Amelia’s Magazine | Vintage at Goodwood: Festival Review

Wolf and Badger launch display amy
WolfandBadger skull
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I don’t often head into town for launches after work these days but I was intrigued enough by the sound of the Wolf and Badger pop up store in Selfridges to request a ticket from them and make the trek over on my bike. Even though it was raining and I now have a snuffle.

There’s probably a reason why I don’t get asked to parties at that temple to consumerism Selfridges – it’s hallowed halls are all gleaming and full of trinkets and I don’t know that the readers of my website have much money to spend in them. I certainly don’t. But it’s rather wonderful to visit once in a blue moon – especially the food hall, order where I couldn’t resist picking up some Marmite flavoured biscuits by Fudges (shaped like Marmite pots!) as a special treat. Now there’s a brand diffusion I really can’t get enough of…

WolfandBadger Selfridges window display by Kyle Bean
The current window display by Kyle Bean.

On arrival I could see what was rather a swanky affair through the windows as I peered past a rather wonderful fairytale castle made out of old books. Inside some furiously groomed folk filled the aisles as they fuelled up with champagne and jellybeans. A couple of ladies with bog roll wigs delivered creamed canapes from a side table and there was so much people watching potential that I found it hard to concentrate on the work being sold.

WolfandBadger amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not sure about this as a look…

Along the back wall a vision of Amy Winehouse in buttons was on display centre stage by the artist Sarah Gwyer. We particularly admired the clever use of old Costa service badges in the hairpiece on her beehive. Next door a digital parakeet by Troy Abbott boggled my mind somewhat. Erm… fun, but do we really have energy to waste with fripperies like this?

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory

I preferred the plates and cups with curly bites taken out of them – created by the designer Evthokia. And over the top it might be but I adored the opulent ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson: great curlicued gold and cream extravagances inspired by coral reefs and wood. Note to Wolf and Badger: it’s a shame the names of artists were hammered out in metal, making them incredibly hard to read and take note of.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not your usual crockery from Evthokia.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson.

On the tables knuckle duster jewellery by Gisele Ganne was equally over the top. I can’t much imagine anyone wearing this stuff but it was fun to marvel at it in a glass case.

WolfandBadger gisele ganne
Knuckle duster madness by Gisele Ganne.

Maybe I’m suddenly getting a little more low key in my old age, but I was more drawn to the delicate gold filigree jewellery of Mallarino. I often gaze longingly at the Indian wedding earrings in the windows of the shops on Bethnal Green Road, and this seemed to be greatly inspired by such designs.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Botoxed high society lady.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
And not quite so botoxed (or high society) lady.

As we left I picked up a satisfyingly heavy goodie bag from Selfridges – unfortunately it wasn’t anything exciting from Wolf and Badger. Just a bog standard notebook.

Even if you haven’t got the cash to flash, the Wolf and Badger pop up concept store is worth popping into for some cool West London designer inspiration if you’re in that part of town. It’s only on between the dates of 12-31 August 2010.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger skull
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I don’t often head into town for launches after work these days but I was intrigued enough by the sound of the Wolf and Badger pop up store in Selfridges to request a ticket from them and make the trek over on my bike. Even though it was raining and I now have a snuffle.

There’s probably a reason why I don’t get asked to parties at that temple to consumerism Selfridges – it’s hallowed halls are all gleaming and full of trinkets and I don’t know that the readers of my website have much money to spend in them. I certainly don’t. But it’s rather wonderful to visit once in a blue moon – especially the food hall, store where I couldn’t resist picking up some Marmite flavoured biscuits by Fudges (shaped like Marmite pots!) as a special treat. Now there’s a brand diffusion I really can’t get enough of…

WolfandBadger Selfridges window display by Kyle Bean
The current window display by Kyle Bean.

On arrival I could see what was rather a swanky affair through the windows as I peered past a rather wonderful fairytale castle made out of old books. Inside some furiously groomed folk filled the aisles as they fuelled up with champagne and jellybeans. A couple of ladies with bog roll wigs delivered creamed canapes from a side table and there was so much people watching potential that I found it hard to concentrate on the work being sold.

WolfandBadger amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not sure about this as a look…

Along the back wall a vision of Amy Winehouse in buttons was on display centre stage by the artist Sarah Gwyer. We particularly admired the clever use of old Costa Coffee service badges in the hairpiece on her beehive.

Wolf and Badger launch display amy

Next door a digital parakeet by Troy Abbott boggled my mind somewhat. Erm… fun, but do we really have energy to waste with fripperies like this?

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory

I preferred the plates and cups with curly bites taken out of them – created by the designer Evthokia. And over the top it might be but I adored the opulent ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson: great curlicued gold and cream extravagances inspired by coral reefs and wood. Note to Wolf and Badger: it’s a shame the names of artists were hammered out in metal, making them incredibly hard to read and take note of.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not your usual crockery from Evthokia.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson.

On the tables knuckle duster jewellery by Gisele Ganne was equally over the top. I can’t much imagine anyone wearing this stuff but it was fun to marvel at it in a glass case.

WolfandBadger gisele ganne
Knuckle duster madness by Gisele Ganne.

Maybe I’m suddenly getting a little more low key in my old age, but I was more drawn to the delicate gold filigree jewellery of Mallarino. I often gaze longingly at the Indian wedding earrings in the windows of the shops on Bethnal Green Road, and this seemed to be greatly inspired by such designs.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Botoxed high society lady.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
And not quite so botoxed (or high society) lady.

As we left I picked up a satisfyingly heavy goodie bag from Selfridges – unfortunately it wasn’t anything exciting from Wolf and Badger. Just a bog standard notebook.

Even if you haven’t got the cash to flash, the Wolf and Badger pop up concept store is worth popping into for some cool West London designer inspiration if you’re in that part of town. It’s only on between the dates of 12-31 August 2010.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Dahling_by_Abigail_Nottingham
Dahling by Abigail Nottingham.

“We’re building great cafes and restaurants on the Vintage High St, site where you will even find a Waitrose.” So said the flyer that I picked up in a local pub the day after our sojourn to Vintage at Goodwood. To be honest, and if I’d seen this same flyer before I’d been inundated with hype from the great VAG press machine then I might not have been so keen to attend the festival.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It’s ironic then, that, like the camping spots in “hidden glades, hollows, copses and hillocks” Waitrose didn’t make it into the final Vintage at Goodwood vision. But what did was every bit as soulless as I feared it might be in my preview blog.

Vintage Goodwood 2010

Past a regimental camping site that better represented a hillside carpark, we did indeed approach the main VAG entrance via a wooded glade… and as we did so passed what was to prove the most interesting aspect of the whole festival – a small eco-campment complete with beautiful decorated gypsy caravan, outsized lace-making and knitting, and a tiny outdoor stage for up and coming bands. Curated by textile artist Annie Sherburne, it was like a touch of Secret Garden Party had crept into the mix, but knowing not where to put it the madness was relegated to the woods.

Vintage Goodwood knit
Love shack caravan By Jessica Sharville
Love Shack Caravan by Jessica Sharville.

So far, so not very vintage, but as we ducked under the entrance arch a slew of gorgeous old cars funnelled us down towards the much trumpeted High Street, rearing up against the dramatic sky like a cross between a back lot of a Hollywood western and a trade show.

