Amelia’s Magazine | Soojin Lee AW15: London Fashion Week Catwalk Review

Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 20
Stark red eye make up accompanied the colourful designs paraded down the catwalk by Soojin Lee. On closer inspection Art Deco-esque designs revealed repeat patterns made up of bullets, rippled metal panels and fighter planes. Here was another designer with war on the mind (see also Jean-Pierre Braganza). Scarfs at the neck echoed an older era of war, as did lady-like crop waist jackets and delicately ruffled shirts worn with dainty floral pleat skirts, creating elegance in a time of great unrest. At the back of her look book Soojin Lee states ‘Pray for peace and protection for everyone…

Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 11
Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 16
Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 14
Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 29
Soojin Lee AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 26
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Soojin Lee AW 15/16 from FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,A/W 2015, ,AW15, ,catwalk, ,London Fashion Week, ,review, ,Show report, ,Soojin Lee

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Amelia’s Magazine | Yeashin: Fashion Scout Ones to Watch A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Yeashin A/W 2013 by Sylwia Szyszka
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Sylwia Szyszka.

South Korean designer Yeashin Kim‘s Woodland collection juxtaposed traditional Korean dress with inspiration from the swinging 60s. The colourful results built on the look she has been honing since completing her studies in fine arts and then attending the London College of Fashion.

Yeashin A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman.

ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Victoria Wright
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Victoria Wright
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Victoria Wright.

A multitude of textures were thrown together and somehow emerged victorious. Oversized embellished hats, plenty of colourful trims and digitally printed woodgrain based on Korean furniture lent the collection a fairytale feel, with bespoke woolly boots adorned with pompoms adding to the idea that the models could have stepped off the pages of a children’s book (no bad thing in my world).

Yeashin A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman.
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman.

ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Yeashin-by-Sylwia-Szyszka
Yeashin A/W 2013 by Sylwia Szyszka.

Skirts were predominantly short and flared, collars adorned with on trend details, cuffs beautifully buttoned or trimmed in wool. Knitwear came in the form of a dotty cape, bolero and cosy looking chequerboard coat. Yeashin‘s was a delightfully unique collection in this time of monochrome madness, and all the better for it.

ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
ones to watch yeashin AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,A/W 2013, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,knitwear, ,Laura Hickman, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Ones To Watch, ,review, ,South Korean, ,Sylwia Szyszka, ,Victoria Wright, ,woodland, ,Yeashin, ,Yeashin Kim

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sorapol presents IMMORTAL: a fashion film for the A/W 2013 ready-to-wear collection

Sorapol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals

Sorapol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals.

Extravagant Bangkok born fashion designer Sorapol Chawaphatnakul and his equally extravagant creative director – the irrepressible Daniel Lismore – have together created a fantastical short fashion film to accompany the inaugural Sorapol ready-to-wear collection. Take a peek below, and read on to find out more.

What was the inspiration behind the new collection?
This will be the first SORAPOL ready to wear collection. Each collection is usually inspired by one or two elements of history and culture merged together with aesthetics. The new collection is inspired by the common ground between mysticism, surrealism and the animal kingdom. The Fabrics used include, silks, wools and leathers, with much of the collection using natural fibres.

Sorapol Immortal by Leah Nelson

Sorapol Immortal by Leah Nelson.

Which materials feature most heavily in your creations?
Sorapol has worked with a number of extravagant fabrics, from silks to lavish prints, to produce a collection embodying decadence and Oriental contemporaries. Every season we use new materials and try to create new techniques in embroidery and knit. Sorapol like to experiment with new ideas born from couture skills. Our garments have been designed for the modern woman who appreciates timeless designs. The collection includes coats, tailored jackets and evening gowns.

Sorapol by Kimberly Elle#21

Sorapol by Kimberly Ellen Hall.

What was the idea behind the creation of the video?
The Immortal video was based on a tale from 1001 nights. There was once a king who discovered that his wife had been disloyal. He had her executed and then proceeded to marry every fair lady in his kingdom. He protected himself from the treachery of women by putting each wife to death the morning after their wedding. After his marriage to his 1001st wife had been consummated, they lay back on the royal bed. To pass the hours she began telling the king wondrous stories of love and destiny, cutting short each tale just before dawn so that the king would let her live another night to hear the end of the story. After their final night together she escapes with her new lover. The woman portrays our client, who is both strong in character & fearless in style. Sorapol designs are beautiful pieces of armour, fit for the trials and tribulations that life throws at us. A woman who wears Sorapol feels confident about herself in any situation. 

Sorapol By Briony Jose

Sorapol by Briony Jose.

How long did it take to make the video and what were the biggest challenges?
The biggest challenge in making this video was to make a high production film in a short amount of time and on a tight budget, with just one day of shooting which was done at Castle Gibbson in Dalston. It took a while to get the music and sound recordings right, requiring a day in a studio with four singers. The rest was easy. Stephen took two recordings which he sent to us. 

Soropol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals

Soropol IMMORTAL by xplusyequals.

Where are the words from?
The words were written by one of the best wordsmiths we know, Sigmund Oakeshott. We called him one night and asked him to write a piece of art for us. The next day we got it back and it was perfect.

