the switch from acting to jewellery designer happen?
I always carried on crafting and decided that in between acting jobs rather than work in a call centre I would see if I could earn some money making and selling jewellery. I made a small collection and took it to the buyer at Harvey Nichols… and they bought everything I had there and then. I then got my stall at Spitalfields market which I had for about 8 years, and as my jewellery got more popular my acting career got LESS popular so I decided to knock the acting on the head. This was also around the time my partner and I decided to start a family.
 
Clara Francis beaded jewellery butterfly necklace

How does each design evolve?
I’m always ALWAYS thinking about jewellery and beads and all the possibilities that go with them. When I get an idea I sit in my studio and just play around with beads and various stitches (flat and three dimensional) until I get the effect I had pictured in my head. Some pieces will take weeks to get right as the beading process itself is so slow. I can spend an entire week making something and it’s only when I finish it and take a step back that I realise it hasn’t worked, so I have to start all over again.

Clara Francis wedding portrait

Clara Francis star tiaras on bridesmaids

Wedding tiara bessie funny face
 
I believe you recently made your own bridal headpiece, what did it look like and where did the inspiration come from?
Yes, I got married a couple of months ago. I knew that I wanted to make my own headpiece and five more for my little bridesmaids. I based my entire wedding on these incredible gold glitter brogues I found for all the bridesmaids AND the film Paper Moon which I’m currently obsessed with. So a celestial theme appeared quite organically. I beaded with 24 carat gold plated beads to make 3D stars for my headdress and flat stars for the girls’ ones. I also beaded wedding favours for all my female guests; a beaded butterfly ring or brooch or forget-me-not flower. It was a massive labour of love but worth it whan I saw everyone wildly dancing and butterflies and bees sparkling on everyones fingers and lapels. (A: what a beautiful beautiful idea!)

Clara Francis by Melissa Angelik

Clara Francis by Melissa Angelik.
 
How did the experience of becoming a mother affect your business?
I had my two girls, Bessie and Maude very close together and continued to build my business whilst changing nappies and breastfeeding, doing lots of wholesale. I exhibited at LFW, selling all over the world particularly in the US, Japan and Korea… plus I was working freelance for Topshop and River Island making jewellery ranges for them. I collaborated with Tracey Boyd for a season plus I did a collaboration with the V&A museum.

Clara Francis beaded jewellery butterfly star necklace
 
In January 2011 Maude died very suddenly from a flu virus and my whole life changed in that instant. I couldn’t work for a long time. Simply couldn’t concentrate on anything. My perspective on life changed completely, and when I did tentatively start working again after many months it was in a very different way to the way I worked before. The creation of two collections a year and everything that went with it was too demanding… I live more simply now. I want to keep my business small and manageable and not travel too much. I want to take and collect my daughter from school most days. I’m so much less ambitious. I have also had another child since losing Maude: my son Gilbert who has just turned 2. It is such a joy to be with him everyday and watch him grow, and I want to savour every second of him as before I know it he will be at school…
 
Clara Francis stars

How do you run your business now and what designs do you have in the pipeline for 2014?
I currently have 3 beaders who work from home and I send them patterns and beads and they do piecework for me. All of their work gets sent back to me and Fiona (who works with me part time) and we sew everything together and finish pieces off in my studio, which is at the bottom of my garden. It is very hard juggling young children with running your own business and I am constantly berating myself for not having enough time to do anything properly (parent or business) but I am doing the best that I can and that is all I can do at present. I often have to work into the night when everyone else is asleep as that is the only way things will get finished, it’s not ideal but not forever… I’m definitely going to bring out a bespoke bridal collection in the near future as there is a definite gap in the market for the more quirky bride and I enjoyed the whole process of making mine for my wedding so much I want to share it with the world!

Categories ,80s, ,Beading, ,Bridal, ,Butterflies, ,Clara Francis, ,Françoise Montagne, ,Harvey Nichols, ,interview, ,japan, ,jewellery, ,Kentish Town, ,korea, ,Lucy Eves, ,Maia Fjord, ,Matilda Hill Jenkins, ,Melissa Angelik, ,N. Sukandiwirya, ,Paper Moon, ,Rebecca May Illustration, ,River Island, ,Snarfle, ,stars, ,Stella Pong, ,swans, ,The Central School of Speech and Drama, ,Tiaras, ,topshop, ,Tracey Boyd, ,US, ,Wedding, ,Wembley Market, ,Wholesale

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carlotta Actis Barone: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 by gaarte
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Gaarte.

Carlotta Actis Barone always makes great use of the catwalk to showcase her zany aesthetic, but last season I felt that the concept had begun to overshadow the garments.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Thankfully this season the charismatic designer took a more lighthearted approach – no seal clubbing or nazi references here: instead she sent out a vibrant collection styled with over the top sculpted wigs of frothy orange curls. These were a reference to her source material – the famous opera The Magic Flute, (and the title of this show) – but they also lent a cartoonish air to the proceedings.

Carlotta-Actis-Barone-by-Isabelle-Mattern-iszaa
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Isabelle Mattern.

As if to truly banish all memory of more macabre collections this was described in the show notes as ‘a celebration of happiness, protection, sisterhood and love.’ Aw. It opened with a bevy of ballet dancers twirling in catsuits and boned pill shaped tutus to Mozart.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker.