Vintage Goodwood entrance
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

“Fifty years on from the design-led 1951 Festival of Britain, Goodwood is to host in 2010 the first of what will be an annual event” opens the glossy VAG flyer, and true to this spirit the very first shop on the High Street housed Wayne Hemingway Inc, choc full of products plastered with designs inspired by the very same Festival of Britain. As one worker commented to me “How arrogant can you be?” Vintage at Goodwood was a monument to our current obsession with consumerism as leisure, and bore no resemblance to the Festival of Britain’s celebration of modern societies’ achievements in post-war Britain. To compare something to such an iconographic event is to set oneself up for a fall.

Vintage Goodwood pub
Vintage Goodwood dress
TigzRice_pinupcar
Pinup Girl with Car by Tigz Rice.

Boggling, I gazed up at the garishly coloured towering fascias, wondering at the huge amount of money that must have gone into the construction. And none of it looking remotely recyclable. For that matter, where were the recycling bins? The post war years were frugal, and there was no sign of that here.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

Instead there was the opportunity to shop inside stands for those well known vintage brands: The Body Shop, Fortnum & Mason, John Lewis and some really expensive watch brand I’ve never heard of; in whose stall people quaffed champagne as a man picked apart on old watch face and another displayed a case of super expensive items to a wealthy shopper. The same brand had sponsored the festival wristbands, made out of lethal lentographic plastic that cut my friend’s arm to shreds.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

There was also: a cinema, and a catwalk hosting “sold out” shows. We never did find out if this was just a turn of phrase or whether they were actually sold out. Yup, you had to pay on top of the ticket price for many of the attractions. And did I mention the style stand, where you could get your hair done by Primark in collaboration with the Sunday Times Style Magazine. Yes really. This is what we’ve come to.

vintage at goodwood by erica sharp
Vintage at Goodwood by Erica Sharp.

I heard rumours of people flying in to attend this festival on private jets, but it was telling of the strange mix of people that there was also a Daily Mirror volkswagen bus on site. As someone wrote on twitter, it seemed like a sanitised Daily Mail version of fifty years of culture, devoid of all nuance or passion. Inside the Sotheby’s auction tent the intermittent rain drip dripped onto a vintage speaker valued at £6000 as a couple passed looking uncomfortable in a fancy dress version of the 1970s.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
vintagegoodwood by Maria del Carmen Smith
Vintage at Goodwood Auction by Maria del Carmen Smith.

The most popular dress amongst women seemed to be the ubiquitous flouncey polka dot fifties number, or some other poorly rendered version of what was worn in the 60s or 70s. Fine if that’s your bag, but I’ve seen fancy dress done with a whole lot more verve at places like Bestival. I guess pure vintage enthusiasts wear vintage clothes with a dedication to style that wasn’t obvious on many festival goers, because vintage enthusiasts choose to wear these clothes day in day out, not as mere fancy dress. It wasn’t altogether surprising to find the real vintage enthusiasts looking slightly bemused and out of place in the staff dinner queue.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood crocs
Future Vintage: Crocs apparently…
Vintage Goodwood 2010
and the Big Brother chair. God help us.
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Tyrells crisps promotion: a vegetable chamber group.
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Rocking the vintage look.

We spoke to friends in the much smaller vintage stall area that was hidden in cramped tents behind the central shopping parade. They were ambivalent about the festival: cross with the way it had been organised and how they were being treated, but happy with the money being spent on their stalls. Aside from spend spend spend, there wasn’t really much to do. We saw little evidence of art from across the decades, other than a strong presence from Peter Blake. We were amazed at the lack of protection for all the beautiful vintage cars stationed next to themed areas for each decade, scattered across the largely unpopulated site. Although there were rumours of workshops, without a £12 programme (touted as a must have “annual”) to tell us when and where, there didn’t seem to be much opportunity.

Vintage Goodwood craft

Like others we gawped at the crafters rather than join in and participate. “Ladies, wear your heels,” urged the flyer. But there wasn’t that much evidence of glamour as the small and bedraggled crowd waved their brollies in the air during the mid afternoon set at the 80s rave warehouse.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
The programme: £12 a pop.
Vintage Goodwood rave
The rave. Wet. Photograph by Tim Adey.
Vintage Goodwood empty
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

I had hoped to visit The Chap Olympiad but every time we got close the heavens opened and we retreated. We tried to see comedian John Shuttleworth but the inflatable Leisure Dome was full to capacity and I was buggered if we were going to stand in a queue in the rain. How much electricity does it take to keep a blow up tent full of air? *ponders* Over on the main stage a respectable crowd gathered for The Noisettes, but seemed bemused by singer Shingai Shoniwa’s stage banter. And I wonder, how do The Noisettes fit into any kind of “vintage” mould?

Vintage Goodwood Noisettes
noisettes-singer-by-anagomezhernandez
Shingai Shoniwa by Ana Gomez Hernandez.

Instead we headed back to the Leisure Dome after another tip off – this time to see the absolutely amazing Swingle Singers singing choreographed acapella and beat box versions of popular songs. An utterly astonishing discovery they alone made the trip down south worthwhile.

Vintage Goodwood Swingle Singers
Vintage Goodwood austin
Vintage Goodwood swingle
Vintage Goodwood Swingle singers
swingle singers by anna hancock young
Swingle Singers by Anna Hancock Young.

Afterwards we stayed onto watch 70 year old Tony Hatch, he of soap opera theme tune fame (don’t worry, I had no idea who he was either). A highlight of our short visit to VAG was surely the sight of Captain Sensible (of punk legends The Damned), listening to Tony Hatch and singers reprise the Neighbours theme tune. Does it get anymore surreal?

Vintage Goodwood Tony Hatch
Tony Hatch and friends.

Thanks to the power of twitter I was able to find out what VAG was like for myself, and in retrospect I am very glad that I didn’t get given free tickets by the organisers because I would have felt duty bound to be much nicer about the VAG experience if I had. I am sure that many people thoroughly enjoyed their trip to Vintage at Goodwood, but for me the idea of staying on for another day was utterly unappealing. Instead we left whilst the going was good, stayed over at a friend’s house and spent Sunday getting drunk with locals at a historic pub in nearby Petersfield.

Vintage Goodwood by Louise Sterling
Vintage Goodwood by Louise Sterling.

On my previous blog there have been a couple of comments stressing the need for big sponsors in order to make a return on investment on a festival such as VAG. This is absolutely not true unless you aspire to make a festival bigger than it wants to be. Most festivals start small and grow organically through the love and dedication of the people who take part. It’s not necessary to bring big brands in unless you’re aiming for a showy experience at the expense of any kind of soul.

Vintage Goodwood girls
Vintage Goodwood shop
Vintage Goodwood red
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Sponsored up to the hilt.

For real vintage lovers I suggest that next year, instead of going to Vintage at Goodwood you check out the numerous other boutique festivals dedicated to specific eras. Especially since I have a sneaking suspicion that many of the true vintage enthusiasts that made it to VAG will not be returning next year. And if you want pure unadulterated playful creative dressing up then I suggest you check out Secret Garden Party – and for real forward thinking cultural inspiration then try Latitude. A hyped-up vanity project does not a successful festival make.

