Amelia’s Magazine | Vauxhall Fashion Scout Ones to Watch A/W 2011 – A Preview


Kirsty Ward, cialis 40mg pilule illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

Oh God, doctor more about is it really that time again? Do I really have to stay up, approved night after night, sending all those emails? Worrying about outfits? Processing 12,000 photographs? Yep, London Fashion Week is just around the corner, and yesterday Vauxhall Fashion Scout announced their line up for their extra special Ones to Watch show.

Previous winners of the accolade include Ada Zanditon and Lu Flux (both in Amelia’s new book) as well as Eudon Choi and David Longshaw. Last season’s outing was an ecclectic mix of ‘dandyish’ menswear, cream pleats and yellow ruffles. The line up this time around looks certain to impress, though – Central Saint Martins’ graduates Anja Mlakar and Kirsty Ward, along with Sara Bro-Jorgensen and Tze Goh.

While we all get excited about London’s most fashionable five days, here’s a little round up of the new design talent.

Tze Goh

Illustration by Lana Hughes

Tze Goh graduated with a BA from Parsons in New York before completing an MA at Central Saint Martins. Tze’s collections to date have had that strong, minimal aesthetic with emphasis on shape and sculpture.

They’re definitely futuristic, and each garment appears to have been moulded from an unknown material rather than sewn from jersey. Pieces emphasise the shapes of his models – exaggerated shoulders and discrete twists in fabric make for modern, appealing clothes. Hopefully he’ll stick to his minimalist principles during his outing this coming season.

Kirsty Ward

Illustration by Gabriel Ayala

Kirsty Ward is brilliant. She’s one of the most unique designers I’ve seen in ages, and it’s no surprise that she’s, yep – you guessed it – Central Saint Martin’s alumni and went on to work with Alberta Ferretti in Italy. Amelia reviewed her collection last season , a vertiable wonder of sculptural jewellery and clothing that echoes the contours of the body.

I loved her work with David Longshaw (creating jewellery that he teamed with his collection) during his debut on the very same Ones to Watch stage a year ago This season promises another fashion-forward outing.

Anja Mlakar

Illustration by Willa Gebbie

Anja Mlakar is – you guessed it – another Central Saint Martins graduate. I’m feeling fatigued typing those three words already and the shows haven’t even started. Anyway, Her debut collection harboured much interest and having only graduated last year, Anja is set to cement herself in fashion this coming season.

Her S/S 2011 collection was a welcome ray of sunshine, with bursts of pastel yellows and pinks. Her aesthetic features structural forms and body-concious frocks, and her style straddles the fine line between flattering and futuristic. The most diverse collection, it will be intereting to see if Anja develops a particular element or mixes it up again.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen

Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan

Sara, a Royal College of Art graduate (at last!) takes a different approach to fashion and is heavily influenced by 2D forms like black and white photographs. She’s been nominated for awards here and there.

Her previous collections contain a mix of knits and deconstructed pieces, and I’m not exaggerating when I say this girl digs black. As it’s the A/W 2011 we’re looking forward to, I wouldn’t be surprised if we see more of fashion’s favourite colour on Sara’s outing, but then what do I know?

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Alberta Feretti, ,black, ,Central Saint Martins, ,David Longshaw, ,fashion, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Italy, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Lana Hughes, ,London Fashion Week, ,new york, ,Ones To Watch, ,parsons, ,Royal College of Art, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Willa Gebbie

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Amelia’s Magazine | Vauxhall Fashion Scout Ones to Watch A/W 2011 – A Preview


Kirsty Ward, cialis 40mg pilule illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

Oh God, doctor more about is it really that time again? Do I really have to stay up, approved night after night, sending all those emails? Worrying about outfits? Processing 12,000 photographs? Yep, London Fashion Week is just around the corner, and yesterday Vauxhall Fashion Scout announced their line up for their extra special Ones to Watch show.

Previous winners of the accolade include Ada Zanditon and Lu Flux (both in Amelia’s new book) as well as Eudon Choi and David Longshaw. Last season’s outing was an ecclectic mix of ‘dandyish’ menswear, cream pleats and yellow ruffles. The line up this time around looks certain to impress, though – Central Saint Martins’ graduates Anja Mlakar and Kirsty Ward, along with Sara Bro-Jorgensen and Tze Goh.

While we all get excited about London’s most fashionable five days, here’s a little round up of the new design talent.

Tze Goh

Illustration by Lana Hughes

Tze Goh graduated with a BA from Parsons in New York before completing an MA at Central Saint Martins. Tze’s collections to date have had that strong, minimal aesthetic with emphasis on shape and sculpture.

