Amelia’s Magazine | LFW AW10/11: Women’s Wear Preview

Louse Goldin

GOLD_SS10_0272The first designer tipped for great things later this week is Louise Goldin, buy cialis 40mg who last month was named as the winner of the illustrious Fashion Forward sponsorship scheme. Renowned for her innovative knitwear designs including; short figure enhancing knitted dresses, viagra dosage separates and swimwear, Louise often incorporates both unusual weaving techniques and futuristic patterns earning her the epithet ‘Queen of Knits’.

LouisegoldinWhilst busily producing designs for her eponymous label Louise also finds to work on her esteemed collections for Topshop, with this spring seeing her debut a capsule footwear range of studded court shoes set to put the fierce back into fashion week.
Louise Goldin is showing at LFW at 3:15pm on Sunday 21st Feb in the Topshop space.

Bryce Aime

Bryce1One of my favourite designers of recent seasons has to be Bryce Aime, who launched his self named label back in 2006. A designer who understands the difference between conceptual and commercial design, Bryce’s unique combination offers his customers sexy and understated garments with a twist of edgy and dramatic tailoring.

bryce2Bryce’s current SS10 collection channels 50’s Parisian Chic, combining his classic tailoring techniques with futuristic body con structures to great effect.
Bryce Aime is showing at LFW at 11:30am on Saturday 20th Feb as part of On|Off.

Georgia Hardinge

georgia 1
Another great designer looking to make her stamp on the British fashion industry next season is that of Georgia Hardinge. Best known for her figure enhancing dresses, each garment is specifically designed to ‘map the silhouette and curves of the female line’.
georgia2With a penchant for avant-garde tailoring Georgia produces highly controlled yet progressive pieces which successfully juxtapose the futurism of sculptural design with femininity, empowering the her legion of customers without being overtly sexual. Georgia is taking part in the LFW exhibition at Somerset House between 19-23rd February.

Belle Sauvage

Belle1A relatively new label, having emerged on the scene in 2008, Belle Sauvage is the brainchild of design duo Virginia Ferreira and Christian Neuman. Best known for their eye-popping digital prints and electric use of colour, this is one brand who look set to achieve the unachievable, having the fashion world eating out of the palm of their hands.

belle_sauvage_ss10_650px_02Fresh for SS10 the enigmatic duo have sampled block colouring in shocking scarlet and electric blues creating a contrast to the clashing primary hues of the geometric graphic prints and trademark lipstick detailing visible throughout. With a subtle nod to futurism referenced throughout the collection you’ll see conical shaped breasts, origami-inspired directional cuts across the hips and the occasional boxy shoulder.
Belle Sauvage is showing at LFW at 5:00pm on Saturday 20th Feb as part of On|Off.

Gemma Slack

slack1The last designer I’m tipping for greatness at LFW is the one and only Gemma Slack. Having graduated last year, SS10 sees Gemma’s second post-graduate collection inspired by fetishised super heroines and metal girls. Never one to toe-the-line with conventional designs this season sees Gemma experimenting with leather, suede, aluminium and steel to produce a highly unique and futuristic collection.

slack2
Looking to empower women across the nation, Gemma’s collections tend to be bold, brash and above all strong. By using biomechanics to combine body and science, Gemma successfully replicates the ideology of transformation through costume.
Gemma Slack is showcasing a presentation at LFW between 5-8pm on Friday 19th Feb.

Categories ,Belle Sauvage, ,BFC, ,Bryce Aime, ,Christian Neuman, ,Fashion-forward, ,Gemma Slack, ,Georgia Hardinge, ,lfw, ,LFW AW10/11: Women’s Wear Preview, ,Louse Goldin, ,topshop, ,Virginia Ferreira

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Belle Sauvage

Belle Sauvage. All photography by Amelia Gregory.
Belle Sauvage. All photography by Amelia Gregory unless otherwise stated.

It’s always good, approved I find, to get talking to the various freaks I photograph at fashion week. So there I was, taking an artfully staged pose of a boy channelling a New Romantic Michael Jackson (I’m sure there’s nothing like a death to bring on the best types of homage) when we got into a little conversation. “Are you a blogger?” he asked. “Why yes, I suppose I am, I said,” giving him my card. “Ohhhhh,” he went. “I know you – you’ve taught me. You came down to Epsom and gave us a lecture recently.”

Looking HAWT at fashion week gets you places...
Looking HAWT at fashion week gets you places…

I congratulated him on actually making an effort to get out to the fashion shows and he bemoaned his classmates, many of whom obviously weren’t inclined to blag it into the shows or maybe just didn’t possess his particular kind of panache. He told me had tickets for Mark Fast. Really? “Nightmare,” he said like a seasoned pro, gesticulating to the crush outside the venue before being whisked straight to the front of the queue by his mates. You see kids, if you dress up and make an effort to look FABULOUS, you get automatic access to all the best bits of fashion week. Mark Fast eh? I was refused tickets for that show dear readers. “Sorry we are oversubscribed so cannot accommodate you,” was the abrupt response from one Charlotte Delahunty (who she?) Unless, it appears, you are an ambitious student of mine. In which case you will be accommodated. I talked to Mark at his stand over at Somerset House and in person he proved to be very lovely, but it is the press bitches that control the gates to the shows and it pays to know these people. And they know it. Unfortunately I’m not very good at sucking arse. Sorry, I mean, being polite and charming (unless I genuinely like you). Story of my life really – but that doesn’t mean that I wouldn’t recommend making that little bit extra bit of effort to get along in fashion if that’s where your future lies. The future lies with the ambitious. Go out there, make friends and always, always dress fabulous.

