Amelia’s Magazine | Vita Gottlieb: London Fashion Week S/S 2015 Catwalk Review

vita gottlieb - llfw - ss15 - jenny robins
Vita Gottlieb by Jenny Robins.

She may only have been creating collections for a few seasons, but Vita Gottlieb has already honed her look to great effect. For her S/S 2015 collection Microworld Vita found inspiration at the bottom of the sea; in the peachy hues of coral reefs and the creature filled waters of the far deep. A sensation of floating was achieved by the use of gossamer light asymmetric panels of georgette, juxtaposed against graphical black blocks on slouchy tees and swing skirts. Signature prints were created from the swirling botanical illustrations of Ernst Haeckel and worked well with stripes of contrast bias binding and delicate layered waist ties. Lacey laser cut gloves, smokey eyes, high hair and spike heeled metallic sandals gave a glamorous edge to everyday pieces, as Vita Gottlieb once more successfully married the avante grade with the wearable.

Scroll to the bottom to watch the video of the show.

Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon
Vita Gottlieb by Karolina Burdon.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern
Vita Gottlieb SS15 by Isabelle Mattern.

Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
Vita Gottlieb SS 2015 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Vita Gottlieb SS15 show video from Vita Gottlieb on Vimeo.

Categories ,Catwalk review, ,Ernst Haeckel, ,Fashion Scout, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Jenny Robins, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Microworld, ,S/S 2015, ,SS15, ,Vita Gottlieb

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Amelia’s Magazine | Royal College of Art: Fashion Design Graduate Show 2011 review. Menswear Knitwear.

Hannah Taylor by Karolina Burdon
Hannah Taylor by Karolina Burdon.

I had to sit in the photographer’s pit – legs akimbo – to view the RCA graduate fashion show on Thursday 2nd June 2011… apparently there are no allocated seats. Hurumph, buy more about how often have we covered RCA shows on this website? On the bright side it meant that I had a fabulous view of the models as they walked towards me down the catwalk. Menswear fine tailoring and knitwear was particularly strong at this year’s show. Here’s introducing two fabulous knitwear designers to watch:

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Cherie Newing photography by Amelia Gregory
Cherie Newing. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cherie Newing by Emma Durnell
Cherie Newing by Emma Durnell.

Cherie Newing showed brightly coloured repeat pattern jumpers that touched the ankle. Intarsia knit jumpers and garish printed tracksuits featured stop signs and abstract shapes.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hannah Taylor photography by Amelia Gregory
Hannah Taylor‘s collection featured a whole host of influences, erectile from the Green Man to bank robbers, this web via the jungle: both urban and tropical. It was a super fun collection of cable knit shagpile wonder from someone not afraid to experiment with colour and shape.

The RCA is of course a fabled institution that has endowed the world with many fabulously well trained creatives, so I fail to understand why so many RCA graduates leave the college with zero web presence. Hannah Taylor, however, is one of the few who has multiple websites where you can catch up with her, including a website, a blog and a twitter feed. Hurrah!

Categories ,Brights, ,Cable knit, ,Emma Durnell, ,Graduate Fashion Show, ,Green Man, ,Hannah Taylor, ,Hanzipan, ,Intarsia, ,jungle, ,Karolina Burdon, ,knitwear, ,menswear, ,Patterns, ,rca, ,Royal College of Art, ,urban

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Amelia’s Magazine | Royal College of Art: Fashion Design Graduate Show 2011 review. Womenswear.

Philipp Schueller by Casey Otremba
Philipp Schueller by Casey Otremba.

It’s time to meet the rest of the RCA graduating womenswear designers… so much talent amongst this lot, clinic but who will the be the ones who make it? Your guess is as good as mine.

RCA - Hao Feng Li by Kristina Vasiljeva
Hao Feng Li by Kristina Vasiljeva.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Hao Feng Li photography by Amelia Gregory
Hao Feng Li opted to explore the furthest boundaries of pleats, thumb cascading out of dresses, visit this site exploding out of arms and swirling around legs.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Sayaka Kamakura photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sayaka Kamakura photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sayaka Kamakura photography by Amelia Gregory
Shapes for Sayaka Kamakura‘s collection were clean and simple, asymmetric sculpturing sweeping into shrouded shapes in luminous orange. Find Sayaka Kamakura online here.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Amelie Marciasini photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Amelie Marciasini photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Amelie Marciasini photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Amelie Marciasini photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Amelie Marciasini photography by Amelia Gregory
Amelie Marciasini did the fur thing, this time in a riot of over-dyed fluorescent colours. Which once again begs the question, why? Surely fake does the job just as well, especially in a collection that pushed the boundaries of good taste. Just because Russian oligarchs have a lot of money does not make it a good idea to pander to their sense of style…

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Katie Hildebrand photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Katie Hildebrand photography by Amelia Gregory
Katie Hildebrand collaborated with textiles designers Amelia Mullins and Andrew Kenny on a sophisticated collection that featured sheer wrap tops in shimmering greens or encrusted with tumbling beads. She has the basics of a web presence – find her here.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Nicola Morgan photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Nicola Morgan photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Nicola Morgan photography by Amelia Gregory
Nicola Morgan produced a very interesting collection focused on svelte tailoring techniques and integral beaded shaping. Nicola Morgan has the beginnings of a nice website where you can see previous collections.

Abbnit Nijjar by Sandra Contreras beigeAbbnit Nijjar by Sandra Contreras blackAbbnit Nijjar by Sandra Contreras red
Abbnit Nijjar by Sandra Contreras.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Abnit Nijjar photography by Amelia Gregory
Abnit Nijjar explored the layering of fabrics, sometimes in different block shades and with protruding patterns of overlaid perspex.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Saskia Schijen photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Saskia Schijen photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Saskia Schijen photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Saskia Schijen photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Saskia Schijen photography by Amelia Gregory
I really liked Saskia Schijen‘s relaxed approach: sheer tops worn with wide legged trousers and big belts, oversized cardigans floating on top.

