Amelia’s Magazine | S/S 2011 Press Days – An illustrated round-up


Ada Zanditon, website like this illustrated by Sara Chew

Wahoooo! Summer is finally here. No really, dosage it is. Seriously I don’t care how damp and dreary it is outside that office window, summer is most definitely here. I’m toasty warm and looking at shorts, t-shirts and dresses ranging from ethereal to barely there. Skipping round London in the increasingly cold weather this can be hard to believe, but that’s how it goes. Here’s a little look at some of the summer outfits I’ve been looking at…

Ada Zanditon
Held eight stories up in Holborn with a stunning view out over the Thames to the Oxo Tower, Ada showed her latest collection. A quick chat with the designer revealed a charming, intelligent woman and in her own words ‘geeky’. Who else would be so inspired by maths and formulas that they borrow text books from libraries? Well if that’s where inspiration comes from, long may it last. Ada is not just a lovely person but also incredibly talented. Three dimensional sculptural pyramids burst forth from the intelligently structured garments.

Even the prints were inspired by fractal geometry and swept across many garments from a particularly stunning floor length bias cut 1930s dress with backless detail to a leather minidress complete with a chiffon front panel. Hard seaming was juxtaposed with soft fabrics and details. The jewellery carried the same prints as the dress and were another hard counterpoint to some of the softness. Look out for more on Ada’s ethical collection in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Giorgio Armani

Armani called and off to Bond Street I went. Giorgio showed some great pieces with open weave jackets and low-breaking double-breasted jackets for the men, soft and light in beige, grey and smoke. T-shirts emphasised the lightness with sheer elements. Maybe this is a way to get the ‘heavage’ out without looking like a modern day medallion man. The shoes and accessories were simple and classic, from a soft leather briefcase to a brown woven leather shoe catching my eye in particular. Suede and salmon skin belts helped to further soften the tone. All very simple and invoking a cool Italian summers evening.

On the far side of the partition was the womenswear. Strong tailoring was paired with sheer blouses in varying shades of blue and deep purple. Skirts were long and flared slightly to the hem, though I will admit it was the shoes and accessories that stood out. High perspex wedges with wooden platforms excuded both freshness and class. Chunky cuffs, twisted silver necklaces and amulets of large dark blue/black stones hung on leather and fabric. Powerful, yet clean and sophisticated.

Emporio Armani

Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent
Emporio, the delinquent nephew of Giorgio, was my next visit. There may have been a similar colour palette across the brands, but that’s pretty much where the similarities ended. No Giorgio man is ever going to be seen in a chainlink bondage harness. The use of sheer panels as highlights was also shared, this time showing off what one imagines will be gym-honed biceps. The highlight for me was a double-fronted crock effect suit. Hiding underneath the croc, a layer of leather gave the hint of something more to come.

Draping and ruffles were mixed with simple clean lines in womenswear. A grey and purple halterneck knee length dress particularly appealed, not to mention vertiginous heels. A dainty black chiffon bow, gave the vampiest pieces a demure side. Combining both the soft and the sharp, a draped jersey dress was teamed with a pale grey cap sleeve tailored jacket. It’s youthful and energetic but with a business edge.

Paul Costelloe

Illustration by Karolina Burdon

Showing menswear for the third season Paul opened London Fashion Week with a strong summer collection including short suits, lightweight long coats, and intricate print details. The menswear of this brand is growing on a season by season basis and whilst the formalwear is available in stockists such as John Lewis and Austin Reed, it’s hoped the casualwear and the odd catwalk piece should start hitting the shops soon.


Illustration by Natsuki Otani

You can see reviews of Paul’s collections by Matt and Amelia here and here.

Snake & Dagger

This London based denim company are growing stronger and stronger. Having trained in Japan, they hope to bring a more traditional feel to the denim market. The quality of the denim and the range of finishes are exquisite and the designers behind the brand bring together the best of their training and the city of London to create a unique look.

Aqua

Illustration by Joana Faria

Wherever you thought you were going to buy your Christmas party dress, forget it. Scrub that idea now. Go straight to Aqua and get yourself sorted. This Christmas’ collection ‘Out to Sleigh’ is affordable glamour at its best.

The pieces are daringly cut but clever and in no way trashy. More importantly, whilst you’ve been eyeing up that dress on the high street for the last three weeks so has every other girl in your office, but it’s unlikely you’ll be in the same number if you visit Aqua.

Morphe

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Having previously shown in India, Morphe is thankfully launching in the UK. Playing with shape and form, the pieces are both dramatic and cutting edge. Born from countless hours of work, the statement pieces are surprisingly easy to wear, if somewhat out there.

However, the true gems in the collection include a one shoulder dress with silver trim along the neckline. Creating more than a simple point of interest this is a brand to watch as they develop their continued success in India.

Asher Levine

This was a fantastic collection from a burgeoning menswear designer. In particular, the asymmetric leather biker jackets were right on trend. Using differing leathers as well as digital printing, Asher showed a dynamic and contemporary collection.

Eleanor Amoroso

Most certainly one to watch. Eleanor graduated this summer from the University of Westminster. Her work with fringing has to be seen to be believed. Genuinely unique and fresh, I can only hope the future holds big things for Amoroso. This is one young designer who definitely needs to be nourished.

There were more…far more people that I saw during the press days. From the sublime to the ridiculous and everything inbetween. Trying to contain yourself when browsing all these wonders is a challenge, as is trying to get enough photos and remember everything. But I can safely say S/S 2011 is going to be a very, very good season.

All photography by Nick Bain

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustratio, ,Aqua by Aqua, ,Asher Levine, ,Blow PR, ,Bond Street, ,Eleanor Amoroso, ,Emporio Armani, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Giorgio Armani, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,london, ,menswear, ,Morphe, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Press days, ,S/S 2011, ,Sara Chew, ,Snake & Dagger, ,Spring Summer, ,Stéphanie Thieullent, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Ada Zanditon and ADZ


ADZ, pilule information pills illustrated by Jess Stokes

Whilst eco-couture has always been ahead of the times in terms of sustainability, it’s often been left behind in the style stakes, unable to compete with mainstream, high fashion. Gradually though, a new breed of designer has emerged who is equally concerned with creating a cutting edge aesthetic as they are utilising sustainable and organic materials.

At the forefront of this movement is Ada Zanditon, whose designs experiment with shape and texture in a way that is unsurprising once you learn that she originally interned with Alexander McQueen and Gareth Pugh. After establishing her own eco-luxury womenswear line in March 2008, Ada has gone on to raise awareness of everything from eco fashion to politics through the likes of the Think Act Vote campaign. Ada took the time to answer a few questions for us about the inspiration behind her new range ADZ, and the future of eco fashion. ? 


ADZ S/S 2011

You’ve really established yourself as a pioneer of eco-fashion, giving the movement a younger, sexier image than it had in the past. How did you go about this?  
I think that I had two very strong passions that I was determined to make work together – fashion and sustainability. I enjoy the innovative aspect that comes into every part of the process, my main how-to part of it I think comes from a basic viewpoint that anything is possible. It’s equally possible to make a beautiful fashionable dress from an ecological material as it is from one that is not. It’s equally possible to create fashion that considers its full life span and even decay as it is to create something that does not. It’s a question of awareness, choice and aesthetics. 

Tell us about your new collection, ADZ?  
ADZ by Ada Zanditon is the bridging line to my main collection, it’s contemporary, resort urban wear that combines strikingly unique prints with casual yet sophisticated pieces that are focussed around bold geometric detailing in fluid soft fabrics such as tencel, silk jersey and chiffon. The SS 2011 debut collection of ADZ is titled Nebulayan. My inspiration came from creating illustrations of satellite images of the Himalayas mountain range which I then layered with Hubble telescope imagery of deep space nebulae. We now have achieved the technology to see the Earth from space and also to see deep into outer space. I like the idea of contrasting these perspectives with each other. 


ADZ, illustrated by Aniela Murphy

How do you cope with the volume of work and your nerves in the build up to London Fashion Week? Any trade secrets?
I am always aware that I am so fortunate to be in the position to be running my own label, I don’t really want to complain. Everyday always has its challenges, but I try to see that as opportunity. I think gratitude is vastly underrated these days…. don’t you? 

Absolutely! Amelia’s magazine have always been a big fan of your illustrations, any plans to design your own prints based on your work?
Actually, all my prints are based on my illustration work and photography and as well as that I use watercolour then layer all these elements together. ? 