Sorapol illustration by Mitika 28.1.14

Sorapol illustration by Mitika Chohan.

How did you get so many big names involved?
Aiden Shaw, our muse Wei Chiung Lin & BB Kaye are all great believers in making art, the progression of fashion and are all supporters of the brand. They loved the ideas that the head designer, Sorapol and myself as creative director, Daniel Lismore, put to them. Daniel sent the unfinished film to Stephen Fry to ask his opinion. He loved it and kindly agreed to do the narration.

Sorapol by Ste Johnson

Sorapol by Ste Johnson.

What do you hope for in the coming year?
This year we have had the choice of starting to create a ready to wear collection. Showing at The Serpentine Gallery will be the changing point for us as it will be our first show during the time period of London Fashion Week. We plan to launch an accessible diffusion line later on in the year for our large fan base.

Categories ,1001 Nights, ,Aiden Shaw, ,BB Kaye, ,Briony Jose, ,Castle Gibbson, ,dalston, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Film, ,IMMORTAL, ,Kimberly Ellen Hall, ,Leah Nelson, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mitika Chohan, ,Serpentine Gallery, ,Sigmund Oakeshott, ,Sorapol, ,Sorapol Chawaphatnakul, ,Ste Johnson, ,Stephen Fry, ,Wei Chiung Lin, ,xplusyequals

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Amelia’s Magazine | You Can’t Mistake Her Biology

Having spearheaded the new London folk scene with their debut album, there medical Noah and the Whale are back with their hands full up, releasing a new single, album and film out this summer. We talk school plays, Daisy Lowe, weddings, gardening, Werner Herzog in the studio with the effortlessly charming frontman, Charlie Fink.

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Photos by Katie Weatherall

Amelia’s Mag: You’ve got a whole host of new releases coming up – single, album, film – how are you feeling about it all, happy/nervous/excited?

Charlie Fink: All of the above… I dunno, we did the album so long ago… From the last album, I realised the only satisfying feeling you’re going to get is the feeling you get when you’ve finished it and you think it’s good, that’s the best it gets. Reading a review of somebody else saying it’s good is good to show off to your mum, but it doesn’t really mean anything. Likewise, if there’s something you believe in and someone says it’s bad, you’re still going to believe in it.

AM: And the live shows must add another dimension to that?

CF: Yeah. What I’m excited about really is that this record realises us as a band more than the previous one. So that’s going to be really exciting to go out and play that live to people.

AM: And is there anything in particular that has done this or has it been the natural progression of the band?

CF: It’s a million small things, from us playing together more, us growing up, learning our trade a bit better, from what happens in lives and the records you listen to. I very much try to rely as much as I can on instinct and satisfying myself. And this is not a selfish thing because the only way you can supply something worthwhile to somebody else, is if you’re totally satisfied with it yourself. Doing the right things for us and hoping that’ll transfer to the audience.

AM: Was there anything in particular you were listening to whilst making the record?

CF: The things I’m listening to now are different from the things I was listening to when I wrote the record. When I first started the record, I was listening to ‘Spirit of Eden’ by Talk Talk, which is a different sounding record to what we did. Nick Cave, lots by Wilco

AM: So tell me about the film, ‘The First Days Of Spring’, that accompanies the album (of the same name)… which came first?

CF: The first thing was the idea of a film where the background and the pace was defined by an album. But it totally overtook my whole life. It’s one of those things you start for a certain reason and then you keep going for different reasons. The inspiration was sort of how people don’t really listen to albums anymore, they listen to songs. We wanted to try making an all emersive record where the film puts people into it. We’re not dictating that this should be the only way people listen to music, we just wanted to offer something alternative. On a lot of records these days, you don’t feel like the unity of the album gives it more strength than each individual song. Whereas with this record, the whole thing is worth more than the individual parts. That’s how I see it anyway.

The First Days Of Spring Teaser from charlie fink on Vimeo.

There’s this quote from I think W. G. Collingwood that says, ‘art is dead, amusement is all that’s left.’ I like the idea that this project, in the best possible way, is commercially and in lots of other ways pointless. It’s a length that doesn’t exist. It’s not a short film or a feature, it’s 15 minutes and the nature of it is that it’s entirely led by its soundtrack. It’s created for the sake of becoming something that I thought was beautiful.

AM: And Daisy Lowe stars in it, how was that?

CF: She’s an incredibly nice and intelligent person. I met with her in New York when we were mixing the album and I told her I was doing this film… She was immediately interested. And her gave her the record as one whole track which is how I originally wanted it to be released. Just one track on iTunes that had to be listened to as a whole and not just dipped into. She sent me an email two weeks later, because she’s obviously a very busy person. With her listening to the album, a kind of live feed of what she thought of it. Making a film and having her was really good because she kept me motivated and passionate. She genuinely really took to this project. The whole cast as well, everyone really supported it and it was a pleasure to make. I had to fight to get it made and understood. It’s one of those things that people either passionately disagree with or agree with. From thinking it’s absurdly pretentious or beautiful. Fortunately all the people working on the film were passionate people.

AM: So is film making something you want to continue with?

