Amelia’s Magazine | Sir Philip Green and his Topshop billions get the UK Uncut treatment.


Heart / Target by Patrick Thomas. All images courtesy of Outline Editions.

Outline Editions’ pop-up shop is tucked away behind stalls on Berwick Street Market, prostate healing but the bright shop front is still hard to miss. Decorated by graphics wunderkind Kate Moross, mind inside the shop is a virtual “who’s who” of Britain’s graphic art world. This was part of what founders Camilla Parsons and Bill Tuckey wanted to achieve – having both spent years commissioning art works for music and print, they saw a gap in the market for a place where these artists and illustrators could show their work in a more permanent manner. ‘We have taken the high-end graphic artists and put them under one roof,’ says Camilla Parsons.

And the list of contributors to Outline Editions’ pop-up shop really does demonstrate that these are some very sought-after graphic artists and illustrators. Starting with Kate Moross, whose name is known from Dazed & Confused, Topshop and Vogue – all the way to Anthony Burrill, the so-called godfather of graphic arts. Universally known for his ‘Work Hard and Be Nice to People’ poster, his work has been seen everywhere from Tate Modern to the Underground.


Robin by David Foldvari

The shop on Berwick Street in Soho shows a mixture of works from the newly commissioned love-theme, which was unveiled on 2 December, and works from ‘Into the Forest’, which opened in November. The shop also has prints from last summer’s London-themed show.

‘We have commissioned a range of graphic artists and illustrators who work in music and pop culture,’ says Parsons, as she shows me around the space. ‘Many of these are one-off works that we have commissioned, all signed and in limited edition.’ She shows me the works by by David Foldvari; ‘he’s a very big name, you’ll recognise his style as you open a paper or magazine’, and HelloVon; ‘we chose him as his thing is animals. Look at it – it’s incredibly detailed and realistic, but also a bit spooky.’


Bird by HelloVon

The works commissioned by Outline Editions were themed, but Parsons says the artists appreciated the chance to create works with a large degree of freedom. ‘They do a lot of commercial work and this was unrestricted, so they found it exciting.’

Also on the wall is works by Supermundane; ‘he’s very prolific’, Kate Moross; ‘the girl of the graphic art scene’, and Klaus Haapaniemi; ‘he does very high end work.’ We stop a while next to Takayo Akiyama’s nautical chart of London, an intriguing little piece which shows the detail of London planet set on a globe, as if it were the only thing in the world. For those of us who live here it feels like that sometimes, doesn’t it.

London Nautical Chart by Takayo Akiyama

While initially focused on established names in the graphic world, Parsons doesn’t rule out the possibility of taking on more unknown names. ‘As time goes on we will start to encompass lesser known names. The main thing is to make sure the work is accessible. We cover all forms of graphic arts. The cement is that they all work in music, fashion and pop culture.’ The accessibility also extends to pricing: works start at £15 and go up to £185.


By James Joyce.

The Central London location for the pop-up shop was a deliberate move to bring the graphics genre to a wider audience. ‘There are lots of print collectives in East London. We wanted to bring it out West, to take it to a new audience. … We wanted to incorporate people with a variety of styles as well, to show something to everyone’s taste.’

‘Our premise is to keep it exciting and fresh, and to keep doing new things,’ says Parsons. She already has a few aces up her sleeve for Outline Editions’ next projects. She makes me promise not to say too much, but it’s hard – it sounds excellent and I for one can’t wait to see what comes next.


Pelican by Jamie Portch

‘Love in the Forest’ runs until 31 January at 94 Berwick Street, Soho, London W1. The works are also available on the Outline Editions website. For more information see our listing.

Heart / Target by Patrick Thomas. All images courtesy of Outline Editions.

Outline Editions’ pop-up shop is tucked away behind stalls on Berwick Street Market, viagra 100mg but the bright shop front is still hard to miss. Decorated by graphics wunderkind Kate Moross, viagra inside the shop is a virtual “who’s who” of Britain’s graphic art world. This was part of what founders Camilla Parsons and Bill Tuckey wanted to achieve – having both spent years commissioning art works for music and print, they saw a gap in the market for a place where these artists and illustrators could show their work in a more permanent manner. ‘We have taken the high-end graphic artists and put them under one roof,’ says Camilla Parsons.

And the list of contributors to Outline Editions’ pop-up shop really does demonstrate that these are some very sought-after graphic artists and illustrators. Starting with Kate Moross, whose name is known from Dazed & Confused, Topshop and Vogue – all the way to Anthony Burrill, the so-called godfather of graphic arts. Universally known for his ‘Work Hard and Be Nice to People’ poster, his work has been seen everywhere from Tate Modern to the Underground.


By Kate Moross

The shop on Berwick Street in Soho shows a mixture of works from the newly commissioned love-theme, which was unveiled on 2 December, and works from ‘Into the Forest’, which opened in November. The shop also has prints from last summer’s London-themed show.

‘We have commissioned a range of graphic artists and illustrators who work in music and pop culture,’ says Parsons, as she shows me around the space. ‘Many of these are one-off works that we have commissioned, all signed and in limited edition.’ She shows me the works by by David Foldvari; ‘he’s a very big name, you’ll recognise his style as you open a paper or magazine’, and HelloVon; ‘we chose him as his thing is animals. Look at it – it’s incredibly detailed and realistic, but also a bit spooky.’


Bird by HelloVon

The works commissioned by Outline Editions were themed, but Parsons says the artists appreciated the chance to create works with a large degree of freedom. ‘They do a lot of commercial work and this was unrestricted, so they found it exciting.’

Also on the wall is works by Supermundane; ‘he’s very prolific’, Kate Moross; ‘the girl of the graphic art scene’, and Klaus Haapaniemi; ‘he does very high end work.’ We stop a while next to Takayo Akiyama’s nautical chart of London, an intriguing little piece which shows the detail of London planet set on a globe, as if it were the only thing in the world. For those of us who live here it feels like that sometimes, doesn’t it.


Love Geometry by Anthony Burrill

While initially focused on established names in the graphic world, Parsons doesn’t rule out the possibility of taking on more unknown names. ‘As time goes on we will start to encompass lesser known names. The main thing is to make sure the work is accessible. We cover all forms of graphic arts. The cement is that they all work in music, fashion and pop culture.’ The accessibility also extends to pricing: works start at £15 and go up to £185.


By James Joyce.

The Central London location for the pop-up shop was a deliberate move to bring the graphics genre to a wider audience. ‘There are lots of print collectives in East London. We wanted to bring it out West, to take it to a new audience. … We wanted to incorporate people with a variety of styles as well, to show something to everyone’s taste.’

‘Our premise is to keep it exciting and fresh, and to keep doing new things,’ says Parsons. She already has a few aces up her sleeve for Outline Editions’ next projects. She makes me promise not to say too much, but it’s hard – it sounds excellent and I for one can’t wait to see what comes next.


