Amelia’s Magazine | The 3rd Annual Fashioning the Future Awards


Caryn Franklin hosting the ceremony, by Antonia Parker

The third annual Fashioning the Future Awards took place last Thursday, where guests from the world of fashion, business and sustainable living came together to celebrate international sustainable fashion talent. Supported by the United Nations, the awards promote students who produce fashion with conscience.

The setting for this glamorous occasion – the East Wintergarden, part of the Canary Wharf complex – seemed a little unusual in the wake of the current financial crisis, and it’s not the first destination I’d think of if I wanted to host a conscious do. But, I was to learn, that Canary Wharf are committed to environmental issues. The Canary Wharf Group is, in fact, one of the country’s top ‘green’ companies.


Two of the finalists’ work by Joana Faria

Inside the venue, a load of wooden cogs had been dotted around the room, on which frozen models posed for the duration of the evening. Large zoetropes descended from the ceiling, requiring manmade kinetic power to operate that involved guests turning winches in order for them to animate. Drinks flowed and there was no obvious stage or focal point, creating a strange but enjoyable atmosphere that allowed guests to freely mingle amongst the spools and lights.


All photography by Matt Bramford

Circular tubes also hung from the celing, a little lower than average height, in which guests could stand, head fully immersed inside, and listen to interviews with the shortlisted nominees while looking a little silly. It all made for good fun and took the sometimes stifling atmosphere of these kind of events quickly away.

The ceremony itself was delayed in the hope that the members of the celebrity judging panel who could make it (Erin O’Connor and Lucy Siegle had already pulled out for unspecified reasons) would eventually show up. It was repeatedly announced that Jo Wood and BFC chairman Harold Tillman were, together, stuck in traffic. Eventually the producers of the awards gave up and the show commenced, glamourously hosted by fashion protagonist Caryn Franklin. The lights dimmed and Caryn took her place in the centre of the room under one of the zoetropes. Guests were invited to sit, anywhere, or stand to view the ceremony.


Jo Wood and Harold Tillman stuck in traffic by Gareth A Hopkins

Five awards were presented across a diverse range of subjects, including design and innovation, under this year’s theme: Biodiversity.


One of the finalists’ work by Jaymie O Callaghan

Unique Balance
Sara Emilie Terp Hansen scooped the coveted prize for Unique Balance with her intriguing and aesthetically brilliant collection made from cork. The judges said Sara Emilie had ‘found an opportunity to utilise an unexpected material in a fashion context, allowing nature to dictate design.’ It was quite the striking collection and Sara, one of the only recipients to collect her award in person, looked heartwarmingly shocked to receive the award.


One of the finalists’ work by Justyna Sowa

Unique Materials and Processes
The second award, for Unique Materials and Processes, was due to be presented by the aforementioned Jo Wood. Guests still hoped she would leg it in last minute and snatch the mic, but still no joy. Massive props must go to Alex McIntosh from the Centre for Sustainable Fashion who took to the stage (metaphorically speaking as there wasn’t one, of course) and presented also absent Evelyn Lebis‘ wearable light collection with the award.


One of the finalists’ work by Katrina Conquista

Unique Enterprise
Australian Alice Payne scooped the Enterprise award for her conceptual approach to business. ‘Think Lifecycle’ is a sort of social media platform for big companies, allowing them to harness environmental sustainability across the entire business. No, I didn’t completely understand it either, but I did like her spider diagrams.

Unique Design
LCF graduate Lara Torres picked up the award for Unique Design. Professor Frances Corner OBE, head of the LCF, said ‘ironically the design category was the hardest to judge; it’s very hard not to fixate on the idea that the winning entry has to be a perfectly realised garment’. In fact, it wasn’t – Lara’s entry examined the role of the fashion designer in modern society and the relationship we have with the clothing we wear.

The Body Shop One to Watch Award
The final award, presented by Ann Massal, International Brand Director of The Body Shop, went to Ashley Brock, who had flown all the way from the USA for the occasion. Eek. It was a sort of all-encompassing award for the prize student who hadn’t been acknowledged in the other categories. Ashley’s collection showed how ‘seemingly obsolete garments can be re-purposed’.