CF: Yeah, definitely! At some point I’d like to make a more conventional film. The thing that really stuck with me about making a film was surround sound. When you’re mixing a film, you’re mixing the sound in surround because you’re mixing for cinemas. You realise the potential of having five speakers around you as opposed to just two in front of you. The complexity of what you can do is vast. So I’d love to something with that. If you record in surround sound you need to hear it in surround sound, so maybe some kind of installation… Then another film after that…

AM: You’ve been put into a folk bracket with your first album, is that something you’re ok with?

CF: I like folk music, I listen to folk music but then every folk artist I like denies they’re folk. It’s one of those things, it doesn’t really matter. We played last year at the Cambridge Folk Festival and I felt really proud to be a part of that. It’s a real music lovers festival. That was a really proud moment so I can’t be that bothered.

AM: I recently sang your first single, ‘5 Years Time’, at a wedding, do you ever imagine the direction your songs may go after you write them?

CF: Wow. That’s really funny. I’ve had a few stories like that actually. It’s touching but it’s not what I’d imagine.

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AM: Do you write songs in that way? Some bands set out to write a love song, dance song etc…

CF: I can’t really remember how I write… I was writing last night but… do you drive?

AM: I just recently failed my test.

CF: Perfect! Well, you know when you start driving you have to think through everything – put my foot on the clutch, take it off the clutch etc. Then when you’ve been doing it a while, you just do all those things without even knowing you’ve done them. That’s how it feels with songwriting, I can’t really remember doing it. It just happens how it happens. Or like gardening… you’ve just gotta chop through and it’ll come.

AM: Is being in a band everything you imagined it to be?

CF: For me it’s more about being creative. I do some production for people, the band, the writing and now the film. I just love what I do and just keep doing it. I follow it wherever it goes. The capacity I have for doing what I do is enough to make it feel precious.

AM: So are there any untapped creative pursuits left for you?

CF: At the moment what I’m doing feels right. I never had any ambitions to paint. I don’t have that skill. I think film and music have always been the two things that have touched me the most.

AM: So how about acting?

CF: I did once at school when I was 13. I played the chancellor in a play the teacher wrote called ‘Suspense and a Dragon Called Norris.’ Which had rapturous reactions from my mum. I don’t think I could do that either. When you direct though you need to understand how acting works. It’s a really fascinating thing but I don’t I’d be any good at it.

AM: Do you prefer the full creative potential a director has?

CF: The best directors are the ones that build a character. Building a character is as important as understanding it. It needs major input from both the director and the actor. You can’t just give an actor the script and expect it to be exactly right. You need to be there to create the little details. The way they eat, the way they smoke… That’s an important skill.

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At this point, Charlie asks me about a note I’d made on my reporter’s pad, which was actually a reminder about a friend’s birthday present. Which draws the conservation to a close as we recite our favourite Werner Herzog films. Turns out, he shares the same taste in film directors as my friend.

Monday 24th August
Mumford and Sons
The Borderline, more about London

UK’s answer to Fleet Foxes, online Mumford and Sons, visit this celebrate their music video to the first single off their debut album in North London tonight.

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Tuesday 25th August
Wilco
The Troxy, London

If Charlie from Noah and the Whale tells us he likes Wilco, then we like Wilco. It’s as simple as that. It’s time to get educated.

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Wednesday 26th August
The Hot Rats
The Old Blue Last, London

Otherwise known as half of Supergrass plus hot shot Radiohead producer, The Hot Rats get their kicks taking pop classics by, amongst others, The Beatles and The Kinks and infusing their own alt-rock psychedelica – worth a gander.

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Thursday 27th August
KILL IT KID
Madam Jo Jos, London

Their blend of durge blues, barndance and freestyle frenzy jazz blues make KILL IT KID a gem to behold in a live setting.

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Friday 28th August
Swanton Bombs
Old Blue Last, London

If you like your indie adorned in Mod and brimming with angularity, then Swanton Bombs will be pushing the trigger on your buttons.

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Saturday 29th August
South East in East Festival – Teenagers In Tokyo, Tronik Youth, Ali Love, Publicist
Vibe Bar, London

It’s all about South East London – full stop. In this cunning event, it up sticks to East London, where synth-pop Gossip descendents, Teenagers In Tokyo headline a night of New X Rave.

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Sunday 30th August
The Gladstone Open Mic Night
The Gladstone, London

As it’s Bank Holiday Weekend and all the bands are at Reading/Leeds Festival, London is starved of big gigs. No fear, The Glad is here – A little known drinking hole in Borough that continually serves up a plethora of folkey talent… and pies!

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Sunderland born designer Rosie Upright is truly passionate about design. Aren’t we all I hear you say? Well, health she’s up, recipe all hours, medical day or night… cutting away with her trusty stanley knife… stopping only when her numb fingertips plead for rest. Do your fingertips bleed? I thought not! Rosie developed her unique hand-crafted techniques whilst at university in Epsom, where she learnt all the usual computer design programs… and then decided to steer clear of them. She’s fled the suburbs of Epsom now, to live in London town with all the other hopeful new freelancers. She spends her days photographing, drawing, organising balls of string… and deciding what hat to wear.
We caught up with Rosie for a little chat…

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Hi, how are you today?

