Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, Carlotta Actis Barone

Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba.

It was the huge and elaborate headdresses by Rachel Galley that grabbed our immediate attention as the first models traversed the catwalk, visit their steady heads bearing wide concoctions of twirling metal, flowers and swinging tassels for Carlotta Actis Barone‘s S/S 2012 commentary ‘on the stolen liberty and beauty associated with prostitution.’

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Carlotta Actis Barone is one of three designers who are being mentored by Fashion Mode, a mysterious entity that provides direction and support in everything from design to business management and marketing.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas.

The new collection was inspired by a cross pollination of cultural ideas: Victorian brothels and French boudoir style from the turn of the last century contrasted with the high class prostitution and honour traditionally associated with being a Geisha.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 by t. reidy
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by t.reidy.

Swishing lilac and cream dresses with roped detailing around the bust and waist signified the imprisonment of prostitution, whilst loosely draped pencil skirts and lingerie-styled tunics suggested a more playful air of seduction, accessorised with wide patterned kimono inspired waist wraps.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Orchid hair accessories and china doll make-up added to the air of naive idolisation of feminine beauty, but the clash of styles did not always work. Wrinkled tights patterned with stripes of letters (a signature of Barone) were a questionable styling detail and high heeled see through plastic stripper shoes filled with orchids were downright tacky, but overall this was an eye-catching collection from a talented new designer with original ideas. Amongst my favourite pieces were cream big pocketed trench coats with huge flouncy bows on the bum, and vibrant tropical printed silk dresses in green, vermillion and lime.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

The definitely not very shy and retiring Carlotta Actis Barone was wearing one of her printed boudoir wraps when she strode out to take a bow at the end of the catwalk, and – somewhat ironically given the theme of her collection – her bosoms made an excited bid for freedom, much to the amusement of the crowd.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Brothels, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Casey Otremba, ,China Doll, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,French Boudoir, ,Geisha, ,Headdresses, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Megan Thomas, ,Orchids, ,prints, ,Prostitution, ,Rachel Galley, ,Stripper Shoes, ,t.reidy, ,Tassels, ,Tina Reidy, ,Victorian

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, Carlotta Actis Barone

Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba.

It was the huge and elaborate headdresses by Rachel Galley that grabbed our immediate attention as the first models traversed the catwalk, visit their steady heads bearing wide concoctions of twirling metal, flowers and swinging tassels for Carlotta Actis Barone‘s S/S 2012 commentary ‘on the stolen liberty and beauty associated with prostitution.’

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Carlotta Actis Barone is one of three designers who are being mentored by Fashion Mode, a mysterious entity that provides direction and support in everything from design to business management and marketing.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas.

The new collection was inspired by a cross pollination of cultural ideas: Victorian brothels and French boudoir style from the turn of the last century contrasted with the high class prostitution and honour traditionally associated with being a Geisha.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 by t. reidy
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by t.reidy.

Swishing lilac and cream dresses with roped detailing around the bust and waist signified the imprisonment of prostitution, whilst loosely draped pencil skirts and lingerie-styled tunics suggested a more playful air of seduction, accessorised with wide patterned kimono inspired waist wraps.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Orchid hair accessories and china doll make-up added to the air of naive idolisation of feminine beauty, but the clash of styles did not always work. Wrinkled tights patterned with stripes of letters (a signature of Barone) were a questionable styling detail and high heeled see through plastic stripper shoes filled with orchids were downright tacky, but overall this was an eye-catching collection from a talented new designer with original ideas. Amongst my favourite pieces were cream big pocketed trench coats with huge flouncy bows on the bum, and vibrant tropical printed silk dresses in green, vermillion and lime.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

The definitely not very shy and retiring Carlotta Actis Barone was wearing one of her printed boudoir wraps when she strode out to take a bow at the end of the catwalk, and – somewhat ironically given the theme of her collection – her bosoms made an excited bid for freedom, much to the amusement of the crowd.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Brothels, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Casey Otremba, ,China Doll, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,French Boudoir, ,Geisha, ,Headdresses, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Megan Thomas, ,Orchids, ,prints, ,Prostitution, ,Rachel Galley, ,Stripper Shoes, ,t.reidy, ,Tassels, ,Tina Reidy, ,Victorian