Vintage Goodwood mobility

Categories ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Ana Gomez, ,Ana Gomez Hernandez, ,Anna Hancock-Young, ,Annie Sherburne, ,bestival, ,Captain Sensible, ,Erica Sharp, ,John Shuttleworth, ,latitude, ,Louise Sterling, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Peter Blake, ,Primark, ,Secret Garden Party, ,Shingai Shoniwa, ,Swingle Singers, ,The Chap Olympiad, ,The Damned, ,the Noisettes, ,Tigz Rice, ,Tigzy, ,Tim Adey, ,Tony Hatch, ,Vintage at Goodwood, ,Vintage Goodwood. Jessica Sharville, ,Wayne Hemmingway

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Amelia’s Magazine | Vintage at Goodwood: Festival Review

Wolf and Badger launch display amy
WolfandBadger skull
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I don’t often head into town for launches after work these days but I was intrigued enough by the sound of the Wolf and Badger pop up store in Selfridges to request a ticket from them and make the trek over on my bike. Even though it was raining and I now have a snuffle.

There’s probably a reason why I don’t get asked to parties at that temple to consumerism Selfridges – it’s hallowed halls are all gleaming and full of trinkets and I don’t know that the readers of my website have much money to spend in them. I certainly don’t. But it’s rather wonderful to visit once in a blue moon – especially the food hall, order where I couldn’t resist picking up some Marmite flavoured biscuits by Fudges (shaped like Marmite pots!) as a special treat. Now there’s a brand diffusion I really can’t get enough of…

WolfandBadger Selfridges window display by Kyle Bean
The current window display by Kyle Bean.

On arrival I could see what was rather a swanky affair through the windows as I peered past a rather wonderful fairytale castle made out of old books. Inside some furiously groomed folk filled the aisles as they fuelled up with champagne and jellybeans. A couple of ladies with bog roll wigs delivered creamed canapes from a side table and there was so much people watching potential that I found it hard to concentrate on the work being sold.

WolfandBadger amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not sure about this as a look…

Along the back wall a vision of Amy Winehouse in buttons was on display centre stage by the artist Sarah Gwyer. We particularly admired the clever use of old Costa service badges in the hairpiece on her beehive. Next door a digital parakeet by Troy Abbott boggled my mind somewhat. Erm… fun, but do we really have energy to waste with fripperies like this?

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory

I preferred the plates and cups with curly bites taken out of them – created by the designer Evthokia. And over the top it might be but I adored the opulent ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson: great curlicued gold and cream extravagances inspired by coral reefs and wood. Note to Wolf and Badger: it’s a shame the names of artists were hammered out in metal, making them incredibly hard to read and take note of.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not your usual crockery from Evthokia.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson.

On the tables knuckle duster jewellery by Gisele Ganne was equally over the top. I can’t much imagine anyone wearing this stuff but it was fun to marvel at it in a glass case.

WolfandBadger gisele ganne
Knuckle duster madness by Gisele Ganne.

Maybe I’m suddenly getting a little more low key in my old age, but I was more drawn to the delicate gold filigree jewellery of Mallarino. I often gaze longingly at the Indian wedding earrings in the windows of the shops on Bethnal Green Road, and this seemed to be greatly inspired by such designs.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Botoxed high society lady.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
And not quite so botoxed (or high society) lady.

As we left I picked up a satisfyingly heavy goodie bag from Selfridges – unfortunately it wasn’t anything exciting from Wolf and Badger. Just a bog standard notebook.

Even if you haven’t got the cash to flash, the Wolf and Badger pop up concept store is worth popping into for some cool West London designer inspiration if you’re in that part of town. It’s only on between the dates of 12-31 August 2010.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger skull
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I don’t often head into town for launches after work these days but I was intrigued enough by the sound of the Wolf and Badger pop up store in Selfridges to request a ticket from them and make the trek over on my bike. Even though it was raining and I now have a snuffle.

There’s probably a reason why I don’t get asked to parties at that temple to consumerism Selfridges – it’s hallowed halls are all gleaming and full of trinkets and I don’t know that the readers of my website have much money to spend in them. I certainly don’t. But it’s rather wonderful to visit once in a blue moon – especially the food hall, store where I couldn’t resist picking up some Marmite flavoured biscuits by Fudges (shaped like Marmite pots!) as a special treat. Now there’s a brand diffusion I really can’t get enough of…

WolfandBadger Selfridges window display by Kyle Bean
The current window display by Kyle Bean.

On arrival I could see what was rather a swanky affair through the windows as I peered past a rather wonderful fairytale castle made out of old books. Inside some furiously groomed folk filled the aisles as they fuelled up with champagne and jellybeans. A couple of ladies with bog roll wigs delivered creamed canapes from a side table and there was so much people watching potential that I found it hard to concentrate on the work being sold.

WolfandBadger amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not sure about this as a look…

Along the back wall a vision of Amy Winehouse in buttons was on display centre stage by the artist Sarah Gwyer. We particularly admired the clever use of old Costa Coffee service badges in the hairpiece on her beehive.

Wolf and Badger launch display amy

Next door a digital parakeet by Troy Abbott boggled my mind somewhat. Erm… fun, but do we really have energy to waste with fripperies like this?

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory

I preferred the plates and cups with curly bites taken out of them – created by the designer Evthokia. And over the top it might be but I adored the opulent ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson: great curlicued gold and cream extravagances inspired by coral reefs and wood. Note to Wolf and Badger: it’s a shame the names of artists were hammered out in metal, making them incredibly hard to read and take note of.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Not your usual crockery from Evthokia.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Ceramic ware from Jasmin Rowlandson.

On the tables knuckle duster jewellery by Gisele Ganne was equally over the top. I can’t much imagine anyone wearing this stuff but it was fun to marvel at it in a glass case.

WolfandBadger gisele ganne
Knuckle duster madness by Gisele Ganne.

Maybe I’m suddenly getting a little more low key in my old age, but I was more drawn to the delicate gold filigree jewellery of Mallarino. I often gaze longingly at the Indian wedding earrings in the windows of the shops on Bethnal Green Road, and this seemed to be greatly inspired by such designs.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Botoxed high society lady.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
And not quite so botoxed (or high society) lady.

As we left I picked up a satisfyingly heavy goodie bag from Selfridges – unfortunately it wasn’t anything exciting from Wolf and Badger. Just a bog standard notebook.

Even if you haven’t got the cash to flash, the Wolf and Badger pop up concept store is worth popping into for some cool West London designer inspiration if you’re in that part of town. It’s only on between the dates of 12-31 August 2010.

WolfandBadger launch photo by Amelia gregory
Dahling_by_Abigail_Nottingham
Dahling by Abigail Nottingham.

“We’re building great cafes and restaurants on the Vintage High St, site where you will even find a Waitrose.” So said the flyer that I picked up in a local pub the day after our sojourn to Vintage at Goodwood. To be honest, and if I’d seen this same flyer before I’d been inundated with hype from the great VAG press machine then I might not have been so keen to attend the festival.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It’s ironic then, that, like the camping spots in “hidden glades, hollows, copses and hillocks” Waitrose didn’t make it into the final Vintage at Goodwood vision. But what did was every bit as soulless as I feared it might be in my preview blog.

Vintage Goodwood 2010

Past a regimental camping site that better represented a hillside carpark, we did indeed approach the main VAG entrance via a wooded glade… and as we did so passed what was to prove the most interesting aspect of the whole festival – a small eco-campment complete with beautiful decorated gypsy caravan, outsized lace-making and knitting, and a tiny outdoor stage for up and coming bands. Curated by textile artist Annie Sherburne, it was like a touch of Secret Garden Party had crept into the mix, but knowing not where to put it the madness was relegated to the woods.