I’ve got a bit of a sore throat coming on, the irritating children over the road are noisily playing some kind of shooting game, a car is beeping its horn continuously just below my window, itunes is refusing to play anything other than Billy Idol (which I’m not in the mood for), my coloured ink cartridge has just ran out, I’ve got a blister from my favourite pink shoes, an uninvited wasp is stuck in my blinds, my ginger hair has faded to a weird brown, I forgot to buy milk and Ronnie Mitchell is still crying on Eastenders – but apart from that I’m topper thanks.

What have you been up to lately?

Fingers in pies, fingers in pies!
Including…cross-stitch and a week in a cottage in Norfolk (no telephone signal or internet connection, bloody lovely!)

Which artists or illustrators do you most admire?

I don’t think I would have done a degree in graphic design if my ever-encouraging parents hadn’t taken me to a Peter Saville exhibition at the Urbis in Manchester many moons ago. Made me see the ideas process at its very best and the crucial-ness (that’s not even a word!) of initial doodles and sketchbooks.
“Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” Where would any of us be if it weren’t for Dr Seuss?
I really love a bit of Russian Constructivism, in particular Alexander Rodchenko and Varvara Stepanova, bloody genius.
Mr Vaughan Oliver, for making us all think differently about where to crop the image, for being an ongoing influence and for that opportunity.
Harry Beck, Robert Doisneau and most recently Philippe Petit.

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If we visited you in your hometown, where would you take us?

Stroll down to Seaburn beach because when you don’t live next to the sea anymore you really miss it, and it has really nice sand. Then to my very best friend Sarah Bowman’s house, to play with Peggy Sue the kitten, have mental vegetarian sandwiches off a cake stand, and a glass of red wine, ice cubes and coke. We should pop to an art shop in Darlington and then to The Borough, the best pub for tunes, a pint of cider and a Jaeger bomb.

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Who would most love to collaborate with creatively?

Mike Perry and YES art studio please. Thank you.

When did you realise you had creative talent?

When some hippy artist came into my junior school to create banners for some event at the local library with us. I was told after five minutes of colouring it in that I had to go away and read because I couldn’t keep within the lines.

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If you weren’t an artist, what would you be doing?

A teenage Mam or an actress, haven’t decided which yet.

Where would you like to be in 10 years time?

I’d like to be the designer than graphic design students hate because their tutors always tell them to get their book out of the Uni library. And I’d quite like to have my own shop in London, Brighton or maybe Newcastle (or all three, and maybe Paris then if we’re going crazy) selling things made by me!

What advice would you give up and coming artists such as yourself?

Take other peoples advice but make your own mistakes, don’t be a dick and always colour outside of the lines.

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How would you describe your art in five words?

Hand made/ typography/ narrative/ personal/ I’d like to say idiosyncratic too but don’t want to sound like a twat.

What is your guilty pleasure?

Seeing people fall over.
(and cake)

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If you could time travel back or forward to any era, where would you go?

It was horrific enough moving away to University and into London and trying to find a job and start my life up. I think if I had to go backward or forward to another era I would probably just straight up die. Having said that though I would like to be a highwayman’s assistant.

Tell us something about Rosie Upright that we didn’t know already.

I can’t wait till I’m an old lady so I can wear those lacy nighties from Marks & Sparks and I love animals in clothes.

What are you up to next?

Going to make a cuppa tea, kill this wasp and then take over the world.
While most of us at the tender age of 19 rooted our existence in smacking down vodka jelly shots at the bar with kebabs at four in the morning and the Hollyoaks omnibus on a Sunday, pilule some people, of course, are born to shine in different ways. Take, for instance, London College of Fashion student Millie Cockton, somebody who has already had their work featured in a shoot for Dazed and Confused, styled by Robbie Spencer.

As a lover of clean lines and beautiful silhouettes, Millie looks for the wearer to bring their own identity to her gender non-specific pieces. At the moment under new label Euphemia, with her AW09/10 about to be stocked in London boutique and gallery space Digitaria, after being chosen to be the first guest designer at the Soho store. Check out the Dazed piece to see some brilliant Shakespearian-style ruffs that Millie has also created working with paper (a material proving popular as with Petra Storrs, who I featured last week).

Each to their own, mind you. I could totally do all that, if I wanted to.

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At the age of 19 you’ve already received quite a lot of attention – how has that been?

It’s been great so far! It’s very flattering but its also very daunting! I am on a constant learning curve and my work is developing all the time so although the attention is great it creates a lot of pressure!

Describe your design aesthetic in three words.

Clean, sculptural, understated.

Who do you see wearing your designs? Are they reflective of your own personality?

I like to think of a real mixture of people wearing my designs. I love the way that the same garment can look completely different on different people- for me its all about the individual and how they carry themselves, bringing their own identity to the piece.

I don’t think that my designs are necessarily a true representation of my personality and personal style. I feel that my designs are more of a reflection of the aesthetic that i find desirable and aspirational.

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Thinking about the ruffs featured in Dazed, people have touched on the theatrical nature of your designs – is the idea of performance important to you in fashion?