April Schmitz by Karolina Burdon
April Schmitz by Karolina Burdon.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-April Schmitz photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-April Schmitz photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-April Schmitz photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-April Schmitz photography by Amelia Gregory
April Schmitz used leather to create knotted fringing that swooshed from shoulders and dangled from waists in deep jewel colours.

RCA_Philipp_Schueller_by_Katie_Woodger
Philipp Schueller by Katie Woodger.

Philipp Schueller Graduate Fashion Week 2011 by Sarah Harman
Philipp Schueller by Sarah Harman.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Philipp Schueller photography by Amelia Gregory
Philipp Schueller apparently took inspiration from the psychedelic 60s and the rave-tastic 80s to produce his phosphorescent collection of plastic, sheer, fake fur, ruffled, over the top, eye catching garments… fit for the most extravert of songstrels.

RCA_Sarah_Seaton_Burridge_by_Katie_Woodger
Sarah Seaton-Burridge by Katie Woodger.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Sarah Seaton-Burridge photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sarah Seaton-Burridge photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sarah Seaton-Burridge photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sarah Seaton-Burridge photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sarah Seaton-Burridge photography by Amelia Gregory
Sarah Seaton-Burridge also used fringing alongside laser cut layers and monochrome prints evocative of wild animal pelts.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Smit photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Smit photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Smit photography by Amelia Gregory
Anna Smit produced a series of round shouldered coats and dresses with an intriguing print that merged contrasting colours in the manner of an airbrush. This was a seriously beautiful and original collection. Visit Anna Smit on her website here.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Itziar Vaquer photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Itziar Vaquer photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Itziar Vaquer photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Itziar Vaquer photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Itziar Vaquer photography by Amelia Gregory
Last but very much not least Itziar Vaquer showed an astonishing collection of pearlised plastic slouch shoulder capes and dresses. It shouldn’t have worked but it did, with bells on.

Like I said, your guess is as good as mine…

All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Abnit Nijjar, ,Amelia Mullins, ,Amelie Marciasini, ,Andrew Kenny, ,April Schmitz, ,Casey Otremba, ,Hao Feng Li, ,Itziar Vaquer, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Katie Hildebrand, ,Katie Woodger, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,Nicola Morgan, ,Oligarch, ,Philipp Schueller, ,rca, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Sarah Harman, ,Sarah Seaton-Burridge, ,Saskia Schijen, ,Sayaka Kamakura

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Amelia’s Magazine | S/S 2011 Press Days – An illustrated round-up


Ada Zanditon, website like this illustrated by Sara Chew

Wahoooo! Summer is finally here. No really, dosage it is. Seriously I don’t care how damp and dreary it is outside that office window, summer is most definitely here. I’m toasty warm and looking at shorts, t-shirts and dresses ranging from ethereal to barely there. Skipping round London in the increasingly cold weather this can be hard to believe, but that’s how it goes. Here’s a little look at some of the summer outfits I’ve been looking at…

Ada Zanditon
Held eight stories up in Holborn with a stunning view out over the Thames to the Oxo Tower, Ada showed her latest collection. A quick chat with the designer revealed a charming, intelligent woman and in her own words ‘geeky’. Who else would be so inspired by maths and formulas that they borrow text books from libraries? Well if that’s where inspiration comes from, long may it last. Ada is not just a lovely person but also incredibly talented. Three dimensional sculptural pyramids burst forth from the intelligently structured garments.

Even the prints were inspired by fractal geometry and swept across many garments from a particularly stunning floor length bias cut 1930s dress with backless detail to a leather minidress complete with a chiffon front panel. Hard seaming was juxtaposed with soft fabrics and details. The jewellery carried the same prints as the dress and were another hard counterpoint to some of the softness. Look out for more on Ada’s ethical collection in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Giorgio Armani

Armani called and off to Bond Street I went. Giorgio showed some great pieces with open weave jackets and low-breaking double-breasted jackets for the men, soft and light in beige, grey and smoke. T-shirts emphasised the lightness with sheer elements. Maybe this is a way to get the ‘heavage’ out without looking like a modern day medallion man. The shoes and accessories were simple and classic, from a soft leather briefcase to a brown woven leather shoe catching my eye in particular. Suede and salmon skin belts helped to further soften the tone. All very simple and invoking a cool Italian summers evening.

On the far side of the partition was the womenswear. Strong tailoring was paired with sheer blouses in varying shades of blue and deep purple. Skirts were long and flared slightly to the hem, though I will admit it was the shoes and accessories that stood out. High perspex wedges with wooden platforms excuded both freshness and class. Chunky cuffs, twisted silver necklaces and amulets of large dark blue/black stones hung on leather and fabric. Powerful, yet clean and sophisticated.

Emporio Armani

Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent
Emporio, the delinquent nephew of Giorgio, was my next visit. There may have been a similar colour palette across the brands, but that’s pretty much where the similarities ended. No Giorgio man is ever going to be seen in a chainlink bondage harness. The use of sheer panels as highlights was also shared, this time showing off what one imagines will be gym-honed biceps. The highlight for me was a double-fronted crock effect suit. Hiding underneath the croc, a layer of leather gave the hint of something more to come.

Draping and ruffles were mixed with simple clean lines in womenswear. A grey and purple halterneck knee length dress particularly appealed, not to mention vertiginous heels. A dainty black chiffon bow, gave the vampiest pieces a demure side. Combining both the soft and the sharp, a draped jersey dress was teamed with a pale grey cap sleeve tailored jacket. It’s youthful and energetic but with a business edge.