They’re definitely futuristic, and each garment appears to have been moulded from an unknown material rather than sewn from jersey. Pieces emphasise the shapes of his models – exaggerated shoulders and discrete twists in fabric make for modern, appealing clothes. Hopefully he’ll stick to his minimalist principles during his outing this coming season.

Kirsty Ward

Illustration by Gabriel Ayala

Kirsty Ward is brilliant. She’s one of the most unique designers I’ve seen in ages, and it’s no surprise that she’s, yep – you guessed it – Central Saint Martin’s alumni and went on to work with Alberta Ferretti in Italy. Amelia reviewed her collection last season , a vertiable wonder of sculptural jewellery and clothing that echoes the contours of the body.

I loved her work with David Longshaw (creating jewellery that he teamed with his collection) during his debut on the very same Ones to Watch stage a year ago This season promises another fashion-forward outing.

Anja Mlakar

Illustration by Willa Gebbie

Anja Mlakar is – you guessed it – another Central Saint Martins graduate. I’m feeling fatigued typing those three words already and the shows haven’t even started. Anyway, Her debut collection harboured much interest and having only graduated last year, Anja is set to cement herself in fashion this coming season.

Her S/S 2011 collection was a welcome ray of sunshine, with bursts of pastel yellows and pinks. Her aesthetic features structural forms and body-concious frocks, and her style straddles the fine line between flattering and futuristic. The most diverse collection, it will be intereting to see if Anja develops a particular element or mixes it up again.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen

Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan

Sara, a Royal College of Art graduate (at last!) takes a different approach to fashion and is heavily influenced by 2D forms like black and white photographs. She’s been nominated for awards here and there.

Her previous collections contain a mix of knits and deconstructed pieces, and I’m not exaggerating when I say this girl digs black. As it’s the A/W 2011 we’re looking forward to, I wouldn’t be surprised if we see more of fashion’s favourite colour on Sara’s outing, but then what do I know?

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Alberta Feretti, ,black, ,Central Saint Martins, ,David Longshaw, ,fashion, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Italy, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Lana Hughes, ,London Fashion Week, ,new york, ,Ones To Watch, ,parsons, ,Royal College of Art, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Willa Gebbie

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Hannah Marshall


Hannah Marshall S/S 2011, check illustrated by Erica Sharp

For S/S 2011 Hannah Marshall began with an elegant (though incredibly high in production value) film in keeping with the designer’s singular aesthetic.

For Spring Summer 2011 Hannah Marshall strayed into the world of soft colour, doctor after the first model strode down the catwalk in one of the collections strongest designs, physician a sheer dress that draped to the floor. The jackets for S/S 2011 remain delicately architecture, the shoulders still prominent appeared less fierce but remained purposeful. Hannah Marshall designs strong clothes to be worn by strong personalities.

The title of last season’s show: Army of Me, and it is almost impossible to think of a more apt title, for a collection so intrinsically linked to the vision and physical presence of the designer. This is not to a fault – though one can feel daunted by the possibility in inhabiting the clothes – but a testament to Hannah Marshall that her aesthetic after three seasons of participating in London Fashion Week is so strong. Another designer that conveys a similar sense of strength in her collections identity is the ever fantastic Louise Gray.


Illustration by Erica Sharp

The catwalk presentation was split into two halves, it being the second section in which a soft cream first appeared from backstage. Whilst the addition of ‘colour’ may have been a challenge to the designers colour palate, it was welcomed. The pattern designs remained loyal, as structural rectangle ruffles adorned the sleeves of the signature blazer and the neckline of dresses.

The collection of blouses and a jumpsuit which appeared in the presentation were unified in the embracement sheer material. The heaviest detailing on these garments appeared around the collar and buttons, enhancing the vulnerable visibility of the models flesh.

At times evocative of the 1980s were clothes were a constant symbol of wealth, the restrained addition of colour from Marshall leaves the viewer intrigued for the designer’s direction for A/W 2011.

Categories ,180s, ,BFC, ,black, ,british fashion council, ,Erica Sharp, ,film, ,Hannah Marshall, ,London Fashion Week, ,S/S 2011, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: John Rocha

John Rocha SS 2012 by Sarah Harman
John Rocha S/S 2012 by Sarah Harman

Harold Tillman, information pills Hilary Alexander and James Goldstein were just a few of the fashion bigwigs to take their prime seating positions in anticipation of the latest John Rocha collection. This was much the same scenario when I attended Rocha’s show last season and the high-flying professionals seem to have become a favoured crowd for Rocha’s front row. And it’s not surprising when, information pills needless to say, cure the designer is a long-standing, treasured feature of London Fashion Week who is widely celebrated and, most of all, respected.