The idea of performance within fashion is something that interests me but I wouldn’t say that it’s a key element within my own designs. I like the notion of a performative element within a piece or a collection as i think that it helps gain a further understanding and insight of the designers thought process and inspiration.

What else do you respond to?

I am constantly discovering new sources of inspiration, being so young I know that I still have so much to learn!

Who are your fashion icons?

Yves Saint Laurent, Katherine Hepburn, Grace Jones.

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Is craft something else you’re interested in too?

I like to use elements of craft within my designs, such as origami style folding. Craft elements can add interesting details to simple pieces.

What are your plans for the future? Who would you like to work for?

I am about to launch my new collection which will be stocked in Digitaria, recently opened on Berwick St, Soho. I have just started to work with Digitaria’s creative director , Stavros Karelis and stylist Paul Joyce on some future projects which are really exciting and I am thoroughly enjoying. I want to continue learning and developing my ideas, challenging myself and most importantly keep having fun!

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‘Having fun’ of course might well translate to ‘becoming future fashion empress of the galaxy’. This is a talent to watch out for.

Photographs:George Mavrikos
Styling: Paul Joyce
Model: Antonia @ FM models

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Image by Mia Overgaard

The Camp for Climate Action 2009 is almost upon us – now’s the time to gather ourselves and prepare to swoop. Convinced that the response to climate change needs more? Ready to share skills, stomach knowledge and experiences? To be part of the grassroots swell of people demanding a difference? To get out there and do something?

Climate Camp is for you.

Be ready next Wednesday, 12th August, from noon, in London. We’re going to swoop on the camp location together. The more people the better. Secret until the last moment, you can sign up for text alerts and join one of the groups meeting scattered about central London before moving together to the camp.

Why Camp? We can all meet each other and learn stuff – reason enough? – I mean, an enormous, public, activist-friendly child-friendly student-friendly climate-friendly gathering with an ambitious and well-prepared programme of workshops covering all things from Tai Chi for those of us up early enough, through histories student activism, DIY radio, pedal-powered sound systems, legal briefings, stepping into direct action, singing, dancing, jumping and waving.

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Why London? Climate Campers have listed ten reasons to focus on London – right up the top of that list is : tall buildings and low flood plains. London is big corporate central, the City square mile itself accounting for a huge proportion of the UK economy, that FTSE100-flavoured slice of barely accountable, shareholder driven pie. And yet, as the Thames Barrier should always remind us, the whole city sits low on the ground. Just check out what the centre looks like with a few metres rise in sea level.

So what’s first? The Climate Camp Benefit party/shindig/jamboree/palooza/knee’s-up/gala ball/discotheque/rave/soiree at RampART, 9pm-3am this Friday 21st August. Consisting of fun/revelry/ribaldry/tomfoolery/jocularity/jive/merriment/high kinks, low jinks, jinks of all stature/cheer/gambol/horseplay & frolic. With bands & DJ’s including Rob the Rub & Sarah Bear & those amazing skiffle kids ‘The Severed Limb’. That’s at:

9pm-3am
rampART, 15 -17 Rampart Street,
London E1 2LA (near Whitechapel, off Commercial Rd)
Donations on the door much appreciated (and needed!) – all going straight to Climate Camp

And then? The Swoop – Night Before – Londoners and out-of-town visitors are welcome to ‘the night before the swoop’ – near the bandstand in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, 7-8.30pm, Tuesday 25th August – for any last minute info, a legal briefing and an opportunity to join an affinity group and get excited. Lincoln’s Inn Fields is just behind Holborn tube station – this map here might help.

Awesome. See you soon.

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Ctrl.Alt.Shift dropped us a line to let us know about a comics-making competition so get your promarkers and layout pads at the ready. Ctrl.Alt.Shift Unmarks Corruption is giving you the opportunity to design a unique comic style story. Ctrl.Alt.Shift is the experimental youth initiative politicising a new generation of activists for social justice and global change. The competition hopes to raise awareness of the Ctrl.Alt.Shift and Lightspeed Champion goals and views by inspiring this generation of designers to work together.

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Oscar nominated Marjane Satrapi, medical V V Brown and Lightspeed Champion are amongst the judges for the Ctrl.Alt.Shift Unmasks Corruption competition launched today. Corruption is both a cause of poverty, and a barrier to overcoming it. It is one of the most serious obstacles to eradicate.

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Entrants to the competition will be in with the chance to create a unique comic style story in collaboration with acclaimed musician and writer Dev Hynes aka Lightspeed Champion. After the first round of judging at the end of September, shortlisted entrants will be given Lightspeed Champion’s comic script as inspiration and asked to create a visual adaptation of the story.

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The winning commission will be published in a comic alongside new work exploring the issue of Corruption by some of comic’s greatest talents. The work will also be showcased as part of a new exhibition, Ctrl.Alt.Shift Unmasks Corruption, later this year at Lazarides Gallery, Soho.
To enter the competition please send relevant examples of your visual work along with your contact details to Ctrl.Alt.Shift by Friday 25th September by visiting www.ctrlaltshift.co.uk/unmaskscorruption.