ADZ, illustrated by Natsuki Otani

Musician Viktoria Modesta is your muse; how did you end up working together? You’ll be contributing to her showcase next month; what will that involve?
Soon after we first met we found we had a good creative rapport. I think Viktoria has incredible elegance and style with a real sense of grace. As for the showcase – I don’t want to give to much away but it will be a great evening. 

How do you think the public can be convinced of the importance of sustainability? Do you think there is more designers, magazine editors and celebrities could be doing to highlight its significance?
I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change. However, I think that people can encourage and inspire, and have a really good try at convincing. What worries me, though, is that catastrophic events only really shake people into action. I think everyone in every walk of life can do more, no matter what you do.

To see the entire ADZ S/S 2011 collection, visit Ada’s website.
To read more about Think Act Vote, see our interview with Amisha Ghadiali here.

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,ADZ, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Aniela Murphy, ,Bangladesh, ,estethica, ,ethical, ,fashion, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Himalayas, ,interview, ,Jess Stokes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nebulayan, ,S/S 2011, ,sustainability, ,Think Act Vote, ,Viktoria Modesta

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Eugene Lin

“It was when we were awarded a giant golden penis at the Erotic Awards, prostate malady that has to be my best moment here so far. It was a fashion show that went really well and everything came to plan.” Holly Jade picked up, check with grinning pride, a huge, winged and golden figurine of male genitalia. As manager of a successful London business, you might expect a more contained answer from Holly, who sits adorned with silver chains, ripped tights and purple streaked hair. Wait a second. Scrap that.

Prangsta Costumiers is far from conventional. “We don’t try and be something that we’re not.” And quite rightly so. Why play the fashion game when their concept already oozes the type of London decadence, imagination and crisp tailoring that one would expect from the likes of Westwood? Seem like an overstatement? Well, yes. But don’t knock this place until you’ve seen it.

I first came across Prangsta when strolling through the streets of New Cross with my mum (as you do). We stopped outside the barred up, clouded shop window and strained our eyes through the metal, trying to fathom what this place was. Despite my mum’s adamance that it was a brothel, she confidently ducked under the corrugated iron and called out for any possible inhabitants. A French lady emerged. She beckoned us inside, casually wearing a riding helmet (as one also does).

An Aladdin’s cave still is the only way to describe it. Trunks and dressers spilling with jewels, brooches, elaborate belts, crowns and masks; dishevelled bustiers heaped with wigs and mad fabric; a trapeze swinging from the ceiling. There was no order. It was undisputed beautiful chaos.

The best part? Every costume is hand-made and tailored by the tight-nit Prangsta team. “We try to purchase as little material as possible so we go to a lot of vintage markets and also get a lot of materials donated to us. We take apart old costumes and old fabrics and then restore them and make them into our own Prangsta designs.” This kind of eco-awareness has been a core principle of Prangsta ever since Melanie Wilson founded the company in 1998. “She studied fashion at Central Saint Martins and really hated how wasteful the fashion industry was portrayed to her.”

Theatrical and period costume dominates Prangsta’s extensive mish-mash gallery of stunning work. A Victorian suited wolf, a burlesque fox or perhaps a two of diamonds playing card? (The shop does have an astonishingly brilliant Alice in Wonderland collection). Simply enter their hidden world and you could transform into characters you barely knew of. Hell, you could make up your own! Or at least leave the imagination to Holly herself, who styles her clients’ costumes rather than creating the pieces in their 1500 square foot studio in Deptford.

I of course guided the conversation onto that 21st birthday party of one Daisy Lowe. Daisy, her mother Pearl and several members of the star-studded guestlist were dressed by Holly and her talented team. Daisy, in particular, wore floor-skimming jaw-dropping ‘Ice Queen’-esque attire. “It was great… They are rock n’ roll royalty. Daisy is a lovely girl and a pleasure to dress.”  ? ?And their impressive list of clients doesn’t end there. Prangsta have also dressed The Noisettes (Shingai, the lead singer, used to work for the company), the Moulettes, the White Stripes, the BBC2 comedy drama ‘Psychoville’ and, get this, have even dressed Florence & The Machine.

Holly insists, however, that dressing such high-flying stars aren’t considered amongst Prangsta’s greatest achievements. I know. ‘You what?’ was my reaction too. But she continued… “I think it’s more of an achievement that we’ve been going like this for 12 years. We’ve made everything ourselves and we’re a London-based local business. Everyone works really hard. We work long hours, sometimes 12 hour days, and keeping the business running I think is more of an achievement.”

And she’s right. The Prangsta team do seem to work incessantly hard. They don’t just simply lend beautiful costumes to individuals. They tour all different festivals throughout the summer. They organize community nights for local performers and artists. They scour markets and thrift stores for the beautiful trinkets and treasures you’ll see placed around their shop. They even run their own dressmaking classes which take place in their Deptford studio. “Classes are taught by Mel and two of her seamstresses,” she says. I then of course comment on the advantage to the class members by being taught by Melanie, being an ex-Saint Martin’s student and pioneer of this mad palace. Holly even mentioned to me how Melanie began squatting in the building that we were sitting in. “Mel started out completely alone, from nothing. She now owns this row of shops and rents them out and also has Prangsta.”How’s that for a success story?

I also just HAD to ask about that haunting but quirky shop-front that had my mum so convinced we were about to come across prostitutes. Holly laughed when I told of her of this.  ?“We do what we can. We’re in New Cross, not in Soho. And I guess we’re quite an urban team. We’re quite subversive, eccentric characters. It is quite dilapidated but we’re a small business in a rundown area.” But no excuses were necessary. I really and truly loved the subversive exterior. And, well, the mysterious look of Prangsta is certainly parallel with the mysterious Melanie, who apparently prefers not to do interviews (damn, eh?).  ? ?Prangsta sure has got a good thing going, but they’re not stopping there. They have pretty big plans for future expansion. “One day we will have an online shop. People will be able to click on, say, a little hat and will be able to request one to be made for them. Within the next five years I’d say we’d like to be working on expanding our costume collection and maybe pump out a fashion collection aswell. We’d like to break through this wall to next door so that we can have an exhibition space and put a lot of costumes up on the walls like a bit of a gallery, have some music playing with a DJ, have some chai on the go. Above all, we want to provide a really quality service by restoring and recycling aswell as contributing to the community.”

After seeing the place for the second time, and speaking to Holly, it appears that not only Prangsta’s enchanting costumes, but also it’s intriguing story and extensive achievement is a true example of what those young, fun, London minds are made of.

Prangsta can be found at 304, New Cross Road, London. ?Costumes are between £80-100 to rent for 5 days and are also sold at individual prices. ?Their next dressmaking classes begin on Wednesday 22nd September from 7 – 9.30pm and cost £200. There is a maximum class size of 10 (so get in there quick if you’re interested!).

Eugene Lin, page A/W 2010, stomach illustrated by Abby Wright

It is the impeccable designs of Eugene Lin that have captivated us here at Amelia’s Magazine. The Central Saint Martins graduate’s intricate and feminine designs are a force to be reckoned with in the near future, patient and it is his expertise in pattern cutting that has given him this power. While we wait for Eugene Lin’s ultra-swish designs to bulldoze their way into magazine editorials and on the bodies of celebrities alike, we get to know the designer behind his eponymous label…

Your autumn/winter 2010 collection ‘The Gordian Knot’ and your spring/summer ?2010 collection both have a unique, tailored simplicity that flatteringly ?emphasises the feminine form. Is this a key factor when designing your collections, or do you feel it comes naturally to you? 
In the words of the great Hubert De Givenchy ‘Adding a flower or piling on details is not couture. But make an utterly simple dress, with a simple style line, this is the key to haute couture.’  The legendary Coco Chanel also said, ‘Simplicity is the keynote of all true elegance.’ My clothes are not haute couture, but the essence of what the two aforementioned designers is something I totally agree with and embody in my work. Simplicity should not be confused with plainness; the elegance of my work becomes very evident on closer inspection and that is what the women who buy my pieces appreciate and love. While some of the pieces from both collections are very feminine, there are also large appropriations taken from menswear, right down to the fabrics of the S/S 2010 collection where I used fine menswear shirting for the best-selling dresses. Ultimately, it is a combination of both a feel and a conscious reminder that it is a womenswear line after all. ?


