Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode


Illustration by Gemma Randall

Aiming to promote recent graduates onto a more commercially viable platform, stuff Fashion Mode launched this September with a show on the 19th amid a lot of glitzy PR and press releases. The initiative is aiming ‘to bring back cutting edge fashion to London’, information pills enabling our ‘young fledgling designers…to be cultivated, supported and cherished’. Aside from the rather slushy blurb surrounding it, the ensuing show was enjoyable and a few gems were sent down the catwalk. Celeb top spot of the day must go to Nick Knowles of DIY SOS fame, who turned up with a man wearing a huge paper sock hat on his head. If anyone can shed any light on this guy, I would be so happy to find out more.


See background for ‘man in hat’ with Nick Knowles

First onto the runway was Carlotta Actis Barone with a collection that reminded me of the kind of clothes clichéd royals in storybooks wear. Dark dramatic reds, with big shoulders and lots of dangly bits hanging off, the collection featured draped and knotted dresses, plus work style dungarees. The hair, which usually passes me by on the catwalk, was amazing (up do’s with lots of boof) so congrats must go to Toni and Guy who styled the whole event.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

The Wear My Skin collection is based on the fight against racism and the clothes attempt to represent workers clothes on the plantation fields. The skin element is portrayed using scribbled-print, black-and-white body con dresses, polo necks and leggings under all of the garments. A bit like those sleeves you buy when you want to look like you have a tattoo but an interesting way of pulling together collection none the less.

Next out was James Hillman, who based his collection on the 59 Bike Club, Teddy Boy look and a desire for simplicity. I will remember it for different reasons: the poor male model who had to walk down the runway in a see through dress, the adorable grandma bursting with pride as her grandson (not in a see through dress) walked down the catwalk, and the stifling heat taking hold of the hall. NB Most people had picked up fans from the previous show and were fine…not me though.


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyren

His collection was very neutral and very beige/grey/brown. The use of fabrics generally reserved for womenswear was a promising idea but wasn’t used to a great effect. The semi-opaque trousers and jacket/dress were fun but I expected more from someone who defines themselves on their use of simplicity, tailoring and well styled masculinity. I did however, love the army boots which were worn with every outfit including the smarter tailored suits.


Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Elson Figueiredo is inspired by 19th century European carnies and uses 100% organic fair-trade cottons. He presented a really strong collection with nicely tailored jackets, mid length coats and loose fit chino-esque trousers. His self-description of ‘quirky and distinctive’ is perfect. The jackets are well cut and the added elbow pads and red edgings on pockets and lapels were definitely a bonus for me in terms of well thought through details.


The beige knee length coat worn with characteristic edging details was the highlight of the show for me, and slightly different from all of the other pieces he sent down the runway.

The star of the show (kept till last) was Florian Jayet. I really enjoyed his collection and many influences were prevalent in his styling – he interned with Alexander McQueen. Jayet’s S/S 2011 collection is inspired by insects and armour style garments. Mainly white, black and silver his pieces were futuristic yet very of the moment with sculptured shoulders, padding and defining shapes.


Using metallic fabrics and leather, his robust exoskeleton pieces are often softened with a long draped skirt or a flimsy top. Also, again with the noticing of the hair, I like the sharp pulled back ponytails sported by all the models.


My ones to watch are definitely Figueiredo and Jayet. They presented collections with distinctive yet restrained looks rather than over designing pieces a la River Island chic.

All photography by Florence Masssey

Categories ,Fashion Mode, ,illustration, ,London Fashion Week, ,S/S 2011, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, Carlotta Actis Barone

Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba.

It was the huge and elaborate headdresses by Rachel Galley that grabbed our immediate attention as the first models traversed the catwalk, visit their steady heads bearing wide concoctions of twirling metal, flowers and swinging tassels for Carlotta Actis Barone‘s S/S 2012 commentary ‘on the stolen liberty and beauty associated with prostitution.’

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Carlotta Actis Barone is one of three designers who are being mentored by Fashion Mode, a mysterious entity that provides direction and support in everything from design to business management and marketing.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas.

The new collection was inspired by a cross pollination of cultural ideas: Victorian brothels and French boudoir style from the turn of the last century contrasted with the high class prostitution and honour traditionally associated with being a Geisha.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 by t. reidy
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by t.reidy.

Swishing lilac and cream dresses with roped detailing around the bust and waist signified the imprisonment of prostitution, whilst loosely draped pencil skirts and lingerie-styled tunics suggested a more playful air of seduction, accessorised with wide patterned kimono inspired waist wraps.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Orchid hair accessories and china doll make-up added to the air of naive idolisation of feminine beauty, but the clash of styles did not always work. Wrinkled tights patterned with stripes of letters (a signature of Barone) were a questionable styling detail and high heeled see through plastic stripper shoes filled with orchids were downright tacky, but overall this was an eye-catching collection from a talented new designer with original ideas. Amongst my favourite pieces were cream big pocketed trench coats with huge flouncy bows on the bum, and vibrant tropical printed silk dresses in green, vermillion and lime.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

The definitely not very shy and retiring Carlotta Actis Barone was wearing one of her printed boudoir wraps when she strode out to take a bow at the end of the catwalk, and – somewhat ironically given the theme of her collection – her bosoms made an excited bid for freedom, much to the amusement of the crowd.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Brothels, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Casey Otremba, ,China Doll, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,French Boudoir, ,Geisha, ,Headdresses, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Megan Thomas, ,Orchids, ,prints, ,Prostitution, ,Rachel Galley, ,Stripper Shoes, ,t.reidy, ,Tassels, ,Tina Reidy, ,Victorian

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, Carlotta Actis Barone

Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Casey Otremba.

It was the huge and elaborate headdresses by Rachel Galley that grabbed our immediate attention as the first models traversed the catwalk, visit their steady heads bearing wide concoctions of twirling metal, flowers and swinging tassels for Carlotta Actis Barone‘s S/S 2012 commentary ‘on the stolen liberty and beauty associated with prostitution.’

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Carlotta Actis Barone is one of three designers who are being mentored by Fashion Mode, a mysterious entity that provides direction and support in everything from design to business management and marketing.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas.

The new collection was inspired by a cross pollination of cultural ideas: Victorian brothels and French boudoir style from the turn of the last century contrasted with the high class prostitution and honour traditionally associated with being a Geisha.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 by t. reidy
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by t.reidy.

Swishing lilac and cream dresses with roped detailing around the bust and waist signified the imprisonment of prostitution, whilst loosely draped pencil skirts and lingerie-styled tunics suggested a more playful air of seduction, accessorised with wide patterned kimono inspired waist wraps.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns.