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Five short listed artists will then be given a comic brief to respond to and a winner chosen by a panel of judges including: Marjane Satrapi (Writer and Director of Academy Award Nominated Animated Film Persepolis) Paul Gravett (Comica founder), V V Brown and David Allain (Musician and Comic Book Writer/Artist duo), Lightspeed Champion and Ctrl.Alt.Shift.

The competition is restricted to UK Residents only
For further information about the competition please contact John Doe on 020 7749 7530 or Hannah@johndoehub.com / Jo.bartlett@johndoehub.com
Brooke Roberts is my favourite new designer. Why? Well, more about after exchanging several emails with her over the last few weeks, for sale for a young designer making such waves in the industry, her witty and playful personality has impressed even via my inbox! Having worked with such characters such as Louise Goldin and Giles, her avant- garde aesthetic really shines through in her highly tailored and retro-feel designs. Miss Roberts is going places, and she’s more than willing to take us along with her!

brooke3.JPG

What made you want to be a designer? What’s your design background?

I’m definitely not one of those designers who always knew that’s what they wanted to do. I did a degree in Applied Science at Sydney University (I’m from Australia) and worked as a radiographer for a year before moving to London to find out what I wanted to do. I did some work as a stylist with a fashion photographer (random hook-up). I knew his girlfriend and she knew my massive extensive collection of vintage clothes and shoes. My mum had a boutique when I was growing up and I loved clothes – I just never knew it was going to be my career.

I did a few jobs in London (pub, bank – more randomness) before realising I wanted to study fashion. I went to London College of Fashion and Central St.Martins (graduated 2005) wanting to be a pattern-cutter or tailor. I really wanted to create, rather than design. I get most satisfaction from making beautiful things and being involved in the whole process. I have a close working relationship with my suppliers, and go to the factories to develop my garments. I cut them all myself, which is probably bordering on control freakery, but I feel it shows in the final product and I can realise my designs exactly as I imagine them.

I’m waffling. I worked for Giles for two seasons after I left Uni, and started with Louise Goldin when she launched her label. We worked together for three years (until last October when I launched my label).

What are your inspirations for your collections?

I get lots of inspiration from my radiography job (I do that part-time to fund my label). So I’m running between the hospital and my studio all the time. I have used CT (cat) brain scans this season to create knit fabrics and digital prints. My obsession with reptile skins never seems to go away, and I have worked with Anwen Jenkins (awesome print designer) to create skull slice python skin prints. Basically, the python scales are replaced with multi-dimensional skull slices.

Apart from that, I research at museums and LCF Library. This season went to the British Museum and discovered Yoruba sculpture and traditional costumes. I researched these for silhouette and style lines. I also looked at Niger garments. They’re beautifully colourful, vibrant and flamboyant.

brooke%201.jpg

What are your favourite pieces from your latest collection?

Umm. I wear the cat suit most. I actually met my boyfriend the first time I wore it. So I’m renaming it Lucky cat suit. I also love the Flex jacket in red snakeskin. The razor sharp points make me feel like I am ready for world domination!

What was it like working with Giles Deacon and Louise Goldin? What did you learn from them?

I learnt that I hate taking orders from others! I’m really not one to toe-the-line. I am a perfectionist and this drives other people mad sometimes. I was a pattern-cutter at Giles, doing mostly tailoring, which suited me fine. Most people wanted to do the showpieces, but I was most happy cutting jackets. Giles is a really lovely bloke. Working with him was really my first experience of doing shows and the pressure and stress of getting everything done.

With Louise, my job was broader because in the beginning it was just the two of us. I learnt so much, I can’t even write it down. I worked in the London studio and the knitwear factory in Italy. I had the opportunity to learn knitwear programming, selecting yarns and cutting and constructing knit. I still work in the factory for my own label and really love it. The other big thing was learning about running a business and starting from scratch. The hoops you have to jump through, the process of getting sponsorship, doing shows, sales and production… It’s a massive undertaking starting your own label. And I still chose to do it! Bonkers.

brookegood.JPG

Who do you think are the most important designers of your generation?

Hmm. Well, I like the work of Tina Kalivas and Gareth Pugh. If we’re talking most important, it has to be Gareth.

I’m really a lover of 80′s and 90′s designers. I find the work of Gianni Versace, Thierry Mugler and Rifat Ozbek most relevant to my style and most exciting.

What do you think are the problems facing young designers at the moment?

The biggest problems are funding and dealing with suppliers, particularly for production. Creating a beautiful product that you can reproduce is actually really difficult! You need to understand the technicalities of fabrics and construction (or hire someone who does) otherwise it all goes wrong.

brookegood2.JPG

What’s next for Brooke Roberts?

In fantasy land, what’s next for Brooke Roberts is a holiday. In reality, I’m working hard on marketing and sales for London Fashion Week. I’m collaborating with jewellery designer Chris Edwards and shoe and bag designer Laura Villasenin on side projects for the label. Look out for skull slice stacked rings and metal bone-fixation embellished super-soft bags for SS10!!

Find Brooke stocked at the King and Queen of Bethnal Green.

Categories ,Digital Prints, ,Knitwear, ,London Fashion Week, ,Reptile Print, ,Skulls

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Amelia’s Magazine | Swedish School of Textiles: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review part two

Emma Lindqvist by Novemto Komo
Emma Lindqvist by Novemto Komo.