John Rocha by Duilio Marconi 1

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi 2

Model Abbey Lee Kershaw opened the show and took to the runway in the opening outfit. Sporting an all-black voluminous textured dress, her entrance had photographers’ flashes illuminating the BFC tent. Kershaw, who was finally dubbed a supermodel this year by V magazine, had also been presented as a key feature in Rocha’s A/W 2011 show back in February, suggesting that Rocha has seemingly taken quite a shine to the 24 year-old Australian.

John Rocha SS 2012 LFW by Nicola Ellen 2
John Rocha S/S 2012 by Nicola Ellen

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

Also just like last season, (Rocha loves his traditions!) the models were styled with wind-swept nymph hair and long braided plaits. Make-up was minimal, pure and simple with pale fresh-faced skin and nude colouring; an overall effortless ethereal look to compliment John Rocha’s signature design ethic.

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

Much to their delight, I’m sure, John Rocha was one designer that gave models’ skinny-pins a short break from killer heels. In their place were black platformed flat sandals, adding an updated feminine grunge look (minus all the pain!).

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

 Rocha SS 2012 LFW by Nicola Ellen 1
John Rocha S/S 2012 by Nicola Ellen

To name a few of the many more intricacies that went into Rocha’s elaborately crafted collection, ribbons were attached to hair and hung long next to plaits and all models sported either wire or feather headdresses. The problem with this idea was that because Abbey had opened the show in a wired headdress with black feathers, I was almost convinced that a major fashion disaster had occurred. Models were appearing with bare wire headdresses; no feathers. They looked absolutely bizarre so I naturally assumed that their feathers must have fallen off. What a nightmare, I thought. This wasn’t the case at all. It was purposeful. Just John Rocha keeping us on our toes, I suppose.

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

Just as was the case with his A/W11 collection, the colour palette was ultra-minimal with neutral tones dominating throughout. In fact, there were only three colours on the agenda; all rich-black ensembles led to cream creations which then led to head-to-toe stark white. With only black, cream and white, the focus shifted away from colour to texture instead. Texture was intricately and ornately crafted with Abbey’s opening black raffia dress, raw raffia that made up other ensembles, loops of black rubber and Lurex threads intertwined in the cream and white garments.

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha Catwalk LFW by Nicola Ellen jpg
John Rocha S/S 2012 by Nicola Ellen

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi

Towering tall over John Rocha, Abbey Lee Kershaw once again led the Hong Kong born designer down the catwalk for another of his gracious finales. And, as has become tradition, he placed a kiss on Abbey‘s cheek at the feet of the snapping papz, and then John Rocha was off, thanking and bowing to the audience as he went.

John Rocha SS 2012 by Duilio Marconi
All photography by Duilio Marconi

Categories ,Abbey Lee Kershaw, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,BFC Catwalk Space, ,BFC Showspace, ,BFC Tent, ,black, ,british fashion council, ,Cream, ,Debenhams Rocha, ,Duilio Marconi, ,Georgia Takacs, ,Harold Tillman, ,Headdresses, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Hong Kong, ,James Goldstein, ,John Rocha, ,lfw, ,LFW S/S 2012, ,LFW S/S12, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Fashion Week S/S 2012, ,London Fashion Week S/S12, ,Lurex, ,Myth, ,Mythologies, ,Myths, ,Nicola Ellen, ,Nymphs, ,Raffia, ,Rubber, ,S/S 2012, ,Sarah Harman, ,Simone Rocha, ,Somerset House, ,Texture, ,Warriors, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Corrie Nielsen (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, find buy information pills illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.

Jenny Robins’ and Abby Wright’s illustrations can also be found in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,1800s, ,1900s, ,19th century, ,60s, ,Abby Wright, ,black, ,blonde, ,Corrie Nielsen, ,Elizabeth I, ,Elizabethan, ,Feminine, ,fitted, ,gothic, ,headbands, ,Helen Martin, ,heroine, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,models, ,pencil skirt, ,Queen, ,Queen Victoria, ,Red, ,teal, ,Tess of the D’Urbervilles, ,Thomas Hardy, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,Wuthering Heights, ,Yorkshire Moors

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Corrie Nielsen (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, find buy information pills illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.