Paul Costelloe

Illustration by Karolina Burdon

Showing menswear for the third season Paul opened London Fashion Week with a strong summer collection including short suits, lightweight long coats, and intricate print details. The menswear of this brand is growing on a season by season basis and whilst the formalwear is available in stockists such as John Lewis and Austin Reed, it’s hoped the casualwear and the odd catwalk piece should start hitting the shops soon.


Illustration by Natsuki Otani

You can see reviews of Paul’s collections by Matt and Amelia here and here.

Snake & Dagger

This London based denim company are growing stronger and stronger. Having trained in Japan, they hope to bring a more traditional feel to the denim market. The quality of the denim and the range of finishes are exquisite and the designers behind the brand bring together the best of their training and the city of London to create a unique look.

Aqua

Illustration by Joana Faria

Wherever you thought you were going to buy your Christmas party dress, forget it. Scrub that idea now. Go straight to Aqua and get yourself sorted. This Christmas’ collection ‘Out to Sleigh’ is affordable glamour at its best.

The pieces are daringly cut but clever and in no way trashy. More importantly, whilst you’ve been eyeing up that dress on the high street for the last three weeks so has every other girl in your office, but it’s unlikely you’ll be in the same number if you visit Aqua.

Morphe

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Having previously shown in India, Morphe is thankfully launching in the UK. Playing with shape and form, the pieces are both dramatic and cutting edge. Born from countless hours of work, the statement pieces are surprisingly easy to wear, if somewhat out there.

However, the true gems in the collection include a one shoulder dress with silver trim along the neckline. Creating more than a simple point of interest this is a brand to watch as they develop their continued success in India.

Asher Levine

This was a fantastic collection from a burgeoning menswear designer. In particular, the asymmetric leather biker jackets were right on trend. Using differing leathers as well as digital printing, Asher showed a dynamic and contemporary collection.

Eleanor Amoroso

Most certainly one to watch. Eleanor graduated this summer from the University of Westminster. Her work with fringing has to be seen to be believed. Genuinely unique and fresh, I can only hope the future holds big things for Amoroso. This is one young designer who definitely needs to be nourished.

There were more…far more people that I saw during the press days. From the sublime to the ridiculous and everything inbetween. Trying to contain yourself when browsing all these wonders is a challenge, as is trying to get enough photos and remember everything. But I can safely say S/S 2011 is going to be a very, very good season.

All photography by Nick Bain

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustratio, ,Aqua by Aqua, ,Asher Levine, ,Blow PR, ,Bond Street, ,Eleanor Amoroso, ,Emporio Armani, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Giorgio Armani, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,london, ,menswear, ,Morphe, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Press days, ,S/S 2011, ,Sara Chew, ,Snake & Dagger, ,Spring Summer, ,Stéphanie Thieullent, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tabernacle Twins: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon.

Tabernacle Twins was a new brand to me, but having visited the website my interest was piqued. The label is described as an exploration of fashion, textiles and illustration by designer Vibe Lundemark, a graduate of the RCA now relocated home to Denmark.

Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Rose Crees
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Rose Crees.

The show began with the appearance of the ‘Tabernacle Twins‘ who, as Vibe Lundemark‘s creative muses, take fictional journeys through surreal landscapes. This season the scene was set for a Cobra Casablanca, with our handouts describing a desert quest to search for a magic cobra, meeting fortune tellers, jesters and street magicians along the way. These ideas were translated into colourful abstract illustrations that crept and curled across large panels of fabric on dresses and blowsy shirts. Vibe Lundemark used a bold colour palette of lilac, purple, peach and ochre which was lightened by plentiful white across this relaxed collection. Girls with bright matte orange lips swung talismans from their wrists and paced the catwalk in patent white DMs with ankle socks. Alongside blouson shapes that were the perfect canvas for prints there were tailored details that included cowl necks, a crop top covered in pointy scales and a lacey matching shorts suit. A marbled chequerboard in deep purple on white created an arresting all over effect.

Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

It seemed odd that the girls chosen as twins were barely alike, and not even the same height, but that aside the twins were an appealing visual concept, who cropped up several times on the runway wearing key pieces. I liked the use of narrative to drive ideas behind the collection and look forward to seeing more from the Tabernacle Twins on future Fashion Scout runways.

Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,catwalk, ,Cobra Casablanca, ,copenhagen, ,Danish, ,Denmark, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,rca, ,review, ,Rose Crees, ,S/S 2014, ,Tabernacle Twins, ,Vibe Lundemark

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lug Von Siga: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon

Turkish designer Gül Ağış presented her brand Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 collection in the upper halls of Freemasons’ Hall at Fashion Scout on the second day of London Fashion Week. What we saw was an elegant and varied collection that featured evening dresses in luxurious fabrics such as silk crepe, leather and knitwear, as well as some more sportive outfits. The colour palette ranged from black and white to beige, caramel and coral red. Just by looking at Gül Ağış’ S/S 2014 collection one could easily discern influences from her rich cultural and historical heritage. Exposed bellies, see through fabric around hips and low fringed waists all brought to mind images of exotic belly dancers. Three dresses with laced, swirly patterns also reminded me of doilies used as decorations on tables and sofas of Anatolian houses.

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Novemto Komo

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Novemto Komo

But, as it often happens at fashion shows, reading the press release revealed an extra, unexpected layer of meaning and intention to the collection. This season Gül Ağış was inspired by populations around the world recently going back to tribal attitudes to express their anger towards the state of the world and the nature of their governments. More specifically she was inspired by the 2013 protests in Turkey started on 28 May 2013, initially to contest the urban development plan for Istanbul’s Taksim Gezi Park. Prints of tribal masks, which are often used in transitional situations and rituals, appeared writ large on tops and dresses. A mask protects, empowers the wearer spiritually and also gives anonymity, so that one can be aggressive and break the rules; thus here this powerful symbol was used beautifully to illustrate the insecurity towards the future felt by the Turkish people.