Orchid hair accessories and china doll make-up added to the air of naive idolisation of feminine beauty, but the clash of styles did not always work. Wrinkled tights patterned with stripes of letters (a signature of Barone) were a questionable styling detail and high heeled see through plastic stripper shoes filled with orchids were downright tacky, but overall this was an eye-catching collection from a talented new designer with original ideas. Amongst my favourite pieces were cream big pocketed trench coats with huge flouncy bows on the bum, and vibrant tropical printed silk dresses in green, vermillion and lime.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

The definitely not very shy and retiring Carlotta Actis Barone was wearing one of her printed boudoir wraps when she strode out to take a bow at the end of the catwalk, and – somewhat ironically given the theme of her collection – her bosoms made an excited bid for freedom, much to the amusement of the crowd.

Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Carlotta Actis Barone S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Brothels, ,Carlotta Actis Barone, ,Casey Otremba, ,China Doll, ,Claire Kearns, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,French Boudoir, ,Geisha, ,Headdresses, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Megan Thomas, ,Orchids, ,prints, ,Prostitution, ,Rachel Galley, ,Stripper Shoes, ,t.reidy, ,Tassels, ,Tina Reidy, ,Victorian

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, Florian Jayet

Florian Jayet S/S 2012 by Faye West
Florian Jayet S/S 2012 by Faye West.

I think it was round about show three at Fashion Mode when I was suddenly implored to shunt up into a non existent space so that two more people could be squeezed on to the end of the front row. Now excuse me, cure but if you’re that late to a fashion show, order isn’t it just polite behaviour to hover at the back? That’s certainly what I do when the situation arises.

Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet S/S 2012 by Faye West
Florian Jayet S/S 2012 by Faye West.

So it was with mild aggravation that I watched the Florian Jayet collection parade in front of me. Jayet is known for his structured outfits befitting of a modern amazonian, viagra and for S/S 2012 he was inspired by the Japanese myth of Yurei, whereby those who are murdered must spend the afterlife seeking their killer in order to free their tormented spirits and finally reach heaven.

Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet by Sarah Jayne Morris
Florian Jayet S/S 2012 by Sarah Jayne Morris.

I think it must have been in the styling that this concept really took hold – models had seriously over the top back-combed hair, as if dragged through an otherworldly mire. Added to this they wore exceptionally dark eye make-up and bloodily smudged lips that gave the impression they had been feasting on something unholy. To top the look off they wore chain headdresses that draped low over their eyes. It was all in all an unappealing look that dominated the clothing far more than was necessary.

Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Florian Jayet S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Far more successful were the smart tailored separates in white: structured skater dresses featuring cut out details and jackets with high waisted peplums and flowing caped sleeves. However printed floral lace panels and bodies were wide off the mark, giving the collection an unnecessarily cheap finish. Let’s hope that next season sees Florian Jayet return to form.

Categories ,Afterlife, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Faye West, ,Florian Jayet, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,japanese, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Myth, ,Sarah Jayne Morris, ,Yurei

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode, James Hillman

James Hillman SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
James Hillman S/S 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins.

I’ll say it straight up front shall I? It’s the second time I’ve seen a James Hillman catwalk show and I’m just not convinced by his choice of models. Models and styling are utterly intrinsic to my perception of a collection and unfortunately slightly cheesy ‘n’ sleek muscle men who strut with a stoop shouldered stride just don’t do it for me, ask proving a distraction from the collection rather than an enhancement… For S/S 2012 James Hillman – who is one of the Fashion Mode designers – styled his men in dark shades, slightly quiffed hair and bitty lips in pastel shades, as if ski protection had been badly applied.

James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
James Hillman S/S 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins.

Most interesting and wearable were the wide legged suit trousers and darling suit shorts worn with elegantly pleated shirts that had just a hint of pan collar. Pan collars for men! Surely that’s when you know that a trend is here to stay. This seasons collection was inspired by outer space and in particular black holes: manifested in the swirling asymmetric cuts of shirting and pastel colours reminiscent of an exploding star. Elements of formalwear were very strong, but forays into the land of sportswear with tight jersey tops were not so well advised.

James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James, I’m gonna make a plea: please reconsider your choice of models for next season because these boys just weren’t very directional and your clothes deserve better. Go on, just for me, although I am sure that others will agree.

James Hillman SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
James Hillman SS 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Black Holes, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Formal wear, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,James Hillman, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Outer Space, ,pastel, ,Shirting, ,sportswear, ,Suiting

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Exhibition Review

Caitlin Rose by Hayley Akins
Illustration by Hayley Akins.

Such had been the anticipation surrounding Caitlin Rose’s return to the UK, medical search especially after the release of her acclaimed debut album, pilule Own Side Now, nurse that her shows in the capital soon sold out. Being the smallest of those venues, but organised by such thoughtful fellows, Brixton’s Windmill quickly arranged a special early evening show to cater for any disappointed punters. Needless to say, the tickets flew for that one as well.

CAITLINROSE_BY DONYATODD
Illustration by Donya Todd

I’d been caught out too many times by being lastminute.com when buying tickets in the past, so I’d got in sharpish and, as a result, I drew the straw for the late show. I arrived quite early (well, 9.00pm) and caught the support band, Treetop Flyers, limbering up for their second performance of the evening. A London based band, and purveyors of the finest Americana, tonight they were playing a more stripped back acoustic set. I’d never caught them before, but I liked what I heard. They set the mood nicely for the evening, even throwing in a Townes Van Zandt cover.

caitlin rose-stephanie thieullent
Illustration by Stephanie Thieullent

By the time Caitlin Rose took to the stage, the Windmill was pretty rammed. I’d seen her live a couple of times before (and all but once at the Windmill), though this was the first time with a full band (apparently they couldn’t afford to fly out the drummer from the US on the last tour). After having obviously enjoyed a few refreshments between sets, Rose cheerfully exclaimed “two of us haven’t slept!”, as the band launched into New York.

caitlin rose by mary ferfyri
Illustration by Mary Ferfiry

Own Side Now has seen Caitlin Rose expand on the fairly traditional country sound of her debut release, the Dead Flowers EP (as hinted at in an interview with Amelia’s Magazine last summer). The intimacy of the Windmill really lent itself to her songs (and especially that voice!), as we sampled such bittersweet treats as For The Rabbits and Learning To Ride.

YouTube Preview Image

There was a particularly affecting rendition of Own Side, which brought a lump to the throat of even this old cynic. Answer In One Of These Bottles (from Dead Flowers) sparked a raucous sing-along, before everyone rocked out to Shanghai Cigarettes.