S/S 2010

You’ve spent a lot of time with influential British designers – Preen, Vivienne WestwoodRoksanda Ilincic and Ashley Isham. Do you feel your designs exemplify what British fashion is all about? Would you define your aesthetic as British, or otherwise?
I love British fashion. I always have and always will.  British fashion for me stands for designers who are bold, directional and cutting edge. There is a burning spirit and huge support for new British designers which far surpasses any other city, including the other three fashion capitals. While the catwalks are teeming with unwearable showpieces which often draw flak from the public and other cities, there are also other designers such as myself which push the boundaries in a quieter, unexaggerated way in terms of innovative cut, fabrication and wearability.  Jackie JS Lee and Joana Sykes are examples of this.

I would define my aesthetic as Euro-centric, but not necessarily British. A designer can say all they want about who they think they are or are like, but at the end of the day, the buyers and customers are the ones who ultimately decide because customers never lie with their money. They are the ones who, through the pure forces of economics, decide which market responds the best and whose collections sit alongside yours in the multi-brand boutiques. So far, my work has been described as very chic, very Italian and very Parisian. But I am stocked along other great British designers both in the UK and in Asia, hence I feel the label has a broad European appeal. ?


A/W 2010, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Your spring/summer collection made use of a beautiful royal blue colour, ?whilst your autumn/winter collection visited a flattering and seductive red. Do you find inspiration in the rich colours, or do the rich colours inspire you? Do you feel you must be selective in your colour choices to match ?your aesthetic? 
There is always an accent colour in each of my collections, but the question is finding it and making it work in harmony with the rest of the palette. I choose my colours very carefully, and if I cannot envision a piece in a certain colour, I will re-evaluate the entire palette.  The accent colours are rich, but the rest tend to be muted to balance it. Sometimes, the fabric jumps out at me and I immediately know I will use it, like the rich blue for S/S 2010. For the red in A/W 2010, the inspiration came from the concept; red is the colour of Mars, the Roman God of War. Finding the right shade, weight and texture is very tricky especially for new designers who cannot afford large minimums. The colours have to sit in blocks across the collection, as well as in the order of silhouettes. This process is a constant delicate juggling act, but getting it right really pays off as it makes each collection cohesive – something that all my buyers have really appreciated when visiting my stands and buying into the collections for their stores.


A/W 2010, illustrated by Katherine Tromans

Your intricately made ‘Bella’ top (above) is both draped and unmistakeably tailored to fit the female form. Is your unique tailoring going to be a pleasantly recurring theme in your future work, like a calling card or so to speak?
The key difference between a Eugene Lin piece and many other designer pieces is the amount of attention that is paid to the intelligent cut and detail, both in draped and tailored pieces.  The entire front of Bella is actually draped out of one single piece, being pinched together at the knot. With such a rich experience in pattern cutting, it came as a natural progression to my work, and it’s one of the few things that is incredibly difficult to imitate due to the level of technical difficulty in my work. S/S 2010 had a lot of panels and pieces which were cut from a single piece of fabric – draped or intricately split, while A/W 2010 revolved around the knots and loops.  I have been accused of being a minimalist, but ask any one of my interns or machinists who have worked on my pieces and they will laugh it off. As I mentioned before, my work always reveals something on closer inspection.  I find it incredibly insulting to both customers and other designers who really put in a lot of effort into creating a real designer garment when a pretender slaps a couple of metal studs and rings onto a piece of leather and calls it a designer dress or jacket. I would never insult my customers this way. I will always push my tailoring in different directions each season to give them something new, yet draw them back because of the familiar guarantee of quality of an impeccable fit.   ?



A/W 2010

Speaking of your future work, what do you have in store for the future of the ?Eugene Lin label? Can you divulge any information on future ventures, or even ?Spring/Summer 2011?
I will be exhibiting my third collection, S/S 2011 ‘The Vanishing Twin’, on-schedule at Somerset House this coming London Fashion Week, and for the first time taking the collection to Paris Fashion Week to an even bigger international audience. S/S 2011 was inspired by Stephen King’s novel ‘The Dark Half’ and based on the medical condition foetus in fetu (FIF), commonly known as Vanishing Twin Syndrome, whereby a foetus develops around its twin in the womb. The result, although rare, causes cases where a foot has been found growing in a boy’s brain, and limbs growing in stomachs.  However, for me a concept is only as good as its translation, and I’d like to think I’ve translated all my themes successfully so far. The pieces for S/S 2011 feature tailored trousers with extra ‘grown in’ features like an extra waistband, mutated skirts and dresses and separates which have been draped to resemble muscle and tissue.  Bottom line, I am selling clothes, and even if the customer is not aware of the inspiration or does not buy into the concept, they can always walk away with an incredible designer piece.  The concept becomes a bonus for those interested in more than just a beautifully created garment. ? ?


A/W 2010, illustrated by Jaymie O’Callaghan

Do you prefer sketching designs or actually constructing them?
I prefer constructing them, although I do sketch of course. Seeing the piece come to life is like birthing an idea, and sometimes I discover things on the stand which makes it even more beautiful than the sketch. Anyone can draw a sketch, but a woman is not going to walk into a boutique to buy a sketch to wear to an event now, is she?
 
?What do you like most about designing clothes?
The fulfilment of seeing women buy and wear a piece of their identity based on my aesthetics which originated from a simple thought. It’s like watching a seed grow right to fruitation.

?Describe your personal style in three words.
Clean, precise, elegant. In that order.

What does fashion mean to you in three words?
Love. Life. Light.

What advice would you give to those that would like to get into fashion ?design? 
Haha!! Where do we start on this….It’s really not for everyone, you have got to be really, really tough – it’s not a profession for little farm girls. Ask yourself WHERE exactly you want to be in the industry – a designer of your own label or designing for a house, and WHY you want to do it. For some like myself, I know that I will never be happy working under someone else and I wanted my own career, but for others they enjoy a design team. There is no right or wrong solution, and you should never expect to emulate another designer’s path. Internships are vital, do as many as you can to see the real face of our industry.

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Abby Wright, ,Ashley Islam, ,Asia, ,Bella, ,british, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Coco Chanel, ,Eugene Lin, ,europe, ,fashion, ,FIF, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Hubert De Givenchy, ,Jackie JS Lee, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Joana Sykes, ,Katherine Tromans, ,London Fashion Week, ,Parisian, ,Preen, ,Roksanda Ilincic, ,S/S 2010, ,S/S 2011, ,Simplicity, ,Somerset House, ,tailoring, ,UK, ,Vanishing Twin Syndrome, ,Vivienne Westwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | R/H Label, fashion design from Finland: meet Hanna Riiheläinen and Emilia Hernesniemi

Hanna Riiheläinen and Emilia Hernesniemi RH Label
Hanna Riiheläinen and Emilia Hernesniemi of R/H Label.

I met Hanna Riiheläinen and Emilia Hernesniemi of R/H Label on my trip to Moscow, click where they came by train (very jealous) to pitch their brand to a panel of experts for feedback, website of which *ahem* I was one. The girls studied together for six years at the University of Art & Design Helsinki, and have forged a strong partnership which made them a delight to hang out with during my stay in Russia and I was utterly charmed by their playful style, for which they are the best ambassadors. In the first of two blog posts here’s a summary of what R/H Label are up to.

RH Label by Fawn Carr
RH Label by Fawn Carr.

R/H Label was named for a combination of the girls’ surnames, and was founded only last June in Helsinki after being in the planning for way longer, both girls having studied and worked in fashion at home and abroad after graduation – I actually met Emilia a few years ago when I borrowed clothes from Agency V, where she worked as a PR. Small world eh? They took this time in the industry to learn about the commercial sides of the business and analysed what they could do best when starting their own label: clever girls. It is no surprise that their designs perfectly encapsulate the Agency V aesthetic; playful, colourful, printed. All good things in my book!

RH Label by June Chanpoomidole
RH Label by June Chanpoomidole.

Whilst the Finnish design scene is strong on the international stage, the fashion scene is something new, and so for them indigenous inspiration comes from the likes of well known furniture designers Alvar Aalto and textiles supremo Marimekko who mainly produces textiles for the home. IVANNAhelsinki is one of the only major Finnish fashion designers to have a profile abroad, as well as Laitinen menswear which has a high profile in Milan and Paris.

Hanna Riiheläinen of R/H Label in Moscow
Hanna Riiheläinen of R/H Label in Moscow.

But now is an exciting time because there is a new generation of creatives coming through. Ones to check out include fashion photographer Susanna Majuri and Helsinki based illustrator Laura Laine. Emilia and Hanna work with creatives across lots of disciplines and are inspired by Finland’s location between the east and west – a place where different visual aesthetics easily meet and mingle. Functional solutions come over from Sweden, but there is plenty of rich decorative detail to play with from the eastern side.

RH Label SS 2011 blue dressRH Label SS 2011 jacket leggings dahlia
R/H Label S/S 2011.