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Yelena Bryksenkova

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Yelena Bryksenkova

Lug Von Siga Catwalk photo by Amelia Gregory SS 2014

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 7

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 6

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Novemto Komo

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Novemto Komo

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory-0023

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Claire Kearns

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014 by Claire Kearns

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 5

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 9

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 10

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 11

Lug Von Siga SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou HAIR

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 4

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Lug Von Siga Catwalk SS 2014 photo by Amelia Gregory

Lug Von Siga S/S 2014. All photography by Amelia Gregory and Maria Papadimitriou.

Categories ,Catwalk review, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gül Ağış, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lug Von Siga, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Masks, ,Novemto Komo, ,S/S 2014, ,Taksim Gezi Park Protests, ,Tribal, ,Tribal Masks, ,Turkish, ,Yelena Bryksenkova

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Amelia’s Magazine | Min Wu: Ones to Watch S/S 2015 London Fashion Week Preview

Min Wu by Karolina Burdon
Min Wu A/W 2014 by Karolina Burdon.

I’ve been keeping an eye on Chinese born London College of Fashion alumni Min Wu for some seasons now, ever since I picked out her work at the 2013 LCF MA graduate show, held at the illustrious Royal Opera House. She’s already done a few presentations with Fashion Scout but this season she will be on the catwalk as one of Fashion Scout’s Ones to Watch. I caught up with her for a quick sneak preview of what to expect this season.

Min Wu AW 2014
Min Wu A/W 2014.

What or who are the biggest influences on your approach to fashion?
My approach has developed with my life experience, alongside the article that I have read or the exhibitions that I have been. I like to keep moving forward.

Where do you get inspiration for your subtle colour combinations from?
I get inspired by photographs and paintings, then use drawings to translate my ideas into my own language. I try many different combinations until I find the best one.


Min Wu S/S 2015 preview
Min Wu S/S 2015 preview
Min Wu S/S 2015 preview.

What can we expect from your new season collection?
I used some light jelly fabric which kind of looks yummy.


You are adept with merging the high tech with the traditional, have you ever encountered any issues with this approach?
Issues aways appears when you try to do something interesting, but up until now I have handled it well. Both high tech and traditional techniques come at a high cost, but I have been trying very hard to work this out.


You’ve been presenting at LFW for a few seasons now, what have you learnt over that period?
Definitely, it is such a precious experience to work with a team members, and I am constantly learning about how to catch the attention of press and also make buyers and customers happy. I am still learning.

Categories ,Chinese, ,Fashion Scout, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London College of Fashion, ,Min Wu, ,Ones To Watch, ,Royal Opera House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week Emerging Talent A/W 2011: A Preview

Charlotte Ford & Geoff Sobelle
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl was inspired by photographs of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat near Chernobyl, treat taken many years after the city was abandoned to radiation. They show the buildings and streets overtaken with plants and animals, view which have happily returned to build homes amongst the human detritus.

The impressively depressing (yet realistic) stage set features the interior of an office for Convenience Foods: dead plants and old mugs litter the desks and the walls sprout crumpled charts and post it notes. It is into this nightmarish world that Jerry, viagra order played by Geoff Sobelle, emerges, rolling gracelessly out of a dumpster inside which he has presumably spent the night, and hobbling a few steps to his desk.

Office Deer by Sarah Matthews
Office Deer by Sarah Matthews.

The lengthy intro features a zany fight with a buzzing fly that refuses to die, before we’re introduced to his office colleague Rhoda, played with relish by Charlotte Ford. Despite their dysfunctional relationship she’s clearly interested in developing a more intimate arrangement with her middle management foe, artlessly arching her bottom in his direction as she microwaves her lunch repeatedly. The only time they communicate with words is in cringeworthy office jargon against the backdrop of a wonky Leadership poster featuring a lion’s head superimposed over a mountain. It’s all too easily recognisable as the kind of office that litters the business estates of the UK, which is interesting because Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is performed by Americans.

Office-Bear-by-Sarah Matthews
Office Bear by Sarah Matthews.

Both Geoff Sobelle and Charlotte Ford are trained clowns, adept at using exaggerated body movement and facial expressions to convey repressed feelings that eventually rise to the surface as the theatre set is taken over by a series of stuffed animals and plastic undergrowth.

Mime Festival Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan
Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan.

Before long they are mating loudly in the dumpster, from which Jerry emerges disgusted that his animal instincts have at last taken over, immediately spraying his body with disinfectant. As the animals continue to stake their claim over the environment Jerry desperately clings to obsessive compulsive means of control, all of which eventually fail.

Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews
Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews.

The programme says very little about the meaning of Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl, preferring instead – in the great manner of mime – to leave the story to unfold through the telling. But it seems clear that this is a tale of human folly, and how, ultimately, our environment will have the last laugh of all. It’s a testament to the performers’ clowning expertise that what could so easily have come across as uncompromisingly depressing is instead one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.

Flesh and Blood And Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia
Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is showing at The Pit in the Barbican as part of the London International Mime Festival for the rest of this week and I urge you to grab a ticket now. The Mime Festival is London’s longest running annual theatre event, encompassing visual theatre of all kinds. It runs from 15th-30th January and features a huge range of performances. Why not check out their calendar of events here?

Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl was inspired by photographs of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat near Chernobyl, symptoms taken many years after the city was abandoned to radiation. They show the buildings and streets overtaken with plants and animals, which have happily returned to build homes amongst the human detritus.