Jenny Robins’ and Abby Wright’s illustrations can also be found in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,1800s, ,1900s, ,19th century, ,60s, ,Abby Wright, ,black, ,blonde, ,Corrie Nielsen, ,Elizabeth I, ,Elizabethan, ,Feminine, ,fitted, ,gothic, ,headbands, ,Helen Martin, ,heroine, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,models, ,pencil skirt, ,Queen, ,Queen Victoria, ,Red, ,teal, ,Tess of the D’Urbervilles, ,Thomas Hardy, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,Wuthering Heights, ,Yorkshire Moors

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Fashion Mode No.2 James Hillman (by Helen)

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

Bora Aksu is one of the most unassuming and down to earth men I’ve ever met, find let alone in the land of fashion – which is why it is so bizarre that his shows attract such a high level of celebrity interest – I can’t for one moment imagine that he courts it himself…

Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Amelia Gregory
Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It was only after I’d planted myself down in the front row that I realised I was in the thick of a celebrity pap fest. Twiggy was busy giving vox pops to my left and Marina of Marina and the Diamonds fame came stomping past inches from my nose in a bid to find a spare patch of front row action. I kept my head down, information pills so it was only after the show that I realised I’d been sitting only a few bodies down from ex Sugababes’ star Keisha Buchanan, as she stood for an awkward and heavily photographed air kiss reunion with Girls Aloud’s current fashion darling Nicola Roberts, whose incredible thinness was enhanced by the halo of flashes going off behind her. I could hardly leave the venue for the ensuing scrum. Memo to self: try to avoid sitting in the thick of celeb land next time.

Marina by Artist Andrea
Marina by Andrea Peterson.

Last season Bora took a step away from the Somerset House action to show at the considerably smaller venue at Victoria House, and in reflection of this step down his collection seemed slightly lacking in confidence. But for A/W 2011 he was back in the big tent, and proving once more that he is at the height of his powers.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd.

Gun metal grey is a favourite Bora colour, and the collection flew off the starting blocks as it meant to continue, with a gorgeous bustle-backed party frock in metallic fabric and wool, highlighted by a slash of emerald green at the waist and in the underskirt – a colour that was to take second place only to his beloved grey this season. Bora staples: lace, sheer chiffon, cable knit and corsetry lacing were all present and correct, bound and wound around the models in cunning arrangements. Playful inspiration was found in the form of tuxedos and bow ties, Bora playing with proportion, placement and tromp l’oeil effects. As usual some of the dresses called to mind a suit of armour, contouring the female form. As the collection progressed the models heads became evermore bound in black gauze, encasing their delicate features. At the end the models grouped in an army to take their final turn on the catwalk – a trend that was to be repeated throughout the week at various shows.

Bora Aksu has an extraordinarily clear vision that keeps getting stronger and stronger: feminine without being too girly, clever without being unwearable, recognisable without being samey and just damn innovative every time. He is without doubt one of the most individual and idiosyncratic designers working in the UK today. Roll on S/S 2012.

You can read Georgia Takacs’ review here and Jemma Crow’s review here. Or you can check in with my intimate interview, posted last September. We’re big fans, what can I say?

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

Bora Aksu is one of the most unassuming and down to earth men I’ve ever met, viagra approved let alone in the land of fashion – which is why it is so bizarre that his shows attract such a high level of celebrity interest – I can’t for one moment imagine that he courts it himself…

Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Amelia Gregory
Twiggy at Bora Aksu. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It was only after I’d planted myself down in the front row that I realised I was in the thick of a celebrity pap fest. Twiggy was busy giving vox pops to my left and Marina of Marina and the Diamonds fame came stomping past inches from my nose in a bid to find a spare patch of front row action. I kept my head down, discount so it was only after the show that I realised I’d been sitting only a few bodies down from ex Sugababes’ star Keisha Buchanan, as she stood for an awkward and heavily photographed air kiss reunion with Girls Aloud’s current fashion darling Nicola Roberts, whose incredible thinness was enhanced by the halo of flashes going off behind her. I could hardly leave the venue for the ensuing scrum. Memo to self: try to avoid sitting in the thick of celeb land next time.

Marina by Artist Andrea
Marina by Andrea Peterson.

Last season Bora took a step away from the Somerset House action to show at the considerably smaller venue at Victoria House, and in reflection of this step down his collection seemed slightly lacking in confidence. But for A/W 2011 he was back in the big tent, and proving once more that he is at the height of his powers.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Donya Todd.

