Amelia’s Magazine | Eleven Glorious Albums of 2010


Eugene Lin, medical illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Happy New Year! It’s that time of year again when we all set about making resolutions and miraculously changing our lives for the better. So far, case for 2011, viagra dosage I’ve set myself the insurmountable tasks of quitting smoking (again), getting fit (again) and saving money (AGAIN), as well as to make more of an effort to contact friends who I don’t see regularly, get through that list of books I buy on recommendation that is quickly becoming a floor-to-celing pile, learn to cook more than just beans on toast. Oh, sure!

Here at Amelia’s Magazine, we thought it might be interesting to find out what some of our favourite fashion designers plan to do in 2011. I spoke to a few of them, who we interviewed in 2010, about their plans, hopes, ambitions, dreams and everything in between. I posed the question suggesting the response could be hopes for their labels, their personal lives or something more philosophical. I’m so glad one of our designer friends, amidst economic recession and doom and gloom, prioritises ‘more sex’ on their agenda for this coming year…

Here’s a little round-up, with as always, fabulous illustrations… and I’ve linked each designer’s name to our original interview so you can read more about them if you wish!

Ada Zanditon

Illustration by Caroline Coates

‘My main resolution for 2010 is to keep growing and evolving as a brand, creatively and as a business with the vision to bring awareness to conservation and also increase the percentage of my profit margin that can go towards conservation charities, completing the circle between what inspires me as a designer and helping to sustain it in a creative, innovative way that results in sculptural, desirable, uniquely embellished fashion.

‘I would also like to find some time between all of that to spend more time gardening…’

Read a full interview with Ada with even more amazing illustrations in Amelia’s new book!

Eugene Lin

Eugene Lin, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

1. Keep perfecting the cut of my clothes
2. Remember to ‘TAKE A BREAK’ at least once a month
3. Eat healthy. Run more.

Imogen Belfield

Illustration by Caroline Coates

‘My New Year resolutions are… well, quite honestly, I have to stop injuring myself in the workshop. I had two rather nasty accidents within the last 2 months. And secondly, it would be to have more Skype dates with my overseas friends and family. 2010 has been beyond incredible, and to wish for the same again would be enough in itself, I cannot wait for 2011 to begin, bring it on!’

Makepiece

Illustration by Genie Espinosa

Whilst we’ve developed new cute tags to help our garments last longer (it’s a nice little wooden tag holding yarn so you can fix your garments), launched knitwear shrugs for winter brides and taken on a small concession in Harveys, (the Halifax department store) I’ve also been struggling to feed the poor snowbound sheep.

I’ve been using sledges, mountain bikes and my own two feet to defeat the snow. I’ve never felt so popular as when I’m spotted from afar by my sheep so that they’re already forming a welcoming committee by the gate. It’s difficult, but exhilarating when, once the sheep are cheerfully surrounding their bale of haylage, I can look out over the snowbound valley. It’s beautiful!

Looking forward to the new year though, we’re hoping for a sunny spring. Lots of lambs, picnics in the hay meadow and summer balls. The new collection is coloured like the sun on a misty spring morning and is frilled and ruched and rippled into delicate dresses, tops, cardis and scarves.

Olivia Rubin

Illustration by Lisa Stannard

‘2011 already holds some exciting opportunities for the label including a lot more hard work! I’m looking forward to my collaborations with very.co.uk and my new accessory line for Dune at the start of the year. I’m hoping to broaden my collections and expand the brand by introducing printed knitwear as well as building on the success of the jersey line Oli Rubi… I have a very determined attitude for 2011!

On a personal level one of my New Year’s resolutions is to continue with my running and possibly attempt a half marathon – eeek!’

(Stefan) Orschel-Read

Illustration by Rachel Clare Price

’2011 will be a busy year for me. I will be producing three collections for Orschel-Read. A small A/W 2011/12, the summer 2012 collection for London Fashion Week in September, and also a couture collection for the end of May. A New Year’s resolution for me is to stop working Sundays! And to enjoy the wonderful city we live in a little more. I also hope to spend more time with friends and family, and finally learn something totally new.’

New Year’s Day is every man’s birthday” (Charles Lamb)

Ziad Ghanem

Illustration by Rukmunal Hakim

‘Professionally: In January 2011 I am launching the wedding collection during Couture Fashion Week. So from now on its “strictly sex after marriage…” In February 2011 I am producing an amazing show during London Fashion Week, inspired by Islamic Art, and Maiden Britain tees and sweats will be launched to buy online soon. I am also hoping to do a lot of new collaborations with artists from all over the world this year.

Personally: I hope and wish for peace of mind, good health and more sex. This year I am open for love! I hope everybody’s New Year wishes will come true.’

Do let us know if you’ve made any interesting resolutions for 2011, I’d love to hear them!


Eugene Lin, health illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Happy New Year! It’s that time of year again when we all set about making resolutions and miraculously changing our lives for the better. So far, cost for 2011, I’ve set myself the insurmountable tasks of quitting smoking (again), getting fit (again) and saving money (AGAIN), as well as to make more of an effort to contact friends who I don’t see regularly, get through that list of books I buy on recommendation that is quickly becoming a floor-to-celing pile, learn to cook more than just beans on toast. Oh, sure!

Here at Amelia’s Magazine, we thought it might be interesting to find out what some of our favourite fashion designers plan to do in 2011. I spoke to a few of them, who we interviewed in 2010, about their plans, hopes, ambitions, dreams and everything in between. I posed the question suggesting the response could be hopes for their labels, their personal lives or something more philosophical. I’m so glad one of our designer friends, amidst economic recession and doom and gloom, prioritises ‘more sex’ on their agenda for this coming year…

Here’s a little round-up, with as always, fabulous illustrations… and I’ve linked each designer’s name to our original interview so you can read more about them if you wish!

Ada Zanditon

Illustration by Caroline Coates

‘My main resolution for 2010 is to keep growing and evolving as a brand, creatively and as a business with the vision to bring awareness to conservation and also increase the percentage of my profit margin that can go towards conservation charities, completing the circle between what inspires me as a designer and helping to sustain it in a creative, innovative way that results in sculptural, desirable, uniquely embellished fashion.

‘I would also like to find some time between all of that to spend more time gardening…’

Read a full interview with Ada with even more amazing illustrations in Amelia’s new book!

Eugene Lin

Eugene Lin, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

1. Keep perfecting the cut of my clothes
2. Remember to ‘TAKE A BREAK’ at least once a month
3. Eat healthy. Run more.

Imogen Belfield

Illustration by Caroline Coates

‘My New Year resolutions are… well, quite honestly, I have to stop injuring myself in the workshop. I had two rather nasty accidents within the last 2 months. And secondly, it would be to have more Skype dates with my overseas friends and family. 2010 has been beyond incredible, and to wish for the same again would be enough in itself, I cannot wait for 2011 to begin, bring it on!’