Following on from part one of my review I present the next six graduates to show on the catwalk with the Swedish School of Textiles at Fashion Scout in Freemasons’ Hall. As always, there were some ace looks to grace the runway…

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Saina Koohnavard was enamoured of brocade and optical geometric prints in Chickipedia, using the lines to emphasise womanly curves in puff sleeved dresses and bodiced playsuits.

Swedish school of textiles by-Antonia-Parker
Emelie Arvidsson by Antonia Parker.

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Emelie Arvidsson‘s End of Line played with sportswear styling: oversizing the familiar stripes on maxi dresses and jackets.

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
For Duo Klara Hobbs played with simple panels of fabric that exposed the unexpected.

Swedish School Of Textiles SS14 2 by Gareth A Hopkins
Gustav Falgen by Gareth A Hopkins.

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Gustav Falgen looked to multiple subcultures to create a bleached, puffered, braced and booted collection that was not for the faint hearted. Bears on the Loose, indeed.

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Emma Lindqvist had fun layering abstract prints on different opacities of fabrics to create optical illusions as the clothes moved.

Swedish School of Textiles SS14 by Vicky Ink
Karolina Persson by Vicky Ink.

Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Swedish School of Textiles SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Karolina Persson took next season’s favourite powder pink and spruced it up for colder climes. Her incredibly clever collection featured a round shouldered coat that had been quilted to resemble a chunky knit. Further garments played with this tromp l’oeil effect, emphasising cables with print and stitch. It was a great collection to end on. Graduates of the Swedish School of Textiles never fail to impress.

All photography by Amelia Gregory. Watch a video featuring all of the designers below:

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Bears on the Loose, ,Chickipedia, ,Duo, ,Emelie Arvidsson, ,Emma Lindqvist, ,End of Line, ,Exit 13, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,graduate, ,Gustav Falgen, ,Karolina Persson, ,Klara Hobbs, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Novemto Komo, ,review, ,Saina Koohnavard, ,Swedish, ,Swedish School of Textiles, ,textiles, ,Vicky Ink

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Amelia’s Magazine | Youjia Jin AW15: London Fashion Week Catwalk Review

Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 9
Everything about the Youjia Jin collection was well considered. Perfect tailoring was given a unique and fanciful twist, deftly playing with usual proportions and stylistic norms. A coat appeared one thing from the front and another from the back, with a swishing cape attached to a smartly tailored jacket. Sheer was combined with wool, cable knit provided detail on a pleated suit dress and gossamer light cascading ruffles adorned skirt waists, sleeves and hems. A traditional single breasted suit collar became the main feature on a coat dress. My favourite piece was a beautiful pinstripe wrap over dress that flared elegantly over a dark underskirt: so flattering and different.

Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 1
Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 6
Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 17
Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 38
Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 45
Youjia Jin AW15-photo by Amelia Gregory 37
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Youjia Jin AW 15/16 from FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,A/W 2015, ,AW15, ,catwalk, ,London Fashion Week, ,review, ,Show report, ,Youjia Jin

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tabernacle Twins: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Karolina Burdon.

Tabernacle Twins was a new brand to me, but having visited the website my interest was piqued. The label is described as an exploration of fashion, textiles and illustration by designer Vibe Lundemark, a graduate of the RCA now relocated home to Denmark.

Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Rose Crees
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014 by Rose Crees.

The show began with the appearance of the ‘Tabernacle Twins‘ who, as Vibe Lundemark‘s creative muses, take fictional journeys through surreal landscapes. This season the scene was set for a Cobra Casablanca, with our handouts describing a desert quest to search for a magic cobra, meeting fortune tellers, jesters and street magicians along the way. These ideas were translated into colourful abstract illustrations that crept and curled across large panels of fabric on dresses and blowsy shirts. Vibe Lundemark used a bold colour palette of lilac, purple, peach and ochre which was lightened by plentiful white across this relaxed collection. Girls with bright matte orange lips swung talismans from their wrists and paced the catwalk in patent white DMs with ankle socks. Alongside blouson shapes that were the perfect canvas for prints there were tailored details that included cowl necks, a crop top covered in pointy scales and a lacey matching shorts suit. A marbled chequerboard in deep purple on white created an arresting all over effect.

Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins S/S 2014. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

It seemed odd that the girls chosen as twins were barely alike, and not even the same height, but that aside the twins were an appealing visual concept, who cropped up several times on the runway wearing key pieces. I liked the use of narrative to drive ideas behind the collection and look forward to seeing more from the Tabernacle Twins on future Fashion Scout runways.

Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tabernacle Twins SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,catwalk, ,Cobra Casablanca, ,copenhagen, ,Danish, ,Denmark, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karolina Burdon, ,London Fashion Week, ,rca, ,review, ,Rose Crees, ,S/S 2014, ,Tabernacle Twins, ,Vibe Lundemark

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Amelia’s Magazine | Zeynep Kartal: London Fashion Week A/W 2014 Catwalk Review

Zeynep Kartel A/W 2014 by Melissa Angelik

Zeynep Kartel A/W 2014 by Melissa Angelik.