Gun metal grey is a favourite Bora colour, and the collection flew off the starting blocks as it meant to continue, with a gorgeous bustle-backed party frock in metallic fabric and wool, highlighted by a slash of emerald green at the waist and in the underskirt – a colour that was to take second place only to his beloved grey this season.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Alia Gargum
Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Alia Gargum.

Bora staples: lace, sheer chiffon, cable knit and corsetry lacing were all present and correct, bound and wound around the models in cunning arrangements. Playful inspiration was found in the form of tuxedos and bow ties, Bora playing with proportion, placement and tromp l’oeil effects.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

As usual some of the dresses called to mind a suit of armour, contouring the female form. As the collection progressed the models heads became evermore bound in black gauze, encasing their delicate features. At the end the models grouped in an army to take their final turn on the catwalk – a trend that was to be repeated throughout the week at various shows.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Bora Aksu has an extraordinarily clear vision that keeps getting stronger and stronger: feminine without being too girly, clever without being unwearable, recognisable without being samey and just damn innovative every time. He is without doubt one of the most individual and idiosyncratic designers working in the UK today. Roll on S/S 2012.

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Georgia Takacs’ review here and Jemma Crow’s review here. Or you can check in with my intimate interview, posted last September. We’re big fans, what can I say?

Bora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia GregoryBora Aksu A/W 2011 by Amelia Gregory
Bora Aksu A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Ankolie

Whilst in the press lounge I had a natter with a benefits investigator and a lady who runs an art gallery. The benefits investigator did the media bits as a relief from fraud and because ‘the people are always so friendly.’ This is true, buy information pills somewhat surprisingly. I have met some super and interesting people at LFW, order and this man was no exception. A delight to chat to. All three of us were heading for the Fashion Mode show, ed but I was faffing about with Toni and Guy etc. so didn’t walk with the investigator or art lady. But I saw them opposite me in the audience and it was obvious, although we had talked mostly about high class fraud, investigator man, liked his threads. And why not? I love it that Charlie, my boyfriend, loves his clothes, and he’d be all over watching a male fashion show, like the one at Fashion Mode: James Hillman.

hillman

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Illustration by Ankolie

Most men, I want to say ALL MEN, look great in a well cut suit. Boys turn to men, and previously bland chaps, turn to hotness. Is it the shoulders? Is it the old school charm? Or is it because it’s almost rare to see everyday, thus special and alluring? It’s a shame, because men look fantastic when they’re wearing something cut correctly. Why not embrace the suit more? Have you not seen Mad Men, with Don and err Don? In real life Jon Hamm looks like Bon Iver in the middle of his woods escapade. In Mad Men, he is all that millions of women desire. I don’t think it’s the 50s ideologies of man protecting woman, whilst woman looks perfect and alert. It’s just a suit looks NICE.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

So, James Hillman shows that men look good dressed in black clothes, cut well, particularly suits. The collection is all black because James used crude oil as his inspiration for his designs. Embracing the concept wholeheartedly, he studied the distillation of crude oil, learning that different temperatures produce different iterations of oil. Each fabric thus, represents a different tier in the crude oil process. The heavyweight oils are represented with heavyweight woollen cashmere mixes and reindeer leather. Whilst the lightweight oils are represented in rip stock and lightweight wax cottons.

Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia Hillman - Amelia

LFW A/W 2011 James Hillman Collection. Photography by Amelia Gregory

The deigns are sleek and sharp. Whilst the pockets and necklines are detailed, with for example; reflective fabric; pock and crepe pocket panelling; high neck or collarless necklines, all the pieces retain luxurious simplicity. I still have issues with man bags, but the rest of the show was hot to trot. This was confirmed by a man, by the investigator. I saw him at the end of the show. Statement on James Hillman follows: “I don’t normally go in for men’s fashion, but I loved that. I would wear all of that. Hmmm…may need to investigate this James Hillman further.” Indeed. And spread the word.

Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,Ankolie, ,Anne N’Toko, ,art, ,benefits, ,black, ,Bon Iver, ,crude oil, ,distillation, ,fashion, ,Fashion Mode, ,Fashion Mode Show Two, ,Fashion Scout, ,Forward PR, ,Helen Martin, ,James Hillman, ,Jon Hamm, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mad Men, ,men’s fashion, ,sleek, ,Suits, ,Texture, ,Toni and Guy, ,wool

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jean-Pierre Braganza (by Amelia)

thumb emilio
Emilio de la Morena by Faye West
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Illustration by Faye West

Apparently Emilio de la Morena has lengthened his silhouette. His pieces are now touching, viagra sale or over the knee, prostate ‘signalling a new direction that is stricter and more refined.’ The body con is still there of course, order remaining tighter than a wetsuit, and both wigglier and feistier than Mad Men’s, Joan. That’s exactly what the collection made me think of: Joan and Jessica Rabbit. This translates to: HOT… but sophisticated.