Makepiece

Illustration by Genie Espinosa

Whilst we’ve developed new cute tags to help our garments last longer (it’s a nice little wooden tag holding yarn so you can fix your garments), launched knitwear shrugs for winter brides and taken on a small concession in Harveys, (the Halifax department store) I’ve also been struggling to feed the poor snowbound sheep.

I’ve been using sledges, mountain bikes and my own two feet to defeat the snow. I’ve never felt so popular as when I’m spotted from afar by my sheep so that they’re already forming a welcoming committee by the gate. It’s difficult, but exhilarating when, once the sheep are cheerfully surrounding their bale of haylage, I can look out over the snowbound valley. It’s beautiful!

Looking forward to the new year though, we’re hoping for a sunny spring. Lots of lambs, picnics in the hay meadow and summer balls. The new collection is coloured like the sun on a misty spring morning and is frilled and ruched and rippled into delicate dresses, tops, cardis and scarves.

Olivia Rubin

Illustration by Lisa Stannard

‘2011 already holds some exciting opportunities for the label including a lot more hard work! I’m looking forward to my collaborations with very.co.uk and my new accessory line for Dune at the start of the year. I’m hoping to broaden my collections and expand the brand by introducing printed knitwear as well as building on the success of the jersey line Oli Rubi… I have a very determined attitude for 2011!

On a personal level one of my New Year’s resolutions is to continue with my running and possibly attempt a half marathon – eeek!’

(Stefan) Orschel-Read

Illustration by Rachel Clare Price

’2011 will be a busy year for me. I will be producing three collections for Orschel-Read. A small A/W 2011/12, the summer 2012 collection for London Fashion Week in September, and also a couture collection for the end of May. A New Year’s resolution for me is to stop working Sundays! And to enjoy the wonderful city we live in a little more. I also hope to spend more time with friends and family, and finally learn something totally new.’

New Year’s Day is every man’s birthday” (Charles Lamb)

Ziad Ghanem

Illustration by Rukmunal Hakim

‘Professionally: In January 2011 I am launching the wedding collection during Couture Fashion Week. So from now on its “strictly sex after marriage…” In February 2011 I am producing an amazing show during London Fashion Week, inspired by Islamic Art, and Maiden Britain tees and sweats will be launched to buy online soon. I am also hoping to do a lot of new collaborations with artists from all over the world this year.

Personally: I hope and wish for peace of mind, good health and more sex. This year I am open for love! I hope everybody’s New Year wishes will come true.’

Do let us know if you’ve made any interesting resolutions for 2011, I’d love to hear them!

Beach House by Karolina Burdon

Beach House by Karolina Burdon

Being the new year and all, medical perhaps it might be nice to take an appreciative glance at the wonderful music that touched our ears and hearts in 2010, mind and indeed continues to do so as we begin the thrilling joy that is January 2011. Now, remain/become positive chaps and chappettes, a new dawn, means a shiny new chapter. You can file 2010 away under ‘misc’ and make all sorts of resolutions on new notepaper. As arty people and appreciators of creativity, this MUST appeal to you. I personally believe that creativity can be kickstarted with music. So, if you are feeling sluggish and are already considering a nap, perhaps first quickly read my list of music that has the potential to kick the ass of thou. If you are already napping, and can not bring yourself to open your eyes, please use a person to click on an immersed youtube video and feel a small whack from one of these beauties. Then you can wallow as much as you want.

Beach House: Teen Dream, Bella Union
French born, Victoria Legrand produces the sounds of vocals and organ. A striding, confident femme fatale. With her long, dark curly hair she is all about the swipes, swooshes, ducks and flicks. Alex Scally in contrast plays his guitar delicately and beautifully. Interestingly, he was not a guitarist before Beach House and taught himself, which is why he says, he can play exactly how he wants with no preconceived notions about the role of guitar. Together they work as a flamboyant, thinking, sultry and exciting creation. Listening to them is like being stuck in the bubble of a dream pop flash lens… and loving it.

Angus and Julia Stone by Karolina Burdon

Angus and Julia Stone by Karolina Burdon

Angus and Julia Stone: Down The Way, Flock Music
So sweet and delicate. But with some serious edge. Definitely not wishy washy ‘blah’ folk. This Australian brother and sister duo are strong and create catchy songs with a distinct sound from the heart. They used to be solo artists, but decided to collaborate in 2006. One can imagine them sitting somewhere on one of Australia’s ridiculously massive and unfeasibly gold beaches, upright on a beige throw, writing their emotions out. Or on the road… with straw hats on. They tend to write separately apparently, then get together to create a structure and the harmonies. This sounds right, I personally can’t imagine writing about boys with my brother eating marmite (urgh) on toast next to me to be fair. Down The Way is glorious album and a whimsical mixture. Pay particular attention to; ‘I’m Not Yours’, ‘For You’ and ‘And The Boys’.

JoannaNewsom by Avril Kelly

Joanna Newsom by Avril Kelly

Joanna Newsom: Have One On Me, Drag City
Joanna Newsom; harpist, pianist, singer and model from Nevada City, USA. One of those girls at school that is both extremely talented and manages to sustain excellently long hair. Her voice is incredible, and watching her recently, she sounds softer than earlier in her career. ‘Peach, Plum, Pear, live – wow. She released a new album in 2010, ‘Have One On Me’. The gentler sound of her voice and the precise, stunning notes of her instruments leave you in awe with this album. ’81 is just fabulous. Graceful and composed, it’s like listening to a soundtrack from a party taking place in another world, where everything is unashamedly and naturally, magical.

The Acorn: No Ghost, Bella Union
A bit like Bon Iver and Elbow. More like the former, in that The Acorn are from Canada and write their music in Canadian cottages. They went to one in Northern Quebec for No Ghost.This is a highly romantic vision for me and works on many levels, not least because the music seems to reflect the surroundings they were born in. Spindly melodies and haunting humming, these songs are the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere. ‘Almanac’ and ‘Misplaced’ are perfect.