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode No.3 Carlotta Actis Barone (by Helen)

Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, viagra 100mg help somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, seek and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, cure but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don etc. and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing crude oil wholeheartedly, he has studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator who I saw at the end of the show. “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, viagra 100mg somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don etc. and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing crude oil wholeheartedly, he has studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator who I saw at the end of the show. “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, viagra approved somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, try and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing crude oil wholeheartedly, he has studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator who I saw at the end of the show. “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, unhealthy somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, tadalafil and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing the concept wholeheartedly, he studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator. I saw him at the end of the show. Statement on James Hillman follows: “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, nurse somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, view and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Anne N’Toko

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing the concept wholeheartedly, he studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator. I saw him at the end of the show. Statement on James Hillman follows: “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

I will confess now. I may have gone over the top. Yes, information pills this blog is positively popping at the seams with illustrations. And it’s the FOURTH, order yes the FOURTH one to hit our website. But really it’s no surprise that Prophetik is such a big draw for both writers and illustrators, capsule peddling as he does an uber romantic view of the world that is steeped in a deep love for the natural world.

For his A/W 2011 Artist Wonderment collection designer Jeff Garner once again referenced times past, this time the “frivolous snobbery” of the court of Louix XV, an epoch that for him epitomises the falsity of impulsive consumption. Having interviewed Jeff Garner for my book, Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration I know how important to him it is to live a fully accountable life, and it seems to me that the title of this collection refers to the purity of artistic vision with which he himself attempts to live his own life.

It was the detailing which really stood out as the models swept past me. His ball gowns and corseted dresses were awash with gorgeously constructed patchwork, twirly brocade, gilded buttons and ruffles. But the absolute stand outs were a couple of stupendous quilted jackets. And by quilted I really do actually mean made out of an antique quilt, one of which belonged on his childhood bed that he must surely have baulked at destructing – just a tiny bit. But as his stylist Rebekah Roy pointed out to me later on, it makes absolute sense to refashion a quilt in this way – a quilt that in the very first place was made from fabric remnants.

This approach of continuous upcycling is certainly innovative, and what I love most about Jeff is his dedication to sustainable practice. All his fabrics are painstakingly hand dyed with a magical potion of herbs in a process that takes many weeks to accomplish – this season’s special plum colour was obtained by mixing up a blend of madder root, sorrel, logwood and indigo. Of anyone on the ethical fashion scene I really feel that Prophetik is pushing the way forward by putting on a ambitious catwalk show that ensures excitement amongst mainstream fashionistas. Prophetik opened Fashion Scout for the third season running and the Freemasons Hall was packed to the rafters, including famous front row attendees in the form of Hilary Alexander and Livia Firth, erstwhile wife of Colin and celebrity advocate of ethical fashion.

I can only hope that Jeff’s dedication to the ethical cause will rub off on other members of the fashion industry. Soon.
I will confess now. I may have gone over the top. Yes, store this blog is positively popping at the seams with illustrations. And it’s the FOURTH, yes the FOURTH one to hit our website. But really it’s no surprise that Prophetik is such a big draw for both writers and illustrators, peddling as he does an uber romantic view of the world that is steeped in a deep love for the natural world.

For his A/W 2011 Artist Wonderment collection designer Jeff Garner once again referenced times past, this time the “frivolous snobbery” of the court of Louix XV, an epoch that for him epitomises the falsity of impulsive consumption. Having interviewed Jeff Garner for my book, Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration I know how important to him it is to live a fully accountable life, and it seems to me that the title of this collection refers to the purity of artistic vision with which he himself attempts to live his own life.