Vintage Goodwood knit
Love shack caravan By Jessica Sharville
Love Shack Caravan by Jessica Sharville.

So far, so not very vintage, but as we ducked under the entrance arch a slew of gorgeous old cars funnelled us down towards the much trumpeted High Street, rearing up against the dramatic sky like a cross between a back lot of a Hollywood western and a trade show.

Vintage Goodwood entrance
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

“Fifty years on from the design-led 1951 Festival of Britain, Goodwood is to host in 2010 the first of what will be an annual event” opens the glossy VAG flyer, and true to this spirit the very first shop on the High Street housed Wayne Hemingway Inc, choc full of products plastered with designs inspired by the very same Festival of Britain. As one worker commented to me “How arrogant can you be?” Vintage at Goodwood was a monument to our current obsession with consumerism as leisure, and bore no resemblance to the Festival of Britain’s celebration of modern societies’ achievements in post-war Britain. To compare something to such an iconographic event is to set oneself up for a fall.

Vintage Goodwood pub
Vintage Goodwood dress
TigzRice_pinupcar
Pinup Girl with Car by Tigz Rice.

Boggling, I gazed up at the garishly coloured towering fascias, wondering at the huge amount of money that must have gone into the construction. And none of it looking remotely recyclable. For that matter, where were the recycling bins? The post war years were frugal, and there was no sign of that here.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

Instead there was the opportunity to shop inside stands for those well known vintage brands: The Body Shop, Fortnum & Mason, John Lewis and some really expensive watch brand I’ve never heard of; in whose stall people quaffed champagne as a man picked apart on old watch face and another displayed a case of super expensive items to a wealthy shopper. The same brand had sponsored the festival wristbands, made out of lethal lentographic plastic that cut my friend’s arm to shreds.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

There was also: a cinema, and a catwalk hosting “sold out” shows. We never did find out if this was just a turn of phrase or whether they were actually sold out. Yup, you had to pay on top of the ticket price for many of the attractions. And did I mention the style stand, where you could get your hair done by Primark in collaboration with the Sunday Times Style Magazine. Yes really. This is what we’ve come to.

vintage at goodwood by erica sharp
Vintage at Goodwood by Erica Sharp.

I heard rumours of people flying in to attend this festival on private jets, but it was telling of the strange mix of people that there was also a Daily Mirror volkswagen bus on site. As someone wrote on twitter, it seemed like a sanitised Daily Mail version of fifty years of culture, devoid of all nuance or passion. Inside the Sotheby’s auction tent the intermittent rain drip dripped onto a vintage speaker valued at £6000 as a couple passed looking uncomfortable in a fancy dress version of the 1970s.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
vintagegoodwood by Maria del Carmen Smith
Vintage at Goodwood Auction by Maria del Carmen Smith.

The most popular dress amongst women seemed to be the ubiquitous flouncey polka dot fifties number, or some other poorly rendered version of what was worn in the 60s or 70s. Fine if that’s your bag, but I’ve seen fancy dress done with a whole lot more verve at places like Bestival. I guess pure vintage enthusiasts wear vintage clothes with a dedication to style that wasn’t obvious on many festival goers, because vintage enthusiasts choose to wear these clothes day in day out, not as mere fancy dress. It wasn’t altogether surprising to find the real vintage enthusiasts looking slightly bemused and out of place in the staff dinner queue.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood crocs
Future Vintage: Crocs apparently…
Vintage Goodwood 2010
and the Big Brother chair. God help us.
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Tyrells crisps promotion: a vegetable chamber group.
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Rocking the vintage look.

We spoke to friends in the much smaller vintage stall area that was hidden in cramped tents behind the central shopping parade. They were ambivalent about the festival: cross with the way it had been organised and how they were being treated, but happy with the money being spent on their stalls. Aside from spend spend spend, there wasn’t really much to do. We saw little evidence of art from across the decades, other than a strong presence from Peter Blake. We were amazed at the lack of protection for all the beautiful vintage cars stationed next to themed areas for each decade, scattered across the largely unpopulated site. Although there were rumours of workshops, without a £12 programme (touted as a must have “annual”) to tell us when and where, there didn’t seem to be much opportunity.

Vintage Goodwood craft

Like others we gawped at the crafters rather than join in and participate. “Ladies, wear your heels,” urged the flyer. But there wasn’t that much evidence of glamour as the small and bedraggled crowd waved their brollies in the air during the mid afternoon set at the 80s rave warehouse.

Vintage Goodwood 2010
The programme: £12 a pop.
Vintage Goodwood rave
The rave. Wet. Photograph by Tim Adey.
Vintage Goodwood empty
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Vintage Goodwood 2010

I had hoped to visit The Chap Olympiad but every time we got close the heavens opened and we retreated. We tried to see comedian John Shuttleworth but the inflatable Leisure Dome was full to capacity and I was buggered if we were going to stand in a queue in the rain. How much electricity does it take to keep a blow up tent full of air? *ponders* Over on the main stage a respectable crowd gathered for The Noisettes, but seemed bemused by singer Shingai Shoniwa’s stage banter. And I wonder, how do The Noisettes fit into any kind of “vintage” mould?

Vintage Goodwood Noisettes
noisettes-singer-by-anagomezhernandez
Shingai Shoniwa by Ana Gomez Hernandez.

Instead we headed back to the Leisure Dome after another tip off – this time to see the absolutely amazing Swingle Singers singing choreographed acapella and beat box versions of popular songs. An utterly astonishing discovery they alone made the trip down south worthwhile.

Vintage Goodwood Swingle Singers
Vintage Goodwood austin
Vintage Goodwood swingle
Vintage Goodwood Swingle singers
swingle singers by anna hancock young
Swingle Singers by Anna Hancock Young.

Afterwards we stayed onto watch 70 year old Tony Hatch, he of soap opera theme tune fame (don’t worry, I had no idea who he was either). A highlight of our short visit to VAG was surely the sight of Captain Sensible (of punk legends The Damned), listening to Tony Hatch and singers reprise the Neighbours theme tune. Does it get anymore surreal?

Vintage Goodwood Tony Hatch
Tony Hatch and friends.

Thanks to the power of twitter I was able to find out what VAG was like for myself, and in retrospect I am very glad that I didn’t get given free tickets by the organisers because I would have felt duty bound to be much nicer about the VAG experience if I had. I am sure that many people thoroughly enjoyed their trip to Vintage at Goodwood, but for me the idea of staying on for another day was utterly unappealing. Instead we left whilst the going was good, stayed over at a friend’s house and spent Sunday getting drunk with locals at a historic pub in nearby Petersfield.

Vintage Goodwood by Louise Sterling
Vintage Goodwood by Louise Sterling.

On my previous blog there have been a couple of comments stressing the need for big sponsors in order to make a return on investment on a festival such as VAG. This is absolutely not true unless you aspire to make a festival bigger than it wants to be. Most festivals start small and grow organically through the love and dedication of the people who take part. It’s not necessary to bring big brands in unless you’re aiming for a showy experience at the expense of any kind of soul.

Vintage Goodwood girls
Vintage Goodwood shop
Vintage Goodwood red
Vintage Goodwood 2010
Sponsored up to the hilt.

For real vintage lovers I suggest that next year, instead of going to Vintage at Goodwood you check out the numerous other boutique festivals dedicated to specific eras. Especially since I have a sneaking suspicion that many of the true vintage enthusiasts that made it to VAG will not be returning next year. And if you want pure unadulterated playful creative dressing up then I suggest you check out Secret Garden Party – and for real forward thinking cultural inspiration then try Latitude. A hyped-up vanity project does not a successful festival make.