YouTube Preview Image

Caitlin Rose by Ashley Fauguel
Illustration by Ashley Fauguel

Rose switched from acoustic guitar to electric and back again, there was plenty of banter, and there were all the hallmarks for a special night in place. After a couple more UK dates before a return to the US, and then a trip to the Antipodes, we’re not likely to see Ms Rose on these shores again before some festival appearances in the summer – given her current ascendency, one wonders whether we’ll ever see her play in such a venue as the Windmill again.

Caitlin Rose by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs
Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly the Eggs

Caitlin Rose by Hayley Akins
Illustration by Hayley Akins.

Such had been the anticipation surrounding Caitlin Rose’s return to the UK, doctor especially after the release of her acclaimed debut album, patient Own Side Now, that her shows in the capital soon sold out. Being the smallest of those venues, but organised by such thoughtful fellows, Brixton’s Windmill quickly arranged a special early evening show to cater for any disappointed punters. Needless to say, the tickets flew for that one as well.

CAITLINROSE_BY DONYATODD
Illustration by Donya Todd

I’d been caught out too many times by being lastminute.com when buying tickets in the past, so I’d got in sharpish and, as a result, I drew the straw for the late show. I arrived quite early (well, 9.00pm) and caught the support band, Treetop Flyers, limbering up for their second performance of the evening. A London based band, and purveyors of the finest Americana, tonight they were playing a more stripped back acoustic set. I’d never caught them before, but I liked what I heard. They set the mood nicely for the evening, even throwing in a Townes Van Zandt cover.

caitlin rose-stephanie thieullent
Illustration by Stephanie Thieullent

By the time Caitlin Rose took to the stage, the Windmill was pretty rammed. I’d seen her live a couple of times before (and all but once at the Windmill), though this was the first time with a full band (apparently they couldn’t afford to fly out the drummer from the US on the last tour). After having obviously enjoyed a few refreshments between sets, Rose cheerfully exclaimed “two of us haven’t slept!”, as the band launched into New York.

caitlin rose by mary ferfyri
Illustration by Mary Ferfiry

Own Side Now has seen Caitlin Rose expand on the fairly traditional country sound of her debut release, the Dead Flowers EP (as hinted at in an interview with Amelia’s Magazine last summer). The intimacy of the Windmill really lent itself to her songs (and especially that voice!), as we sampled such bittersweet treats as For The Rabbits and Learning To Ride.

YouTube Preview Image

There was a particularly affecting rendition of Own Side, which brought a lump to the throat of even this old cynic. Answer In One Of These Bottles (from Dead Flowers) sparked a raucous sing-along, before everyone rocked out to Shanghai Cigarettes.

YouTube Preview Image

Caitlin Rose by Ashley Fauguel
Illustration by Ashley Fauguel

Rose switched from acoustic guitar to electric and back again, there was plenty of banter, and there were all the hallmarks for a special night in place. After a couple more UK dates before a return to the US, and then a trip to the Antipodes, we’re not likely to see Ms Rose on these shores again before some festival appearances in the summer – given her current ascendency, one wonders whether we’ll ever see her play in such a venue as the Windmill again.

Caitlin Rose by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs
Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly the Eggs

title - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Most illustrations by Jenny Robins.

I got photographed on my way in to Somerset House (in my jumble sale sheepskin coat belonging to my sister and waistcoat from H&M Kids circa 1999) – expect to see me in Vogue. Not really. The reason I wore the waistcoat was to hide the fact that the little charity shop top I had on underneath with the Peter Pan collar was missing several buttons up the back which continued to pop off as I rushed around London.

sketchbook -Jordan Azkill - Felicity Brown - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Jordan Askill and Felicity Brown in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

After sketching away at the Charlotte Eskildsen exhibition (leather gloves, nurse exciting shapes, erectile draw string leg warmers, see the write up by Jemma Crow which includes my sketches here) and drawing like a mad thing from a sideways view at Jasper Conran’s catwalk show (see my write up and illustrations here) I went for a wander through the New Gen, BFC/Elle talent launch pad and Vauxhall Fashion Scout galleries to take in some static displays and meet some nice publicists and designers. Please see here for your viewing pleasure my sketchbook pages from the day and some additional pictures and commentary.

sketchbook - Holly Fulton - Christopher Raeburn - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Holly Fulton & Christopher Raeburn in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

It’s a funny thing to visit these exhibitions on the Saturday (as I did) because half the stuff on show at New Gen is Spring/Summer as the new things are off being catwalked – as it were – or are secret till they have been, and the designers don’t really want you to write about their Spring/Summer stuff yet so sometimes they talk it down. This didn’t stop me from falling in love with the hand perforated yellow leather cocktail dress and skirt by Holly Fulton which were some of the first things I saw. I’ve had a look at her new collection and it isn’t quite as joyful as these two pieces for me but still typically beautiful with her geometric patterns and increasingly incorporating more sinuous art nouveauesque prints too.

Jordan Askill Ceramic Bird Necklace by Madi
Jordan Askill Ceramic Bird Necklace by Madi.

The next thing to really catch my eye was the stunning sculptural jewellery work of Jordan Askill. Anything with a lot of birds in, or let’s face it, just one bird, is a joy for me and Askill’s white resin and nylon swallows *en masse* was perfection itself.

Jordan Askill by Jenny Robins
Jordan Askill by Jenny Robins.

Opposite was Yang Du’s stall with her fabulously kitsch and chic cashmere dolly dresses and capes. These I love, but Yang Du‘s additional arrangement of knitted toy scarves and finger puppet gloves confused me quite a lot. It’s not that I don’t like them, I just don’t see what about them is different from the crafty equivalent you could pick up in a village jumble for probably a fiver, or from a hobbyist on etsy for a bit more, but they are retailing at Selfridges for hundreds of pounds. This is the paradox of lo-fi high fashion.

sketchbook - Yang Du - Mary Katrantzou - Fannie Schiavoni - Piers Atkinson - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Yang Du, Mary Katrantzou, Fannie Schiavoni & Piers Atkinson in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

I didn’t see any of Mary Katrantzou’s amazing collection as it was out on show, but the pieces on show from S/S 2011 still caught my eye: high colour interior prints and tasselled house lamp skirts – I highly recommend taking a look at the review of her A/W 2011 collection here.

Piers Atkinson - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Piers Atkinson by Jenny Robins.