Flesh and Blood office

The impressively depressing (yet realistic) stage set features the interior of an office for Convenience Foods: dead plants and old mugs litter the desks and the walls sprout crumpled charts and post it notes. It is into this nightmarish world that Jerry, played by Geoff Sobelle, emerges, rolling gracelessly out of a dumpster inside which he has presumably spent the night, and hobbling a few steps to his desk.

Office Deer by Sarah Matthews
Office Deer by Sarah Matthews.

The lengthy intro features a zany fight with a buzzing fly that refuses to die, before we’re introduced to his office colleague Rhoda, played with relish by Charlotte Ford. Despite their dysfunctional relationship she’s clearly interested in developing a more intimate arrangement with her middle management foe, artlessly arching her bottom in his direction as she microwaves her lunch repeatedly. The only time they communicate with words is in cringeworthy office jargon against the backdrop of a wonky Leadership poster featuring a lion’s head superimposed over a mountain. It’s all too easily recognisable as the kind of office that litters the business estates of the UK, which is interesting because Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is performed by Americans.

Office-Bear-by-Sarah Matthews
Office Bear by Sarah Matthews.

Both Geoff Sobelle and Charlotte Ford are trained clowns, adept at using exaggerated body movement and facial expressions to convey repressed feelings that eventually rise to the surface as the theatre set is taken over by a series of stuffed animals and plastic undergrowth.

Mime Festival Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan
Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan.

Before long they are mating loudly in the dumpster, from which Jerry emerges disgusted that his animal instincts have at last taken over, immediately spraying his body with disinfectant. As the animals continue to stake their claim over the environment Jerry desperately clings to obsessive compulsive means of control, all of which eventually fail.

Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews
Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews.

The programme says very little about the meaning of Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl, preferring instead – in the great manner of mime – to leave the story to unfold through the telling. But it seems clear that this is a tale of human folly, and how, ultimately, our environment will have the last laugh of all. It’s a testament to the performers’ clowning expertise that what could so easily have come across as uncompromisingly depressing is instead one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.

Flesh and Blood And Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia
Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is showing at The Pit in the Barbican as part of the London International Mime Festival for the rest of this week and I urge you to grab a ticket now. The Mime Festival is London’s longest running annual theatre event, encompassing visual theatre of all kinds. It runs from 15th-30th January and features a huge range of performances. Why not check out their calendar of events here?

Charlotte Ford & Geoff Sobelle
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl was inspired by photographs of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat near Chernobyl, seek taken many years after the city was abandoned to radiation. They show the buildings and streets overtaken with plants and animals, no rx which have happily returned to build homes amongst the human detritus.

Flesh and Blood office

The impressively depressing (yet realistic) stage set features the interior of an office for Convenience Foods: dead plants and old mugs litter the desks and the walls sprout crumpled charts and post it notes. It is into this nightmarish world that Jerry, recipe played by Geoff Sobelle, emerges, rolling gracelessly out of a dumpster inside which he has presumably spent the night, and hobbling a few steps to his desk.

Office Deer by Sarah Matthews
Office Deer by Sarah Matthews.

The lengthy intro features a zany fight with a buzzing fly that refuses to die, before we’re introduced to his office colleague Rhoda, played with relish by Charlotte Ford. Despite their dysfunctional relationship she’s clearly interested in developing a more intimate arrangement with her middle management foe, artlessly arching her bottom in his direction as she microwaves her lunch repeatedly. The only time they communicate with words is in cringeworthy office jargon against the backdrop of a wonky Leadership poster featuring a lion’s head superimposed over a mountain. It’s all too easily recognisable as the kind of office that litters the business estates of the UK, which is interesting because Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is performed by Americans.

Office-Bear-by-Sarah Matthews
Office Bear by Sarah Matthews.

Both Geoff Sobelle and Charlotte Ford are trained clowns, adept at using exaggerated body movement and facial expressions to convey repressed feelings that eventually rise to the surface as the theatre set is taken over by a series of stuffed animals and plastic undergrowth.

Mime Festival Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan
Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan.

Before long they are mating loudly in the dumpster, from which Jerry emerges disgusted that his animal instincts have at last taken over, immediately spraying his body with disinfectant. As the animals continue to stake their claim over the environment Jerry desperately clings to obsessive compulsive means of control, all of which eventually fail.

Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews
Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews.

The programme says very little about the meaning of Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl, preferring instead – in the great manner of mime – to leave the story to unfold through the telling. But it seems clear that this is a tale of human folly, and how, ultimately, our environment will have the last laugh of all. It’s a testament to the performers’ clowning expertise that what could so easily have come across as uncompromisingly depressing is instead one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.

Flesh and Blood And Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia
Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is showing at The Pit in the Barbican as part of the London International Mime Festival for the rest of this week. Surreal, funny, disturbing and thought provoking, as twittered on the night of the performance, this was a brilliant piece of mime and I urge you to grab a ticket now. The Mime Festival is London’s longest running annual theatre event, encompassing visual theatre of all kinds. It runs from 15th-30th January and features a huge range of performances. Why not check out their calendar of events here?

Charlotte Ford & Geoff Sobelle
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl was inspired by photographs of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat near Chernobyl, decease taken many years after the city was abandoned to radiation. They show the buildings and streets overtaken with plants and animals, viagra dosage which have happily returned to build homes amongst the human detritus.

Flesh and Blood office

The impressively depressing (yet realistic) stage set features the interior of an office for Convenience Foods: dead plants and old mugs litter the desks and the walls sprout crumpled charts and post it notes. It is into this nightmarish world that Jerry, buy information pills played by Geoff Sobelle, emerges, rolling gracelessly out of a dumpster inside which he has presumably spent the night, and hobbling a few steps to his desk.

Office Deer by Sarah Matthews
Office Deer by Sarah Matthews.

The lengthy intro features a zany fight with a buzzing fly that refuses to die, before we’re introduced to his office colleague Rhoda, played with relish by Charlotte Ford. Despite their dysfunctional relationship she’s clearly interested in developing a more intimate arrangement with her middle management foe, artlessly arching her bottom in his direction as she microwaves her lunch repeatedly.

Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews
Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews.

The only time they communicate with words is in cringeworthy office jargon against the backdrop of a wonky Leadership poster featuring a lion’s head superimposed over a mountain. It’s all too easily recognisable as the kind of office that litters the business estates of the UK, which is interesting because Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is performed by Americans.

Office-Bear-by-Sarah Matthews
Office Bear by Sarah Matthews.

Both Geoff Sobelle and Charlotte Ford are trained clowns, adept at using exaggerated body movement and facial expressions to convey repressed feelings that eventually rise to the surface as the theatre set is taken over by a series of stuffed animals and plastic undergrowth.

Mime Festival Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan
Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan.

Before long they are mating loudly in the dumpster, from which Jerry emerges disgusted that his animal instincts have at last taken over, immediately spraying his body with disinfectant. As the animals continue to stake their claim over the environment Jerry desperately clings to obsessive compulsive means of control, all of which eventually fail.

Flesh and Blood And Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia
Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia.

The programme says very little about the meaning of Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl, preferring instead – in the great manner of mime – to leave the story to unfold through the telling. But it seems clear that this is a tale of human folly, and how, ultimately, our environment will have the last laugh of all. It’s a testament to the performers’ clowning expertise that what could so easily have come across as uncompromisingly depressing is instead one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.

Charlotte Ford & Geoff Sobelle

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is showing at The Pit in the Barbican as part of the London International Mime Festival for the rest of this week. Surreal, funny, disturbing and thought provoking, as twittered on the night of the performance, this was a brilliant piece of mime and I urge you to grab a ticket now. The Mime Festival is London’s longest running annual theatre event, encompassing visual theatre of all kinds. It runs from 15th-30th January and features a huge range of performances. Why not check out their calendar of events here?

Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift
Flesh and Blood by Stacie Swift.

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl was inspired by photographs of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat near Chernobyl, information pills taken many years after the city was abandoned to radiation. They show the buildings and streets overtaken with plants and animals, which have happily returned to build homes amongst the human detritus.

Flesh and Blood office

The impressively depressing (yet realistic) stage set features the interior of an office for Convenience Foods: dead plants and old mugs litter the desks and the walls sprout crumpled charts and post it notes. It is into this nightmarish world that Jerry, played by Geoff Sobelle, emerges, rolling gracelessly out of a dumpster inside which he has presumably spent the night, and hobbling a few steps to his desk.

Office Deer by Sarah Matthews
Office Deer by Sarah Matthews.

The lengthy intro features a zany fight with a buzzing fly that refuses to die, before we’re introduced to his office colleague Rhoda, played with relish by Charlotte Ford. Despite their dysfunctional relationship she’s clearly interested in developing a more intimate arrangement with her middle management foe, artlessly arching her bottom in his direction as she microwaves her lunch repeatedly.

Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews
Office Squirrel by Sarah Matthews.

The only time they communicate with words is in cringeworthy office jargon against the backdrop of a wonky Leadership poster featuring a lion’s head superimposed over a mountain. It’s all too easily recognisable as the kind of office that litters the business estates of the UK, which is interesting because Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is performed by Americans.

Office-Bear-by-Sarah Matthews
Office Bear by Sarah Matthews.

Both Geoff Sobelle and Charlotte Ford are trained clowns, adept at using exaggerated body movement and facial expressions to convey repressed feelings that eventually rise to the surface as the theatre set is taken over by a series of stuffed animals and plastic undergrowth.

Mime Festival Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan
Rhoda by Sarah Alfarhan.

Before long they are mating loudly in the dumpster, from which Jerry emerges disgusted that his animal instincts have at last taken over, immediately spraying his body with disinfectant. As the animals continue to stake their claim over the environment Jerry desperately clings to obsessive compulsive means of control, all of which eventually fail.

Flesh and Blood And Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia
Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl by Mira Tazkia.

The programme says very little about the meaning of Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl, preferring instead – in the great manner of mime – to leave the story to unfold through the telling. But it seems clear that this is a tale of human folly, and how, ultimately, our environment will have the last laugh of all. It’s a testament to the performers’ clowning expertise that what could so easily have come across as uncompromisingly depressing is instead one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.

Charlotte Ford & Geoff Sobelle

Flesh and Blood & Fish and Fowl is showing at The Pit in the Barbican as part of the London International Mime Festival for the rest of this week. Surreal, funny, disturbing and thought provoking, as I twittered on the night of the performance, this was a brilliant piece of mime: I urge you to grab a ticket now. The Mime Festival is London’s longest running annual theatre event, encompassing visual theatre of all kinds. It runs from 15th-30th January and features a huge range of performances. Why not check out their calendar of events here?


Sarah Baardarani, sickness illustrated by Naomi Law

With Fashion Scout releasing their Ones to Watch for the coming season last week, find it was only going to be a matter of fashion minutes before the British Fashion Council announced who was going to feature on the stands this A/W 2011 fashion week. And here they are!

I like the exhibitions a lot. You get to really get a feel for the collections – you can see them up close and touch them – hell, viagra 40mg you can even smell them if that’s your bag. While a big-budget catwalk show has the atmosphere to accompany the clothes, I often miss many of the design quirks and fabric features because I’m just too damn busy photographing, tweeting and scribbling what will later become illegible notes. With the stands, you can see the colossal effort that a designer has put into their collection and often they’re hanging around, so you can EVEN chat to them too.