The show opened in typical Jeff style, with live vocals followed by a madly thrashing classical violinist, who strutted down the catwalk as if her life depended on it. But it was the finer detailing which really stood out as the models swept past me. His ball gowns and corseted dresses were awash with gorgeously constructed patchwork, twirly brocade, gilded buttons and ruffles. But the absolute stand outs were a couple of stupendous quilted jackets. And by quilted I really do actually mean made out of an antique quilt, one of which belonged on his childhood bed that he must surely have baulked at destructing – just a tiny bit. But as his stylist Rebekah Roy pointed out to me later on, it makes absolute sense to refashion a quilt in this way – a quilt that in the very first place was made from fabric remnants.

This approach of continuous upcycling is certainly innovative, and what I love most about Jeff is his dedication to sustainable practice. All his fabrics are painstakingly hand dyed with a magical potion of herbs in a process that takes many weeks to accomplish – this season’s special plum colour was obtained by mixing up a blend of madder root, sorrel, logwood and indigo. Of anyone on the ethical fashion scene I really feel that Prophetik is pushing the way forward by putting on a ambitious catwalk show that ensures excitement amongst mainstream fashionistas. Prophetik opened Fashion Scout for the third season running and the Freemasons Hall was packed to the rafters, including famous front row attendees in the form of Hilary Alexander and Livia Firth, erstwhile wife of Colin and celebrity advocate of ethical fashion. At the end Jeff took a demure bow dressed in a cream silky top and powder blue peddle pushers: if there’s one major advocate for dressing this way it’s the ever dapper Jeff Garner himself.

I can only hope that Jeff’s dedication to the ethical cause will rub off on other members of the fashion industry. Soon.
Carlotta_Actis_Barone_Abby_Wright_LFW

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Abby Wright

Well the third of Fashion Mode’s designers this Sunday was simply put: stunningly pretty and explosive. Frosted make up, and backcombed and massive hair, more about beige skyscraper heels and icy pouts – all complimented utterly beautiful pieces from the designer. Carlotta Actis Barone drew gasps and ‘ooohs’ as her models sashayed down the catwalk. These girls were ice princesses. With enormous hoods, view fluffy shrugs, pom poms, exposed zips, extravagant fishtail dresses, flamboyant netting and super sleek, pencil skirts; they all had a heavenly, intense, snowy fairytale vibe.

Gemma Milly-Carlotta Actis Barone-Fashion Mode-A-W11

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Gemma Milly

Reading about the designer, her artistic training has been life -long. Carlotta Actis Barone is the daughter of Italian visual artist Manuela Corti and writer Gianni Actis Barone. Although she discovered her true passion for fashion at the age of 24. During her study at Central St. Martin’s College of Art and Design for a BA in Fashion Print, she went on a gap year, working with Korean designer Moon Young Hee, B.C.B.G Max Azria Manoukian and Balmain.. Explaining the bold colour use in her collection, we discover that Carlotta’s pieces are based around strong, feminine women. She often also has a political edge to her designs, and is extremely passionate about the ethical issues surrounding fashion. These ethical opinions are often reflected in her designs, this season being no exception. The Autumn/Winter 2011 collection focuses on cruelty against animals, with particular focus on fur, and seals. We all know fur is wrong, our animals should be celebrated, not worn. We at Amelia’s feel very fiercely about this. See Amelia’s own ethical fashion book, here.

Gareth A Hopkins Carlotta Fashion Mode AW11

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Hence for Carlotta, the frosted lipped models, beige faux fur and red, white and navy blue palette. The seals being the beige faux fur, the blue the cold sea, and the white symbolic of the snow and ice. Red is obviously the horrendous slaughter of the seals, shown in the underskirts and showpieces.

Carlotta Actis Barone

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The enormous, white eyelashes, iced lips and enormous hair, paired with fitted 50s influenced dresses, short knitted, luxurious, hooded pieces… faux fur shrugs, hand muffs, sleeves and collar details… were so strong and and almost, beautifully angry. Carlotta also referenced Inuit people in her designs, each of the skirted models wore transparent leggings and geometric patterns ran through the collection, similar to their attire. The whole collection represents how I’m sure many girls would love to look in the winter time. It’s so feminine, heavenly and bold. A mixture of prom dresses, Narnia and Victorian fashion – a fantasy, a drama – and of course in terms of the seals; a harsh reality.