In the riverside lobby downstairs where the cake is, a display of various hats under the title headonism (get it) was sure to catch my attention with Piers Atkinson’s awesome giant cherry headband – he has a wide array of other more and less absurd head accessories including a beanie with giant mickey mouse ear style pompoms, a glittery and 24 carrot gold aubergine head band and various exuberant ostrich feathered creations. Read a longer review of this here.

sketchbook - Lublu Kira Plastina - George Angelopoulos - Yunus & Eliza - Les Nereides - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Lublu Kira Plastina, George Angelopoulos, Yunus & Eliza & Les Nereides in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

At the BFC/Elle Talent Launchpad exhibition space the first thing to pique my curiosity were the jewel like gold plated enamel face crucifixes made by Yunus & Eliza – I say crucifixes, but looking at the website it seems maybe they are not meant to be Christian symbols at all – the ambiguity probably plays to their favour though. While Eliza was wonderfully eloquent about some of their other pieces – which are based on child genius and bird heads (yay, birds) – she didn’t say a lot about what seems to be their signature idea. Good for them I say, spiritual ambiguity should be shiny and beautiful. I was also very impressed by the description the pair gave of their collaborative working – the metamorphosis of their ideas mirroring the themes they play with. I don’t play very well with others so I’m always impressed by successful collaboration. I was also struck by Lublu Kira Plastinina’s novelty oversize zips, as well as her classic mac with giant fur sleeves (boo fur), I drew this to scale (above) to demonstrate the size of the zips.

les nereides - n2 aw11 - lfw
Les Nereides, image courtesy of N2

I then spent a good amount of time looking at the beautiful and quirky N2 jewellery collection by Les Nereides and chatting to the lovely Rose and Melissa about fashion week snobbery. The work is gorgeous, a cheaper, kitscher spin off from the intricate work of the main label (although still retailing from £30 – cheaper is high end cheaper of course) featuring designer collaborations, fairytales, French patisserie and large characterful animal necklaces. N2 recently opened their own spin off special store in Monmouth Street. I love it all though similarly to with Yang Du I feel the same conflict brought on by the posh/cute dynamic – I’m just not born to be bothered by quality as much as some, if it’s going to look cheerful and basic, why gold plate it?

sketchbook - Teatum Jones - N2 llama - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Teatum Jones and N2 llama in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Upstairs I was struck by Teatum Jones’ amazing printed silk Eva Moore Shirt Dress – super delicate and all lilacs and pinks against the utilitarian shapes of the shirt design. Catherine Teatum (who was wearing an amazing silver leather jacket), shared with me how the piece is inspired by two women who worked on the front line during World War I – there was no female uniform for their position so they wore oversized men’s uniform and the floral looking pattern reflects their mud and blood soaked attire. You would not guess this from looking at the dress. But there is that sense of strength and melancholy in the collection – which also includes high waist trench trousers and a heavy caped trench coat cut short as well as more delicate items – that chimes well at the moment. Let us be stoic and feminine, and pull together. I drew the two designers above with their iconic dress. Read more about Teatum Jones in our emerging talent preview.

Nuerotica - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Nuerotica by Jenny Robins.

My next love affair was with Neurotica’s A/W 2011 Bright Eyes collection based on Watership Down. Even though the animated film did give me nightmares, especially that bit with the gas in the tunnels, you’ve got to love the foresty, rabbity vibe on show here. I want almost everything in this collection, from the chunky quilted collars to the amazing strapless jumpsuit – all sporting some kind of atmospheric winter branch print. A little bit gothic in sentiment, but so clean and feminine in the shapes. Yeah I super love it actually. Their S/S 2011 stuff is pretty brilliant too. Look out for it.

sketchbook - Little Glass Clementine - Neurotica - ethical - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Little Glass Clementine & Neurotica in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Then I strayed into Estethica and met Little Glass Clementine (as featured in ACOFI!) who puts together all sorts of oddments and icons in her maximalist jewellery, not so much of a collection because each piece is a one off, but there are emerging themes. I especially enjoyed the stop-watch elements and the pieces of blue and white tiles incorporated into some of the necklaces.

Pachacuti - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Pachacuti by Jenny Robins.

I was also impressed by Pachacuti’s array of colourful ethical panama hats made by women’s collectives in Ecuador. Apparently they were doing it before it was all trendy.

sketchbook - Ginta - Anthony Peto - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Ginta & Anthony Peto in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Tatty Devine - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Tatty Devine by Jenny Robins.

I also enjoyed a sneak peek at Tatty Devine’s forthcoming new collections, which feature pieces inspired by owls, ivy, foxes, sycamore seeds and chunky oldschool brogues. All very fun, with the organic subtlety of some of these new designs blending softly with their Perspex shapes – perfect in the new matt frosted Perspex used for some of these. I like the foxes and ivy especially, mature yet whimsical showing that Tatty Devine is growing from strength to strength. Also featured were an upcoming footwear collaboration with the Old Curiosity Shop – adding Perspex moustaches to their shoes.

Ginta Siceva Masks by Madi
Ginta Siceva Masks by Madi.

Ginta - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Ginta by Jenny Robins

Ginta’s lovely lazer cut intricate accessories layer leather flowers, and were almost as stunning as the designer herself.

Ginta - aw11 - lfw
Image courtesy of Ginta

sketchbook - Vauxhall Fashion Scout - Erika Trotzig - Una Burke - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Erika Trotzig & Una Burke in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

As extensively covered elsewhere on Amelia’s Magazine, I also found myself struck by Una Burke’s prosthetics inspired pieces and wet plate photography at Vauxhall Fashion Scout. High concept bondage, beautifully put together – all by hand because apparently the riveter has not been made that can rivet so many layers of leather, so more art than fashion really. Exploring how people with prosthetics (like disfigurements) find they often lose their identity when all people see is their unusual limbs, the work is successful I think – you certainly would notice a Una Burke outfit more than the person inside it.

In the small amount of time left before I headed into the Vauxhall Fashion Scout exhibition, where I drew two stunning dresses and the designers who created them:

sketchbook - Nicole Murray - Edward Finney - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Nicole Murray & Edward Finney in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Edward Finney’s work here is amazingly fluid yet sculptural, the silhouette is so long and sumptuous, and I love the matter of fact shapes of the bodice. Classy yet daring. All that stuff.

Nicole Murray’s dress by comparison is an absolute delight of softness and intricacy. The classic long gown underneath the gorgeous lace shift covers the wearer almost completely, yet seems very naked and unearthly. She was also beautiful.