Belle Sauvage runway. Photography by Tim Adey.
Belle Sauvage runway. Photography by Tim Adey.

Belle Sauvage. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Belle Sauvage by Maryanne Oliver
Belle Sauvage by Maryanne Oliver.

Belle Sauvage.
Belle Sauvage by Maryanne Oliver
Belle Sauvage by Maryanne Oliver.

Belle Sauvage
Check out those armoured shoes. Won’t get into any trouble in those, no siree.

Belle Sauvage high hair and close plaits by Maryanne Oliver
Belle Sauvage high hair and close plaits by Maryanne Oliver.

Belle Sauvage

But back to the shows. Belle Sauvage is the baby of designers Virginia Ferreira and Christian Neuman. They’ve only just starting showing at London Fashion Week and there was a good crowd piled into Victoria House to see what they’d cooked up for their new collection. They have already made a bit of a name for their strong digital prints, and on this score they did not disappoint. Fritz Lang Metropolis inspired kaleidoscopic shapes were splattered across leggings and short shift dressings. A large face stared ominously back from oversized slouchy knitwear. Huge protected shoes, spiked and plated shapes emphasised the ever-present armoured theme, as did the severe back-combed mohawks and high swept eyeliner – making the models appear alien-esque, cold and untouchable as they strode down the runway to an industrial sound track. Belle Sauvage class themselves as a “boutique” brand and retail at a reasonable price on websites such as ASOS. It’s not easy to marry catwalk edginess with commerciality – especially at this price point – but Belle Sauvage seem to be making admirable headway. Other brands would do well to watch and learn.

Belle Sauvage. Photography by Tim Adey.
Belle Sauvage ALIENS. Photography by Tim Adey.

Categories ,ASOS, ,Belle Sauvage, ,Blagging, ,boutique, ,Christian Neuman, ,Digital Prints, ,epsom, ,Fritz Lang, ,Leggings, ,Mark Fast, ,Maryanne Oliver, ,Michael Jackson, ,New Romantic, ,UCCA, ,Victoria House, ,Virginia Ferreira

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Amelia’s Magazine | Belle Sauvage: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Belle_Sauvage_AW_2013_by_Isabelle_Mattern
Belle Sauvage A/W 2013 by Isabelle Mattern.

Belle Sauvage hit Fashion Scout with the look for which they are known best: incredibly complex digital placement prints, as described in our exclusive preview interview with designers Virginia Ferreira and Chris Neuman.

Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage A/W 2013 by Victoria Haynes
Belle Sauvage A/W 2013 by Victoria Haynes.

The show opened with a trio of models, resplendent in massive hairpieces: swishing pigtails and gigantic dip dyed fringes that dominated each of the looks that were to follow. Sheepskin and fake fur topped eminently wearable silk shift dresses which were covered in swirls inspired by Chinese dragons and baroque ornaments, and lace trims appeared at the arms and thigh. Zip up black suede boots and laced patent platforms worked well with the simplicity of the looks, though to my mind they were of questionable styling taste. The intention of this collection was to mix up inspirations from East and West and there was certainly a wide range of styles on show. Classic Chanel styling appeared in the form of heavy contrast seams and big buttons on boxy suits and peplums paired with pencil skirts and mini capes provided a contrasting silhouette.

Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle_Sauvage_AW_2013_by_Isabelle_Mattern
Belle Sauvage A/W 2013 by Isabelle Mattern.

That this brand does well in the commercial sector abroad was evident in the more casual range that made up the middle section of the show. Amongst my favourite looks was the head of Botticelli‘s famous Birth of Venus reimagined in a repeat pattern on a loose fitting top and matching trouser set, but there was one odd look that didn’t appear to fit in at all: an intarsia knit cat portrait top which was accessorised with beanie and sunglasses.

Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
This was a lengthy show featuring many similar pieces and I must confess I became a little weary somewhere around the ten minute mark, but this was clearly intended as a showcase for plentiful looks that will no doubt gain lots of sales for this talented twosome. The show came to a screeching halt as the models massed for a final walk down the catwalk.

Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Belle Sauvage A/W 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,A/W 2013, ,Belle Sauvage, ,Birth of Venus, ,Botticelli, ,chanel, ,Chris Neuman, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Isabelle Mattern, ,London Fashion Week, ,review, ,Victoria Haynes, ,Virginia Ferreira

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Amelia’s Magazine | Belle Sauvage: London Fashion Week A/W 2014 Catwalk Review

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman.

For A/W 2014 Belle Sauvage once again put together a collection that featured their trademark mishmash of quirky prints and youthful sportsluxe. This season they were inspired by the ladies of the night, specifically Paris Cats After Midnight, those iconic French women who did not let the devastation of two World Wars stand in the way of a good time. This was translated into prints, embroideries and trims featuring the ‘feminine weapons’ of choice – chains, lipsticks, necklaces and pearls. On shift dresses symmetrical designs with overlaid bubbles had a distinct Metropolis feel, and overall there was a definite 80s style to this collection, featuring as it did simple black heels, asymmetric style pillar box hats with dangling chains and foxy cut off red gloves. Boxy quilted crop jackets, flared peplums on pencil skirts and bodycon dresses further referenced that most decadent of decades in this super fun collection, which finished with a high octane floor length red dress and coat.

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 Gaarte

Belle Sauvage A/W 2014 by Gaarte.

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

Belle Sauvage AW 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory

All photography by Amelia Gregory. Read more about Belle Sauvage in our review and interview here and here.

Categories ,80s, ,A/W 2014, ,Belle Sauvage, ,bodycon, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gaarte, ,Isher Dhiman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Metropolis, ,Paris Cats After Midnight, ,print, ,sportsluxe

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