Pelican by Jamie Portch

‘Love in the Forest’ runs until 31 January at 94 Berwick Street, Soho, London W1. The works are also available on the Outline Editions website. For more information see our listing.
UKuncut Topshop-police amelia gregory
Topshop, viagra 40mg with your welcoming entrance you are spoiling us…

If you are on twitter you will probably have noticed the mutterings of the #UKuncut hashtag – from small beginnings it has grown to become the standard bearer of the cuts demonstrations. And to think it all started only a few weeks back, cialis 40mg when I got a frantic phone call from one of my friends on the first UK Uncut Vodafone demo. “We’ve got a trending hashtag” he exclaimed somewhat maniacally. “but we’ve misspelled Vodaphone, stuff you’ve got to help us!!” I assured him that a quick glance at twitter confirmed that he didn’t need my twittering powers one iota. And frankly I think it’s Vodafone who’ve got their spelling wrong. Now, thousands of people follow the @UKuncut twitter feed and the #UKuncut hashtag stream is used to communicate between anti-cuts protests up and down the country. Makes you dead proud of your mates it does.

UKUncut by Avril Kelly
UKUncut by Avril Kelly.

I didn’t manage to get along to that first demo due to my head being buried in the creation of my new book about fashion illustration and ethical fashion design, but I have been avidly following the progress of the cuts protests. And when I heard about the next major target for UK Uncut I was most excited: the Topshop flagship store in Oxford Circus. Regular readers of this blog will no doubt be able to guess that I am not exactly a big fan of Topshop – I know too many small designers who have been ripped off, they have an atrocious human rights record, and I find the association with Kate Moss frankly tedious. Suffice to say I won’t be covering any Topshop collections in Amelia’s Magazine in the near future.

UK uncut sinister pics
Photograph by Sinister Pictures.

Instead, I hope to be joining more protests. Why? Well, a while ago the papers exposed Sir Philip Green‘s cunning tax avoidance trick that enables him to siphon vast profits out of the country and safely into the hands of his Monaco dwelling wife. There was a surge of interest and then the news disappeared. But the cunning folks at UK Uncut have decided to resurrect the gripe. Why? For the simple reason that this country is in the grip of savage cuts to almost everything imaginable. And yet the very rich are able to take our money out of the country: it is the very reverse of the ethos behind the resurgence of local currencies triumphed by Transition Towns. If you use the Brixton Pound in Brixton it enables local money to stay in a local area, enriching the lives of everyone who partakes in the local economy. If you use your pounds in Topshop they leak straight out of the UK, benefiting none of us at all.

Pay your Taxes Ross McEwan
Illustration by Ross McEwan.

Why is it that the richer people get the more greedy they become? Surely once you’ve earnt your first billion there’s little reason to keep chasing more? But no, the super rich, chums of our millionaire Con-Dem cabinet (Philip Green has the audacity to advise on austerity measures) together avoid £25 billion in tax by removing it from the country. One argument says that if the UK was to make it less amenable for large businesses to run their services here they would simply take them elsewhere. I fail to see the logic in this: Philip Green runs a British company, Topshop. He isn’t about to pack up and ship it over to Dubai never to be seen again, is he?

topshop riot by kellie black
Topshop protest by Kellie Black.

So it was that on a cold Saturday morning I jumped out of bed and sped into the centre of town. I missed the first noisy influx into the store by a few minutes and the main entrance was already blocked by security. However, although I very rarely get sucked into Topshop these days, I know well that there are several entrances so I zipped straight in via the side door.

UK_UncutTopshop2_byAlisonDay
UK Uncut Topshop Protest by Alison Day.

Inside about thirty protestors were already staging a sit in, chanting as bemused shoppers gazed on, uncertain what to do. They were a mix bunch from different movements, including climate activists and peeved students. “Philip’s Green’s taxation could pay for our education” was but one of many clever chants I heard.

UKuncut Topshop-amelia gregory

Within moments I was hustled straight back out the main entrance due to my very large camera, but I just went right back around and came back in with my iphone camera instead. Eventually I heard these magical words over the tanoy system: There has been an incident: please exit the store immediately. And so it was that we were able to close down the main branch of Topshop for well over an hour on a busy Saturday in the run up to Christmas. The sour faces of thwarted shoppers peered down at us as the streets got busier, but most of them seemed fairly content to visit Urban Outfitters next door instead. A gaggle of protestors then spread up and down Oxford Street, shutting Dorothy Perkins and BHS (both also part of Philip Green’s Arcadia empire) and revisiting Vodafone. In fact, just the threat of our arrival was enough to close most stores before we even got to them.

UK Uncut sinister pictures
Outside BHS. Photograph by Sinister Pictures.

As I was twittering through the protest I received a reply from a small fashion brand that has a concession in Topshop – But what about the independent labels that are losing business? – she said. I do think that if you get into bed with a corporate brand you can expect to experience the pitfalls as well as the bonuses, but our quibbles are obviously not with the independent designers who stock Topshop (and at any rate in this case she definitely supported us) or the workers in the store, who may well have lost income if we had blocked the entrances more effectively and they had been told to go home.

Abi Daker - Topshop protest 2010
One Woman Topshop protest 2010 by Abigail Daker.

It is very hard to protest without some unwanted fallout, which is why I so love this inspiring one woman protest: whilst we were causing mayhem at Oxford Circus Bryony went along to her local Wandsworth Topshop equipped only with flyers and chocolate, and on the purchase of a Breton top politely explained that she would not be able to pay the VAT because she didn’t trust Philip Green to give it the HMRC. She handed out information to the other customers and chocolates to the confused employees as they tried to accommodate her request by calling head office. What a clever way to raise awareness in a totally calm and collected manner, but the real success has been in the telling of the story – which has been bouncing around on the #UKuncut hashtag, attracting glowing comments from others who may well be inspired to do the same.

UKuncut Topshop-amelia gregory outside

For naturally this story is far from over: the students are still revolting on the streets and UK Uncut have announced yet another day of action: this time I urge you to join them and protest against the greedy fat cat billionaires who are currently free to move the money we spend on their products out of this country and away from where it might be put to good use. On Saturday 18th December Topshop and Vodafone will be targeted in high streets across the UK. Find out all the details here.

Find out how fashion should be made and sold in my new book, Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, featuring the very best in ethical fashion design.

Categories ,#UKuncut, ,Abigail Daker, ,Alison Day, ,Arcadia, ,Avril Kelly, ,BHS, ,Billionaire, ,Brixton Pound, ,Con-Dem, ,Dorothy Perkins, ,hashtag, ,HMRC, ,Human Rights, ,Kate Moss, ,Kellie Black, ,My One Woman Topshop Protest, ,Oxford Circus, ,Ross Mcewan, ,Sir Philip Green, ,topshop, ,transition towns, ,twitter, ,UK Uncut, ,Urban Outfitters, ,Vodafone, ,Vodaphone

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sorapol presents IMMORTAL: a fashion film for the A/W 2013 ready-to-wear collection

Sorapol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals

Sorapol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals.

Extravagant Bangkok born fashion designer Sorapol Chawaphatnakul and his equally extravagant creative director – the irrepressible Daniel Lismore – have together created a fantastical short fashion film to accompany the inaugural Sorapol ready-to-wear collection. Take a peek below, and read on to find out more.

What was the inspiration behind the new collection?
This will be the first SORAPOL ready to wear collection. Each collection is usually inspired by one or two elements of history and culture merged together with aesthetics. The new collection is inspired by the common ground between mysticism, surrealism and the animal kingdom. The Fabrics used include, silks, wools and leathers, with much of the collection using natural fibres.