Vintage Goodwood mobility

Categories ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Ana Gomez, ,Ana Gomez Hernandez, ,Anna Hancock-Young, ,Annie Sherburne, ,bestival, ,Captain Sensible, ,Erica Sharp, ,John Shuttleworth, ,latitude, ,Louise Sterling, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Peter Blake, ,Primark, ,Secret Garden Party, ,Shingai Shoniwa, ,Swingle Singers, ,The Chap Olympiad, ,The Damned, ,the Noisettes, ,Tigz Rice, ,Tigzy, ,Tim Adey, ,Tony Hatch, ,Vintage at Goodwood, ,Vintage Goodwood. Jessica Sharville, ,Wayne Hemmingway

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Amelia’s Magazine | Zeynep Tosun: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink.

Last week I ran an exclusive preview on Zeynep Tosun because last season her collection was one of my highlights. For Spring/Summer she did not disappoint, leaping into warmer weather with a range of summery fabrics that included sporty netting, floaty chiffon and swinging panels of silk in a gossamer light colour palette of creams, dove grey, mint, on trend powder pink and caramel, accented with glossy navy and black. Out of three Turkish designers showing in London this season she was the only one not to be inspired by the effects of recent turmoils on home soil, instead inspiration was taken from the androgynous sexuality of the 1920s and transformed into a series of sport luxe garments fit for the modern day minx. The flared cut of the cape was a key shape, with capelets integral to tops and dresses, as were peek-a-boo cutout details, revealing appealing glimpses of belly and back. Delicate glass beads provided a focal point for evening wear, either fringing the sides of net panels or cascading in geometric designs down the front of slinky dresses. Styling by Tamara Cincik was kept simple: sleek ponytails were accessorised with sultry eyes and simple rope flip flops. Keep your eyes on Zeynep Tosun, she’s making big waves over at Fashion Scout.

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Dom&Ink.

Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Isabelle Mattern
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014 by Isabelle Mattern.

Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Tosun S/S 2014. All photography by Amelia Gregory and Tim Adey.

Categories ,1920s, ,catwalk, ,Dom&Ink, ,Fashion Scout, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,review, ,S/S 2014, ,Tamara Cincik, ,Tim Adey, ,Turkish, ,Zeynep Tosun

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Charlie Le Mindu (by Amelia)

Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea
Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea.

Charlie Le Mindu has already done massive headpieces and copious nudity… what could possibly be next? How about dripping blood, nurse Nazi references and CUNT (sprayed onto the back of a model’s head)? Yes, more about this and more was to be our Sunday morning treat at Berlin Syndrome, a show inspired by the WWII decadence of the German Third Reich.

Charlie Le Mindu. Photography by Tim Adey
Charlie Le Mindu. Photography by Tim Adey.

Charlie Le Mindu by Dan Stafford
Charlie Le Mindu by Dan Stafford.

Each season a Charlie Le Mindu ticket grows that little bit hotter… and the queues of people desperate to view his inimitable mix of genius, fantasy and fannies grows ever more clamourous. So it was that whilst waiting for Jazzkatze to start I made a judgement, made my excuses, and headed over to the tiny On/Off venue. These things happen. I knew it would be totally worth it.

Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea
Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea.

But first I had to battle my way into a decent seat. Hot avante garde fashion tends to attract a lot of extravagant characters, each trying to out-outfit the next one.

YouTube Preview Image
Out Outfit You by Bourgeois & Maurice.

So it was that I found myself just a few bodies down from fashion doyenne Daphne Guinnessallegedly attending her only show this season – and a rare LFW sighting of Diane Pernet.

Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Emma Jardine
Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Emma Jardine.

Across the way club kid Daniel Lismore looked uncomfortably squished in one of the huge froufrou contraptions that constitutes his “look”. The delightful (and talented) Natasha Khan of Bat for Lashes looked wonderfully normal in comparison – and had to fight for a front row spot.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Kap Bambino provided the intense soundtrack to this show, a mash up of melodic vocals, pig squeals and a grimy off-kilter baseline. Our first treat? A stripper, dripping with blood from her Violence headgear to her vampirish talons. Her only accessory was an ancient looking metal bag, slung nonchalantly from her shoulder on a thin piece of chain.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

She was followed onto the catwalk by a giant mohican worn with plastic cape and lacy shorts – a cross of gaffa tape the only nod to modesty. More buttery lace, more plastic, more fringing and beading on both men and women. Make up was pale, deathly, fittingly. From the front a plastic fluffy fringed cape looked pervily demure, arms bound down to the sides. From the back it revealed a spray painted phallus and more that I cannot read.

Charlie Le Mindu by Madi
Charlie Le Mindu by Madi.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely WarsCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A moderately wearable lace belted maxi coat was followed by more exposed boobs and a gas mask with a waterfall of hair extruding from the mouth like an alien intervention. More hair as fur, smudged red lips, a smile from a knowing model as she pounded towards the thickly layered ranks of photographers.

Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Natsuki Otani
Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Natsuki Otani.

Charlie Le Mindu Finale Piece by LJG Art & Illustration
Charlie Le Mindu Finale Piece by LJG Art & Illustration.

And finally the denouement, a huge white eagle – a reference to the Third Reich insignia – clutching a blonde be-wigged head, the bird trailing lace and blood to the floor. It was a trail that followed the models back stage as the show ended to the sounds of a porcine massacre and Charlie Le Mindu took his curtain bow in a butcher’s apron, hands bloody. I glanced anxiously over to stylist Tamara Cincik, who was protectively cradling her pregnant belly.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Katie Antoniou’s earlier blog about the same show here, and see more work by Andrea Peterson in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. There is also a lovely blog featuring Andrea Peterson at work on the creation of her Charlie Le Mindu painting right here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Ani Saunders, ,Anna Trevelyan, ,Artist Andrea, ,Bat for Lashes, ,berlin, ,Berlin Syndrome, ,Blood, ,Bourgeois & Maurice, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,CUNT, ,Dan Stafford, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Daphne Guinness, ,Diane Pernet, ,Eagle, ,Emma Jardine, ,Hair, ,Insignia, ,Jazzkatze, ,Kap Bambino, ,Katie Antoniou, ,LJG Art & Illustration, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Natasha Khan, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nudity, ,onoff, ,Out Outfit You, ,Plastic, ,Strippers, ,Tamara Cincik, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Third Reich, ,Tim Adey, ,Wigs, ,WWII

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Charlie Le Mindu (by Amelia)

Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea
Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea.

Charlie Le Mindu has already done massive headpieces and copious nudity… what could possibly be next? How about dripping blood, nurse Nazi references and CUNT (sprayed onto the back of a model’s head)? Yes, more about this and more was to be our Sunday morning treat at Berlin Syndrome, a show inspired by the WWII decadence of the German Third Reich.

Charlie Le Mindu. Photography by Tim Adey
Charlie Le Mindu. Photography by Tim Adey.

Charlie Le Mindu by Dan Stafford
Charlie Le Mindu by Dan Stafford.

Each season a Charlie Le Mindu ticket grows that little bit hotter… and the queues of people desperate to view his inimitable mix of genius, fantasy and fannies grows ever more clamourous. So it was that whilst waiting for Jazzkatze to start I made a judgement, made my excuses, and headed over to the tiny On/Off venue. These things happen. I knew it would be totally worth it.

Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea
Charlie Le Mindu by Andrea Peterson aka Artist Andrea.

But first I had to battle my way into a decent seat. Hot avante garde fashion tends to attract a lot of extravagant characters, each trying to out-outfit the next one.

YouTube Preview Image
Out Outfit You by Bourgeois & Maurice.

So it was that I found myself just a few bodies down from fashion doyenne Daphne Guinnessallegedly attending her only show this season – and a rare LFW sighting of Diane Pernet.

Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Emma Jardine
Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Emma Jardine.

Across the way club kid Daniel Lismore looked uncomfortably squished in one of the huge froufrou contraptions that constitutes his “look”. The delightful (and talented) Natasha Khan of Bat for Lashes looked wonderfully normal in comparison – and had to fight for a front row spot.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Kap Bambino provided the intense soundtrack to this show, a mash up of melodic vocals, pig squeals and a grimy off-kilter baseline. Our first treat? A stripper, dripping with blood from her Violence headgear to her vampirish talons. Her only accessory was an ancient looking metal bag, slung nonchalantly from her shoulder on a thin piece of chain.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

She was followed onto the catwalk by a giant mohican worn with plastic cape and lacy shorts – a cross of gaffa tape the only nod to modesty. More buttery lace, more plastic, more fringing and beading on both men and women. Make up was pale, deathly, fittingly. From the front a plastic fluffy fringed cape looked pervily demure, arms bound down to the sides. From the back it revealed a spray painted phallus and more that I cannot read.

Charlie Le Mindu by Madi
Charlie Le Mindu by Madi.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely WarsCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A moderately wearable lace belted maxi coat was followed by more exposed boobs and a gas mask with a waterfall of hair extruding from the mouth like an alien intervention. More hair as fur, smudged red lips, a smile from a knowing model as she pounded towards the thickly layered ranks of photographers.

Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Natsuki Otani
Charlie Le Mindu Berlin Syndrome by Natsuki Otani.

Charlie Le Mindu Finale Piece by LJG Art & Illustration
Charlie Le Mindu Finale Piece by LJG Art & Illustration.

And finally the denouement, a huge white eagle – a reference to the Third Reich insignia – clutching a blonde be-wigged head, the bird trailing lace and blood to the floor. It was a trail that followed the models back stage as the show ended to the sounds of a porcine massacre and Charlie Le Mindu took his curtain bow in a butcher’s apron, hands bloody. I glanced anxiously over to stylist Tamara Cincik, who was protectively cradling her pregnant belly.

Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia GregoryCharlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Le Mindu A/W 2011 Berlin Syndrome. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Katie Antoniou’s earlier blog about the same show here, and see more work by Andrea Peterson in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. There is also a lovely blog featuring Andrea Peterson at work on the creation of her Charlie Le Mindu painting right here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Ani Saunders, ,Anna Trevelyan, ,Artist Andrea, ,Bat for Lashes, ,berlin, ,Berlin Syndrome, ,Blood, ,Bourgeois & Maurice, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,CUNT, ,Dan Stafford, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Daphne Guinness, ,Diane Pernet, ,Eagle, ,Emma Jardine, ,Hair, ,Insignia, ,Jazzkatze, ,Kap Bambino, ,Katie Antoniou, ,LJG Art & Illustration, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Natasha Khan, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nudity, ,onoff, ,Out Outfit You, ,Plastic, ,Strippers, ,Tamara Cincik, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Third Reich, ,Tim Adey, ,Wigs, ,WWII

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Presentation Review: Cooperative Designs (by Amelia)


Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, information pills I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.

I bumped into contributor Georgiahttp://www.ameliasmagazine.com/?s=Georgia%20Takacs there and we headed into the venue, here sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, sales she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Saville Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, illness I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.


Contributor Georgia with Paul Weller

I bumped into contributor Georgiahttp://www.ameliasmagazine.com/?s=Georgia%20Takacs there and we headed into the venue, recipe sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.


Illustration by Joana Faria

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.


Illustration by Rob Wallace

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Saville Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, visit this I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.


Contributor Georgia with Paul Weller

I bumped into contributor Georgiahttp://www.ameliasmagazine.com/?s=Georgia%20Takacs there and we headed into the venue, pharm sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.


Illustration by Joana Faria

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.


All photography by Matt Bramford

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.


Illustration by Rob Wallace

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Saville Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, abortion I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.


Contributor Georgia with Paul Weller

I bumped into contributor Georgiahttp://www.ameliasmagazine.com/?s=Georgia%20Takacs there and we headed into the venue, medications sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.


Illustration by Joana Faria

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.


All photography by Matt Bramford

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.


Illustration by Rob Wallace

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Saville Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, doctor I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.


Contributor Georgia with Paul Weller

I bumped into contributor Georgiahttp://www.ameliasmagazine.com/?s=Georgia%20Takacs there and we headed into the venue, sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.


Illustration by Joana Faria

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.


All photography by Matt Bramford

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.


Illustration by Rob Wallace

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Savile Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani.

Last season I was incredibly gutted to miss the Cooperative Designs presentation – such were the glowing reports on our website. But in my enthusiasm I actually turned up too early this time, treatment got turned away, medications ate a Pret sandwich… and then missed most of what turned out to actually be a catwalk show on repeat.


Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Descending some stairs we were asked to sit in a darkened vault but my photographer’s sixth sense directed me instead to stand in a separate photographers box, healing where the models paused for a few seconds in somewhat brighter conditions.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

This was a collection inspired by 90s rave culture, Drum n Bass and the contemplative industrial photography of Thomas Struth, which meant that the oversized silhouette of Cooperative Designs came in industrial tones of grey and beige stripes combined with fluoro highlights in tie detailing, visors and threaded hair accessories.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was lots of asymmetrical patterning, floppy hooded jumpers, boxy baggy tops and knit dresses tiered with baggy pouches. Lacy see through knitwear recalled the combat trouser shapes so beloved of 90s dancers. Hats by Noel Stewart were tall and floppy like a gnome’s or featured ear flaps and visors – questionable styles that were somehow rendered infinitely desirable. A wide knitted skirt was particularly cute, as were the little boots by Flip Flop, customised by Cooperative Designs with extravagant orange soles.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of any designers that I love I can actually imagine myself wearing Cooperative Designs. Their clever knitwear is by it’s very nature supremely flattering to the shape of a real women. Thankfully, they make a point of picking their models to reflect their customer.

Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson for Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

On my way out I was given a brilliant press release: informative, well written and protected in a cardboard envelope that even I would struggle to lose. Best of all, it came with my very own piece of painted plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson, as featured in the collection. More designers could learn from such professionalism on the press release frontier.

You can read Naomi Law’s excellent review here and you can see more of Natsuki Otani’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,90s, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Cooperative Designs, ,Corrie Williamson, ,Drum n Bass, ,East 17, ,Flip Flop, ,Industrial, ,It’s Alright, ,Jane Young, ,jewellery, ,knitwear, ,London Kills Me, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Noel Stewart, ,Rave Culture, ,rsa, ,Thomas Struth, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | 5 Great Things to do with Kids in the Lake District

Lake District Muncaster Castle view
Last week we went on a family vacation to the Lake District, taking in a packed schedule of attractions during our short five day trip. I love being outdoors and walking in particular but have resigned myself to a different style of holiday whilst I have young children (a three year old and another on the way) so it was brilliant to visit so many wonderful places that are family friendly in this gorgeous area of the UK. Here’s some great ideas for things to do with kids on your next visit to Cumbria.