RH Label SS 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou
R/H Label SS 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou.

S/S 2011 was R/H Label’s first commercial collection, inspired by Dolly Parton, Mickey Mouse, Black Magic and the Nordic Summer Sky. You don’t get much more fun than that! It features a mix of local reindeer leather and bamboo jersey and all the bespoke prints were digitally printed onto silk – they like to create every element of the collection. I particularly love the purple sky and dotty dahlia prints, and was thoroughly enamoured of their ceramic eyeball necklace, created in collaboration with a local ceramics studio.

RH Label AW 2011
R/H Label A/W 2011.

RH Label AW 2011 by Michalis ChristodoulouRH Label AW 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou
R/H Label AW 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou.

For A/W 2011 they were inspired by Dragons, Mountains, Acrobats and Vagabonds. Another rich inspirational mash up! Role models that helped to inspire the collection included the strong character of Stieg Larsson’s Lisbeth Salander, and Finnish author Sofi Oksanen. Lots of black is offset again with bright prints in louche easily wearable shapes.

RH Label AW 2011 coat
R/H Label A/W 2011

Production is mainly done in Tallinn, Estonia which is 80km away, but the reindeer bags are made in Helsinki and they are keen to do more with local materials. Interest in the collection has been quick and enthusiastic and as well as stocking at home in Finland they already have stockists in Berlin, Vienna and New York. Naturally Agency V has been looking after press, which is also going pretty darn well for such a new label.

RH Label AW 2011 jumpsuit
R/H Label A/W 2011

Now they just need to figure out a way to grow the brand organically whilst retaining their creative control… it’s all about achieving that balance, which is why they came to Moscow for advice. In my next blog Hanna and Emilia answer a few questions. In the meantime take a browse around the R/H Label website and R/H Label online shop. Let’s hope they find stockists in the UK soon.

Emilia Hernesniemi RH Label
Emilia Hernesniemi of R/H Label talking to Michael Salac of Blow PR.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Acrobats, ,Agency V, ,Alvar Aalto, ,berlin, ,Black Magic, ,Blow PR, ,ceramic, ,colourful, ,Dolly Parton, ,Dragons, ,Emilia Hernesniemi, ,Estonia, ,Eyeball Necklace, ,Fawn Carr, ,finland, ,FInnish, ,Helsinki, ,IVANNAhelsinki, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Laitinen, ,Laura Laine, ,Lisbeth Salander, ,Marimekko, ,Michael Salac, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Mickey Mouse, ,Mountains, ,Nordic Summer Sky, ,pr, ,prints, ,R/H Label, ,Reindeer Leather, ,Riiheläinen, ,S/S 2011, ,Silk, ,Sofi Oksanen, ,Stieg Larsson, ,Susanna Majuri, ,Tallinn, ,University of Art & Design Helsinki, ,Vagabonds, ,Vienna, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Jena.Theo ‘Bandoliers’

The best things about fashion week are, health in order of importance:

1. The shows. Of course, cheap otherwise we wouldn’t be here. I mean, remedy the good ones. Sometimes you want to explain to a designer that just because something can be designed, it doesn’t mean it should be. George Mallory said he wanted to climb Mount Everest “because it’s there” and look what happened to him. I’m pleased to report I’ve liked everything I’ve seen so far though.
2. Free pastries.
3. Looking at people’s crazy crazy outfits. Gorgeous girls are ten a penny at fashion week, so what everyone really wants to see is cone-shaped hairdos, dresses that are basically just a bra sellotaped to climbing apparatus and interesting hats.

The press room is also pretty great. It has benches and foliage:

Cool laptops I’ve seen around Somerset House.

Superior snacks I have seen and eaten:

I did also try to take sneaky pictures of the good-looking men who were providing help in the registration room but I bottled it when one of them looked at me, so I’m afraid you’ll just have to use your imagination.

The best things about fashion week are, pharmacy in order of importance:
1. The shows. Of course, for sale otherwise we wouldn’t be here. I mean, more about the good ones. Sometimes you want to explain to a designer that just because something can be designed, it doesn’t mean it should be. George Mallory said he wanted to climb Mount Everest “because it’s there” and look what happened to him. I’m pleased to report I’ve liked everything I’ve seen so far though.
2. Free pastries.
3. Looking at people’s crazy crazy outfits. Gorgeous girls are ten a penny at fashion week, so what everyone really wants to see is cone-shaped hairdos, dresses that are basically just a bra sellotaped to climbing apparatus and interesting hats.

The press room is also pretty great. It has benches and foliage:

Cool laptops I’ve seen around Somerset House.

Superior snacks I have seen and eaten:


The best things about fashion week are, stuff in order of importance:
1. The shows. Of course, online otherwise we wouldn’t be here. I mean, the good ones. Sometimes you want to explain to a designer that just because something can be designed, it doesn’t mean it should be. George Mallory said he wanted to climb Mount Everest “because it’s there” and look what happened to him. I’m pleased to report I’ve liked everything I’ve seen so far though.
2. Free pastries.
3. Looking at people’s crazy crazy outfits. Gorgeous girls are ten a penny at fashion week, so what everyone really wants to see is cone-shaped hairdos, dresses that are basically just a bra sellotaped to climbing apparatus and interesting hats.

The press room is also pretty great. It has benches and foliage:

Cool laptops I’ve seen around Somerset House.

Superior snacks I have seen and eaten:


The best things about fashion week are, order in order of importance:
1. The shows. Of course, otherwise we wouldn’t be here. I mean, the good ones. Sometimes you want to explain to a designer that just because something can be designed, it doesn’t mean it should be. George Mallory said he wanted to climb Mount Everest “because it’s there” and look what happened to him. I’m pleased to report I’ve liked everything I’ve seen so far though.
2. Free pastries.
3. Looking at people’s crazy crazy outfits. Gorgeous girls are ten a penny at fashion week, so what everyone really wants to see is cone-shaped hairdos, dresses that are basically just a bra sellotaped to climbing apparatus and interesting hats.

The press room is also pretty great. It has benches and foliage:

Cool laptops I’ve seen around Somerset House.

Superior snacks I have seen and eaten:

I did also try to take sneaky pictures of the good-looking men who were providing help in the registration room but I bottled it when one of them looked at me, so I’m afraid you’ll just have to use your imagination.

Illustration by Andrea Peterson

It wasn’t until the Jena.Theo show that I got my first hit of fashion adrenaline this LFW. The design duo Jenny Holmes and Dimitris Theocharidis have created a Spring Summer 2011 collection that combines both the theatrical and the wearable in draped layers of silk and jersey, viagra shot through with the Midas Touch. Gold leaf was applied not only to models’ eyelids and nails, stuff but also to wrists, ankles, collarbones and occasionally a breast or belly button that happened to be exposed.

Though this would undoubtedly not go down well in the Muslim world today, culturally the show was a mix of the old Arabian Nights- or Prince of Persia to the computer game generation- meets 19th century British colonialism; models’ heads swathed in oversized turbans or hair backcombed into huge Victorian updos.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The winners of Fashion Fringe 2009 struck a perfect balance between catwalk creativity and clothes with the potential to actually be worn in real life; with a wonderful take on a Victorian hoop skirt to finish the show. This is what I want from an LFW show; something fun and inventive as well as wearable clothes.

I sat with the team behind the new Young British Designers website, which champions the likes of Jena.Theo; keep an eye out on Amelia’s for an interview with them coming soon. Adriana was in fact loyally wearing an outfit by the design duo.

We were in the second row but got bumped forward into the front row when there were a few spaces at the last minute; which meant I managed to get a really good, close up look at the raw painted gold leaf stiletto platform shoes.

It also of course, meant goody bag ahoy!Ironically, for a fashion gift, this included one of the best brownies I’ve ever eaten; in fact many of the stalls in the LFW exhibitions have sweets or cakes on their stands, though you never see anyone eating them. Except me.Which is why you won’t see me bearing my gilded navel in an Aladdin-esque ensemble anytime soon.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,arabian nights, ,Jena.theo, ,lfw, ,S/S 2011, ,Somerset House, ,young british designers

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Amelia’s Magazine | Post-London Fashion Week Interview: Minna

Masters of Reality return with their latest mind altered offering to master their, treat cialis 40mg well, reality.

Masters of Reality’s sixth and latest record Pine/Cross Dover is a welcome return of the classic American desert kings who have many rock and roll fingers in many Palm Desert pies. Although released in 2009, the record is making waves over in the UK now. Presented as two halves, the question is Pine/Cross Dover, their first record in five years, any good?