Sorapol Immortal by Leah Nelson

Sorapol Immortal by Leah Nelson.

Which materials feature most heavily in your creations?
Sorapol has worked with a number of extravagant fabrics, from silks to lavish prints, to produce a collection embodying decadence and Oriental contemporaries. Every season we use new materials and try to create new techniques in embroidery and knit. Sorapol like to experiment with new ideas born from couture skills. Our garments have been designed for the modern woman who appreciates timeless designs. The collection includes coats, tailored jackets and evening gowns.

Sorapol by Kimberly Elle#21

Sorapol by Kimberly Ellen Hall.

What was the idea behind the creation of the video?
The Immortal video was based on a tale from 1001 nights. There was once a king who discovered that his wife had been disloyal. He had her executed and then proceeded to marry every fair lady in his kingdom. He protected himself from the treachery of women by putting each wife to death the morning after their wedding. After his marriage to his 1001st wife had been consummated, they lay back on the royal bed. To pass the hours she began telling the king wondrous stories of love and destiny, cutting short each tale just before dawn so that the king would let her live another night to hear the end of the story. After their final night together she escapes with her new lover. The woman portrays our client, who is both strong in character & fearless in style. Sorapol designs are beautiful pieces of armour, fit for the trials and tribulations that life throws at us. A woman who wears Sorapol feels confident about herself in any situation. 

Sorapol By Briony Jose

Sorapol by Briony Jose.

How long did it take to make the video and what were the biggest challenges?
The biggest challenge in making this video was to make a high production film in a short amount of time and on a tight budget, with just one day of shooting which was done at Castle Gibbson in Dalston. It took a while to get the music and sound recordings right, requiring a day in a studio with four singers. The rest was easy. Stephen took two recordings which he sent to us. 

Soropol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals

Soropol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals.

Where are the words from?
The words were written by one of the best wordsmiths we know, Sigmund Oakeshott. We called him one night and asked him to write a piece of art for us. The next day we got it back and it was perfect.

Sorapol illustration by Mitika 28.1.14

Sorapol illustration by Mitika Chohan.

How did you get so many big names involved?
Aiden Shaw, our muse Wei Chiung Lin & BB Kaye are all great believers in making art, the progression of fashion and are all supporters of the brand. They loved the ideas that the head designer, Sorapol and myself as creative director, Daniel Lismore, put to them. Daniel sent the unfinished film to Stephen Fry to ask his opinion. He loved it and kindly agreed to do the narration.

Sorapol by Ste Johnson

Sorapol by Ste Johnson.

What do you hope for in the coming year?
This year we have had the choice of starting to create a ready to wear collection. Showing at The Serpentine Gallery will be the changing point for us as it will be our first show during the time period of London Fashion Week. We plan to launch an accessible diffusion line later on in the year for our large fan base.

Categories ,1001 Nights, ,Aiden Shaw, ,BB Kaye, ,Briony Jose, ,Castle Gibbson, ,dalston, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Film, ,IMMORTAL, ,Kimberly Ellen Hall, ,Leah Nelson, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mitika Chohan, ,Serpentine Gallery, ,Sigmund Oakeshott, ,Sorapol, ,Sorapol Chawaphatnakul, ,Ste Johnson, ,Stephen Fry, ,Wei Chiung Lin, ,xplusyequals

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Amelia’s Magazine | Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza

I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, search store and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, information pills and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, pill and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, dosage and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, viagra and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, mind and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
titleImages throughout courtesy of both Ester Kneen and James Gardiner, help with a special thanks to Sarah herself for her images

The launch of ‘Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza’ at Poke Design Studios last week was not your average Christmas shopping experience. For a limited period only (1st – 15th December) East London gem, The Biscuit Factory will host Sarah’s Supermarket with a difference.

dress

Sarah Bagner aka Supermarket Sarah “decided to leave the corporate world behind” and set up shop in her home just round the corner from Portabello Market. “I wanted to touch and feel the real world again, make things and really form relationships with people so started doing Portobello Market and assisting top stylists.”

_about

Selling vintage finds alongside pieces from some top new designers, Sarah’s supermarket is a great place for your Christmas shopping. Before the event I had been imagining a trolley dash for vintage bargains that would put Dale’s Supermarket Sweep to shame, instead it was a cool, fun, casual affair. Staff wore supermarket skirts made of plastic bags, designed by Joanna Strickland and neon price banners displayed well known supermarket slogans; “For those who have everything”, “while stocks last!” and of course, “SALE!”

Among the wealth of talented designers exhibiting are:
Victoria Grant
London based milliner with stockists such as Coco de Mer and Harrods.

Marie Molterer
London based print textiles designer.

Future Industries
Product designers reforming chipped milk cartons and plastic lids into new reusable objects.

Pheobe Eason
London based illustrator working in prop design, art direction, shop design, murals and textiles.

Work It! (Loren Platt, Sara El Dabi and Rory McCartney)
Underground club come sellers of classic 90s clothing and memorabilia.

Sasha Kipferling
German designer for Studioilse featured in Wallpaper*, Elle Decoration, Frame and Viewpoint.

Lynne Hatzius
Illustrator, collage artist and printmaker currently experimenting with paper engineering.
Shared her wall with…
Rina Donnersmarck
German illustrator, stage designer and costume maker.

peter1Peter Ibruegger
London based artist, creator of the Surrealist inspired ‘Moustache Mug’. Peter Ibrugger’s mugs were great. They’d make great presents for boyfriends, brothers and dads.

scottwall_finalScott Ramsay Kyle
Hand embroidery with “an obsessive hobbyist feel, with additional Luxe”. Scott Ramsay Kyle’s embroidery work was fabulous. The kind of thing that can really only be appreciated properly when you’re up close and personal with it. The intricate layering of silk threads and beads was beautiful.

mel2Mel Elliott
London based Artist / designer from South Yorkshire. Following her MA IN Communication Art and Design at the RCA she started up her ‘I Love Mel’ brand.

Melwall_final

Mel Elliott’s large scale illustration had added denim pockets holding felt tip pens to encourage visitors to get involved. Her playful products on sale include ‘Colour Me Good’ books inspired by celebrity and fashion magazines and celebrity paper dolls. Mel will also be selling at this months “All I want for Xmas” Fair at the Truman Brewery.

Each designer will be selling at the Supermarket until December 15th. I would thoroughly recommend a visit (appointment only 9.30am-6.30pm) but if you’re unable to make it you can shop online. (I’ve added a Lily Allen paper doll by Mel Elliott to my list to Santa!)

Categories ,Dale Winton, ,Ester Kneen, ,Future Industries, ,Joanna Strickland, ,Lynne Hatzius, ,Marie Molterer, ,Mel Elliott, ,Peter Ibruegger, ,Pheobe Eason, ,Poke Design Studios, ,Portabello Market, ,Rina Donnersmarck, ,Sasha Kipferling, ,Scott Ramsay Kyle, ,Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza, ,Supermarket Sweep, ,The Biscuit Factory, ,Truman Brewery, ,Victoria Grant, ,Work It!

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tata Naka: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Presentation Review

Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Laura Hickman
Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Laura Hickman.