Each season Carlotta Actis Barone chooses lettering which is imprinted on transparent netting and used in bodystockings: this season it was sheet music that was transcribed into a curvy typographic print design. This was the best I have seen it work, as a neat foil to the bold colour palette of the over garments that included zinging tangerine, deep purple, blinding yellow, plum and lime green. A large swirly print was used in panelling on tight high waisted trousers and intersected by binding in lines that emphasised womanly curves. These ‘ribs’ were inspired by cages carried by Papageno in the opera, this time symbolic of freedom. The idea reached its apogee in a stunning strapless boned gown which flared at the hem to create a unique and dramatic silhouette.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Flouncy feathers accessorised up-does where wigs failed to do the job; opaque tights (not so summery!) and shoes with spike heels echoed the bold tropical palette. Points accentuated shoulders and sharpened ripples of fabric at waists on tailored two pieces, which were worn with draw-waisted jackets made from plasticised fabrics.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-0080
Carlotta Actis Barone by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Claire Kearns.

The show closed with a swirling orange satin frock, perfect for sweeping down a grand staircase. And of course another appearance from the ballet dancers, who leapt down the catwalk with Carlotta in tow for a deep formation curtsey in front of Snarfle, who was wearing the gold coin found in our goodie bags as a necklace.

snarfle at fashion week
Jasper at Carlotta
Snarfle was joined on the front row by his friend Jasper.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gaarte, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,lfw, ,Mozart, ,Papageno, ,S/S 2013, ,The Magic Flute

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with Future Classics Fashion Designer Julie Wilkins

Future Classics AW14 by Gareth A Hopkins
Future Classics A/W 2014 by Gareth A Hopkins.

Fashion designer Julie Wilkins explores ideas of garment construction/deconstruction, radical conservatism and androgyny for A/W 2014. Her capsule collections come with the guiding principle that purposeful limitation allows for increased invention, so the new Future Classics collection features a sombre colour palette, with conservative fabrics given multiple possibilities of wear that are highlighted in the gifs viewed here. Julie Wilkins is also a musician, releasing her album as The Electra Woods in May this year.

Future Classics AW14 GIF (01)
What inspired the new collection?
The idea of using very classic fabrics – cashmere, camel hair, silk, fine cotton – and a sedate, conservative palate – while working through the staples of a wardrobe and applying all the various things FUTURE CLASSICSC© “does” to a recognisable garment form – multi-functioning, hybrids, twins etc. – but to a SUPER degree. With a shot of plastic bag blue polyester as a kind of contrast/marker. The colour palette matches the plates too. And it marks the end of that incarnation of FUTURE CLASSICSC© and the label’s transition to DRESS© in SS15 – which is a kind of fresh start in lots of ways.

Future Classics AW14 GIF (02)
Future Classics by Marianna Madriz
Future Classics by Marianna Madriz.

How did you put together the gifs, and what gave you the idea to create them?
I built them up (painstakingly, including painting square lips in!) from the look book stills. Oftentimes people don’t see the way the garments will look on and their multi-functionality – so I wanted to show this, and also put a bit of cartoony expressive-ness into the look book. The model Irina was great, very dead pan – super Russian. I love them. It’s like having an electronic pet doll. I often talk to her, when I click on them.

Future classics AW14 GIF (15)
Future-Classics-Fashion-by-Isabelle-Mattern
Future Classics Fashion by Isabelle Mattern.

Who would they like to see wearing this collection?
Clever humans who like some comfort with their edge.

Future Classics AW14 by Beatthepulp aka Kulvinder Dhillon
Future Classics AW14 by Beatthepulp aka Kulvinder Dhillon-2
Future Classics A/W 2014 by Beatthepulp aka Kulvinder Dhillon.

What are you working on next?
I am working on a dress collection for DRESS© for SS15. The collection has thematically titled EP and another cultural product with it – which is part of the new way of working. This one is super exciting……

Dirty Explanation from The Electra Woods on Vimeo.

The ELECTRA WOODS – Dirty Explanation – Video by Dean Brannagan.

See more Future Classics Fashion here. Hear The Electra Woods (out now on FC/fm) here, and find out more about the band here.

Categories ,A/W 2014, ,Beatthepulp, ,Dean Brannagan, ,Dirty Explanation, ,FC/fm, ,future classics, ,Future Classics Fashion, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,interview, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Julie Wilkins, ,Kulvinder Dhillon, ,Marianna Madriz, ,The Electra Woods

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Amelia’s Magazine | Belle Sauvage: London Fashion Week A/W 2014 Catwalk Review

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman.

For A/W 2014 Belle Sauvage once again put together a collection that featured their trademark mishmash of quirky prints and youthful sportsluxe. This season they were inspired by the ladies of the night, specifically Paris Cats After Midnight, those iconic French women who did not let the devastation of two World Wars stand in the way of a good time. This was translated into prints, embroideries and trims featuring the ‘feminine weapons’ of choice – chains, lipsticks, necklaces and pearls. On shift dresses symmetrical designs with overlaid bubbles had a distinct Metropolis feel, and overall there was a definite 80s style to this collection, featuring as it did simple black heels, asymmetric style pillar box hats with dangling chains and foxy cut off red gloves. Boxy quilted crop jackets, flared peplums on pencil skirts and bodycon dresses further referenced that most decadent of decades in this super fun collection, which finished with a high octane floor length red dress and coat.

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 Gaarte

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Gaarte.

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

All photography by Amelia Gregory. Read more about Belle Sauvage in our review and interview here and here.

Categories ,80s, ,A/W 2014, ,Belle Sauvage, ,bodycon, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gaarte, ,Isher Dhiman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Metropolis, ,Paris Cats After Midnight, ,print, ,sportsluxe

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