Au Revoir Simone by Avril kelly

Au Revoir Simone by Avril Kelly

Au Revoir Simone: Night Light, Moshi Moshi
All remixes of Au Revoir Simone’s songs- by the likes of Jens Lenkman and Neon Indian. The Brooklyn indie pop gals, Heather D’Angelo, Erika Forster and Annie Hart took their name from a minor character in the Tim Burton comedy; Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. This remix album is a like finding a hidden Snickers on a 20 mile walk, or the ice-cream at the end of the tunnel. I challenge you to feel grumpy when listening to the electro, pure girly voices running up and down in pitch. Come on, stand up and make a cup of tea. To use the title of their song; ‘Only You Can Make You Happy’. Drink some tea.

this is the Kit2 by Avril kelly

This Is The Kit by Avril Kelly

This Is The Kit: Wriggle Out The Restless, Dreamboat Records
I put this album on when we visited my boyfriend’s Dad’s new house in Jersey. It’s a big, 60s, art-deco style, Gatsby type house, right on the seafront (I know, it’s idyllic). Previously I had only ever listened to This Is The Kit on my Mac, and once, seen her live. Both intimate venues, I liked to keep Kate locked in my collection as ‘mine’. However, when she was played loud with no distortion, in an acoustically happy room, it’s truly something else (as they say). Her voice resonates and echoes, as if you are actually within an enchanted forest with the most ethereal story teller you can possibly imagine. Or perhaps inside a whale traveling in the ocean. Captivating and vulnerable, she will envelop you. Whenever I play Wriggle Out The Restless, people are immediately in love. I can not recommend this album enough. See my previous review here and listen to my favourite; Moon, below.

Hidden Orchestra: Night Walks, Tru Thoughts
These guys just sound very cool. Wholesomely cool. Listening to this album is being in the countryside and looking at everything in a totally refreshing light. I think they are best listened to in such settings, but this could be my romantic side playing up again (boyfriend away on business…) – I can imagine listening to them waiting for a bus in a city, or with a glass of whisky and someone good to chat to… in a city. I am sure they are really urban actually (being Tru Thoughts and all) but amazing instruments equate to nature for me. I’m rambling. I apologize. ‘Strange’ is angelic.

johnny_flynn-been_listening

Johnny Flynn: Been Listening, Transgressive
We all know how Amelia’s Magazine loves old Johnny. He is multi-talented and makes you want to stare at his face for days. Flynn’s latest album; Been Listening is a culmination of his musings, travels, thoughts and feelings as he grows, figures life out a little more, and becomes more distinctive and beautiful. It’s got a bit more bite than A Larum, but continues with the theatrical edge. Occasionally it sounds like he is swaying about with a tankard singing in your local (endearing). Sometimes it’s like he’s sitting by a river, or in the city’s compact and grimy depths. It is less haystack joviality and more gutsy than younger Flynn. ‘Barnacled Warship’ is a stomper, whilst, ‘The Water’ with Laura Marling is a duet formed in heaven. See live review by Rob Harris here.

Sea Of Bees: Songs for The Ravens, Heavenly Recordings
Lovely voice with a dark undercurrent fluttering through her lyrics. Julie Ann Baenziger is a 25 year old from Sacramento California. Unable to embrace her clear talent, she spent years secretly teaching herself how to sing, until she moved out of home at 23. She plays marimba, glockenspiel and slide guitar. This is her debut album and it is full of raw emotion, wistfulness and beauty. See my full review here.

Best-Coast-Crazy-For-You

Best Coast: Crazy for you, Mexican Summer
Singing about the ocean, sun and fun with a wholly American rocky sound, this band are surf pop at its best. The band consists of Bethany Cosentino, Bobb Bruno and Ali Koehler. Crazy for you is about Bethany’s longing for Los Angeles while spending her days in NY attending Eugene Lang College. Best Coast formed during her first days back in California. Bethany has a ginger cat called Snacks who you can find on twitter and often tweets her whilst she is on tour. Almost too cute.

Mountain Man: Made The Harbor, Bella Union
Molly Erin Sarie, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig and Amelia Randall Meath produce sounds as sweet as honey pie. The trio use minimal instruments, and instead rely on the power of their voices in unison to produce their earthy, ethereal atmosphere. The three met in Vermont and are from West, Middle West and Eastern United States, they share a love of nature, femininity and the moon. Together their harmonies are utterly all encompassing. So calm, very real and shiver inducing in their intimacy. Made The Harbor was recorded in an old ice cream parlor from the turn of the 20th century. The sounds of the building and the artist’s breathing, welcomed.

Categories ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Angus and Julia Stone, ,Avril Kelly, ,Beach House, ,Bella Union, ,Best Coast, ,Bon Iver, ,Drag City Records, ,Dreamboat Records, ,Elbow, ,Flock Music, ,Helen Martin, ,Hidden Orchestra, ,Jens Lenkman, ,joanna newsom, ,Johnny Flynn, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Mexican Summer, ,Moshi Moshi, ,Mountain Man, ,neon indian, ,Rob Harris, ,The Acorn, ,This Is The Kit, ,Transgressive Records, ,tru thoughts

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tony Cox

We adore this talented Central Saint Martins graduate Anna Garforth. With a degree in Graphic Design, click medicine ethical ideas are high on the agenda of this green fingered creative.

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Employing all things leafy and grassy, sildenafil more about a self-initiated project utilising recycled milk bottles as plant containers has been displayed around urban areas which need a bit of earthy decoration. Entitled Head Gardener, decease these invented characters were used by Garforth to spur on our future Little Gardener‘s sowing seeds of herbs and flowers.

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A bit of a horticultural wizard, Anna has been growing moss for years. With the influence of guerilla gardening and landscape artist Andy Goldsworthy, Anna is currently working on a collection of work which explores street art and public space. By attaching moss to walls using biodegradable materials, Anna has selected verses of a poem by friend Eleanor Stevens. The first installation of the poem reads “in this spore borne air” and will be followed up in a different spot with “watch your skin peel.” There will be a total of four quotes dotted around central London so keep your eyes peeled.

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Oh and, the recipe for green graffiti couldn’t be simpler… a bit of yoghurt, sugar, a few clumps of moss and your own ideology so lets all have a go!
I picked my breakfast on my way out of the house at 6am to catch my plane to India, medical for I have physalis fruit growing right next to my front door – clearly the result of some pips that had earlier got into my compost.

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physalis fruit next to my front door

The train was slow, site as always, visit this site excited only by a lone moth escaping from my bag and dancing nervously through the air – how the hell do I have so many moths? It’s like a moth invasion round my house I tells ya. They get everywhere, even onto the Picadilly line.

The plane was nearly empty – good for lying down across three seats, not so good for my conscience – god what a waste of fuel. I arrived in India at about midnight and like clockwork driver Sanjay located me and whisked me out past a depressingly large new airport (ten times the size of the present one) that is being built to accommodate the expected increase in traffic for the Commonwealth Games in 2010. We were soon engaged in a passionate conversation about the state of our planet – it’s so nice to meet people who feel the same way as me anywhere in the world.

I am staying at Shanti Home, which is a small family run hotel on the outskirts of New Delhi – on arrival I was greeted by the traditional flower garland and then shown up to my lovely little room. The cupboard is in the bathroom and the view isn’t up to much but the people are super friendly and the breakfasts are on a rooftop terrace.