As a pretty big Queens of the Stone Age fan, I was keen to dip my toe into the pool of rock and branch away from my Tension Head (a track which has incidentally been on my top five records for the last decade), let my ears broaden their taste and listen to fellow desert rockers Masters of Reality, which although I was quite familiar with them I hadn’t fully appreciated. Main member and founder Chris Goss has produced many QOTSA records, and so it’s a clear lineage many make associating the two bands together. To my bountiful joy I was pleased with what I heard in the shape of Pine/Cross Dover, kicking off with King Richard TLH, epitomizing from the outset the classic chugga chugga desert rock sound in a nutshell. This song makes me want to get up to get down, swing my limbs around the room and air drum to the max. Which, after doing so left me injured, but on a futuristic trip through nostalgia at the cusp of the desert rocking it’s best.

Aside from the belting opener, stand out tracks include the blissful Always, pounding with its repetitive drum beats and guitar riffs commonly associated to bands in the Palm Desert scene. The instrumental Johnny’s Dream, broadens the sound and style of Masters of Reality to something more then what many have said to be within the realms of stoner rock. Johnny’s Dream is pure end credit music and an awakening to the bands’ previous explorations. Further tracks to download include Absinthe Jim and Me, and the juggernaut Up In It, with Dave Catching playing guest guitar on the former – a fellow member of the desert rock scene and collaborator to many Josh Homme projects, including touring with Eagles of Death Metal last year. Masters of Reality, who add a dash of dark riff house blues to complete their newest record, are for anyone who has overplayed their Queens of the Stone Age records (which does happen) and are after a darker and deeper foray into the light of desert rock at it’s best. Due to tour the UK supporting The Cult in early 2011, if you’re into psychedelic, desert rock and dirty riffs, this is a band you don’t want to miss.

Masters of reality Pine

Masters of Reality return with their latest mind altered offering to master their, price well, dosage reality. Their sixth and latest record Pine/Cross Dover is a welcome return of the classic American desert kings who have many rock and roll fingers in many Palm Desert pies. Although released in 2009, buy the record is making waves over in the UK now. Presented as two halves, the question is Pine/Cross Dover, their first record in five years, any good?

As a pretty big Queens of the Stone Age fan, I was keen to dip my toe into the pool of rock and branch away from my Tension Head (a track which has incidentally been on my top five records for the last decade), let my ears broaden their taste and listen to fellow desert rockers Masters of Reality, which although I was quite familiar with them I hadn’t fully appreciated. Main member and founder Chris Goss has produced many QOTSA records, and so it’s a clear lineage many make associating the two bands together. To my bountiful joy I was pleased with what I heard in the shape of Pine/Cross Dover, kicking off with King Richard TLH, epitomizing from the outset the classic chugga chugga desert rock sound in a nutshell. This song makes me want to get up to get down, swing my limbs around the room and air drum to the max. Which, after doing so left me injured, but on a futuristic trip through nostalgia at the cusp of the desert rocking it’s best.

Chris Goss
Chris Goss – something of a character!

Aside from the belting opener, stand out tracks include the blissful Always, pounding with its repetitive drum beats and guitar riffs commonly associated to bands in the Palm Desert scene. The instrumental Johnny’s Dream, broadens the sound and style of Masters of Reality to something more then what many have said to be within the realms of stoner rock. Johnny’s Dream is pure end credit music and an awakening to the bands’ previous explorations. Further tracks to download include Absinthe Jim and Me, and the juggernaut Up In It, with Dave Catching playing guest guitar on the former – a fellow member of the desert rock scene and collaborator to many Josh Homme projects, including touring with Eagles of Death Metal last year. Masters of Reality, who add a dash of dark riff house blues to complete their newest record, are for anyone who has overplayed their Queens of the Stone Age records (which does happen) and are after a darker and deeper foray into the light of desert rock at it’s best. Due to tour the UK supporting The Cult in early 2011, if you’re into psychedelic, desert rock and dirty riffs, this is a band you don’t want to miss.

Masters of reality Pine

Masters of Reality return with their latest mind altered offering to master their, approved well, approved reality. Their sixth and latest record Pine/Cross Dover is a welcome return of the classic American desert kings who have many rock and roll fingers in many Palm Desert pies. Although released in 2009, the record is making waves over in the UK now. Presented as two halves, the question is Pine/Cross Dover, their first record in five years, any good?

As a pretty big Queens of the Stone Age fan, I was keen to dip my toe into the pool of rock and branch away from my Tension Head (a track which has incidentally been on my top five records for the last decade), let my ears broaden their taste and listen to fellow desert rockers Masters of Reality, which although I was quite familiar with them I hadn’t fully appreciated. Main member and founder Chris Goss has produced many QOTSA records, and so it’s a clear lineage many make associating the two bands together. To my bountiful joy I was pleased with what I heard in the shape of Pine/Cross Dover, kicking off with King Richard TLH, epitomizing from the outset the classic chugga chugga desert rock sound in a nutshell. This song makes me want to get up to get down, swing my limbs around the room and air drum to the max. Which, after doing so left me injured, but on a futuristic trip through nostalgia at the cusp of the desert rocking it’s best.

Chris Goss
Chris Goss – something of a character!

Aside from the belting opener, stand out tracks include the blissful Always, pounding with its repetitive drum beats and guitar riffs commonly associated to bands in the Palm Desert scene. The instrumental Johnny’s Dream, broadens the sound and style of Masters of Reality to something more then what many have said to be within the realms of stoner rock. Johnny’s Dream is pure end credit music and an awakening to the bands’ previous explorations. Further tracks to download include Absinthe Jim and Me, and the juggernaut Up In It, with Dave Catching playing guest guitar on the former – a fellow member of the desert rock scene and collaborator to many Josh Homme projects, including touring with Eagles of Death Metal last year. Masters of Reality, who add a dash of dark riff house blues to complete their newest record, are for anyone who has overplayed their Queens of the Stone Age records (which does happen) and are after a darker and deeper foray into the light of desert rock at it’s best. Due to tour the UK supporting The Cult in early 2011, if you’re into psychedelic, desert rock and dirty riffs, this is a band you don’t want to miss.


Illustration by Faye West

Recently in the midst of London Fashion Week (S/S 2011 already I hear you say?!) I had the chance to interview a designer who’s no stranger to the bi-annual tradition, buy nor Amelia’s Magazine. Her last interview with us took place before Fashion Week in February when the Minna brand was early in its second year and we have since seen her A/W 2010 collection provide a culmination of gothic lace and textured velvet loved by many.

But this year Minna was back to show at Estethica again, view so it was time to catch up with her whilst eyeing up her S/S 2011 look.


Minna at Estethica. All photography by Jemma Crow

So you’re back for another season within Esthetica, illness how do you think this collection is different to your others and what are you hoping to offer to the customer?
Well this season we are going back to what we do best; hand finished and truly-vintage looking pieces. We wanted each piece to look like it was a ‘one of a kind.’ This is something we achieve by tea dying vintage lace and leaving the hemlines slightly frayed. The end result is a collection of beautiful feminine pieces that are designed to suit every shape and size. I’m very excited about this collection as we’ve put into good use everything that we’ve learnt about the customer and what she wants for the past two years.


Illustration by Antonia Parker

Sounds exciting. So what has been you real drive and inspiration behind the SS11 collection?
Well I love summer so designing this collection is always the easiest for me and is always lots of fun; the only problem is that I had too many ideas to put into work. I suppose the inspiration me and my team worked from was based around the ‘Alice in Wonderland’ movie of which my daughter is a huge fan (and Minna herself could watch all day long), both other inspirations came from laid back summer afternoons in the South of France where I spend a lot of time with my family. I think it’s the slow pace of life there and the beautiful architecture to see that puts me into a creative mood.

The A/W 2010 looks on the website are beautiful and very gothic. The Claudia dress especially is amazing and very inspirational. Who do you see as your customer and where do you imagine her wearing the pieces? Is it something that you bear in mind when you create the look?
In the winter I am always craving darker pieces so that’s what I love to create for my customer. I also a big fan of creating pieces that are functional and think dresses are the perfect mix of functionality and fashion; that’s the reason there were no tops in my A/W 2010 collection. I think I directed [the collection] towards a more mature audience and I think it’s apparent that as I get older so does my design style. But it’s about not being too serious; I think its important to pay attention to the little details and the collar on the Claudia dress (very Peter Pan-esque) adds just the right amount of playfulness.