Nicole Murray - lfw aw11 - dress
Nicole Murray. Photo courtesy of h.prlondon

Of the three shows I enjoyed the vibe at Freemasons Hall the most… it may have been the venue but it just felt far more relaxed and refined. The toilets were also very nice.

sketchbook - Fashion Mode crowd - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
The Fashion Mode crowd in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Anthony Peto, ,BFC/ELLE Talent Launch Pad, ,birds, ,Edward Finney, ,Elle Talent Launch Pad, ,Erika Trotzig, ,estethica, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Fannie Schiavoni, ,fashion, ,Fashion Mode, ,Felicity Brown, ,Freemasons, ,George Angelopoulos, ,Ginta, ,hats, ,Holly Fulton, ,illustration, ,Jenny Robins, ,jewellery, ,Jordan Askill, ,Les Nereides, ,Lublu Kira, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,N2, ,Neuroticam Little Glass Clementine, ,New Gen, ,Nicole Murray, ,Pachacuti, ,piers atkinson, ,Sketches, ,Tatty Devine, ,Teatum Jones, ,Úna Burke, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Yang Du, ,Yunus & Eliza

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Exhibition Review

title - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Most illustrations by Jenny Robins.

I got photographed on my way in to Somerset House (in my jumble sale sheepskin coat belonging to my sister and waistcoat from H&M Kids circa 1999) – expect to see me in Vogue. Not really. The reason I wore the waistcoat was to hide the fact that the little charity shop top I had on underneath with the Peter Pan collar was missing several buttons up the back which continued to pop off as I rushed around London.

sketchbook -Jordan Azkill - Felicity Brown - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Jordan Askill and Felicity Brown in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

After sketching away at the Charlotte Eskildsen exhibition (leather gloves, exciting shapes, draw string leg warmers, see the write up by Jemma Crow which includes my sketches here) and drawing like a mad thing from a sideways view at Jasper Conran’s catwalk show (see my write up and illustrations here) I went for a wander through the New Gen, BFC/Elle talent launch pad and Vauxhall Fashion Scout galleries to take in some static displays and meet some nice publicists and designers. Please see here for your viewing pleasure my sketchbook pages from the day and some additional pictures and commentary.

sketchbook - Holly Fulton - Christopher Raeburn - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Holly Fulton & Christopher Raeburn in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

It’s a funny thing to visit these exhibitions on the Saturday (as I did) because half the stuff on show at New Gen is Spring/Summer as the new things are off being catwalked – as it were – or are secret till they have been, and the designers don’t really want you to write about their Spring/Summer stuff yet so sometimes they talk it down. This didn’t stop me from falling in love with the hand perforated yellow leather cocktail dress and skirt by Holly Fulton which were some of the first things I saw. I’ve had a look at her new collection and it isn’t quite as joyful as these two pieces for me but still typically beautiful with her geometric patterns and increasingly incorporating more sinuous art nouveauesque prints too.

Jordan Askill Ceramic Bird Necklace by Madi
Jordan Askill Ceramic Bird Necklace by Madi.

The next thing to really catch my eye was the stunning sculptural jewellery work of Jordan Askill. Anything with a lot of birds in, or let’s face it, just one bird, is a joy for me and Askill’s white resin and nylon swallows *en masse* was perfection itself.

Jordan Askill by Jenny Robins
Jordan Askill by Jenny Robins.

Opposite was Yang Du’s stall with her fabulously kitsch and chic cashmere dolly dresses and capes. These I love, but Yang Du’s additional arrangement of knitted toy scarves and finger puppet gloves confused me quite a lot. It’s not that I don’t like them, I just don’t see what about them is different from the crafty equivalent you could pick up in a village jumble for probably a fiver, or from a hobbyist on etsy for a bit more, but they are retailing at Selfridges for hundreds of pounds. This is the paradox of lo-fi high fashion.

sketchbook - Yang Du - Mary Katrantzou - Fannie Schiavoni - Piers Atkinson - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Yang Du, Mary Katrantzou, Fannie Schiavoni & Piers Atkinson in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

I didn’t see any of Mary Katrantzou’s amazing collection as it was out on show, but the pieces on show from S/S 2011 still caught my eye: high colour interior prints and tasselled house lamp skirts – I highly recommend taking a look at the review of her A/W 2011 collection here.

Piers Atkinson - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Piers Atkinson by Jenny Robins.

In the riverside lobby downstairs where the cake is, a display of various hats under the title headonism (get it) was sure to catch my attention with Piers Atkinson’s awesome giant cherry headband – he has a wide array of other more and less absurd head accessories including a beanie with giant mickey mouse ear style pompoms, a glittery and 24 carrot gold aubergine head band and various exuberant ostrich feathered creations. Read a longer review of this here.

sketchbook - Lublu Kira Plastina - George Angelopoulos - Yunus & Eliza - Les Nereides - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Lublu Kira Plastina, George Angelopoulos, Yunus & Eliza & Les Nereides in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

At the BFC/Elle Talent Launchpad exhibition space the first thing to pique my curiosity were the jewel like gold plated enamel face crucifixes made by Yunus & Eliza – I say crucifixes, but looking at the website it seems maybe they are not meant to be Christian symbols at all – the ambiguity probably plays to their favour though. While Eliza was wonderfully eloquent about some of their other pieces – which are based on child genius and bird heads (yay, birds) – she didn’t say a lot about what seems to be their signature idea. Good for them I say, spiritual ambiguity should be shiny and beautiful. I was also very impressed by the description the pair gave of their collaborative working – the metamorphosis of their ideas mirroring the themes they play with. I don’t play very well with others so I’m always impressed by successful collaboration. I was also struck by Lublu Kira Plastinina’s novelty oversize zips, as well as her classic mac with giant fur sleeves (boo fur), I drew this to scale (above) to demonstrate the size of the zips.

les nereides - n2 aw11 - lfw
Les Nereides, image courtesy of N2

I then spent a good amount of time looking at the beautiful and quirky N2 jewellery collection by Les Nereides and chatting to the lovely Rose and Melissa about fashion week snobbery. The work is gorgeous, a cheaper, kitscher spin off from the intricate work of the main label (although still retailing from £30 – cheaper is high end cheaper of course) featuring designer collaborations, fairytales, French patisserie and large characterful animal necklaces. N2 recently opened their own spin off special store in Monmouth Street. I love it all though similarly to with Yang Du I feel the same conflict brought on by the posh/cute dynamic – I’m just not born to be bothered by quality as much as some, if it’s going to look cheerful and basic, why gold plate it?

sketchbook - Teatum Jones - N2 llama - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Teatum Jones and N2 llama in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Upstairs I was struck by Teatum Jones’ amazing printed silk Eva Moore Shirt Dress – super delicate and all lilacs and pinks against the utilitarian shapes of the shirt design. Catherine Teatum (who was wearing an amazing silver leather jacket), shared with me how the piece is inspired by two women who worked on the front line during World War I – there was no female uniform for their position so they wore oversized men’s uniform and the floral looking pattern reflects their mud and blood soaked attire. You would not guess this from looking at the dress. But there is that sense of strength and melancholy in the collection – which also includes high waist trench trousers and a heavy caped trench coat cut short as well as more delicate items – that chimes well at the moment. Let us be stoic and feminine, and pull together. I drew the two designers above with their iconic dress. Read more about Teatum Jones in our emerging talent preview.