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my room at Shanti Home

This morning I breakfasted alone. Just me, up there on that big ol’ roof terrace. Which meant muchos personal attention from the lovely Nepali waiters – there are a lot of Nepalis here. Then Ajay from Laxya models turned up mid morning to take me back to his office. He was initially a bit prickly; I guess he wasn’t sure who the hell I was but then who would blame him – here I come, demanding free models and not even looking the glamourous magazine editor part. What a swindle! But he soon forgave me as the big grin shows and delighted in giving me a whistlestop guided tour of Delhi (drop the New, that’s not the done thing here) which took in the parliament buildings and India archway – celebrating all the Indian soldiers who gave their lives for the British – and finished at the Baha’i house of worship – a wonderful looking all religions building.

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Ajay. I think he likes me now.

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parliament

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arch for the soldiers

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I wish I was a small boy who could strip off and dive into a pond, maybe

The dude who built the temple believed there should be total equality for men and women and that all religions should unite for world peace – what a guy. Ajay had sufficiently warmed to me that he even bought me a little souvenir keyring – I was very touched.

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families make their way up to the Baha’i temple

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I prefer this version, on a poster

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Wow! what a dude! check out his t-shirt! It rocks!

We finally made it to the Laxya offices, where several men were lounging around on their laptops, (well, not literally, you know what I mean) discussing a shoot.

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a very well respected set designer – the presents behind are props

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model offices, new delhi style

I only realised much later that one of them was actually the boss, once he left. Woops. Again, Nepali boys (although apparently not, they just look young) attended to me – but soon gave up with my requests for a not too sweet chai and bought me instead an Earl Grey teabag – seems the easiest option for those picky english!

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notice the cunningly overturned teabag. maybe I won’t realise it is not chai til it’s too late

We saw lots of cute girls, met a fashion designer who totally sorted me out with my plans, and ate some yummy food that was hand delivered into the basement, which hummed with the constant banging of non-stop construction. My eyes hurt even inside the building, and my throat is a mess already. A new metro needs to be finished in time for the Commonwealth Games and the dust is excruciating.

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food, proper indian food – they offered me a Subway! get away with you!

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construction is everywhere

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a hazy construction sunset

After a great interview with one of the artists we have been in contact with I fell asleep in the car (courtesy of Ajay) on the way home. Tomorrow I have three fashion shoots, bring ‘em on…
The words ‘bargain, ed designer and ethical’ aren’t used nearly enough in the same sentence. Wouldn’t it be great if we didn’t have to save up for the latest ‘it’ bags? And if only our quest for them were guilt free! Banishing the mad dash past street fundraisers while mumbling shamefully, purchase ‘I’m late!’ before rushing excitedly into Dolce and Gabbana.

Well girls, the answer is here and let me tell you, your bank manager will be pleased!
The organisation ‘Whatever It Takes‘, runs charitable projects worldwide and has already raised around $1,500,000 (many, many designer bags worth of cash).
Taking on the world of celebrity endorsement and fashion, ‘Whatever It Takes’ asked over 600 celebrities to donate their own works of art to be incorporated into a range of products including tableware, cosmetics, clothing and most importantly ladies ‘bags’!

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Stella McCartney

These totes and shoulder bags feature work by some of fashion’s biggest names; so whether you have a thing for Paul Smith, or are dying to get your hands on anything McQueen, then you’re in luck.

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Paul Smith

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McQueen

With prices ranging from £10 – £15, even the most spend thrift shopper can join in, and while they may not have the leather and stud trappings of the super brand bags, these cute print canvas pieces make great everyday ‘shoppers’; spacious enough to carry all your bits and pieces, a celeb tote is a must have this season. As if a designer bag at £15 wasn’t enough encouragement, each bag sold will help raise funds for charities such as ‘The 21st Century Leaders Foundation‘, who work to tackle key global development causes including poverty alleviation, environmental conservation and the protection of children.

So ladies, this time you really say that this purchase will change the world!
Now, the Alexander McQueen or Paul Smith tote? At such a great price, maybe I’ll get both!

All of the bags will be available on the website by the end of the month.

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Giorgio Armani

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Giorgio Armani

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Stella McCartney
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The Dulwich Picture Gallery has teamed up with the House of Illustration in anticipation of its opening, link inviting 45 figures in the public eye to participate in the Victorian parlour game ‘What are you like?‘ The game involved players depicting their personality by drawing what best describes them; their favourite pastime, more about food, visit place, possession and so on. I know; just wild those Victorians were!

The trek out to Dulwich for the private view was well worth it though, the diversity, humour and imagination of each piece really shone, and made you realise how illustration is often overlooked as an artform. The House of Illustration currently has no actual house, but is aiming to create a permanent home in the King’s Cross regeneration area by 2011. As Lord Christopher Frayling pointed out; ‘At present-and this is amazing-there’s no non-commercial gallery in the entire British Isles to be devoted entirely to illustration. Its as if there’s this invisible hierarchy within the arts…all very old-fashioned and not helpful.’

The brainchild of illustrator Quentin Blake, the House of Illustration has high hopes; aiming to ‘put illustration centre stage and give it the attention it deserves’. This is pretty exciting for us here at Amelia’s, where we’ve long been championing up and coming illustrators. This exhibition certainly sets the House of to a fine start, with contributors varying from professional illustrators like Quentin himself, Shirley Hughes and Michael Foreman, to musicians, writers and TV personalities for whom art is just a hobby. Philip Pullman, Andrew Marr, Eric Clapton and Jack Penate are just a few of the household names who have put pen to paper.

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Baths and bed crop up with reliable regularity as favourite places and comforts, cats and bicycles are also extremely popular, but otherwise each creation is completely unique; some incorporating photographs and collages, with designer Paul Smith presenting his in a stunning vintage scrapbook. David Shrigley, however, steals the show, with his fantastic insight into the mind of someone with a fetish for serpents: favourite animal: snakes, favourite weather: snakes, favourite place: snake pit. Genius.

There are 50 limited edition prints of each piece on sale for £200; a wise art investment if ever I saw one, proven by the fact that even mid credit-crunch, they were selling like crazy Tuesday night. If you’re lucky, you might still be able to grab one though. Alternatively, enter the House of Illustration competition by creating your own ‘What are you like’, the winning entry will be hung in the Dulwich Picture Gallery.For more details see the website.

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I first came across Tony Cox about nine years ago, viagra buy at the Hogsback Festival in South Africa. I was 15 years old, cialis 40mg and my appreciation of music extended to the top 40 chart and not much else. I’d been brought up on The Mamas and The Papas and Eric Clapton, however, and had a father who insisted on educating me on ‘decent’ music such as Jimi Hendrix and The Who. So I still had an appreciation for good guitarists and also, growing up in South Africa, traditional African music.