Too right that they’re not too serious (and who in fashion should be?!). I have a bit of a crush on that piece right now to kick start my autumn winter look. And from a (recently) London girl what do you think of the style in our capital? How does it compare with the Finnish style you experienced at home?
What I love about the Brits is that they’re not afraid of breaking the rules; and I’m a big believer that the rules are there to be broken. People over here aren’t just following the trends, they have their own individual style that they translate into so many different looks in their outfits. I think you’re lucky to have the British High Street here as it’s the best in the world; its cheap and accessible but it also makes it very hard for smaller brands to compete with the Primark and Topshop’s of the world.
Finland is completely different and it’s a very expensive and tricky market to break into but if you can crack it then Finnish customers are amongst the most loyal I know. In fact you can probably count on one hand the number of brands in the market. Weather is also a big issue out there though and the Finnish need like their pieces to be simple and serviceable whilst still following the trends. They have to be functional and people have to have a functional winter wardrobe to get through the seasons.
Saying this I am surprised every time I visit Finland again as there’s a new generation of fearless fashionista’s emerging who but their pieces over the internet and aren’t afraid to experiment with fashion. After all, Fashion should be fun and that’s what I try to create with my pieces and what I hope the customer gets from them too.

Thank you so much, Minna. Sounds like a great philosophy to have when looking at a collection and SS11 sounds like it will be a great year for you. I’m looking forward to it already! And put me on the list for a Claudia dress too, as you say everyone needs a functional winter wardrobe. Thanks and congratulations for London Fashion Week.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,estethica, ,ethical, ,Faye West, ,finland, ,interview, ,lace, ,London Fashion Week, ,Minna, ,S/S 2011, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Bernard Chandran

Illustration by Rachel Lewis Illustrations by Rachel Lewis

In what is swiftly developing into a London Fashion Week tradition, treat Fashion editor Matt Bramford and I found ourselves waiting in eager anticipation for what would be our third consecutive Bernard Chandran Catwalk. Meeting outside The Old Sorting Office at 9.15 on a cold Saturday morning, more about we wondered what this intriguing designer would produce for S/S 2011.

All photographs by Matt Bramford

The tunic dresses of the collection carried Bernard Chandran’s signature nature inspired prints and were inspired by the designer’s interest in the clean lines and rectangular shape of tradition Malay garments. The print effect were achieved by a traditional Malaysian technique known as Kerawang. Elongated pockets relaxed the straight lines and the bell sleeves added a touch of modern romance.

This most recent collection was a markably less experimental than the designer’s S/S 2010 affair (read our review here). However, information pills taking in the consideration of the current economic climate and the limited funds these designers often have available to them, it is not surprising that the majority of the catwalks (that this reviewer has seen) of S/S 2010 have focused on designs that are relatively sellable rather than the ‘crazy cool’ London is known for.

Perhaps the increased interest in commerce is the result of the British Fashion Council’s hard work to reestablish London Fashion Week as a viable option for buyers to stop at between New York, Milian and Paris. Whatever the reason is, behind this move away from challenging shows, it would be a shame if designers lost completely their platform for experimentation.

Illustration by Rachel Lewis Illustrations by Rachel Lewis

For S/S, the Bernard Chandran women will be dressed in a simple shift coupled with outsized rectangular paneling or the designers trademark use of print. These delicate prints adorning the clothes often have surprising original locations – be it studio detritus, objects or the environment of the designer’s native Malaysia.

The collection shimmered with deep golds interwoven with simmering greens, the collection embraced the colour spectrum and metallics made an appearance either entirely

or within knitted patchwork panels:

As would have be duly noted by now, this London Fashion Week has been the season of tottering models – but perhaps it is not surprising when they are sent down the catwalk in both the highest and filmiest of shoes? One model who never regained her balance limped out of the catwalk.

The music for the show was performed live by Mr Hudson, the hard beats of the DJ was a bold contrast with the sophisticated projection for what to wear in S/S 2011.

The off schedule London catwalks often provide a break from the banal trend reporting the fashion press increasingly focuses on. In reality breathtaking shows whose zeitgeist impact ripple across catwalks for seasons to come are few and far between.

Currently an idea of sophisticated 70′s elegance dominates following the recent (2009) collections of Chloe, Celine and Stella MaCartney, it is refreshing to see collections by designers who are continuing to develop their own aesthetic language.

Trousers came as skinny as the eponymous YSL cigarette suit and the presence of the jumpsuit remains undiminished, are they becoming an undeniable aspect of a designer’s repertoire? As uniform as trousers, skirts and dresses?

Bernard Chandran’s gently romantic collection came to a head with the final show stopping dress, perfect for those days that require a decadent lounging outfit.

Categories ,Bernard Chandran, ,Blow PR, ,british fashion council, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Malaysia, ,Modern Romance, ,My Beautiful Fashion, ,Off Schedule, ,S/S 2011, ,SS11, ,The Old Sorting Office

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike, ask mind after starting the day super early at My Beautiful Fashion, shop Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I hot-stepped it via bike to see Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection (see Matt’s review here) in the elegant setting of the Portico rooms. Afterwards I dashed up to Covent Garden before returning for Betty Jackson at 1pm in the BFC tent, buy more about Somerset House. I can’t put my finger on it but something really entrigued me about what it was that Betty Jackson would present, a long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer I know incredibly little about. I appeared to be the only one either, the tent located in the Courtyard of Somerset house was packed to the rafters and there appeared to be a pile up as people dashed towards the front row.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

The collection was beautiful simplicity with Jackson updating 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which was most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love”

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer, especially when designers tempt you with instead beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Luckily after lulling me into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before the collection returned to soft muted browns, mind you was rather partial to the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall. At this point I glanced around the room – fashion fhows are a great place to watch people’s expressions – I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking completely unperturbed) by the photographers, it must have been a real scrum at the door for Rock Royalty to be left standing.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were simple but well made and the designer certainly knows how to maintain a crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of long simply cut black skirts. Mind you, what is it about all designers obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it, as showcased in our excellent coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here!

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike, web after starting the day super early at My Beautiful Fashion, troche Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I hot-stepped it via bike to see Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection (see Matt’s review here) in the elegant setting of the Portico rooms.

Afterwards I dashed up to Covent Garden before returning for Betty Jackson at 1pm in the BFC tent, ambulance Somerset House. I can’t put my finger on it but something really entrigued me about what it was that Betty Jackson would present, a long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer I know incredibly little about. I appeared to be the only one either, the tent located in the Courtyard of Somerset house was packed to the rafters and there appeared to be a pile up as people dashed towards the front row.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

The collection was beautiful simplicity with Jackson updating 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which was most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love”

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer, especially when designers tempt you with instead beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Luckily after lulling me into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before the collection returned to soft muted browns, mind you was rather partial to the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall. At this point I glanced around the room – fashion fhows are a great place to watch people’s expressions – I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking completely unperturbed) by the photographers, it must have been a real scrum at the door for Rock Royalty to be left standing.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were simple but well made and the designer certainly knows how to maintain a crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of long simply cut black skirts. Mind you, what is it about all designers obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it, as showcased in our excellent coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here!

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike, click after starting the day super early at My Beautiful Fashion, price Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I hot-peddled it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection (see Matt’s review here) in the elegant setting of the Portico rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden, I returned easily in time for my appointment with Betty Jackson at 1pm in the BFC tent, Somerset House. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I was (and still am) strangely intrigued about what Betty Jackson would present. A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer whose name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I am the only one who is so clueless as the tent was packed to the rafters and the usual dash to seat the VIP’s as the catwalk covering is removed and the lights start to dim caused something of a pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the removal of the overhead lighting plunged everyone into darkness as the first model stepped out onto the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the murmur is instantly replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash. For S/S 2011 Betty Jackson presented a collection that was beautiful simplicity in her update of 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which was most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love”

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer, especially when designers tempt you with instead beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Luckily after lulling me into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before the collection returned to soft muted browns, mind you was rather partial to the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall. At this point I glanced around the room – fashion fhows are a great place to watch people’s expressions – I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking completely unperturbed) by the photographers, it must have been a real scrum at the door for Rock Royalty to be left standing.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were simple but well made and the designer certainly knows how to maintain a crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of long simply cut black skirts. Mind you, what is it about all designers obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it, as showcased in our excellent coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here!