Lake District Windermere Swan boat
Lake district Lake Windermere Swan family
Lake District Windermere row boats
Lake district Lake Windermere Swan
Windermere Lake Cruises
We spent a whole day on Windermere; a wonderful way to experience the drama of the Lake District landscape, even in overcast weather. Our first trip aboard the Swan (a lovely old boat) took place whilst it was still relatively windless and we were able to take in beautiful views from the open top deck, which is a great way to marvel at the extravagant private homes that line the idyllic eastern shore. From Bowness (after a delightful lunch in the quaint St Martin’s Tea Room & Grill) we took a trip around the islands, discovering that the smallest is but a tree stump clinging on above water level. Then we ventured to Ambleside at the northern end of the lake, where we ate ice cream in the wind, before returning all the way home aboard the Swan once more. This was Snarf’s first experience of being on boats and he especially loved watching the skippers turning their huge wooden wheels on the smaller boats.

Lake District Lakeland Motor Museum tableaux
Lake district Lakeland Motor Museum
Lake district Lakeland Motor Museum mannequin
Lake district Lakeland Motor Museum lady mannequinLake district Lakeland Motor Museum lady mannequin
Lakeland Motor Museum
The Lakeland Motor Museum is billed as the perfect rainy day attraction for Lake District visitors and it’s not hard to see why: whilst the Lakes are always stunning the weather can be difficult, and not everyone is happy outside in the wind and the drizzle. The museum is situated a short drive from the Southernmost end of Windermere, and boasts a large selection of vehicles from every era, including a rare DeLorean (the car from Back to the Future), the tiny Peel P50 car and some beautiful iconic bluebird blue examples of the cars and boats driven by speed racing driver and local legends Martin and Donald Campbell. Snarf is a great lover of all things wheel based and greatly enjoyed this packed space. I liked the slightly surreal tableaux with spooky mannequins arranged throughout the museum: so most of my photos appear to be of these!

Lake Distric South Lakes Safari Zoo Rhino
Lake district South Lakes safari park family
Lake District South Lakes Safari Zoo peacock
Lake District South Lakes Safari Lemur
South Lakes Safari Zoo tiger - tim adey
Lake District South Lakes Safari Zoo Tiger
Lake district South Lakes safari park peacock
Lake district South Lakes safari park giraffe
South Lakes Safari Zoo
This small but well stocked zoo is only a few decades old, the dream of an eccentric individual called David Gill, and when we visited it was relatively empty, giving us an excellent opportunity to view the animals up close. Our first stop was the interactive enclosure which houses a variety of exotic birds, lemurs and wallabies – making for quite a surreal experience. We particularly loved feeding grapes to the ring tailed lemurs, which have the most endearing personalities, sitting upright with bellies to the sun, or curled into groups with their young. We ate lunch at the Maki Restaurant, then visited some cheeky penguins, watched the tiger being fed from a prime position and helped to feed an elegant giraffe. Aren’t they gorgeous creatures? The extraordinarily strong winds on this exposed site finally got the better of us by late afternoon.

Lake District Ravenglass railway driver
lake district ravenglass railway
Lake District Ravenglass railway view
Lake District Ravenglass railway coal
Lake District Ravenglass railway river irt
Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway
It took us a long time to drive over to the coastal village of Ravenglass in the Western Lakes, but fortunately the route was one of the most scenic I have ever driven, taking in delightful villages aplenty and stunning views of the peaks on our sunniest day in the Lake District. The Ravenglass narrow gauge railway was first used to transport iron ore, then granite, but has also ferried passengers seven miles through scenic landscapes to Dalegarth for Boot for over 100 years. We were pulled by the gleaming River Irt steam locomotive which is the oldest in residence. At the far end we watched the train on the miniature turntable before hastily grabbing lunch at the station cafe (which sold a great selection of cakes – cakes are taken so much more seriously in the North). By luck we managed to nab a prime position right behind the driver for the downhill return journey, so our train obsessed little boy was able to mimic the driver as he shovelled coal into the engine and pulled the cord to make that inimitable steam engine noise. What a treat!

Lake District Muncaster Castle hawk experience
Muncaster Castle interior
Muncaster Castle haunted room fireplace
Lake District Muncaster Castle rhododendrons
Muncaster Castle Patrick Gordon-Duff-Pennington
Muncaster Castle red rhododendron
Muncaster Castle rhododendron
Muncaster Castle
It’s not often that you unexpectedly meet the owner of a huge castle but that is exactly what happened when the charismatic Patrick Gordon-Duff-Pennington blustered into the castle cafe outdoor seating area whilst we enjoyed some ice cream and started talking to us: about rhododendrons (beautiful and many at Muncaster) and the struggles he has had with the authorities on matters rural. The vast landscaped gardens perched on the hillside are an undoubted highlight of any visit to Muncaster Castle, (which is just up the road from Ravenglass), but sadly we were unable to explore as much as we would like with a small and increasingly tired boy in tow. Instead we took the zip wire in the playground and watched a half hour show on the castle lawns from the new Hawk Experience, featuring low flying birds of prey. Then we admired the staggering views across the valley (see the opening image) and took in a short tour of the un-lived in castle rooms, which retain such treasures as Jacobean embroideries and amazing carved fireplaces (particularly spectacular in the ‘haunted’ bedroom). I love the many colours and shapes of the dramatic rhododendron and would love to return to Muncaster Castle in future years.

With many thanks to Cumbria Tourism for arranging our tickets to these attractions. We stayed at the Holgates Silverdale Holiday Park and you can read more about our stay (and further ideas for places to visit in the area) here.

All photography by Amelia Gregory and Tim Adey.

Categories ,Ambleside, ,Bluebird, ,Bowness, ,Cumbria, ,Cumbria Tourism, ,Dalegarth for Boot, ,David Gill, ,delorean, ,Donald Campbell, ,Hawk Experience, ,Holgates Silverdale Holiday Park, ,Lake District, ,Lakeland Motor Museum, ,Maki Restaurant, ,Martin Campbell, ,Muncaster Castle, ,Patrick Gordon-Duff-Pennington, ,Peel P50, ,Ravenglass, ,Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway, ,Rhododendrons, ,River Irt, ,Snarf, ,South Lakes, ,South Lakes Safari Zoo, ,South Lakes Wild Animal Park, ,St Martin’s Tea Room & Grill, ,Swan, ,Tim Adey, ,Western Lakes, ,Windermere, ,Windermere Lake Cruises

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Amelia’s Magazine | Secret Garden Party 2010: Friday Review

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, sales Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, cheapest and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, find failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, decease Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Derek Ogbourne’s Hope and Glory

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, health and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

The world is full of misscommunication. History lessons are full of lessons that wars could have been stopped if only communication had been clearer. Frank Selby tackles this problem in his drawing “Stop the next next War War”.

Hidden in a mini industrial estate just off Curtain Road, search Payne Shurvell opens their inaugural exhibition “A Bright and Guilty Place” in an old light factory. The gallery directors introduce thirteen artists’ -who are either unrepresented or have yet to show in London- unique approaches to the subject of mapping and place. The word introduction is mentioned as the gallery presents an idea of each individual’s practice – rather than claiming to represent their overture in it’s entirety. What is successful about this show is that it does not feel as if the curators have placed a theme on the artists rather they have found 13 separate practices that uniquely represent mapping and place.