LFW Kayleigh Bluck

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Illustration by Kayleigh Bluck

I adored the pronounced peplum dress, the fitted black coat, with full skirt from the waist. The blue, white and red mixed beautifully, if slightly shocking. Which of course, is part of the message Carlotta is making with her show. Without doubt the finale piece, a red fishtail, strapless dress, with a faux fur beige, large shrug, was just INCREDIBLE. I was in love with that dress. I still am in love with that dress. It was the perfect ending to a show that inspired, amazed and informed. This fabulous collection, left me in awe.

Carlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia GregoryCarlotta Actis Barone LFW A/W Amelia Gregory

LFW A/W 2011 Carlotta Actis Barone Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Buy Amelia’s Book on Ethical Fashion: here. You will also find illustrations by Abby Wright, Gemma Milly and Gareth A. Hopkins in the book.

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gemma Milly, ,Helen Martin, ,Kayleigh Bluck, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W, ,Matilde Sazio

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carlotta Actis Barone: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Carlotta by Isabelle Mattern
Carlotta Actis Barone A/W 2013 by Isabelle Mattern

Carlotta Actis Barone took a surprising new direction for her A/W 2013 show at London Fashion Week: last season she sent ballet dancers in giant brightly coloured wigs down the catwalk, but this time she stuck to the basic format and colour was replaced with this season’s biggest trend: simple monochrome. Instead of ruffles and elaborate boning there were chic figure hugging pieces with cut out details. Pieces were chic and elegant, structured and loose fitting, but in true Carlotta Actis Barone style her designs celebrated the female form; curves were enhanced by structured shoulders and sinuous tailoring at the bust and hip.

Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone by Chloe Douglass
Carlotta Actis Barone A/W 2013 by Chloe Douglass

Models were elegant with 1930’s inspired chignons and a sassy stride. Gossamer light chiffon hung in pleats to reveal perfect pins, or in daggered panels to reveal a subtle flash of chest. Constructed dresses featured black and white geometric tailoring in reference to Cubism and Dadaism. Contrasting textures were used to represent the complexity of the female mind, and this beautiful collection certainly complimented the fairer sex.

Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta by Angela Lamb
Carlotta Actis Barone A/W 2013 by Angela Lamb

Carlotta Actis Barone’s hallmark bodysuit included the work of artist Manuela Corti and was adorned with the slogans ‘Fashion Forgery’ and ‘Fashion Clockwork’. This appears to be a statement about the copycat culture which is rife in the industry, but luckily this is not an issue that Carlotta faces, since her collections are surprisingly different each season and certainly do not lack originality.

Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone by Pia Bramley
Carlotta Actis Barone A/W 2013 by Pia Bramley

Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta AW13 by Isher Dhiman
Carlotta Actis Barone A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman

Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Angela Lamb, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Chiffon, ,Chloe Douglass, ,Cubism, ,Dadaism, ,Fashion Clockwork, ,Fashion Forgery, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,geometric, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,Isher Dhiman, ,Manuela Corti, ,Pia Bramley, ,tailoring

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carlotta Actis Barone: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 by gaarte
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Gaarte.

Carlotta Actis Barone always makes great use of the catwalk to showcase her zany aesthetic, but last season I felt that the concept had begun to overshadow the garments.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Thankfully this season the charismatic designer took a more lighthearted approach – no seal clubbing or nazi references here: instead she sent out a vibrant collection styled with over the top sculpted wigs of frothy orange curls. These were a reference to her source material – the famous opera The Magic Flute, (and the title of this show) – but they also lent a cartoonish air to the proceedings.

Carlotta-Actis-Barone-by-Isabelle-Mattern-iszaa
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Isabelle Mattern.

As if to truly banish all memory of more macabre collections this was described in the show notes as ‘a celebration of happiness, protection, sisterhood and love.’ Aw. It opened with a bevy of ballet dancers twirling in catsuits and boned pill shaped tutus to Mozart.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker.