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike, there after starting the day super early at My Beautiful Fashion, Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I hot-peddled it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection (see Matt’s review here) in the elegant setting of the Portico rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden, I returned easily in time for my appointment with Betty Jackson at 1pm in the BFC tent, Somerset House. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I was (and still am) strangely intrigued about what Betty Jackson would present. A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer whose name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I am the only one who is so clueless as the tent was packed to the rafters and the usual dash to seat the VIP’s as the catwalk covering is removed and the lights start to dim caused something of a pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the removal of the overhead lighting plunged everyone into darkness as the first model stepped out onto the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the murmur is instantly replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash. For S/S 2011 Betty Jackson presented a collection that was beautiful simplicity in her update of 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which was most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love”

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer, especially when designers tempt you with instead beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Luckily after lulling me into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before the collection returned to soft muted browns, mind you was rather partial to the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall. At this point I glanced around the room – fashion fhows are a great place to watch people’s expressions – I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking completely unperturbed) by the photographers, it must have been a real scrum at the door for Rock Royalty to be left standing.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were simple but well made and the designer certainly knows how to maintain a crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of long simply cut black skirts. Mind you, what is it about all designers obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it, as showcased in our excellent coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here!

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike and is thoroughly recommended for hot tailing it between the various venues dotted around Bloomsbury. Actually I throughly recommend traveling London by bike, generic one word of warning, once you start it becomes increasingly difficult to pour yourself into the tube. Anyway, I digress and their are posts dedicated to the joys of cycling in the web archive of Amelia’s Magazine, in fact why not read Amelia’s interview with Bobbin Bicycles? But back to day two of London Fashion Week, in which Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I met super early at My Beautiful Fashion for Bernard Chandran, we hot-peddled it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection in the elegant settings of the Portico Rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden via the trusty bike, I easily returned in time for my first ever appointment with Betty Jackson at 1pm in the BFC tent, Somerset House. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I was strangely intrigued about what Betty Jackson would present. A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer whose name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I am the only one who is so clueless as the tent was packed to the rafters and the usual dash to seat the VIP’s as the catwalk covering is removed and the lights start to dim caused something of a pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the removal of the overhead lighting plunged everyone into darkness as the first model stepped out onto the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the murmur is instantly replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash. For S/S 2011 Betty Jackson presented a collection that was beautiful simplicity in her update of 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which was most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love”

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer, especially when designers tempt you with instead beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Luckily after lulling me into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before the collection returned to soft muted browns, mind you was rather partial to the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall. At this point I glanced around the room – fashion fhows are a great place to watch people’s expressions – I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking completely unperturbed) by the photographers, it must have been a real scrum at the door for Rock Royalty to be left standing.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were simple but well made and the designer certainly knows how to maintain a crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of long simply cut black skirts. Mind you, what is it about all designers obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it, as showcased in our excellent coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here!

Lako Bukia fashion illustrations
With illustrations by Andrea Peterson.

It was a bum fight at Vauxhall Fashion Scout, viagra 60mg as hoards of people turned out for one of the most highly anticipated collections of the schedule – Lako Bukia’s first runway collection ‘Surati’ S/S 11.

Lako Bukia looked to her homeland, with a collection that was ‘dedicated to Georgian culture’ (as in the country, not Jane Austen) and inspired by Soviet Union Architecture. The obligatory Soviet Red was there in full swing, with bold, all-red outfits opening the show.

LFW-LakoBukia-Andrea-Peterson

But this was a romantic collection, despite the model’s severe slicked-back buns. Instead of brutal tower blocks we had sharp, structured shoulders on every jacket, and instead of a bleak grey landscape, she gave us a soft palette of blue, pink and beige. I was whisked away by the dreamy drop-waist dresses, and full skirts in chiffon, crepe and organza, and can see why her pieces have been snapped up by buyers already – the organza ‘cage’ dress – sheer but with leather trimming was divine.

And the accessories! Bukia collaborated with Georgian artist Aleksandre Mikadza to create handmade glass and stone pendants, and the models strutted down the catwalk on a very soviet take on Mary Janes – finally someone paid attention to the shoes!

Categories ,accessories, ,Andrea Peterson, ,artist, ,catwalk show, ,fashion, ,georgia, ,lako bukia, ,lfw, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,mary janes, ,review, ,S/S 2011, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Carolyn Massey


Illustrations by Izzy Lee

Now showing in his fifth season at London Fashion Week, patient pills Mark Fast showed his debut on-schedule show on the British Fashion Council space.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with Mark Fast, prescription he made his name with electric body conscious lycra knits in 2008 when graduating from the prestigious MA Fashion programme at Central Saint Martins, crafting on his domestic knitting machine in his studio East London.

For S/S 2011 he kept his eye on the lace knitting whilst moving onto heavy fringing and plastic panels, held by hand-manipulated stitches. The result was one of extreme beauty.

Moving on from A/W 2010 where he knitted fabrics and wrapped them up as saris whilst using his trademark lace to craft floaty lower-hip hemmed dresses. S/S 2011 was one for perhaps the more serious woman, something they can and will wear for a more formal affair.

The show opened with a knitted jumpsuit that had fringes running down the leg side seams and underarm seams, creating a vision of destroyed beauty. Referencing from the oil spill where birds have been covered in oil and have lost the ability to fly, this followed with further more black looks where fringing dominated.

Red, pink and turquoise viscose fringes brought bursts of colour to dominant black garments, followed by flashes of yellow, pink, nude and white.

Another key element to the collection was the study of butterfly and insects under microscopes. Using the vivid color from insects and butterflies, knitwear had been encrusted with Swarovski crystals, referencing the study and observation he undertook.

He also continued his take on the “plus size” models he brought into action at London Fashion Week in S/S 2009. The girls looked much more comfortable than in previous seasons.

Mark Fast has made incredible progress over the last few years, bringing knitwear to the forefront of fashion. It’s so exciting to see his collections develop as he cements himself as the pioneer of contemporary knitwear design.

Izzy Lee is the founder of the fashion knitwear blog UrbanKnit


Illustration by Zarina Liew

Hermione de Paula is known for her distinctive screen printing; using hand drawn, doctor painted and embroidered elements she creates beautifully intricate and complex floral textures.  Her website describes the signature style of the label as romantic and sultry, sexually charged yet nonchalant and feminine with a twist. The irresistible philosophy in life of Hermione’s girl is ‘I probably shouldn’t, but I will anyway’. If that doesn’t entice you to explore her collections then I don’t know what will. 

Hermione’s collections are always centered around a female figure; her debut collection was named ‘I heart Elizabeth Berkley’ and took inspiration from the film Showgirls.  A/W 2010 was entitled ‘Polly Crystalline’and featured fabrics printed with pearlised, crystallized and frozen flowers.

http://www.cobaltcafe.co.uk/

S/S 2011 sees de Paula focussing upon ‘the sexual awakening of Flora, the goddess of flowers’.  Garments were layered and fluid; sheer printed silks and chiffon were embroidered loosely with gossamery wisps of cashmere and mohair, adding to the weightless movement of the pieces.  The palette consisted of the delicate muted pink and mauve hues of petals, contrasting with indigo, taupe and black. 






Photographs courtesy Hermione de Paula

Assymetric hems gave a contemporary feel to the collection, along with unfinished, fraying collars and translucent panelling. 

So far it sounds very feminine and demure, but on second glance, the flowing floral prints included unexpected hidden details – dry, wilted blooms, octopus tentacles, thistles, blackbirds and ghostly stems and branches.  

In contrast to the fluttering layers, fraying denim was used to create neckpieces, ankle cuffs, belts and Macramé overskirts. Chunky black crocheted vests, silk shorts and flimsy printed camisoles with denim halternecks were just seen under blouses and dresses.  

http://www.cobaltcafe.co.uk/

The looks were finished with ankle socks in black, taupe and nude, worn with chunky geometric heels by Nicholas Kirkwood.  Hermione is currently working on print consultancy with luxury shoe designer Kirkwood, as well as collaborating with Browns Focus to produce bespoke pieces. Plenty to look out for…


Illustration by Zarina Liew

Hermione de Paula is known for her distinctive screen printing; using hand drawn, viagra buy painted and embroidered elements she creates beautifully intricate and complex floral textures.  Her website describes the signature style of the label as romantic and sultry, illness sexually charged yet nonchalant and feminine with a twist. The irresistible philosophy in life of Hermione’s girl is ‘I probably shouldn’t, diagnosis but I will anyway’. If that doesn’t entice you to explore her collections then I don’t know what will. 

Hermione’s collections are always centered around a female figure; her debut collection was named ‘I heart Elizabeth Berkley’ and took inspiration from the film Showgirls.  A/W 2010 was entitled ‘Polly Crystalline’and featured fabrics printed with pearlised, crystallized and frozen flowers.