Nuerotica - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Nuerotica by Jenny Robins.

My next love affair was with Neurotica’s A/W 2011 Bright Eyes collection based on Watership Down. Even though the animated film did give me nightmares, especially that bit with the gas in the tunnels, you’ve got to love the foresty, rabbity vibe on show here. I want almost everything in this collection, from the chunky quilted collars to the amazing strapless jumpsuit – all sporting some kind of atmospheric winter branch print. A little bit gothic in sentiment, but so clean and feminine in the shapes. Yeah I super love it actually. Their S/S 2011 stuff is pretty brilliant too. Look out for it.

sketchbook - Little Glass Clementine - Neurotica - ethical - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Little Glass Clementine & Neurotica in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Then I strayed into Estethica and met Little Glass Clementine (as featured in ACOFI!) who puts together all sorts of oddments and icons in her maximalist jewellery, not so much of a collection because each piece is a one off, but there are emerging themes. I especially enjoyed the stop-watch elements and the pieces of blue and white tiles incorporated into some of the necklaces.

Pachacuti - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Pachacuti by Jenny Robins.

I was also impressed by Pachacuti’s array of colourful ethical panama hats made by women’s collectives in Ecuador. Apparently they were doing it before it was all trendy.

sketchbook - Ginta - Anthony Peto - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Ginta & Anthony Peto in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Tatty Devine - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Tatty Devine by Jenny Robins.

I also enjoyed a sneak peek at Tatty Devine’s forthcoming new collections, which feature pieces inspired by owls, ivy, foxes, sycamore seeds and chunky oldschool brogues. All very fun, with the organic subtlety of some of these new designs blending softly with their Perspex shapes – perfect in the new matt frosted Perspex used for some of these. I like the foxes and ivy especially, mature yet whimsical showing that Tatty Devine is growing from strength to strength. Also featured were an upcoming footwear collaboration with the Old Curiosity Shop – adding Perspex moustaches to their shoes.

Ginta Siceva Masks by Madi
Ginta Siceva Masks by Madi.

Ginta - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Ginta by Jenny Robins

Ginta’s lovely lazer cut intricate accessories layer leather flowers, and were almost as stunning as the designer herself.

Ginta - aw11 - lfw
Image courtesy of Ginta

sketchbook - Vauxhall Fashion Scout - Erika Trotzig - Una Burke - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Erika Trotzig & Una Burke in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

As extensively covered elsewhere on Amelia’s Magazine, I also found myself struck by Una Burke’s prosthetics inspired pieces and wet plate photography at Vauxhall Fashion Scout. High concept bondage, beautifully put together – all by hand because apparently the riveter has not been made that can rivet so many layers of leather, so more art than fashion really. Exploring how people with prosthetics (like disfigurements) find they often lose their identity when all people see is their unusual limbs, the work is successful I think – you certainly would notice a Una Burke outfit more than the person inside it.

In the small amount of time left before I headed into the Vauxhall Fashion Scout exhibition, where I drew two stunning dresses and the designers who created them:

sketchbook - Nicole Murray - Edward Finney - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
Nicole Murray & Edward Finney in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Edward Finney’s work here is amazingly fluid yet sculptural, the silhouette is so long and sumptuous, and I love the matter of fact shapes of the bodice. Classy yet daring. All that stuff.

Nicole Murray’s dress by comparison is an absolute delight of softness and intricacy. The classic long gown underneath the gorgeous lace shift covers the wearer almost completely, yet seems very naked and unearthly. She was also beautiful.

Nicole Murray - lfw aw11 - dress
Nicole Murray. Photo courtesy of h.prlondon

Of the three shows I enjoyed the vibe at Freemasons Hall the most… it may have been the venue but it just felt far more relaxed and refined. The toilets were also very nice.

sketchbook - Fashion Mode crowd - lfw aw11 - jenny robins
The Fashion Mode crowd in Jenny Robins’ sketchbook.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Anthony Peto, ,BFC/ELLE Talent Launch Pad, ,birds, ,Edward Finney, ,Elle Talent Launch Pad, ,Erika Trotzig, ,estethica, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Fannie Schiavoni, ,fashion, ,Fashion Mode, ,Felicity Brown, ,Freemasons, ,George Angelopoulos, ,Ginta, ,hats, ,Holly Fulton, ,illustration, ,Jenny Robins, ,jewellery, ,Jordan Askill, ,Les Nereides, ,Lublu Kira, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,N2, ,Neuroticam Little Glass Clementine, ,New Gen, ,Nicole Murray, ,Pachacuti, ,piers atkinson, ,Sketches, ,Tatty Devine, ,Teatum Jones, ,Úna Burke, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Yang Du, ,Yunus & Eliza

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode No.1 Florian Jayet (by Helen)

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, price but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, viagra 40mg but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, viagra but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, pharm but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Illustration by Jo Cheung

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, viagra order but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, thumb but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler. A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers, seek the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.


Illustration by Jo Cheung

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Photos by Katie Antoniou

Illustration by Jo Cheung

Presentations are funny things; done badly they can leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, visit this site but done well they can be even more effective than a big catwalk show. Craig Lawrence’s A/W 2011 presentation fell into the latter category for me;a series of presentations meant that there was plenty of room to find a seat, but still impressive front row faces like Susie Bubble and Fred Butler.A voiceover narrated the details of each outfit which really shed a lot of light on the intricacies of the designs that might have been lost on me otherwise; like garments being turned inside out to expose filigree textures beneath the surface.

The shoes were also real show-stoppers,the result of a collaboration between Craig and Crisian & McCaffrey, featuring killer heels and knitted panels.The colours of the collection were inspired by the night; dark blues, purples and navy blues; a brilliant alternative to the blacks and greys autumn/winter collections often resort to. Craig’s alternative textiles like cellophane and Kyototex give a shimmery finish to evening wear, whilst knitted tights worn underneath sheer knits created striking, layered patterns. Some pieces were made up of large circles and stripes woven into the fabric, subtle details which only really showed up in the texture of the garments.

Illustration by Jo Cheung

In striking contrast to the dark clothes, the models’ eyes were accentuated with a neon orange stripe on each eyelid; in keeping with the ‘brights’ make-up trend. Statement tights were also omnipresent in the LFW crowd and Craig’s offerings imply they’re going nowhere.

When the presentation finished, Craig didn’t seem to be making an appearance, until his mum left her place on the front row to drag him out to much applause. He certainly deserves it for pioneering a totally innovative approach to textiles and knitwear which has made him a firm fixture on the London fashion scene.