My last write up for this season features the new collection from the ever wonderful twins behind Tata Naka. This season they eschewed the cool light of the Portico Rooms (no longer used for LFW presentations) to show in the newly created Studio space on the lower levels of Somerset House. Given that this is a dark venue it was a wise decision to shoot with plenty of flash against a simple black backdrop, the girls rearranged on blacked out props, sometimes with parts of their body obscured. Given the complicated set designs of the past few seasons this was probably a relief to put together.

Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory.

This season the girls delved into a wealth of inspiration left behind by Sergei Diaghilev and his iconic Ballet Russes. The bold constructivist shapes that characterised his graphic costumes and set designs were made for these girls to expand on in their inimitable style. The collection was shown in staggered stages so that Tata Naka could shoot their look book, so I only had time to view one part. By a stroke of luck it may well have been my favourite, with geometric designs and lettering placed in great swipes of glorious colour across cream and black grounds on simple calf length strapless flapper dresses, a sleeveless playsuit and a twosie lounge suit with hexagon embellishments. For summer a simple 80s style tank swimsuit looked perfect worn with slicked back hair and heels.

Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Daisy Steele
Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Daisy Steele.

Other parts of the collection (which you can view here) featured dotty net dresses encrusted with giant appliqué stars, jigsaw panels in sugary pastels, and pop art style placement prints on strapless prom dresses. After a mild diversion into new territory last season this felt like Tata Naka returning to their rightful groove: every outfit a beautiful (wearable) piece of art in its own right.

Categories ,Ballet Russes, ,Book Review, ,Daisy Steele, ,Laura Hickman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Presentation, ,S/S 2014, ,Sergei Diaghilev, ,Somerset House, ,Studio, ,Tata Naka

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Amelia’s Magazine | The Amazon: Can Fashion Save the Rainforest? A talk with Bia Saldanha


Illustration by Charlotte Hoyle

“We are consumers, capsule addicted. We need to ask ourselves – this t-shirt, this where did it come from? A devastated place with devastated people?” – Bia Saldanha, health 28 July 2011??

Through Bia’s hesitant English – impressively peppered with the vocabulary of her respective fields – there was a message, a mantra, that seemed to resonate from her core with every sentence she spoke. The message? That as people, as a united force of humanity, we must end the selfishness, stop the excuses and start acting on the fact that our Earth cannot bear the brunt of our reckless lifestyle choices much longer. ??I was sitting at the far back of the still, woody space of The Hub, King’s Cross, looking on at Bia, eco journalist Lucy Siegle and novelist Ed Siegle’s discussion unraveling.

If there’s one thing I learnt on that warm Thursday evening, it’s that when a lady like Bia Saldanha gives out such a message from across the room, you sit up straight, strain your ears and listen. Living in the heart of the Amazon rainforest for 20 years definitely grants you a credible opinion on our Earth’s complex ecosystem and how it can be saved. And it only takes a minute or two of hearing Bia speak on the subject to get a sense of just how special she really is. A Brazilian woman who’s dedicated her years to both supporting the indigenous rubber farmers of Amazonia and aiding the battle against deforestation, Bia traded in a life running a stylish clothing boutique in Rio de Janeiro to live in the rainforest with her family and help the Seringueiros (the native rubber tappers) overcome their defeat by mainstream industrial production.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

But why should we care? Why should we listen? We all know of the damage upon the rainforest through mass deforestation and, for example, that Brazil lost nearly 150,000 square kilometers of forest—an area larger than Greece – between 2000 and 2006 alone. But the basis of why we should think again before discarding these past few lines as just another statistic lies in the words of Lucy Siegle; that we are in “the last chance saloon” when it comes to saving the rainforest. And, to further quote the fabulous Bia,

“You can’t imagine how strong, powerful and important the rainforest is if you haven’t been there”.


Illustration by Claire Kearns

With a background in the fashion industry, Bia began her pioneering work after a trip into the Amazon to search for new materials for her clothing line. She described how she found the indigenous rubber tappers storing their goods in traditional waterproof sacks. She then relayed her excitement of noticing how the sack material looked remarkably like leather when it was, in fact, cotton canvas covered in the extracted rubber from the trees. Bia took the idea for wild rubber “leather” handbags and had hundreds made, all of which completely sold out in the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Brazil. And so her crusade against the mass producers began. ?

The Amazon is, in fact, the only place in the world where rubber trees grow in the wild. When ecological and fair-trade brand Veja began their essential collaboration with Bia in 2007, they were already buying wild rubber from the rubber tappers. Veja are a French brand known for their ultra-cool sneakers and luxe accessories, whose products are sourced and produced solely in Brazil. They now work with Bia and use her independent, direct means of extracting wild rubber to produce their bags and footwear.

VEJA – CAOUTCHOUC SAUVAGE D’AMAZONIE from Veja on Vimeo.

In what can only be seen as a triumph in the fight for sustainable fashion, Bia Saldanha has also worked with Hermès, using her ‘vegan leather’ made of wild rubber to collaborate on an accessories collection for the luxury French fashion house.

Despite the dedication and ground-breaking work that’s been recognized the world over, however, Bia hasn’t received the support she justly deserves. In the discussion, she spelt out the level of sheer power and influence that Brazil’s central bank has over what is and isn’t permitted to function in the country. After struggling against many financial disagreements, Bia even faced being shut down completely, despite the continuous funding to unsustainable companies and projects, including the vast amount of cattle ranches that make up 60-70% of deforestation in the Amazon today.?

“I’ve now devoted 16 years to this,” said Bia. “It’s more than a business; it’s a cult.”


Illustration by Charlotte Hoyle

It’s not that she aims to trade with the giant companies, however. “There’s not enough wild rubber to supply the big companies. We don’t want to trade with anyone in particular but we do want to ask those companies, where does your rubber come from? These companies are just looking for marketing, they don’t care.”

Ed Siegle, author of new book Invisibles which is partially set in Brazil, contributed stating “With a lot of these issues, we’re all aware of them but we don’t do anything about it.” Lucy intervened – “That’s because we don’t know what the options are.”

To me, Lucy Siegle made an invaluable contribution to the event. She spoke of writing her latest book ‘To Die For” (Harper Collins; 2010) which she described as “engaging with the producer’s story”, and how she felt about the “contrast between her and the mainstream industry”, recounting fashion as a “vacuum that we know nothing about”. “We are now so distant from the producer,” she said “that the degradation of the consumer, the producer and the place is now inevitable.”


Photographs courtesy of Veja

She went onto ask the frustrating question, something I’d never put my mind to, of “Who are these people telling us what to wear? Telling us to buy this fast, discount fashion?” She feels that we are “told to shop for the economy”. Her answer to this has been to find a few brands that she can “rely on”.

The discussion moved on to the debate of ‘design and production – which should come first?’. Lucy Siegle, naturally, spoke in favour of production, upholding it as the healthier method in place of paper designs being sent across the world for the fastest and cheapest production possible. She believes instead that we need to be taking inspiration from the methods of Bia, who at the outset went into the forest – to the source – in search of materials, from which she then created her designs. This, she says, is a solution.


Photographs courtesy of Veja

Bia declares that her long-standing mission is to “protect the rainforest through economic alternatives”. And I say we need more ground-breaking fashion entrepreneurs like her. In the constant clash between nature and human demands, the more Bias we have in the world today, the brighter our future will be.