Illustration by Zarina Liew

S/S 2011 sees de Paula focussing upon ‘the sexual awakening of Flora, the goddess of flowers’.  Garments were layered and fluid; sheer printed silks and chiffon were embroidered loosely with gossamery wisps of cashmere and mohair, adding to the weightless movement of the pieces.  The palette consisted of the delicate muted pink and mauve hues of petals, contrasting with indigo, taupe and black. 






Photographs courtesy Hermione de Paula

Assymetric hems gave a contemporary feel to the collection, along with unfinished, fraying collars and translucent panelling. 

So far it sounds very feminine and demure, but on second glance, the flowing floral prints included unexpected hidden details – dry, wilted blooms, octopus tentacles, thistles, blackbirds and ghostly stems and branches.  

In contrast to the fluttering layers, fraying denim was used to create neckpieces, ankle cuffs, belts and Macramé overskirts. Chunky black crocheted vests, silk shorts and flimsy printed camisoles with denim halternecks were just seen under blouses and dresses.  


Illustration by Zarina Liew

The looks were finished with ankle socks in black, taupe and nude, worn with chunky geometric heels by Nicholas Kirkwood.  Hermione is currently working on print consultancy with luxury shoe designer Kirkwood, as well as collaborating with Browns Focus to produce bespoke pieces. Plenty to look out for…


Illustration by Annejkh Carson

I have absolutely no idea why I’ve struggled so much with this one. It’s no secret that I love Carolyn Massey, pills so I was ecstatic as I dashed up the Portico Rooms’ stairs again to see what S/S 2011 had in store. Massey, of course, didn’t disappoint and this was by far my favourite outing on menswear day.

This season saw Carolyn draw inspiration from picture books, notably – Tibor Kalman’s (un)Fashion and Jackie Nickerson’s Farm. The influence of the stark images in these two publications was clear and Massey had taken the visual culture of these opposing landscapes and fused them together.

Entering the room, Massey’s army of models stood in an arrow-facing shape. At first, attendees bunched together in front of the models, unsure as to what exactly to do, but the show was predictably oversubscribed and they soon started to spill all over the place. I quickly dashed around trying to take photographs so that I wouldn’t have a million people in the background, which was stressful I tell ya. I love taking pictures in the static shows. You can probably tell. I took my eyes off the collection for a while (subconsciously, I think, to prevent myself from de-robing these boys and legging it with a handful of coats) and got a little obsessed with taking photographs of the models’ heads.

This collection was by far Carolyn Massey’s most sophisticated yet. Her unique approach to contemporary tailoring keeps journos guessing season after season as to what each new collection will hold. Moving on from her utilitarian collection for A/W 2010, which featured a muted colour palette, lots of heavy fabrics and military blazers, this time around Carolyn presented a softer, more wearable array: more English, more practical, more fun.

Massey’s sophisticated eye for colour was omnipresent with a gorgeous selection of petrol blue, sand, rust, navy and a burst of bright orange. This dreamy colour palette was applied accross the entire collection; on drawstring sports-luxe trenches, tailored jackets and rolled-up trousers. The onset of stripes used on tailored shirts managed to dilute a generally smooth collection. The influence of Eastern military and battle is evident, too.

Each piece in the collection radiated a timeless feel – and while Massey’s collections couldn’t ever be described as anything less than super contemporary, they also avoid being trend-led and instead focus on more connected, enduring style.


Illustration by Annejkh Carson

This season, to my unashamed glee, also sees Carolyn introduce accessories. Suede desert boots in tonal colours similar to the collection are featured, as are the most desirable black leather cases, which come in varying sizes and are modelled on vintage doctors’ cases.

I’ve been mesmerised by fashion film this season, with many designers producing films to show alongside their static presentations (Craig Lawrence, Sibling and Ziad Ghanem have been my faves). This was no exception – a film directed by Chris Brooks played discretely in the corner, featuring a gent making his way through a green landscape. Beautifully shot and edited, it really enhanced the hour we had to enjoy the collection. See it here.

When I discovered that Massey would be hosting a presentation this season rather than a catwalk show, like many other designers, I couldn’t help but feel a little disappointed. My general feeling after seeing so many, though, is that they’re far more preferable. Catwalk shows are over in a flash; you have literally seconds to view an outfit, photograph it and digest it. With a presentation, though, particularly one with as much style as Massey’s, you have a really good chance to absorb everything. There’s also something quite haunting about stock-still models who avoid eye contact and barely move, and allowing press and buyers to see your work and craftsmanship in so much detail widens their opportunities to criticise. With Carolyn Massey, though, it simply allowed us to see exactly what she’s capable of.

Keep an eye out for an interview with Carolyn in the coming weeks, if I can ever pin her down…!

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,accessories, ,Annejkh Carson, ,Carolyn Massey, ,Chris Brooks, ,Desert, ,Doctor’s bags, ,fashion, ,film, ,menswear, ,Portico Rooms, ,S/S 2011, ,tailoring, ,Tibor Kalman

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Bryce Aime

Illustrated by Gareth Hopkins

Blue lips. Lipstick. Even on the male models. Wrong or right?
Well Elliot J Frieze certainly thought it was right when he sent his models sashaying down the catwalk wearing “cool blue” on their smackers. And all only in his second season at London Fashion Week S/S 11. Brave move.

But actually Frieze always packs his shows with a little something extra; last season Jacquette Wheeler and Amber Le Bon were models du jour and this season see’s an appearance from Chronicles of Narnia actress (and muse) Anna Popplewell.

Of the actual collection though I wasn’t convinced. A mixture of Menswear and Womenswear the pieces were part utility and part work wear. No joke, store models wore dishevelled ties over striped shirts and clashed them with gingham dirndl skirts all in a palette of “powder shades of lemon and blueberry sherbet, hard boiled peppermints coupled with vibrant shades of fruit nougat for trimmings.” All a bit too saccharine for my liking. Top that off with a male model in a cropped powder blue jacket and something was not quite right.

Although Frieze did pull it back with his classic tailored trench coats and dresses; something of a speciality due to his known skill of “driving the boundaries of classic tailoring.”

I don’t think it was the aim though to send a model down the catwalk with her dress undone. Poor girl had to keep it together with her hand behind her back all the way down. All in a days work for a fashion designer!

A fashion mistake….not a new trend

Despite the sickly colour palette Frieze pulled together a collection that was rounded and made sense whilst sticking to his “British Heritage.” Taking his final walk down the catwalk Frieze surprised us all by joining the models in their love of blue lips. Cheeky scamp. But even more surprisingly (for Frieze and us) one spectator felt compelled to jump out of their seat and accost him for a photo before he walked off stage. Even though slightly stunned (and who wouldn’t be…..security!) Frieze ever the professional made the most of the impromptu photo op and posed with his muse. Lets not write off this one yet.

Illustration by Jaymie O’Callaghan
Bryce Aime show at On/Off
Illustrations by Gabriel Ayala

Random celebrity spot of the day had to go to Janice Dickinson – who sat botoxed to the max in the front row at Bryce Aime. Well, about it apparently. I didn’t see the self-proclaimed ‘world’s first supermodel’ (and funniest guest on Come Dine with Me in the show’s history) because I was crammed in at the back of the On / Off showcase. My camera would be out of action, information pills thanks to the guys in turbans standing in front of me, viagra 60mg but with the lively, laid-back atmosphere and banging music in the On/Off space, it was on with the show.

Bryce Aime fashion illustration
Illustrations by Gabriel Ayala

Known for his understated, elegant designs, and harsh tailoring, Bryce Aime was going in a different direction for S/S 11, with ‘Asiarama’ (my favourite show title so far) a theatrical collection drawing on Kabuki costume and the Beijing Opera. It was quite a show – Bryce’s skilled tailoring and clean lines hadn’t quite disappeared, with some kimono style tops, and structured dresses, but things were a lot more playful than usual. It was like seeing a harlequin transported to the Far East – with mismatched coloured tights, bright clown like makeup and space age shoes. There were also hats aplenty – avant-garde headpieces and even a mini crown of pom poms and feather plumes.

Bryce Aime Fashion Illustration
Illustrations by Gabriel Ayala

Thankfully, Bryce’s sensational prints were still there, but manipulated into skin tight leggings and even a fluid chiffon mini dress. This was the first time Bryce had branched out into shoes and headgear, and he went for all-out drama. It was entirely unexpected collection – but a whole lot of fun.

Categories ,Bryce Aime, ,Leggings, ,lfw, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,onoff, ,S/S 2011, ,Womenswear

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