Photos by Katie Antoniou

Illustration by Artist Andrea

Charlie Le Mindu’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ catwalk show was packed with journalists, viagra photographers and front row candy like Daphne Guinness and Diane Pernet, remedy lots of people were left outside, disappointed. Such is the draw of the promise of nudity.

And Charlie didn’t let us down- first up on the catwalk was a naked model drenched in fake blood, wearing only a headpiece adorned with the word ‘Violence’. Profound, eh?The ‘Carrie’ theme ran through the whole show, with a number of the pieces being blood-splattered or drenched,a gimmick I’d have got pretty bored of if it weren’t for the nod to second world war Berlin. Vintage style lace and lots of military influences from gasmarks to metal cases meant that my interest was definitely peeked. Some of this stuff WAS wearable- have a look at this fantastic robe.

The shoes were a result of a collaboration between Charlie and Underground Shoes, I’m really disappointed that I didn’t get a better picture of any of them, because they were fantastic; stunning platforms covered in lace and Charlie’s signature hair.


Beginning life as a hairdresser, Charlie has gone on to work human hair into his clothing designs, now worn by the likes of Lady Gaga. In this show, hair fringing was often daubed in Graffiti, as were the model’s own hairstyles.

Illustration by Artist Andrea

The return of a darkly rebellious nod to the Punk era was evident in a number of shows this year,evidence of the current economic climate, dissatisfaction with the government; certainly Charlie was out to shock, provoke and disturb, with the final walk through set to a soundtrack of pigs being slaughtered. Whilst maintaining his artistic integrity, I do think Charlie was thinking of potential buyers when he designed this collection, as a lot of it is much more wearable than his previous pieces, despite the avant garde presentation.Get ready to see these looks on many a celeb; though probably without the fake blood.

Illustration by Artist Andrea

Photographs by Katie Antoniou

Ziad Ghanem by Avril Kelly

What an amazing show; Ziad Ghanem has trumped everything else I’ve seen this week. Opening with a model dressing in a dark, doctor dramatic floor length strapless gown, price with green feathers, stilts and skull makeup the audience were cheering from the off.

The front row was packed out with the eccentrically dressed – Boy George almost blended into the background in a bright yellow hat and full face of makeup. Special mention has to go to the PVC clad, (and complete with blow up hair), London artist Pandemonia, sitting opposite me. Together with a matching blow up dog, she must have been boilin’!

Ziad Ghanem by Alison Day

The loud show, with music changes more frequent than model changes provided clapping, laughing and unanimous approval – so much so that no one seemed to care that the show started an almost an hour late. Male and female models took to the catwalk in stunning creations – capes, gigantic earrings and tremendously tight dresses were wriggled, danced and glided down the runway on joker-style made-up faces.

The models came in all shapes and sizes but voluptuous curves and a heaving bosom was the order of the evening. Corset dresses that pushed said bosoms up and out were so tight that somewhere Scarlett Johansen was blushing. Full length floaty gowns in pale hues of blue, deep reds, sparkling gold and matte grey also allowed for plenty of swishing, and cloak spinning as the models made their way towards the waiting photographers.

Ziad Ghanem by Madi

My favourite dress was the bright fuschia deep cut and backless cocktail dress that nipped in perfectly at the waist. The shiny nature of the material was so unashamedly trashy that it avoided (I think) being either tacky or quality street wrapper-esque. Other notable highlights of the show include a deathly bride and groom, solemnly showering the crowd with petals at the end of the show, and the model who pirouetted her way backwards after walking down the catwalk. All in all, a brilliant show – exciting, entertaining and some truly beautiful clothes.
LFW2_FlorianJayet_by_AlisonDay

LFW A/W 2011, viagra sale Florian Jayet. Illustration by Alison Day

I spent London Fashion Week staying at my parent’s house. My childhood home with a new kitchen, order dog ‘brother’, central heating that works and a bath. I’m not going to lie, I enjoyed having my porridge made in the morning. Maple syrup on the side, and a herbal tea, packed lunch filled with snacks. That’s right, I lapped it up. Although Charlie is an excellent boy/man, there is nothing quite like the mother. However they live a few miles outside of Brighton, in a village. Thus the trek to London, the long days and write ups – intense. All because I LOVE it. Love words, fashion, and obviously, this mighty magazine. Yet I deliberated with coming to London for one show on Sunday. Day of rest day normally means Roast dinner. But I have in my mind, ‘NO HELS! SAY NOT TO NOTHING!’ at all times. I’m following my writing dream after all. This causes me great pleasures and enormous pains. So, of course, one show or not, I was on that train to London Victoria. And am I glad I made the effort for Fashion Mode?

Yes. Three shows in one; three excellent shows. I’m going to split Fashion Mode into three posts, because each designer deserves the love. So we will start with Florian Jayet.

LFW3_FlorianJayet_by_AlisonDay

LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Illustration by Alison Day

Initially I was slightly terrified and in awe of the models coming out. Nothing different to every show you might say. But, this was different, because the models had metal contraptions of their heads that made them look like a cross between special aliens and orthodontic patients. Four strips of silver metal came over their heads from the back, to touch their faces, with an enormous roller at the back. After my initial fear, I decided that they looked cool, as inevitably happens at LFW. See: ‘Urg… ahhh.. yah, I totally get that now. I want one.’ Although I’m not sure I would wear one of these creations, I would certainly consider wearing the dresses, which the metal complimented perfectly. Wiggle space lady, that’s what you are. With lasers from your eyes and hips.

W 2011-W 2011-IMG_4100
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LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Florian Jayet is a graduate in Biology which explains his science appreciative designs. The pieces featured strong shoulders, midi length skirts and padded fabrics. The shape of the woman has been celebrated and appreciated as if it is meant to be seen and not covered – raw biology. The models reminded me of those in Huxley’s; Brave New World. Perfect, angular and although feminine, minus the romanticism and emotional sentimentality, that are sometimes conjured by designs. In a sense Jayet‘s pieces are actually a mix of previous, and our vision of future, ideologies. The restricted, but beautiful shapes of the 20s, 30s and 40s appear to have been fused with modern and excessive details; i.e. the shoulders. The contemporary complimenting the past, and particularly with reference to French houses; Chanel and Dior. This makes for a very sophisticated and composed look. It made me want to look closer, at every detail, and know more. As opposed to held within the ruffles, the corset and the red heels, everything seemed so wrapped up, with the story inside. It was whimsical in its own way, and also impenetrable. These outfits are those that I would hope to find in the corner of a cafe in Paris, smoking, mysterious, alone – with a steely, but far away look.