And with this mantra that seemed to beam from Bia’s every sentence; she most certainly wasn’t aiming it at the big logger companies or sweat shops or factories, definitely not. It’s US she meant. All of us. It’s you who sits right there wearing clothes that you really know nothing about. Someone’s hands, somewhere in the world, grew that cotton and dyed that fabric and stitched that pocket and, thus far, to you in your life it has made no difference. We’re all perpetrators and I’m most certainly one too. But after last Thursday, I’ll definitely be doing two things – reading Lucy Siegle’s book “To Die For” and taking a long, hard look at me and my wardrobe. And may I suggest you do the same.

Categories ,Amazon, ,Amazonia, ,Bia Saldanha, ,brazil, ,Ed Siegle, ,environment, ,ethical, ,fashion, ,Invisibles, ,Lucy Siegle, ,rainforest, ,review, ,Sustainable Fashion, ,Talk, ,The Hub, ,To Die For, ,Veja

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Amelia’s Magazine | The H&M Garden Collection

Hello mother nature, visit web H&M calling…. 

Answering to the needs of so many already environmentally conscious shoppers, and those of mother nature, H&M are making their attempt to join the eco-friendly race and making sure we all know about it. A multitude of high street brands have approached the environmentally-friendly route but some with little success. What the average High Street consumer normally gets are increased prices, due to the new fabrics the brand has to source, and the design lacking in quality and variety compared with it’s non eco-friendly competitors. Sometimes the obstacle of incorporating unharmful dyeing techniques isn’t always cost effective enough.  

Luckily none of this is evident in H&M’s new The Garden Collection available from the 25th March 2010. Exhilarating Summer brights boost the collection with everything you could want from a high street Spring/Summer collection. This is an exciting step for one of the most predominate and successful brands on our High Streets, and those around the world. For H&M the beginning of eco-friendly clothing didn’t start here – they’ve been using organic cotton in some of their clothing since 2004 and have invested much time and money into finding and developing fabrics which are sustainable. It’s only now that they’re shouting about it, and for good reason.

The amount of attention inputted in style, texture and colour seems to be delicately balanced between every piece in the collection. There’s also a good varied range of clothing styles, making it accessible to a variety of ages and body shapes. It’s safe to say the collection has a very floral, feminine theme, running from bright and extravagant, to subtle and elegant; draping, flowing and layering create a variety of textures and shapes on the body, complimenting the female form. Best of all – the price points for this collection are no different to those of the rest of H&M – cost effective and guilt free, exactly how fashion should be!

One of the most noticeable pieces in the collection has to be a red strapless dress, sold out in most stores already, beautifully adorned with recycled polyester chiffon roses, with a fitted elegant bodice, romantic and playful in design. 

Excitingly to see is the use of the new fabric Tencel, hyped up by the press to be the next best thing in the development of mother nature friendly fabrics. It is beautiful to the touch and I predict it will be a favourite addition to many wardrobes from now on; it blends the gaps nicely between the recycled polyester, organic cotton, and linen in the collection. 

It’s always great to hear of a brand continuing to mould themselves into the eco-friendly world of fashion, and hopefully this is the start of something continuous and an idea which will be planted in the minds of the suits of the fashion world. So lets start showing these brands that what we want is fashion with a conscience, all of the time, and that if they want our hard-earned pennies then they need to earn them by working hard to make our home a better place to live.

Categories ,eco, ,H&M, ,High Street, ,Recycled Fabrics, ,The Garden Collection

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Amelia’s Magazine | The Stellar Boutique

At Amelia, order we thought you should know about these before you go out and brave the cold for that all important shopping trip! From limited edition prints to games and furniture, symptoms there is something here for all pockets deep to not so deep. But always for the art connoisseur that you are.

The-Weather-Outside

Jess Smart Smiley – The Weather Outside Is Frightful

The Weather Outside Is Frightful is a 2×3 foot winter-themed “look-and-find coloring poster”. Find the evil Ice Wizard and his mischievous bat brigade before they destroy winter cheer! The poster comes with a pack of crayons and a list of items to find and color. Get your own for just $12 + shipping by sending your address and dollars via PayPal to jess.smiley@gmail.com. Orders of 2 or more posters get a free original drawing of a snow creature. Check the Iphone Wallpaper too!

Book

Jean-Claude Mattrat – Le Reste Offense
2008, thumb
limited edition of 25 copies at £95

Jean-Claude Mattrat’s self-published book is full of beutiful original screenprints all nicely clothbound in slipcase. Rocket Gallery offers this and other interesting prints, books and objects from an affordable £50 to £650. Martin Parr’ s enamel tray or Tomoko Azumi ‘s Hexad [stacking table] can be viewed at the gallery or shipped in time for Christmas. Don’t wait!

WWP

WWP – Originals by Artists

From £100

This new series of originals by leading artists is the perfect last minute Christmas gift. These are ‘one-off’ items and exclusively available through the WIWP site. They will be sold on a first come, first served basis, so be quick if you are genuinely interested in purchasing one. Series One Includes Seb Lester, Dan Baldwin, Wilfrid Wood, David Bray, Kristian Hammerstad, Hellovon, Mr Bingo and Pomme Chan. The selection of Sculptures, Drawings, Sketches and Ceramics are with prices starting as low as £100+PP

Rob Ryan

Rob Ryan – You Can Still do a lot with a Small Brain

Published by Yorkshire Sculpture Park £24.99

Rob Ryan is a renowned artist of many achievements. He is a magician at paper cutting and his intricate screen prints are unmistakably romantic and always appealing. The likes of Elle and Vogue magazines, Liberty’s of London, Fortnum and Mason and our favorite designer here at Amelia, Sir Paul Smith, have all been seduced by his wonderfully detailed and delicate work. This hardback is a glossy and classy affair in which trees stand taller than buildings, leaves have faces and birds speak with more wisdom than humans. Published to accompany the exhibition of the same title, Ryan’s first at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, You Can Still do a lot with a Small Brain includes an interview with the artist and stunning photographs of Ryan’s work.

Anthology

Amelia’s House – Amelia ‘s Anthology of Illustration

Published by Amelia’s House £25

Talking of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, they stock our homegrown Anthology of Illustration. This 265-page long colourful and exquisitely designed page-turner has garnered rave reviews from the Guardian, Creative Review and many others. It is also available to order from Concrete Hermit over the Christmas vacation while Amelia is away helping to make this world a better place!

Eco-houses

Etsy – Monaw

From $11.50 USD

Handmade with love and care, Monaw‘s handbags and other items such as pouches and accessoires are decorated with lovely designs. What’s more, they have a lovely eco theme to them, with the organic handpicked lavender filled houses or the cute zippeed pouches made of cotton fabrics. Etsy is a brilliant shop for one of a kind art gifts and many are also ecologically sound- as you know, we care about that at Amelia! Elsewhere on Etsy, the Sparrow Coffee Cozy is a treat, Slidesideways’ Screenprinted poster are environmentally friendly and woolandwater‘s doll sets are just show stopping!