Red Charlotte Olympia shoes featured throughout the show. Now, I’ve always been a fan of red shoes. From ballet to sky scraping, red shoes are sweet vixens, minxes, all playful and naughty. But less; “stop it Roger” and more; “Roger I want champagne, oysters and Chanel. Get them!” She needs a man, not a wimp. She will wear her shoes in the bath, and probably won’t speak to Roger much before or after – whatever happens between them. She’s an old school dressed WOMAN, not a girl, and she expects to be treated with respect. Like the stroppier ones in James Bond films, this woman can kick some ass. And answer back with cutting looks and witty, snappy words.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Other Charlotte Olympia shoes included a suede ankle boot and platform sandals in three colours, black, red, powder pink and ivory. All utterly lust-worthy. Heaven. The colour palette mirrors Emilio de la Morena Autumn/Winter collection, which focuses on black, dark purple and RED. The sombre tones of this show, inspired by the work of the American photographer Francesca Woodman and the circumstances surrounding her suicide in New York, in 1981, aged just 22. Her photographs are hauntingly beautiful and predominantly black and white. Emilio de la Morena wanted to reflect these sad circumstances, with his use of passionate, bruised and mourning colours. These give way however, to ivory and powder pink, making for delicate prettiness, next to the block melancholy. Together, the designs look classy, serious and fantastic. I see these beautiful women by the graves of Italian gangsters, weeping. They are hard, stunning and controlled, but what they love – they adore with all their hearts.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Victoriana also featured within Emilio de la Morena’s collection, but with a modern, sheer twist. Bib decoration and high necklines created from sheer, frayed and tufted organza, make it lighter, sexier and contemporary. The longer length, wool pencil skirts also featured sheer organza. With panels, embroidered in swirling, zig zagging ribbon, created in the material, as well as silk inserts. The additions allowing for fluidity of movement.

The collection felt serious and respectfully attractive. Not flirty, terribly young, overly romantic or precocious. Instead very sensual and confident. The red stole the show. However, like red lipstick on a make up less face, it looked the most alluring, when it was paired with the other other colours. The eyes and lips are too much – alone they are beautiful. Such a bright red needed the other colours to avoid being lost, and to stand out as a solitary statement. And you know, if the three women were sobbing by the grave, each with an accent of red, just imagine… scandalous, stylish, powerful and mysterious RED.
Jean-Pierre Braganza by Catherine Askew
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Catherine Askew.

Ponytails, cure red eye make up, pharm close fitting suits, black, lots of black. A male model with razor sharp cheekbones and a hilarious female model with superlative head throwing posing skills. This is what Jean-Pierre Braganza showed at the Northumberland House, a new grandiose LFW location.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Northumberland House
Northumberland House.

After loitering in the magnificent reception area we were ushered into the huge ballroom, passing by the backstage area which looked suspiciously like the back of a Hollywood film lot.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Positronyx was a sexily provocative collection dominated by sharp tailoring and beautiful pattern cutting in a predominantly monochrome palette, bar a nod to that boldest of colours, pillar box red. This cropped up in a dashing geometric tiger-like striped print and on bam bam look-at-me suits for both men and women, but it was across the breast and curving around the hips of a particularly stunning embroidered dress that it enthralled me most.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011 by Emmi Ojala.

A quick scan of the show press release reveals that when designing Jean-Pierre Braganza had in mind strong female warrior leaders, perhaps existing in a future world where “tribal affiliation has replaced the current societal controls, and clothing becomes even more imperative for identity, security and culture.” He certainly designs for the bold and assertive lady – creating sexy armour that wouldn’t look out of place on the prowl at a cocktail party.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

I was less keen on the sponsored fur elements. But let’s not mention those, eh? It was an otherwise fabulous collection.

Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryJean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Matt Bramford’s superb review here, and view more of Emmi Ojala’s work in Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration.

Categories ,Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration, ,black, ,Catherine Askew, ,Emmi Ojala, ,Fur, ,Jane Young, ,Jean Pierre Braganza, ,Kerri-Ann Hulme, ,lfw, ,London Kills Me, ,Matt Bramford, ,Northumberland House, ,Positronyx

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