It’s also a great place to find up-an-coming design talent: fresh ideas and new ways of doing things. Sod the oldies on the catwalks. This year looks like it won’t disappoint. Here’s a round of the ‘Emerging Designers’ that the BFC has added to its roster:

Teatum Jones

Illustration by Alexandra Rolfe
Catherine Teatum and Rob Jones have done what no other designer duo have done before by cleverly combining their surnames to form new fashion label Teatum Jones. I mock, but this is a label to most certainly watch. Luxurious fabrics drape on models in their sleek look-book, with intriguing, organic prints and deep colours. Diagonal shapes keep this rich collection fresh, with fabrics like crepe and spandex. It will be interesting to see where all this drapery and elegant fabric usage takes the twosome this season.

Ongwat

Illustration by Abby Wright
Ongwat, surname of its founder Paranee, offers understated contemporary jewellery with architectural references; infinitely wearable but bold enough to stand out. Previous pieces include geometric ‘Scaffold’ rings, braceletss like bike gear rings and cuffs that a Gladiator might wear, should he be in London in 2011 on a mission to modernise his look.

Draw in Light

Illustration by Paolo Caravello
Harriet Barford and Polly Wilkinson, aka Draw in Light, studied at the University of Brighton in 2008. Since then, they’ve notched up awards, including Liberty’s Best of British this time last year. Their aesthetic is “elegant, minimal jersey shapes” with hand silk-screen techniques. Their beautiful, ethereal garments air on the body-con cious side, with mystical, loose patterns. Really looking forward to seeing what they come up with for A/W 2011…

Shao-Yen Chen

Illustration by Rukmunal Hakim
A Central Saint Martins graduate (oh, here we go again…), Shao Yen Chen is currently curating a window at Selfridges alongside assembling the A/W 2011 collection. He must be knackered. It seems like this will be the season for sculptural ready-to-wear and innovative accessories (well, I seem to be writing about them a lot at the moment…) Shao-Yen’s work has a sleek Japanese aesthetic but also combines elements of architecture and is full of surprises. In the past he’s knocked up voluminous frocks that defy gravity and his graduate collection from CSM was instantly snapped up by the people at the BFC. A showman in the making, I imagine he’ll progress to catwalk next season, or at least I hope he does.

Wing

Illustration by Holly Trill
Another jewellery designer, another bunch of geometric shapes. Wing Paris’ differ though – they’re discrete, slim-line and sophisticated. Designed by Jenny Wing Chan, a graduate from Studio Bercot in Paris, these pieces combine metallic colours with black and bright purple. Jenny hopes to create “timeless, statement jewellery” which oozes femininity. I think she’s on it already, and with her A/W 2011 collection inspired by “black metal”, I can’t wait to see what she’ll come up with next.

Tze Goh

Illustration by Joana Faria
My prediction is that Tze Goh will be this season’s hot tip. He’s everywhere. First, Vauxhall Fashion Scout announced him as part of their ‘Ones to Watch’ show, and now he’s on this fashionable list. I saw a special collection exclusive to LN-CC (more about them soon) and it is just mind-blowing. Come February, he’ll be everywhere. Promise.

Joanne Stoker

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins
Nicholas Kirkwood better watch his derriere, as I think Joanne Stoker might be in the running for his fashion crown. Joanne has a background in, well, all sorts – architecture, model making, engineering and, of course, shoe design. Her Art Deco-inspired S/S 2011 collection featured geometric shapes, transparent neons and patent leathers in all sorts of dreamy colours. The bold, statement shoes are for the fashion-forward only. Despite the zany colours and unusual shapes, there’s a real decadent period feel to them. Hopefully A/W 2011 will bring lots more colour and decadence from this First into Fashion winner.

Sarah Angold

Illustration by Karolina Burdon
Sarah Angold’s jewellery is pretty unique. Bold, geometric shapes create enormous statement pieces, and looking at her previous collections, it’s no surprise that her previous employers include Swarovski and Hussein Chalayan. Her work has both an industrial and futuristic aesthetic, and it’s “mathematical graduation” that’s inspiring her for this coming season. I can’t wait to see this stuff in the flesh.

Sarah Baardarani

Illustration by Naomi Law
Sarah Baardarani‘s graduate collection in 2009 was one of the highlights of all the graduate shows. Powerfully elegant, her collection featured luxurious fabrics that twisted and turned around models in an incredibly arcane fashion, as if by magic. The showpiece, adorned in beading, was breathtaking. She’s set to continue her delightful drapery over the coming season, and is inspired by “the fusion of contrasting textures and shapes.”

Keep an eye out in the run up to Fashion Week for lots more previews, interviews and coverage!

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Abby Wright, ,Alexandra Rolfe, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Draw in Light, ,fashion, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Holly Trill, ,Joana Faria, ,Joanne Stoker, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Ongwat, ,Paolo Caravello, ,preview, ,Rukmunal Hakim, ,Sarah Angold, ,Sarah Baadarani, ,Shao Yen Chen, ,Teatum Jones, ,Tze Goh, ,Wing

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

I don’t usually do much during fashion week on Mondays and Tuesdays. That’s because I have a day job. But when Amelia offered me tickets to Michael Van Der Ham during Monday lunchtime and Mary Katrantzou on Tuesday morning, no rx I couldn’t resist. It would be a push – a swift Boris from Southwark with moments to spare, see but I thought hell, side effects I’ll give it a go.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

By the time I arrived at Waterloo on Tuesday morning, a queue of standing ticket owners had already formed. Christ, these queues don’t half drag you down. I stood puffing on a cigarette as photographers run down the line to take pictures, interns offer The Daily and other free stuff while a whole host of people in enormous heels leg it inside. ‘Why am I bothering?!’ I thought to myself. Well, it only took the first look to appear at the start of Katrantzou‘s show to make me realise.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I didn’t have a hope in hell of getting my hand on a press release, lest a seat or one of Mary’s covetable, seasonal goodie bags, this time in black with a gorgeous fuchsia print (from what I could see). So I looked around the cavernous old Eurostar station for clues as to what Katrantzou might deliver this season. I didn’t have to look far. The entire runway had been transformed with a vast bank of erect carnations, framed from the back by a huge metal structure; a stark juxtaposition of natural and industrial which was to prevail as Katrantzou‘s inspiration for this stunning collection.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Karolina Burdon

I took a spot next to the photographer’s pit, manoeuvring behind anybody that looked remotely short – some mean feat at fashion week. The show started pretty soon after I finally entered the venue, which was literal music to my ears. It’s so easy to see why Mary Katrantzou has built up such an enormous following. What a breathtaking collection! I vaguely remember a quote in an interview that Katrantzou gave saying that she was worried if she pushed it any further, nobody would wear her clothes. Well there was no shortage of fans here today.