Derek Ogbourne’s Hope and Glory

Ideas touch upon psycho-geography, and and that endless human drive to find our place in the world – either through art or religion these questions are perennial.
Art offers a respite from the ever distance shortening communication provided by the internet. Maps provide a way of documenting economic prowess, viagra buy failure or entrapment as represented by Dan Hays replication of page 62 of the London A-Z focusing on the financial capital of London Canary Wharf.

Maps can also be used to document the trails of immigration, notably failed attempts or the endless drift of those people designated as unwanted. Lucy Wood demonstrates the paths of Mexicans who have attempted to cross the border and in worse cases died trying.

Andrew Curtis plays with ideas of suburbia with his eary prints of houses with trees printed over them…

Ideas of place are explored with Ian W’s print of the studios Jasper Johns inhabited during his time in New York – What makes a house a home? What makes a home important is it who lives there – is there added interest in Jasper Johns house because it belonged to Jasper Johns? What therefore could his house add to the conversation regarding his work?

Anika explores polish shop fronts through these exquisite models and her wonderful drawings.

Adrian McNeil’s sinister photographs tackle tricky ideas on immigration through the arrival of non native plants and their impact upon the ecosystem of their new destination. Making apparent the underlying sense of threat that immigration is all too often portrayed in the media as.

This is a fascinating exhibition introducing artists at the beginning of their careers. Amelia’s Magazine throughly recommends a visit to Hewitt Street before July 24th.

SGP 2010-Collosillyum
Hay bales for seating in the Collosillyum area. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

If Latitude is a well planned amble between the South Bank, buy information pills ICA, store Royal Opera House and Somerset House with added sheep, then Secret Garden Party is the biggest most eccentric three day party in the grounds of a country mansion you could never dream of. Two more diverse festivals you could not imagine.

SGP 2010-Blimp
The Party Blimp – accessible only by boat.

Music is just one of the elements that make up the Secret Garden Party experience, surely the only festival where the main acts are liable to be upstaged by a death-defying wheelchair race or a mud wrestling fight. Because the stages are not the central focus there is always space to sit down or to dance, and the natural layout of the main stage in particular means that there’s always space to see the bands properly – which makes for a far more comfortable viewing experience than at most festivals. Despite a distinct lack of well known bands the quality of music on the line up is never low, and as usual I discovered lots of great new music.

SGP 2010-couple by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-frog by Amelia Gregory

My favourite Secret Garden Party stage is built into the side of a huge tree. This year there were giant eyeballs sewn into the back and the front was made up to look like the prow of a ship, complete with a naked female figurehead. Shortly before the prow had been swung into destruction by inebriated climbing mammals Animal Kingdom took to the good ship Where the Wild Things Are with a beatific set of melodic songs that have gleaned comparisons to Radiohead, Sigur Ros and Coldplay.

SGP 2010-Animal Kingdom by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-girls bust by Amelia Gregory
Animal Kingdom by Holly Exley
Animal Kingdom by Holly Exley.

Over in the geodesic rave dome – AKA the Remix Bubble – the Lake District’s finest Burn the Negative were proving to a small but highly motivated crowd (including security on balloons) that danceable indie electro doesn’t just come out of the big cities.

Alexis-West-Burn-the-Negative
Burn the Negative by Alexis West.

Secret Garden Party has expanded massively since I first came in 2004, and the more idiosyncratic attractions are now linked to the main arena by a floating bridge that caused much swaying hilarity on every crossing. As a mid afternoon treat I decided to get my toes nibbled by some miniature carp from Turkey.

SGP 2010-Fish Therapy
Yes that’s me. White legs! Photography by Tim Adey.

The Doctor Fish has been used for centuries to cure skin ailments, and they were particularly excited by my friend Jemima’s Psoriasis. It was a very soothing experience, and my skin felt notably softer afterwards. This is the first time this particular species of fish have been imported into the UK and entrepreneur Keon Petre hopes to open a range of fish nibbling franchises.

SGP 2010-Emma Ware by Amelia Gregory
Emma Ware.

A huge pink tent housed stalls from a carefully picked range of artists and designers including Spitalfields based illustrator Dan Hillier and jeweller Emma Ware, who makes gorgeous contemporary pieces from recycled inner tubes. Expect to hear more about her designs on this blog soon.

Abi Daker - Fionn Regan
Fionn Regan by Abigail Daker.

Fionn Regan was the perfect treat for a sunny day, following in the traditional mould of talented Irish folk singers with added 80s McEnroe hair band action. Never a bad thing in my book.

SGP 10-baby by Amelia Gregory
Steve Mason by Katherine Tromans
Steve Mason by Katherine Tromans.

I knew there was a reason I felt immediately warm towards main stage act Steve Mason despite having no clue who he was – turns out he was one half of the excellent Beta Band. And anyone who twitters about Ian Tomlinson is even better in my books. Musicians with a conscience – we need more of them.

emma_block_marina_&_the_diamonds
Marina and the Diamonds by Emma Block.

I’ve been a big fan of hot tip Marina and the Diamonds for some time now, but we missed most of her set whilst enjoying the most wonderful three course dinner at the Soulf Fire restaurant, housed in three yurts (read my full review here). Instead we caught the last few songs, which still gave me ample time to admire her vermillion lips and whippet thin waist: I can now confirm that she is every bit as sexy in the flesh as she comes across on record.

SGP 2010-Marina and the Diamonds by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-Marina and the Diamonds by Amelia Gregory

Afterwards we were treated to some nefarious circus fun from Down Under – including pubic angle-grinding, sword swallowing and weights hooked into eyelids. Tasteful.

SGP 2010-angle grinder circus by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-circus by Amelia Gregory
SGP 2010-circus eyeball lift by Amelia Gregory

I featured the Infadels way back in issue 04 of Amelia’s Magazine in 2005, and they’ve been steadily plugging away ever since. I haven’t heard any recent albums but they seemed quite happy to play lots of the old tunes, which perfectly suited the late night party crowd.

infadels by harriet gray
Infadels by Harriet Gray.

Most amusingly they seem to have acquired a female joint lead vocalist on one of their most famous tunes. Maybe all ageing bands will one day invite drunk negligee-wearing teenagers on board to spice things up. Oh hang on, it’s already become a trend… (see Saturday’s blog…)

SGP 2010-Infadels by Amelia Gregory

Abby-Wright-The-Delays
The Delays by Abby Wright.

Last up on Where the Wild Things Are at gone 1am the glitter-covered Delays played a fantastically energetic set to a shockingly small crowd. “Let’s see some shoulder action,” they pleaded. “It’s not a festival without it.” Several people obligingly mounted their friends with rapidity. I hope one day this vastly underrated band finds the success they deserve. Catch our recent interview with them here.

SGP 10-aliens by Amelia Gregory
SGP 10-robot mime by Amelia Gregory

Remember, there’s more where this came from – you can read about Saturday’s events here.

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,Abigail Daker, ,Alexis West, ,Animal Kingdom, ,Beta Band, ,bikes, ,Burn the Negative, ,Dan Hillier, ,Delays, ,Emma Block, ,Emma Ware, ,Fionn Regan, ,Fish Therapy, ,Harriet Gray, ,Holly Exley, ,Infadels, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Marina and The Diamonds, ,Secret Garden Party, ,Soul Fire Restaurant, ,Steve Mason, ,Tim Adey, ,Where the Wild Things Are

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