Tony on this occasion, played with fellow guitar genius, Steve Newman, and although I don’t remember the performance in detail, I do remember enjoying it immensely. So when I heard that Tony had now emmigrated to the UK and was performing his first gig in Putney, I rushed to book tickets.

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The Half Moon is an excellent local pub and also has a brilliant, intimate venue for gigs. Tony was different to how I remembered him – greyer and perhaps a little portlier – but as soon as he began to play I was transported back to my homeland and the night I first heard him play.

With perhaps the exception of Clapton, I have never had the opportunity to see a live performance laden with so much skill and passion. Each composition tells it’s own story beautifully and while distinctly African, this beautiful folk music appeals to all.

But what I found most special about the gig was that it was not only an evening of music, but an insight into an African world. Tony punctuates each tune with an anecdote revealing some aspect of his life in Southern Africa – making the show just that bit more special.

Keep an ear out for him at festivals in the coming year – and in the meantime, his gigs are listed on his MySpace page.

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with Mina Tindle and Review of Debut Album Taranta

Mina Tindle 'To Carry Many Small Things' by Gilly Rochester
Mina Tindle ‘To Carry Many Small Things’ by Gilly Rochester.

Mina Tindle Taranta by Chloe Giordano
Mina Tindle’s Taranta by Chloe Giordano.

French folk pop singer Mina Tindle has a deceptively girly voice: sweet and high. But don’t be fooled: the songs on her debut album Taranta come with strong sentiments and instantly hummable melodies whilst videos reveal her to be a saucy minx. From the jaunty tones of To Carry Small Things to the softly rolling guitar pickings of Echo and the minimal chords of Henry, the whole album is a very individual delight. And her story is an inspiring one indeed.

Mina Tindle by Jamie Wignall
Mina Tindle by Jamie Wignall.

How long have you been singing, and how did it all start? What has your musical journey to this point been?
I have always been singing in a way, because there are some great singers in my family. So I have been surrounded with voices all my life. Then some of my friends had bands, and invited me to sing along with them (Toy Fight, Orouni…). Step by step, I started writing songs of my own and recorded them at home. Then I released in 2009 a 7” with Sauvage Records, a French small and great Indie label. After that, I focused for years in the recording of Taranta, my first LP that just came out.
 
YouTube Preview Image
What do you think of the current contemporary French music scene? Do you feel a part of it or do you think most of your influences come from elsewhere and if so where?
I am not an expert of the current French scene. Still, I really love the work of bands like Francois and the Atlas Mountains, Arlt, Bertrand Belin, Maison Neuve, etc… But I have always been listening to different kinds of music; from American Indie pop to Brazilian music.
 
mina tindle by Nathalie Sanchez
Mina Tindle by Nathalie Sanchez.

Mina Tindle by Jamie Wignall
Mina Tindle by Jamie Wignall.

You also have Spanish roots – how did you come to be in France, and what have you kept of this part of your background?
I was born and raised in France. But a part of my family still lives in Spain. I need to go there to feel at home.  

mina tindle by charlie rallings
Mina Tindle by Charlie Rallings.

How did living in New York colour your creation of music?
I lived my NYC time under the sign of music: I was living above a bar at that time, where they had 3 concerts a night. I also met some great musicians over there and listened to a lot of music. I love the way American people embrace music. There is something really spontaneous about it.

mina tindle pola yell
You self-produced much of your material, how did you learn to do this and do you have any tips for others going down this route?
I did not have the choice at that time. But I had the chance to have met great people who helpt me out a lot with everything.
 
Mina Tindle by Adopted-Design
Mina Tindle by Adopted Design.

What else have you been doing over the two years that it has taken to produce Taranta? And what does the title refer to?
Some part-time jobs here and there, but mostly stressing out about the recordings. I also played a bunch of shows, on my own or with friends. Taranta refers to a traditional dance and music from South Italy. People used to say that women had been bitten by spiders and that explained, supposedly, why they needed to dance to make the poison go out of their body. Which was obviously wrong, but I loved what it says about hysteria and creation.

 minatindle by Franck Loriou
Mina Tindle by Franck Loriou.

What do you most like to sing about?
I wish I could find some answers in music. And it sometimes happens. So basically, I love singing about something true, whether it is love, people, encounters, intuitions, sadness… It is pretty universal in the end.

mina-tindle-by-catherine-askew
Mina Tindle by Catherine Askew.

How did you come up with the name Mina Tindle?
It is a reference to the great movie Sleuth by Joseph L Mankiewicz, don’t ask me more: It’s a really long and not really interesting story.

mina tindle taranta album cover
What are you most excited about doing this year?
I hope to travel a lot with this record. And I am already thinking about a next one.

Taranta will be released on the 28th May on Believe Digital.

Categories ,Adopted Design, ,album, ,Arlt, ,Believe Digital, ,Bertrand Belin, ,Catherine Askew, ,Charlie Rallings, ,Chloe Giordano, ,Echo, ,folk, ,Franck Loriou, ,Francois and The Atlas Mountains, ,french, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Henry, ,interview, ,Jamie Wignall, ,Joseph L Mankiewicz, ,Maison Neuve, ,Mina Tindle, ,Nathalie Sanchez, ,new york, ,Orouni, ,review, ,Sauvage Records, ,Sleuth, ,Spanish, ,Taranta, ,To Carry Small Things, ,Toy Fight

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Amelia’s Magazine | Music: Essie Jain Interview

Essie Jain by Madi
Illustration by Madi Illustration

Could you introduce yourself please?
Hello there, more about my name Essie Jain. Pleased to meet you.

Where are you from and where do you currently reside?
I grew up in London, moved to New York in my early twenties, and I’ve been there ever since.

What sort of music do you create?
Someone once told me that I make “quiet music in a loud world” and i always thought that described it perfectly.

Do you write it yourself?
Yes, I write the music myself. Over the years I have also collaborated on a few songs with my husband Patrick. He’s very technically gifted on his instruments, so working with him has kept me on my toes.

What music/artists/eras influence your music?
I think I’m still quite old fashioned in the music i like. I grew up watching classic musicals; films with Frank Sinatra, Ginger Rogers, Tony Curtis etc…and I listen to more film soundtracks than anything else I think. I also love piano players – Keith Jarrett brings something particularly beautiful to his performances. I think the biggest influence on me is watching or hearing people play their instruments really well. I love it when someone has a pure talent like that. It really lifts my spirit.