I was witness to the run through for Zeynep Kartal when I took a wrong turning at Freemasons’ Hall and ended up in the wrong venue… easy to do when the route to the shows are changed each season. This meant I already had a clear idea of the kind of thing to expect from this Turkish designer well before I sat down for the main event.

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynap Kartal A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman

Zeynap Kartal A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman.

The Manchester based designer boasts more than twenty years of experience in the fashion business, and for her first turn on the London Fashion Week catwalk she delivered pretty embellished evening wear fabricated from sheer and glitzy fabrics in an eye-pleasing colour palette of deep blue, blood red, gold and cream. Pattern details on this elegant and feminine collection were inspired by a combination of the Gothic revival architecture of Manchester’s Town Hall and Hollywood high glamour. The show ended with a fabulous 40s inspired wedding dress from her bridal range, but my favourite pieces (and the most fashion forward of the show) were those that featured a delicate all over sequinned zebra pattern. You can never have enough animal patterns in your life, you know.

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Zeynep Kartal AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,A/W 2014, ,catwalk, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Hollywood, ,Isher Dhiman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Melissa Angelik, ,review, ,Town Hall, ,Turkish, ,Zeynep Kartal

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tata Naka: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Presentation Review

Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander.

Since Tata Naka returned to London Fashion Week it has become customary for Tamara and Natasha Surguladze to create a wonderful set that they photograph live for their upcoming season’s look book: it’s a great concept and always a lot of fun to watch from the sidelines: the whole experience more akin to voyeurism than the traditional catwalk show. This season the Georgian twins were inspired by American High School movies and the multitude of references that underpin these down the decades. So here we had very preppy 50s styles abutting up against the big bouffant hair of the 1980s, a very direct reference to which was found in the graffiti wall that provided the backdrop to one set up, ‘Breakfast Club‘ written in bubble writing above a heart. Sugary coloured tweeds were layered over stripes and trademark graphic prints that merged Mondrian blocks with Pop Art faces, the illustrative elements of which were inspired by iconic scenes from key 80s movies. As we milled around we were served cocktails in milk cartons by ‘dinner ladies’ courtesy of Bompas & Parr.

Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Rebecca French
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Rebecca French.

In the locker room sweethearts covered a simple pencil dress, the detail echoed in a cute cut out back. An A-line skirt was worn with a baseball jacket: other girls wore big quiffs and pastel blocks, both tapered trousers and pencil skirts given sheer mesh slices at the hemlines. Sets were changed with alarming speed and confidence, but the downside of this way of showing is that unless you have an hour or so free you will only manage to see a small portion of the collection. I managed to see two set changes by Chameleon Visual: Jenny Robins took photos of the cheerleaders at the bleachers, and there was also a Prom shoot, where sweethearts emerged yet again as a major theme. The talented Tata Naka twins once more showcased their inventive A/W 2013 collection in wonderfully inimitable style. I have come to expect nothing less.

Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka A/W 2013. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Tata Naka by Jenny Robins
Tata Naka by Jenny Robins
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Jenny Robins.

Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Cissy Hu
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Cissy Hu.

Tata_Naka by_Daniel_Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander.

Categories ,1980s, ,50s, ,A/W 2013, ,American High School movies, ,Bompas & Parr, ,Breakfast Club, ,Chameleon Visual, ,Cheerleaders, ,Cissy Hu, ,Daniel Alexander, ,Georgian, ,Jenny Robins, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mondrian, ,Movies, ,Pop Art, ,Prom, ,Rebecca French, ,Tamara and Natasha Surguladze, ,Tata Naka

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Amelia’s Magazine | Zeynep Kartal: London Fashion Week S/S 2015 Catwalk Review

Zeynep Kartal by Sine Skau
Zeynep Kartal by Sine Skau.

Turkish born Zeynep Kartal is one of the new influx of foreign born designers who are bringing a little red carpet glamour to the Fashion Scout catwalks. Her SS15 catwalk show opened with zingy lemon yellow floor sweeping gowns – backless, strapless, sheer, asymmetric glamour offset with barely there make up and simple locks worn cascading down the back. Zeynep Kartal’s Efflorescence collection featured plenty of floaty dresses covered in subtle rose pink and white florals inspired by the classic novel The Secret Garden, and for those preferring a darker palette there were boxy dove grey satin tops embellished with beaded starbursts and pleated georgette dresses with plunging necklines and cinched-in waists. A glorious rose encrusted A-line dress made for a playful finale from the Manchester based designer.

Scroll down to watch a video of the collection.

Zeynep Kartal Spring Summer 2015, Illustration by Rosa Crepax and Carlotta Crepax, Illustrated Moodboard for Amelia's Magazine
Zeynep Kartal SS15 by Rosa Crepax and Carlotta Crepax of Illustrated Moodboard.

Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
Zeynep Kartal SS 2015-photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Catwalk review, ,Efflorescence, ,Evening Wear, ,Fashion Scout, ,floral, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Glamour, ,Illustrated Moodboard, ,London Fashion Week, ,manchester, ,Red carpet, ,Rosa Crepax and Carlotta Crepax, ,S/S 2015, ,Sine Skau, ,SS15, ,The Secret Garden, ,Turkish, ,Zeynep Kartal

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