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LFW A/W 2011, Florian Jayet. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I adored the padding details and the shrug wraps. Space lady, dressed for dinner. The long dresses had a Japanese feel to them, geisha like and graceful. Florian Jayet said that the focus for him, is to create; ‘a fetish wardrobe, pieces that a woman can keep forever, bringing them out on special occasions when she needs to be propelled into confidence and strength.’ It’s fair to say that you would feel empowered wearing Jayet’s pieces. The creams and blacks, shoulders, padding and midi length skirts would have me stomping and demanding like a glossy magazine Editor with somewhere to be. However at the moment it’s more probable I would be the space lady in the cafe, with a triple americano (having no affect), internally reliving or hoping for something. With an unreadable face, it’s unclear as to what scene could be playing in the mind of this space femme, but in a way it’s romantic – because for me, everything always is. This includes Jayet, of course.

Categories ,Alison Day, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Biology, ,chanel, ,Dior, ,Fahsion, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florian Jayet, ,Forward PR, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W, ,Space

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode No.2 James Hillman (by Helen)

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

Bora Aksu is one of the most unassuming and down to earth men I’ve ever met, find let alone in the land of fashion – which is why it is so bizarre that his shows attract such a high level of celebrity interest – I can’t for one moment imagine that he courts it himself…

Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Amelia Gregory
Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It was only after I’d planted myself down in the front row that I realised I was in the thick of a celebrity pap fest. Twiggy was busy giving vox pops to my left and Marina of Marina and the Diamonds fame came stomping past inches from my nose in a bid to find a spare patch of front row action. I kept my head down, information pills so it was only after the show that I realised I’d been sitting only a few bodies down from ex Sugababes’ star Keisha Buchanan, as she stood for an awkward and heavily photographed air kiss reunion with Girls Aloud’s current fashion darling Nicola Roberts, whose incredible thinness was enhanced by the halo of flashes going off behind her. I could hardly leave the venue for the ensuing scrum. Memo to self: try to avoid sitting in the thick of celeb land next time.

Marina by Artist Andrea
Marina by Andrea Peterson.

Last season Bora took a step away from the Somerset House action to show at the considerably smaller venue at Victoria House, and in reflection of this step down his collection seemed slightly lacking in confidence. But for A/W 2011 he was back in the big tent, and proving once more that he is at the height of his powers.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd.

Gun metal grey is a favourite Bora colour, and the collection flew off the starting blocks as it meant to continue, with a gorgeous bustle-backed party frock in metallic fabric and wool, highlighted by a slash of emerald green at the waist and in the underskirt – a colour that was to take second place only to his beloved grey this season. Bora staples: lace, sheer chiffon, cable knit and corsetry lacing were all present and correct, bound and wound around the models in cunning arrangements. Playful inspiration was found in the form of tuxedos and bow ties, Bora playing with proportion, placement and tromp l’oeil effects. As usual some of the dresses called to mind a suit of armour, contouring the female form. As the collection progressed the models heads became evermore bound in black gauze, encasing their delicate features. At the end the models grouped in an army to take their final turn on the catwalk – a trend that was to be repeated throughout the week at various shows.

Bora Aksu has an extraordinarily clear vision that keeps getting stronger and stronger: feminine without being too girly, clever without being unwearable, recognisable without being samey and just damn innovative every time. He is without doubt one of the most individual and idiosyncratic designers working in the UK today. Roll on S/S 2012.

You can read Georgia Takacs’ review here and Jemma Crow’s review here. Or you can check in with my intimate interview, posted last September. We’re big fans, what can I say?

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

Bora Aksu is one of the most unassuming and down to earth men I’ve ever met, viagra approved let alone in the land of fashion – which is why it is so bizarre that his shows attract such a high level of celebrity interest – I can’t for one moment imagine that he courts it himself…

Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Amelia Gregory
Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It was only after I’d planted myself down in the front row that I realised I was in the thick of a celebrity pap fest. Twiggy was busy giving vox pops to my left and Marina of Marina and the Diamonds fame came stomping past inches from my nose in a bid to find a spare patch of front row action. I kept my head down, discount so it was only after the show that I realised I’d been sitting only a few bodies down from ex Sugababes’ star Keisha Buchanan, as she stood for an awkward and heavily photographed air kiss reunion with Girls Aloud’s current fashion darling Nicola Roberts, whose incredible thinness was enhanced by the halo of flashes going off behind her. I could hardly leave the venue for the ensuing scrum. Memo to self: try to avoid sitting in the thick of celeb land next time.

Marina by Artist Andrea
Marina by Andrea Peterson.

Last season Bora took a step away from the Somerset House action to show at the considerably smaller venue at Victoria House, and in reflection of this step down his collection seemed slightly lacking in confidence. But for A/W 2011 he was back in the big tent, and proving once more that he is at the height of his powers.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd.

Gun metal grey is a favourite Bora colour, and the collection flew off the starting blocks as it meant to continue, with a gorgeous bustle-backed party frock in metallic fabric and wool, highlighted by a slash of emerald green at the waist and in the underskirt – a colour that was to take second place only to his beloved grey this season.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Alia Gargum
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Alia Gargum.

Bora staples: lace, sheer chiffon, cable knit and corsetry lacing were all present and correct, bound and wound around the models in cunning arrangements. Playful inspiration was found in the form of tuxedos and bow ties, Bora playing with proportion, placement and tromp l’oeil effects.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

As usual some of the dresses called to mind a suit of armour, contouring the female form. As the collection progressed the models heads became evermore bound in black gauze, encasing their delicate features. At the end the models grouped in an army to take their final turn on the catwalk – a trend that was to be repeated throughout the week at various shows.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Bora Aksu has an extraordinarily clear vision that keeps getting stronger and stronger: feminine without being too girly, clever without being unwearable, recognisable without being samey and just damn innovative every time. He is without doubt one of the most individual and idiosyncratic designers working in the UK today. Roll on S/S 2012.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Georgia Takacs’ review here and Jemma Crow’s review here. Or you can check in with my intimate interview, posted last September. We’re big fans, what can I say?

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Ankolie

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, buy information pills somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, order and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, ed but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Ankolie

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

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LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing the concept wholeheartedly, he studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

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LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator. I saw him at the end of the show. Statement on James Hillman follows: “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,Ankolie, ,Anne N’Toko, ,art, ,benefits, ,black, ,Bon Iver, ,crude oil, ,distillation, ,fashion, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Mode Show Two, ,Fashion Scout, ,Forward PR, ,Helen Martin, ,James Hillman, ,Jon Hamm, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mad Men, ,men’s fashion, ,sleek, ,Suits, ,Texture, ,Toni and Guy, ,wool

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