Essie Jain Amelia's

What’s your music background?
I come from a very musical family, so music was a natural part of our household, and they have always been be so supportive of me as a musician. I studied the cello for 8 years, learnt the piano, and I also trained for a couple of years with an Opera Singer. I had the opportunity to have a great foundation to work with, for which I am truly grateful, and i hope to give that back in some way to the kids in the next generation after me.

What instruments do you play?
My main instrument is definitely the piano, but i have picked up a bit of guitar and even some bass playing over the years too (not having a great knowledge of the bass has actually made me able to be freer with it, so I’d love to explore that further at some point).

What can we find on your album of lullabies?
A place to shut the world away for a time, and a place to sooth a tired spirit. My friend said it was like inhaling a moment of calm, which was just what i had intended.

What made you want to make an album of lullabies?
Well, friends and family having lots of babies was the first step. When you get to your thirties, it all starts to happen at once, (mainly because men and women have been in hot pursuit of their ambitions and careers throughout their twenties) so suddenly I found myself in a new world, with lots of little ones now hanging out at my house with my friends and I. Sleep seemed to be a major issue with all of them, and “baby music” was driving them bonkers. Just because someone has a baby, does not mean that their musical tastes disappear, and i thought it would be great to make an album for both parties.

Do you feel free to create the music you wish?
I’ve always felt free to create the music that I wanted to make. I’ve really never felt any pressure from anyone to be anything other than myself.

Do you enjoy performing on stage?
Yes, I love performing. I’ve never had a problem with nerves, it has always felt really natural to me to be on stage. For the lullabies, i recently made the decision to leave the instrument playing to other people, which has enabled me to just concentrate on singing. I’ve found that i really love performing this way.

And tours/festivals – what are the like for you?
I’ve toured a fair amount, and I’m definitely happiest when I’m out and about performing. But for this lullaby album, I’m in a slightly different position in terms of live performance, because I’ll be doing more family based shows, which will take place earlier in the day. So I’m really looking forward that side of things.

ESSIE ALBUM

How do you relax?
I’m an active person, I love walking, hiking, yoga etc, but deep down, nothing beats being at home and simply embracing the quiet of the evening, either with music, or the stillness outside.

Do you enjoy being in England? What does it means to you?
Yes, very much. England really does have half my heart, and i think it always will. I love living in the USA, and that’s why I’m still there, but even though I’ve lived abroad for almost a decade now, I will never completely understand what it means to be “American,” just as it would be the same the other way around.

Where do you see yourself in the future?
I’d love to keep traveling all over the world, playing music with my husband, friends and family. And when the moment comes when my husband and i have children of our own, I’d like to bring them along to share in all of that too. I’d also like to work to help children through music. When my father was ill earlier this year, we spent some time in hospital with him, and i was very moved by the people working in the children’s ward one floor below us. It made me want to help bring some soothing music into that environment, so I hope to be able to figure out a way to make that happen.

When can the UK see you? Festivals planned at all?
I’m currently putting together a series of performances for over the summer in the UK, and I’ve met some lovely people recently who are curating family music events and the like, which I am going to work with to set up shows, so lots to look forward to.

Essie Jain’s album; Until The Light of Morning, is out now on her own label, Light Of Morning.

Categories ,album, ,Essie Jain, ,Ginger Rogers, ,Helen Martin, ,Indie, ,interview, ,Keith Jarrett, ,london, ,Lullabies, ,Madi Illustrates, ,New York City, ,The Leaf Label, ,thirties, ,twenties

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ari Up 1962 – 2010: No Typical Girl

Tasha_Whittle
Illustration by Tasha Whittle.

The darker mornings and wetter evenings have already started driving the fair-weather riders away from the cycle lanes, more about but those of us who keep chugging on have our reasons to persevere in spite of the weather. After all, ask just because it’s getting colder it doesn’t mean the thought of getting on the tube every morning is any more tempting, is it? Tom Morris and Sian Emmison, the owners of eclectic Islington cycling outlet Bobbin Bicycles, certainly don’t think so. Saturday 16th October saw the opening of their brand new bicycle workshop, just around the corner of the shop claiming to be ‘The most beautiful bicycle shop in Britain’. Like the shop itself, the workshop specialises in upright town bikes, vintage rides and bicycles with hub gears and back-pedal brakes – all of which can be difficult to get serviced in a standard bike shop.

Carla_Bromhead
Illustration by Carla Bromhead.

‘Now, anyone with a Dutch, Pashley or vintage bike can come to us to get repairs done, be it changing a wheel, a handlebar or something more oily,’ a very busy Tom Morris told me on Saturday afternoon. Cosmetic touches, along with a few practical ones, were still missing from the space as Tom welcomed the first customers on Saturday, but that didn’t stop him from getting his hands dirty as one customer after another came knocking. Parked up the road was my own bike, fresh from its annual check-up, a service also offered at the Bobbin workshop. While it costs money, it’s worth doing as it prevents problems in the long run – for example my chain needed changing, the mechanic pointed out, saving me from a snapped chain in the road in a month or two. Servicing an upright bike is no more expensive nor complicated than a hybrid or a road bike, assured Tom, but it requires certain skills and tools. His employees Alexis and Laura are both trained bike mechanics, having been asked personally by Tom and Sian to come work at Bobbin. Laura has just finished a bike mechanics course where she took a specific interest in town bikes, while Alexis has five years of experience fixing bikes in Oxford and Amsterdam. ‘You keep learning new things. It’s enjoyable work, and there is obviously increasing demand,’ said Alexis, as he checked in a black Pashley with a flat tyre and broken gear shifter.

Genie_Espinosa
Illustration by Genie Espinosa.

The workshop will also be selling kit for what Tom calls ‘bike pimping’: cosmetic changes such as a new saddle, cream tyres, a carrying basket or colourful bike components. But the Bobbin workshop isn’t just for town bikes and other old-school models; ‘We will offer the same friendly service to any cyclist who comes our way,’ assures Tom. Once the workshop is properly up and running, Tom plans to hold classes in bike maintenance, ‘hopefully before Christmas’. I might sign up to one of these myself, as next time I get a flat tyre I’d like to be able to deal with it. Nothing knocks the feeling of independence out of cycling quite like hearing that thud-thud-thud of a flat, but I think mastering a tyre lever might go a long way to remedy this.

In the meantime I have my winter cycling gear ready. Rule number one is the mud guards, closely followed by lights with fresh batteries. A pocket-size rain cover now has a permanent place in my bag, and I have also splurged on a pair of padded, waterproof gloves. A proper pair of winter gloves are pricey, but vital to any semblance of comfort in the cold. Last winter a week of sleet forced the purchase of a cheap pair of waterproof trousers, which look ridiculous but are a life-saver when it’s pouring down and I have to cycle home from work. Lastly, a reflective vest undeniably makes you look like a geek, but you may want to consider one you commute in traffic. So as the fair-weather cyclists hang up their helmets in favour of the buses and trains, the cycle lanes are left to the hard-cores, or should I say freaks, determined to stick to two wheels through the winter. The tube might be warm, but we get to arrive at work bright-eyed and bushy-tailed from full exposure to the elements of the crisp London winter.