I’m so pleased I caught this show, despite my horrendous view: Katrantzou’s fascination with artificial against organic had been magically infused into this bright and bold collection. Digital prints featuring abstract elements of tin cans, microphones and car parts were the mainstay on mid-length dresses with translucent trains floating from the back. Saturated colours of all kinds – burnt organ, plum, greens, yellows, hot pink and cyan were aplenty, as if they had been painted onto the garments as the models wore them. You would be forgiven for thinking that it was all a bit of a mismatch, but discreet changes in cut and colour and the dramatic setting brought the collection together wonderfully.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Mary‘s inimitable cocktail dresses this time seemed a little softer; dresses that began from one shoulder nipped in at the waist before blossoming out again to create an ideal silhouette. Katrantzou also showed sharp tailoring with blazers and trousers that were married together with the same vivid colours and abstract prints. But it will be the dynamic cutting of dresses and the breathtaking finale – a bias cut creation made entirely from brightly colour metals – that we’ll remember this collection for.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

At the risk of sounding like an absolute berk, it was a real fashion moment. And I never say that. I left reeling. I’m sure the BFC are bending over backwards to keep Mary on our London Fashion Week schedule, but I fear it won’t be long before, like our other exceptional talent, she flies the nest to meet the demands of the global fashion market. For now, though, I feel privileged to have witnessed such an phenomenal display of world class fashion.


All photography by Matt Bramford

See the show here:

Categories ,BFC, ,catwalk, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Digital Prints, ,Eurostar Terminal, ,fashion, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Machine, ,Man made, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Matt Bramford, ,metallics, ,nature, ,organic, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,tailoring, ,Topshop Space, ,Waterloo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

I don’t usually do much during fashion week on Mondays and Tuesdays. That’s because I have a day job. But when Amelia offered me tickets to Michael Van Der Ham during Monday lunchtime and Mary Katrantzou on Tuesday morning, I couldn’t resist. It would be a push – a swift Boris from Southwark with moments to spare, but I thought hell, I’ll give it a go.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

By the time I arrived at Waterloo on Tuesday morning, a queue of standing ticket owners had already formed. Christ, these queues don’t half drag you down. I stood puffing on a cigarette as photographers run down the line to take pictures, interns offer The Daily and other free stuff while a whole host of people in enormous heels leg it inside. ‘Why am I bothering?!’ I thought to myself. Well, it only took the first look to appear at the start of Katrantzou’s show to make me realise.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I didn’t have a hope in hell of getting my hand on a press release, lest a seat or one of Mary’s covetable, seasonal goodie bags, this time in black with a gorgeous fuchsia print (from what I could see). So I looked around the cavernous old Eurostar station for clues as to what Katrantzou might deliver this season. I didn’t have to look far. The entire runway had been transformed with a vast bank of erect carnations, framed from the back by a huge metal structure; a stark juxtaposition of natural and industrial which was to prevail as Katrantzou’s inspiration for this stunning collection.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Karolina Burdon

I took a spot next to the photographer’s pit, manoeuvring behind anybody that looked remotely short – some mean feat at fashion week. The show started pretty soon after I finally entered the venue, which was literal music to my ears. It’s so easy to see why Mary Katrantzou has built up such an enormous following. What a breathtaking collection! I vaguely remember a quote in an interview that Katrantzou gave saying that she was worried if she pushed it any further, nobody would wear her clothes. Well there was no shortage of fans here today.

I’m so pleased I caught this show, despite my horrendous view: Katrantzou’s fascination with artificial against organic had been magically infused into this bright and bold collection. Digital prints featuring abstract elements of tin cans, microphones and car parts were the mainstay on mid-length dresses with translucent trains floating from the back. Saturated colours of all kinds – burnt organ, plum, greens, yellows, hot pink and cyan were aplenty, as if they had been painted onto the garments as the models wore them. You would be forgiven for thinking that it was all a bit of a mismatch, but discreet changes in cut and colour and the dramatic setting brought the collection together wonderfully.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Mary’s inimitable cocktail dresses this time seemed a little softer; dresses that began from one shoulder nipped in at the waist before blossoming out again to create an ideal silhouette. Katrantzou also showed sharp tailoring with blazers and trousers that were married together with the same vivid colours and abstract prints. But it will be the dynamic cutting of dresses and the breathtaking finale – a bias cut creation made entirely from brightly colour metals – that we’ll remember this collection for.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

At the risk of sounding like an absolute berk, it was a real fashion moment. And I never say that. I left reeling. I’m sure the BFC are bending over backwards to keep Mary on our London Fashion Week schedule, but I fear it won’t be long before, like our other exceptional talent, she flies the nest to meet the demands of the global fashion market. For now, though, I feel privileged to have witnessed such an phenomenal display of world class fashion.


All photography by Matt Bramford

See the show here:

Categories ,BFC, ,catwalk, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Digital Prints, ,Eurostar Terminal, ,fashion, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Machine, ,Man made, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Matt Bramford, ,metallics, ,nature, ,organic, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,tailoring, ,Topshop Space, ,Waterloo

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