Each season Carlotta Actis Barone chooses lettering which is imprinted on transparent netting and used in bodystockings: this season it was sheet music that was transcribed into a curvy typographic print design. This was the best I have seen it work, as a neat foil to the bold colour palette of the over garments that included zinging tangerine, deep purple, blinding yellow, plum and lime green. A large swirly print was used in panelling on tight high waisted trousers and intersected by binding in lines that emphasised womanly curves. These ‘ribs’ were inspired by cages carried by Papageno in the opera, this time symbolic of freedom. The idea reached its apogee in a stunning strapless boned gown which flared at the hem to create a unique and dramatic silhouette.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Flouncy feathers accessorised up-does where wigs failed to do the job; opaque tights (not so summery!) and shoes with spike heels echoed the bold tropical palette. Points accentuated shoulders and sharpened ripples of fabric at waists on tailored two pieces, which were worn with draw-waisted jackets made from plasticised fabrics.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2013 September 2012-0080
Carlotta Actis Barone by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2013 by Claire Kearns.

The show closed with a swirling orange satin frock, perfect for sweeping down a grand staircase. And of course another appearance from the ballet dancers, who leapt down the catwalk with Carlotta in tow for a deep formation curtsey in front of Snarfle, who was wearing the gold coin found in our goodie bags as a necklace.

snarfle at fashion week
Jasper at Carlotta
Snarfle was joined on the front row by his friend Jasper.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gaarte, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,lfw, ,Mozart, ,Papageno, ,S/S 2013, ,The Magic Flute

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Amelia’s Magazine | Carmen: A Life in Fashion at the Fashion Space Gallery


Carmen Dell’Orefice by Joanna Gniady

I can’t bear having my photograph taken. That’s why I’m not a model. That’s the only reason. But imagine having your photograph taken consecutively for sixty years, by some of the greatest photographer that ever lived. It’s quite the achievement when you really think about it.

I’m taking about Carmen Dell’Orrefice, affectionately referred to as ‘the world’s most enduring supermodel’. A new exhibition at the London College of Fashion‘s Fashion Space Gallery proves why Carmen deserves that accolade.


All photography by Matt Bramford

It’s rare to find exhibitions that celebrate the career of a model rather than the photographers that document them. In recent years, grand masters like Avedon and Penn have been honoured with mammoth exhibitions, so this collaboration between LCF and David Downton is a welcome break, and it’s been put together with feeling (Dowton is a close personal friend of Dell’Orefice) and no stage of her career is left unrepresented.


Carmen Dell’Orefice by Celine Elliott

Carmen Dell’Orefice was born on Welfare Island in 1931 to an Italian father and Hungarian mother. Her first modelling duty was at the age of 13 – Carmen is now 80 and still modelling. As she moved around the room, talking to Colin McDowell, Frances Corner OBE (head of the LCF) I simply couldn’t take my eyes off her. She’s one of those lucky buggers that have matured with grace and elegance and maintained her unique looks without going anywhere near Wildenstein.

Looking around the room at the works is like an encyclopaedia of the great fashion photographers – Penn, Beaton, Coffin, Avedon, Derujinsky, her second husband Richard Heimann, Parkinson; it’s wonderfully exhausting. Reporductions of Vogue and Harper’s covers are mounted on some walls, while others hold photographs ranging from her frolicking in the Bahamas (shot by Parkinson) and basking in Hawaii (shot by Derujinsky).

The crescendo is a stunning selection of portraits commissioned especially by LCF and photographed by Ali Mahdavi. I’ve purposefully omitted any images of these photographs in the hope that you’ll go along and view the exhibition yourself. They are fresh and classical at the same time – there’s something intimately special about them. Please go.

Categories ,Carmen Dell’Orefice, ,Cecil Beaton, ,Clifford Coffin, ,Colin McDowell, ,David Downton, ,exhibition, ,fashion, ,Fashion Space Gallery, ,Frances Corner OBE, ,Gleb Derujinsky, ,Harper’s Bazaar, ,Irving Penn, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Norman Parkinson, ,photography, ,review, ,Richard Avedon, ,Richard Heimann, ,vogue, ,Wildenstein

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