Paul-Davis

The Planets of Unfailure – Paul Davis

A2 (420 x 594mm), digital print on archive paper with archive inks, edition of 50, £300.00 UK, £320.00 overseas, p+p inclusive

The Drawbridge – One Year Subscription

4 issues for £12.00

Paul Davis‘s fantastic satirical drawing “The planets of un-failure” (first published in The Drawbridge issue 4, 2007) is now available as a limited edition print signed and numbered by the artist. The Drawbridge is a quirky and innovative independent quarterly delivering thought, wit and reflection through words, photography and drawing. It is in turn critically nonsensical and radically serious. With each issue, authors and artists cast an unflinching look at a selected theme. Why not offer a gift subscription of one year and 4 issues? Passionately written, elegantly designed and intelligently illuminated, full-colour newspaper is the perfect gift for the the progressive reader in search of  surprising combinations of views, insights and visual wit!

Articulado---Sanserif-Creat

Articulado’s Book – Sanserif

At first sight, this book looks like one of a kind and it is undeniably so;  this limited edition portable book-product is more sculpture for your mantelpiece than mere reading material .A not-for-profit publication featuring opinions and reflections from leading names in international design —Erwan Bouroullec, Ana Yago, Karim Rashid, Milton Glaser…— and other experts —Alice Rawsthorn, Covadonga Pendones…— on the relationship between design, the environment and the economy. Conceived to transmit values like sustainable growth, recycling, low impact production processes… printed in one colour on ecological paper without varnishes or special treatments.  Coordinated by José Antonio Giménez & Designed by Ana Yago (Sanserif Creatius), with the support of ADCV and Impiva. More info at prensa@sanserif.es. The book is available to buy online or at prensa@adcv.com.

SonnyMe

Sonny McCartney – T-Shirts

From £20

SonnyMe is a very talented photographer and designer. His T-shirts are sticking black and white designs that reflect his off-beat sense of humor. Buy this T-shirt on his website.


Cotton monster

Jennifer Strunge – Cotton Monsters

From $35.00 USD

Maryland Institute College of Art graduate Jennifer Strunge makes fantastic creatures out of recycled fabrics that she culls from old garments and linens. The one she has for sale via her website have pockets in their mouths, making them comforting hand-warmers.

Haunch

Haunch of Venison – Limited Edition Prints

Books from £12 and prints from £100

Haunch of Venison has published a number of new books and editions over the past year and their series of prints are particularly noteworthy! Polly Morgan’s etching ‘Blackbird with Maggots‘, produced for ‘Mythologies’, depicts a rotten blackbird that has become a nesting site for flies. Morgan, an artist who incorporates highly skilled taxidermy in her work, has talked of a ‘desire to celebrate the corpse as a thing of beauty and significance’. Published to accompany ‘Mythologies’, Haunch of Venison London, 12 March – 25 April 2009, this etching on Somerset textured paper is an edition of 100 priced at £100.00. Or what about Mark Alexander’s ‘Via Negativa or Hew Locke’s striking ‘Chariots of the Gods‘. Have a look at the Haunch of Venison website; it is a treasure trove of gorgeous books and editions.

Paper-circus

V&A – Press-Out and Stand-Up Paper Circus

Price £5.00

Created exclusively for the V&A, this delightful press-out and stand-up circus is adapted from an early twentieth century paper circus in the museum’s collection. Each pack includes 2 sheets with a press out, slot together and stand up circus tent and crowd; now all you have to do is press out, fold and stand circus performers and animals! Great price for even greater fun and playful idea!

PhotoPYMCA – Richard Braine and Sky Sheldon

From £30.00

This limited edition from the PYMCA archive is the perfect last-minute Christmas gift.The archive contains over 80,000 classic and contemporary images from Mods, Two-Tone, Madchester, Acid House, Swinging London, Punks, Skins…and every subculture and youth movement in-between. The archive also features famous faces from the music world such as The Clash, The Stone Roses, Madness, The Beat, Faithless and many more. Featuring the work of such fantastic photographers as Richard Braine, Ted Polhemus, Paul Hartnett, Toni Tye, Janette Beckman, Syd Shelton, Dean Chalkley, David Swindells, Normski, Eddie Otchere, to name but a few, a PYMCA Limited Edition Print would make a stunning addition to every living room wall. Each print is strictly limited edition, coming with a certificate of authenticity and can be framed or unframed in many sizes up to 50 x 70cm. Prices range from £35 for a small print up to £150 for a signed, 50 x 70cm.

Chris-Martin

Chris Martin – T-shirt Designs

Chris Martin is one busy illustrator as his blog will demonstrate. At Amelia, we like original illustrators and Matin’s work is quirky, colorful and wonderfully detailed! This design and many more are available to buy. Contact the artist to find out more: Chris@mrchrismartin.co.uk

Calendar

Jan von Holleben – Journey to Everywhere Calendar

Large 2010 Wall Calendar, 47×45cm, 13 Pages, Published by Chrismon Edition 2009, Price: £15.00

‘Its great to come back to a place and continue where things were left in the past’. It’s seven years ago since Jan von Holleben started to put his kids and childhood dreams into photographs. Since then trees have grown and new houses have been built in the little village in Sasbach at the Kaiserstuhl, in the South West of Germany. The kids he works with have grown too, but are still keen on playing along with him. ‘It’s just that demands from the kids are much higher now and that I can confront them with more complex ideas than in the past. We still meet in front of my mother’s house, discuss the photographic ideas and collect the props we need for the images”. Perspectives are closely defined for everything needs to be perfect for an illusion that needs no digital postproduction. See for yourself and buy here!
home pageAll imagery throughout courtesy of The Stellar Boutique

Stella McCartney and Kate Moss know a thing or two about good style. Both are fans of Stella McClure, prescription owner of newly opened internet shop, view The Stellar Boutique. Previously running a vintage-customised stall at Portobello Market, McClure packed up shop in 2004 to travel the world in a campervan. Now settled in the Spanish countryside, she has decided to give it another go. This time though from the comfort of her own home via the power of the internet.

80s vintage tiger topThe Stellar Boutique is a great concept. McClure travels the hippy-luxe trail across Europe to Marrakech in order to bring you vintage treasures. Everybody loves a one-off, and that is certainly what The Stellar Boutique provides. Featuring vintage bags, designer garments, customised pieces and exquisitely exotic homeware, there’s something for everyone.

squareingtrq231Unlike many other fashion businesses at the moment, McClure is keen to promote new designers and ethnic artisans. (Instead of ‘Marc Jacobs’ think ‘Marc who?’) McClure insists that real style is best grown from within, instead of stealing magazine looks or following trend advice. The Stellar Boutique offers the freedom to do this.