Get weather-proofed at Bobbin Bicycles, 397 St John Street, London EC1. Visit the Workshop around the corner on 23 Arlington Way.
Tasha_Whittle
Illustration by Tasha Whittle.

The darker mornings and wetter evenings have already started driving the fair-weather riders away from the cycle lanes, dosage but those of us who keep chugging on have our reasons to persevere in spite of the weather. After all, decease just because it’s getting colder it doesn’t mean the thought of getting on the tube every morning is any more tempting, is it? Tom Morris and Sian Emmison, the owners of eclectic Islington cycling outlet Bobbin Bicycles, certainly don’t think so. Saturday 16th October saw the opening of their brand new bicycle workshop, just around the corner of the shop claiming to be ‘The most beautiful bicycle shop in Britain’. Like the shop itself, the workshop specialises in upright town bikes, vintage rides and bicycles with hub gears and back-pedal brakes – all of which can be difficult to get serviced in a standard bike shop.

Carla_Bromhead
Illustration by Carla Bromhead.

‘Now, anyone with a Dutch, Pashley or vintage bike can come to us to get repairs done, be it changing a wheel, a handlebar or something more oily,’ a very busy Tom Morris told me on Saturday afternoon. Cosmetic touches, along with a few practical ones, were still missing from the space as Tom welcomed the first customers on Saturday, but that didn’t stop him from getting his hands dirty as one customer after another came knocking. Parked up the road was my own bike, fresh from its annual check-up, a service also offered at the Bobbin workshop. While it costs money, it’s worth doing as it prevents problems in the long run – for example my chain needed changing, the mechanic pointed out, saving me from a snapped chain in the road in a month or two. Servicing an upright bike is no more expensive nor complicated than a hybrid or a road bike, assured Tom, but it requires certain skills and tools. His employees Alexis and Laura are both trained bike mechanics, having been asked personally by Tom and Sian to come work at Bobbin. Laura has just finished a bike mechanics course where she took a specific interest in town bikes, while Alexis has five years of experience fixing bikes in Oxford and Amsterdam. ‘You keep learning new things. It’s enjoyable work, and there is obviously increasing demand,’ said Alexis, as he checked in a black Pashley with a flat tyre and broken gear shifter.

Genie_Espinosa
Illustration by Genie Espinosa.

The workshop will also be selling kit for what Tom calls ‘bike pimping’: cosmetic changes such as a new saddle, cream tyres, a carrying basket or colourful bike components. But the Bobbin workshop isn’t just for town bikes and other old-school models; ‘We will offer the same friendly service to any cyclist who comes our way,’ assures Tom. Once the workshop is properly up and running, Tom plans to hold classes in bike maintenance, ‘hopefully before Christmas’. I might sign up to one of these myself, as next time I get a flat tyre I’d like to be able to deal with it. Nothing knocks the feeling of independence out of cycling quite like hearing that thud-thud-thud of a flat, but I think mastering a tyre lever might go a long way to remedy this.

In the meantime I have my winter cycling gear ready. Rule number one is the mud guards, closely followed by lights with fresh batteries. A pocket-size rain cover now has a permanent place in my bag, and I have also splurged on a pair of padded, waterproof gloves. A proper pair of winter gloves are pricey, but vital to any semblance of comfort in the cold. Last winter a week of sleet forced the purchase of a cheap pair of waterproof trousers, which look ridiculous but are a life-saver when it’s pouring down and I have to cycle home from work. Lastly, a reflective vest undeniably makes you look like a geek, but you may want to consider one you commute in traffic. So as the fair-weather cyclists hang up their helmets in favour of the buses and trains, the cycle lanes are left to the hard-cores, or should I say freaks, determined to stick to two wheels through the winter. The tube might be warm, but we get to arrive at work bright-eyed and bushy-tailed from full exposure to the elements of the crisp London winter.

Get weather-proofed at Bobbin Bicycles, 397 St John Street, London EC1. Visit the Workshop around the corner on 23 Arlington Way. Read our previous interview with Tom Morris here.
Tasha_Whittle
Illustration by Tasha Whittle.

The darker mornings and wetter evenings have already started driving the fair-weather riders away from the cycle lanes, viagra but those of us who keep chugging on have our reasons to persevere in spite of the weather. After all, side effects just because it’s getting colder it doesn’t mean the thought of getting on the tube every morning is any more tempting, is it? Tom Morris and Sian Emmison, the owners of eclectic Islington cycling outlet Bobbin Bicycles, certainly don’t think so. Saturday 16th October saw the opening of their brand new bicycle workshop, just around the corner of the shop claiming to be ‘The most beautiful bicycle shop in Britain’. Like the shop itself, the workshop specialises in upright town bikes, vintage rides and bicycles with hub gears and back-pedal brakes – all of which can be difficult to get serviced in a standard bike shop.

Carla_Bromhead
Illustration by Carla Bromhead.

‘Now, anyone with a Dutch, Pashley or vintage bike can come to us to get repairs done, be it changing a wheel, a handlebar or something more oily,’ a very busy Tom Morris told me on Saturday afternoon. Cosmetic touches, along with a few practical ones, were still missing from the space as Tom welcomed the first customers on Saturday, but that didn’t stop him from getting his hands dirty as one customer after another came knocking. Parked up the road was my own bike, fresh from its annual check-up, a service also offered at the Bobbin workshop. While it costs money, it’s worth doing as it prevents problems in the long run – for example my chain needed changing, the mechanic pointed out, saving me from a snapped chain in the road in a month or two.

Servicing an upright bike is no more expensive nor complicated than a hybrid or a road bike, assured Tom, but it requires certain skills and tools. His employees Alexis and Laura are both trained bike mechanics, having been asked personally by Tom and Sian to come work at Bobbin. Laura has just finished a bike mechanics course where she took a specific interest in town bikes, while Alexis has five years of experience fixing bikes in Oxford and Amsterdam. ‘You keep learning new things. It’s enjoyable work, and there is obviously increasing demand,’ said Alexis, as he checked in a black Pashley with a flat tyre and broken gear shifter.

Genie_Espinosa
Illustration by Genie Espinosa.