NWfeathfrBut does it deliver? Standout pieces are endless. Let’s start with the accessories. There are the Moroccan style leather handbags.Then there are the mountains of unique jewellery to choose from. Pieces by Bora Bora, Lei Rose and Norwegian Wood are to die for. I love the porcelain tea-cup necklace and the silver postcard trinket by Lei Rose, as well as the feathered and fringed pieces by Norwegian Wood, and wow, have you seen the skull charm bracelet by Bora Bora? Even more for the Christmas list!

vintage shoes goldnsilverNext up, vintage. There’s second-hand, slightly grubby, vintage fashion, and then there’s nice ‘I’m so glad only I have this’ vintage fashion. The Stellar Boutique falls into the latter category. The vintage section of the site is easily the big winner. With clothing separated into 60s, 70s, 80s, handbags, scarves, boots and boho, it couldn’t be easier to navigate towards your era or item of choice.

v125Boho features peasant tops and kaftans Sienna would covet. The 70s section showcases (unusually beautiful) standout dresses at massively cut-down prices, and 80s can tailor to all your glam rock needs. There are sparkly 80s style heels and some killer red leather stilettos in the shoe department, as well as the standard biker or cowgirl boot. With menswear and more accessories coming soon, you’ve got to keep checking back for more goodies!

boomboxAs if it needed to be said; everything is quality assured, hand-picked and highly loved. Check out the site to update your wardrobe for 2010 with fresh, exotic pieces your friends can drool over. For Christmas, they are spreading the holiday joy with a 20% off discount sale on all vintage and womenswear, as well as homeware! So why not pick up something for your Christmas shindigs or New Year’s bashes now instead of waiting for the mania of the January sales?!

Categories ,Becky Cope, ,Bora Bora, ,Kate Moss, ,Lei Rose, ,Marc Jacobs, ,Norwegian Wood, ,Portobello Market, ,Stella McCartney, ,Stella McClure, ,The Stellar Boutique

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Amelia’s Magazine | Treasure: London Jewellery Week 2012 Show Review

Grace Hamilton at Treasure by Claire Kearns

Grace Hamilton at Treasure by Claire Kearns

Being a jewellery designer myself I was thrilled to have an invitation to the press view of Treasure at Somerset House during London Jewellery Week, which took place from the 11th to the 17th of June. I particularly enjoy Treasure, as opposed to The Jewellery Show for instance, as it showcases a wider variety of styles and more contemporary cutting edge jewellery. I really enjoyed going around the show talking to designers – all of whom somehow managed to look like models – and here is a selection of my favorite encounters of the night…

Treasure-show-Pip-Jolley-photo-by-Maria-Papadimitriou

Exciting jewellery was on show immediately upon entering. Pip Jolley was not one of the exhibitors, but a jewellery designer working at the welcoming desk and I loved her roller necklace – her own design.

Tatty Devine at Treasure by Naomi Wilkinson

Tatty Devine at Treasure by Naomi Wilkinson

Treasure show Flavie Michou photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In the Fashion Gallery the first thing that caught my eye were these Lady Skull Rings by Flavie Michou. Some of them have movable jaws!

Treasure show Jessica de Lotz photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Then it was Jessica De Lotz, whose work I knew of and admired. Jessica makes narrative based collections and works with vintage pieces. This fabulous ring called ‘Edith’s cheeky winking eye ring’ is from her ‘Edith Mary Baldwin Collection’ inspired by a framed baptismal certificate, dated 1909, found by Jessica at Portobello Market.

Rachel Galley at Treasure by Sally Cotterill

Rachel Galley at Treasure by Sally Cotterill

Treasure show Daniel Claudio Ramos Y Munoz photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Daniel Claudio Ramos Y Muñoz was showing these bangles in beautiful colours. Two of them can be worn together as they fit into each other and the clever bit is that they can serve as a carrier bag support in your hands when you do your shopping!

Treasure Treasure show Lehmann & Schmedding Marilyn Brooch photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In the Design Gallery I saw Lehmann & Schmedding’s ‘Marilyn Brooch’. Aramith spheres with little magnets in them energise each other and hold onto cloth.

Treasure show Yoko Izawa photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Yoko Izawa’s stand had these fabric covered flakes, which did not look like jewellery at first sight, but when she put them on, they became super cool rings. I also quite like that her jewellery has some philosophical meaning for her behind it: ‘Veiled jewellery reflects my assumption that although certainty is often required in modern society, ambiguous expression has been the most distinctive characteristic found in Japanese values and religious beliefs‘.

Jessica De Lotz at Treasure by EdieOP

Jessica De Lotz at Treasure by EdieOP

Treasure show Christiane Wichert 1 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Treasure show Christiane Wichert 2 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

I loved Christiane Wichert’s bold, sticky jewellery. The green brooch stuck on her skin like a suction cup and some of her other pieces also stuck on clothes.

Treasure show Jenny Llewellyn 2 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

This necklace is from Jenny Llewellyn’s ‘Plume’ collection of hollow silicone cups that glow in the dark. I liked not only its bold colour and shape, but also that the cups looked like they were made from a hard material but when I touched them they felt so soft I did not want to stop squeezing them.

Imogen Belfield at Treasure by Lucy Robertson

Imogen Belfield at Treasure by Lucy Robertson

Treasure show Rachel Galley Jewellery photo by Maria Papadimitriou

I was happy to see some larger body jewellery at Rachel Galley’s stand. This is a larger piece from her ‘Enkai Sun Collection’ inspired by Rachel’s travels in Tanzania.

Treasure show Tatty Devine photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Of course Tatty Devine are always a favorite! I love seeing their larger, more couture pieces. Coincidentally, I saw a lovely photo recently of Kate Nash wearing this necklace.

Treasure show Grace Hamilton photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The Emerge Gallery had tons of talent on display. Grace Hamilton’s beautiful statement accessories are handcrafted using traditional crochet and knotting techniques.

Treasure show Imogen Belfield photo by Maria Papadimitriou

It was great to at last meet the young, talented designer that is Imogen Belfield and her sales manager Emma Crosby, both good friends of Amelia’s Magazine. Imogen makes gorgeous textured jewellery influenced by nature, architecture and in some cases, as she told me, by shapes in packaging. Matt Bramford did a lovely interview with Imogen Belfield a little while ago in Amelia’s Magazine.

Treasure show Claire English photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Claire English was another designer drawing inspiration from everyday objects, such as matchsticks, and I loved her display which included corks!

Treasure show Gina Melosi photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Gina Melosi’s ‘Broken Promises’ collection featured pieces moulded from broken glass This necklace is moulded from a broken gin bottle.

Flavie Michou at Treasure by Polly Stopforth

Flavie Michou at Treasure by Polly Stopforth

Treasure show Jessica Flinn photo by Maria Papadimitriou

I liked Jessica Flinn’s hand printed and gold plated Floral Lace Collar Necklace and Rose Lace Curved Cuff.

Treasure show Diane Turner Jewellery photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Finally in the Emerge Gallery Diane Turner showed pieces created by growing metal on natural fissures in the wood.

Treasure show Emma Ware photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In the Essence Gallery, Treasure’s ethical jewellery gallery, I found Emma Ware, another Amelia’s Magazine favorite. Emma makes beautiful one off pieces by juxtaposing malleable dark rubber with polished metal and look at her refreshing display using plant pots!

Treasure show Linnie Mclarty photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Linnie Mclarty won me over again with her swirly, recycled silver rings.

Treasure show Renush photo by Maria Papadimitriou

One of the best pieces from Renush was this necklace made from assembled leather left overs.

Treasure show Mel White Jewellery photo by Maria Papadimitriou

And my last pick from the Essence Gallery was this pair of elegant cufflinks by Mel White Jewellery made with recycled silver and limited edition reclaimed British wood off-cuts.

Treasure show Sarah Elizabeth Jones photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Finally, in the Design Space room I was impressed by Sarah Elizabrth Jones’ collection which explores her experimentation with the material wood veneer, to create fascinating pieces of body adornment, such as this brooch.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.

Categories ,Christiane Wichert, ,Claire English, ,Claire Kearns, ,Daniel Claudio Ramos Y Munoz, ,Design Space, ,Diane Turner Jewellery, ,Edie OP, ,Emma Crosby, ,Emma J Crosby, ,Emma Ware, ,Essence gallery, ,Flavie Michou, ,Gina Melosi, ,Grace Hamilton, ,Imogen Belfield, ,Jenny Llewellyn, ,Jessica De Lotz, ,Jessica Flinn, ,jewellery, ,Kate Nash, ,Lehmann & Schmedding, ,Linnie McLarty, ,London Jewellery Week, ,Lucie Robertson, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Matt Bramford, ,Mel White Jewellery, ,Naomi Wilkinson, ,Pip Jolley, ,Polly Stopforth, ,Rachel Galley, ,Renush, ,Sally Cotterill, ,Sarah Elizabeth Jones, ,Somerset House, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Jewellery Show, ,Treasure, ,Ware, ,Yoko Izawa

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentino: Master of Couture at Somerset House


Valentino A/W 2005 by Krister Selin

A recent viewing of the documentary Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has To Travel, a film dedicated to the infamous fashion editor’s pioneering feats, highlighted that going to a gallery to view exhibitions of living fashion designers is a relatively new concept. When Vreeland launched an Yves Saint Laurent retrospective in 1983 at the Costume Institute, she set a precedent for a legion of future fashion fairs.

In the modern era, fashion fans have no qualms about trading their hard-earned cash to gaze at frocks on mannequins and fashion retrospectives have dominated galleries with record-breaking visitor numbers. Presenting these exhibitions comes as a challenge to curators: no longer is it a case of whacking a few frocks on mannequins like you’re assembling a high street window display. A quick look at Viktor & Rolf at the Barbican, McQueen at the Met or Louis Vuitton/Marc Jacobs at Les Arts Decoratifs shows the dedication and commitment necessary to present fashion as art.


Valentino A/W 2002 and Natalia Vodianova by Cathleen Naundorf

What better way, then, to present Emperor of Couture Valentino Garavani‘s illustrious history than on one long catwalk? Avoid temptation to sashay past the tableaux as mannequins appear amongst elegant white chairs on either side of a runway, on which you’re the model. The Embankment Galleries at Somerset House have been transformed; no longer tiny catacombs, but brought together for dramatic effect.


Valentino A/W 2002 by Maya Beus

The lower floor showcases a number artefacts appearing in glass cabinets at the start of the exhibition. Letters from prominent designers and magazine editors celebrate Valentino‘s last milestone, his 45th anniversary as King of Couture, showering the Italian with praise for his record-breaking anniversary couture show at the Santo Spirito in Sassia in Rome. Glorious fashion sketches line other cabinets, but as was with Margiela and other exhibitions here, I found myself skimming past these in order to get to the main event upstairs.


Photographs courtesy of Somerset House/Peter MacDiarmid

And so the catwalk comes alive on the upper level, with a breathtaking 130 haute couture creations on models appearing as guests. They are arranged pretty haphazardly amongst the aforementioned white chairs, almost with abandon, without any rigid chronological order. Empty seats bear the names of the great and the good that have worn Valentino and attended countless shows: Princess Margaret, Elizabeth Taylor, Carla Bruni, Diane Kruger, Iman; Diana Vreeland herself.


Valentino S/S 1998 by Annie Rickard Straus


Valentino A/W 1992 by Sandra Contreras

La dolce vita comes alive as you make your way along the displays, featuring floor-sweeping gowns, kaftans, trouser suits and capes. I particularly enjoyed the 1990s section – creations designed with the decadent abandon of an era when the supermodel ruled fashion and Valentino, Gianni Versace and pals were bending over backwards knee-deep in gold chains to appease them. These pieces were without doubt the height of fashion, but have dated the most. Compare these to some numbers from the 1960s: they’re indistinguishable from the output of Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccoli, heading Valentino, over recent seasons.


Valentino S/S 2005 by Jamie Wignall


Valentino S/S 1969 by Maya Beus

The show’s dramatic finale sees Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece‘s wedding dress come to life on a dramatic platform. This pearl-encrusted ivory silk gown features a 4.5m train and 12 kinds of lace. Sure.


Princess Marie-Chantal’s wedding dress

While I wouldn’t wear it, it’s one of the greatest examples of dressmaking in history and this presentation allows you to see the astonishing detail in the flesh.


Valentino S/S 2004 by Krister Selin

I particularly enjoyed a personal tribute to le regazze – the girls – the loyal atelier that have produced innumerable tulles, mock-ups and eventual red-carpet-ready frocks for the Grand Master’s enormous following. They’re the stars of groundbreaking documentary film Valentino: The Last Emperor, bickering as they lovingly stitch the last couture collection by the man himself. In the exhibition we’re spoiled with an education of Italian atelier terms – such beauties as ‘Incrostazioni‘ ‘Drappeggio‘ and ‘Budellini‘, a couture technique specific to Valentino where double charmeuse silk is rolled and sewn around a looped length of wool. Each term has a visual representation, occupying a glass box and highlighting the important role that these individual processes have played in Valentino‘s roaring success.


Valentino A/W 2002 by Jamie Wignall


Valentino S/S 1998 by Sandra Contreras

Unmissable. Go.

Categories ,Annie Rickard Straus, ,Budellini, ,catwalk, ,couture, ,Drappeggio, ,Embankment Galleries, ,emperor, ,exhibition, ,fashion, ,Grand Master, ,Incrostazioni, ,Italy, ,Jamie Wignall, ,Krister Selin, ,le regazze, ,london, ,Marie-Chantal, ,Matt Bramford, ,Maya Beus, ,Natalia Vodianova, ,Peter MacDiarmid, ,Rome, ,runway, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Somerset House, ,The Last Emperor, ,Valentino Garavani

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Amelia’s Magazine | Vita Gottlieb: London Fashion Week S/S 2015 Catwalk Review

vita gottlieb - llfw - ss15 - jenny robins
Vita Gottlieb by Jenny Robins.

She may only have been creating collections for a few seasons, but Vita Gottlieb has already honed her look to great effect. For her S/S 2015 collection Microworld Vita found inspiration at the bottom of the sea; in the peachy hues of coral reefs and the creature filled waters of the far deep. A sensation of floating was achieved by the use of gossamer light asymmetric panels of georgette, juxtaposed against graphical black blocks on slouchy tees and swing skirts. Signature prints were created from the swirling botanical illustrations of Ernst Haeckel and worked well with stripes of contrast bias binding and delicate layered waist ties. Lacey laser cut gloves, smokey eyes, high hair and spike heeled metallic sandals gave a glamorous edge to everyday pieces, as Vita Gottlieb once more successfully married the avante grade with the wearable.

Scroll to the bottom to watch the video of the show.

Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon
Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern
Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern.

Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 show video from Vita Gottlieb on Vimeo.

Categories ,Catwalk review, ,Ernst Haeckel, ,Fashion Scout, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Jenny Robins, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Microworld, ,S/S 2015, ,SS15, ,Vita Gottlieb

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