The workshop will also be selling kit for what Tom calls ‘bike pimping’: cosmetic changes such as a new saddle, cream tyres, a carrying basket or colourful bike components. But the Bobbin workshop isn’t just for town bikes and other old-school models; ‘We will offer the same friendly service to any cyclist who comes our way,’ assures Tom. Once the workshop is properly up and running, Tom plans to hold classes in bike maintenance, ‘hopefully before Christmas’. I might sign up to one of these myself, as next time I get a flat tyre I’d like to be able to deal with it. Nothing knocks the feeling of independence out of cycling quite like hearing that thud-thud-thud of a flat, but I think mastering a tyre lever might go a long way to remedy this.

In the meantime I have my winter cycling gear ready. Rule number one is the mud guards, closely followed by lights with fresh batteries. A pocket-size rain cover now has a permanent place in my bag, and I have also splurged on a pair of padded, waterproof gloves. A proper pair of winter gloves are pricey, but vital to any semblance of comfort in the cold. Last winter a week of sleet forced the purchase of a cheap pair of waterproof trousers, which look ridiculous but are a life-saver when it’s pouring down and I have to cycle home from work. Lastly, a reflective vest undeniably makes you look like a geek, but you may want to consider one you commute in traffic. So as the fair-weather cyclists hang up their helmets in favour of the buses and trains, the cycle lanes are left to the hard-cores, or should I say freaks, determined to stick to two wheels through the winter. The tube might be warm, but we get to arrive at work bright-eyed and bushy-tailed from full exposure to the elements of the crisp London winter.

Get weather-proofed at Bobbin Bicycles, 397 St John Street, London EC1. Visit the Workshop around the corner on 23 Arlington Way. Read our previous interview with Tom Morris here.
Three oil cans; Tate Summer Party, sick Photography by Immo Klink

Gushing from floral skirts, spilling elegantly from giant white eggs, jetting from paint tubes across the floor of the iconic Tate Turbine Hall, 2010 has witnessed a flood of oily resistance against oil sponsorship in the arts. The likes of art activist group Liberate Tate have generated a fierce debate in the art world around oil, ethics and sponsorship.

Plans are afoot to spring board the campaign into the New Year, with a high energy, high profile mainstream gallery event to attract lots of new people and to keep the pressure up. In an innovative bid to raise dosh for the project London creative campaign group PLATFORM has launched a crowd- funding initiative at Indiegogo. The idea is that people can give what ever little bit of cash they can, and by Christmas there will be enough in the pot to book a snazzy venue and put on a truly sensational participatory exhibition in early 2011.

Tate Summer Party, Photograph by Immo Klink

This is all about entry level direct action at it’s most fun. More than that, the campaign is in with a real chance of seeing a tangible result. Protestors forced Shell to back out of the Natural History Museum, and with the right pressure applied to the right places there is no reason why all oil sponsorship in the arts can’t go the same way as tobacco sponsorship in sport; down the pan. The folk at PLATFORM hope to put on educational workshops to get people clued up about the effects of the oil industry, and to host debates about the role our public art institutions play in the branding campaigns of these oil multinationals. Most importantly they hope to empower people to get involved in active resistance and creative interventions.

Easter egg spill with wiggle, British Museum Photography by Amy Scaife

They would be really grateful if you could help by spreading the word forwarding the link bellow by email and facebook, and telling your economically empowered friends and relatives. What ever you can or can’t do to help fundraise, everyone is invited to the event itself, which is likely to be held in January (email sophie@platformlondon.org for more information about getting involved).

To say thank you for donations over £16 ($25) they are offering some quirky perks, including sets of beautiful postcards ideal for a Christmas stocking, invites to the first night private viewing of the exhibition, and limited edition hand made, ‘BP branded’ paint tubes full of molasses, hot from the intervention at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall

So whether you have some cash to spare – or if you just want to get messy with molasses – get involved!


Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent

“Ari Up: John Lydon’s step-daughter dies.” The Telegraph’s headline was horribly reductive. Ari Up, viagra 100mg who died on Wednesday at the tragically young age of 48, viagra buy was the punk legend’s step-daughter but that was just a small and tangential detail in a fascinating life and career. With The Slits and later with the New Age Steppers and solo in several guises, Ari Up was a musical icon in her own right, not a bit player on the fringes of the John Lydon circus.   


Illustration by Gemma Milly

The granddaughter of the owner of Der Spiegel and daughter of Nora Foster who was at the centre of the London music scene for years (befriending Hendrix and dating Chris Spedding before finally marrying Johnny Rotten), Ari Up was born from privilege and chaos in equal measure.  

Nora’s tendency to invite poor punk musicians to bunk down at their house put Ari at the heart of the scene and got her guitar tuition from Joe Strummer. She was 14 when she formed The Slits with Strummer’s former-flatmate Palmolive. Her fascination with reggae gave the band a dubby feel that was in sharp contrast to the guitar thrashing of many other punk outfits.  


Illustration by Aniela Murphy


Illustration by Abi Daker

The Slits debut album Cut, with its memorable image of the band naked but for grass skirts and a liberal coating of mud, featured a cleaner sound than their live performances. While the band’s cover of I Heard It Through The Grapevine is still an indie disco staple, the record is studded with gems particularly the amateurish piano and bouncing bass of Typical Girls.  


Illustration by Faye West

The Splits broke up in 1981 and Ari moved with her husband and twins to Indonesia and Belize before heading for Jamaica, an appropriate location given her an enduring love of reggae and dub. She performed and recorded with Lee Scratch Perry and released a solo album, Dread More Dan Dead, in 2005.  

In 2006, The Slits reformed to some critical acclaim, releasing the Return of The Giant Slits EP which was followed by a new full length record, Trapped Animals, in October last year.The Slits final work together, a video for the Trapped Animals track Lazy Slam (below), was released yesterday in accordance with Ari’s final wishes.  


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

A whirling dervish of dreadlocks and energy even when The Slits returned in their middle-aged incarnation, it’s with sad inevitability that Ari Up will be pegged as John Lydon’s step-daughter first and a musician in her own right second. But more thoughtful souls will remember her as one of punk’s most distinctive voices whose work with The Slits confounded and confronted the heavy-handed misogyny of much mainstream punk – The Stranglers, I’m looking at you.  

The death of Ari up has deprived music of one of its most original and unpredictable voices. It’s a truly sad day.

YouTube Preview Image

You can follow more of Mic’s words on his blog here. You can read our review of Trapped Animal here. A superb album, go buy it now.

Categories ,Abi Daker, ,Aniela Murphy, ,Ari Up, ,Dub, ,Faye West, ,Gemma Milly, ,Gemma Sheldrake, ,Heard It Through The Grapevine, ,John Lydon, ,Johnny Rotten, ,Lazy Slam, ,music, ,Obituary, ,punk, ,reggae, ,Stéphanie Thieullent, ,the slits, ,The Telegraph, ,Typical Girls

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