Erin O’ Connor realxing in the shower and Jo Wood stuck in traffic by Antonia Parker

And so the awards were wrapped up with a brief catwalk show where models stood up from their spools, sashayed around the room and then formed an imposing group under the centre spotlight. Still no sign of Jo Wood or Harold Tillman. It was a marvellous ceremony – genuinely unique – and a celebration of wearable sustainable fashion. I did wonder if it was entirely appropriate that these two were sitting in a car somewhere when they were supposed to be part of an environmentally-aware event (why they didn’t just get out of their bloody cars and get on the bloody tube is beyond me) but infact it didn’t matter; it made the evening entirely about the fashion, the winners, and the real message.

Categories ,Alex McIntosh, ,Alice Payne, ,Ann Massal, ,Antonia Parker, ,BFC, ,Biodiversity, ,Canary Wharf, ,Caryn Franklin, ,Centre for Sustainable Fashion, ,Ceremony, ,East Wintergarden, ,Enterprise, ,environmental, ,Erin O’ Connor, ,ethical, ,Evelyn Lebis, ,fashion, ,Fashion the Future Awards, ,Frances Corner OBE, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,green, ,Harold Tillman, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Jo Wood, ,Joana Faria, ,Justyna Sowa, ,Katrina Conquista, ,Lara Torres, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Lucy Siegle, ,Matt Bramford, ,Sara Emilie Terp Hansen, ,The Body Shop, ,unique, ,united nations, ,Womenswear, ,Zoetropes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Bora Aksu

In the prelude to September’s London Fashion Week, website Amelia’s Magazine ran a series of interviews with designers and previews of designers to watch. One of these took the form of a conversation between Amelia and Bora Aksu, a designer whose progression we love to watch and have followed since his graduation from that increasingly famous St Martins MA.

The interview (a must read) discusses Bora Aksu’s involvement with People Tree and the designer’s personal attempts to incorporate ethically sourced material in the main collection.

As aforementioned, Bora’s shows are often magical and his Spring Summer 2011 collection was no exception, the designer signature material combinations were present on the dresses alongside the new additions of delicately tapered trousers.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

For S/S 11 Bora Aksu premiered his new collection as part of the always pleasing On|Off schedule (there are multiple schedules at London Fashion Week and after three seasons I am still getting my head around the numerous venues, times, places and dates!). Set in the basement of Victoria House, Bloomsbury Square, Bora Aksu produced a series of eerily romantic garments in which all the looks were completed by inky black lines on cream hosiery.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A whimsical affair, each dress elaborated the models physical features through the application of delicate ruffles. Carefully crafted materials mimicked that of an anatomically deconstructed corset. The adorned dresses drew attention to Bora Aksu’s craft drawing the viewers eyes towards every seam, hem and contrasting material.

The collection celebrated the experience of wearing material, from lace panels to the injection of silver jacquard in a pair of beautifully cut trousers. Compared to last season, S/S 2011 was a pared down collection, but as always the designer’s dress patterns intrigued the viewer’s eye.

The mainly muted collection contained moments of vivid saturation achieved by the addition of a beautiful deep red. As always Bora’s eye for collecting and studying discarded garments made this a very special collection and a lovely addition to London Fashion Week.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,BFC, ,Bora Aksu, ,british fashion council, ,LFW SS2011 SS 2011, ,London Fashion Week, ,Romantic

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Amelia’s Magazine | Osman: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review


Osman S/S 2013 by Krister Selin

And so it was to Osman to ‘close’ my fashion week, as it were. It was getting late on the Tuesday and, frankly, I couldn’t be arsed to trek to Somerset House. I had a heap of work to do and the thought of going all that way to watch models walk in front of me twice for five minutes was almost too much to bear. In the end, I decided to go, obviously; I’m so glad I did.


Osman S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker

I had a rubbish seat but enjoyed watching people skid on Kuoni-sponsored A3 Osman lookbooks as I waited for the show to start. The catwalk had been adorned with a huge black rope, crossing above the bit where the models come out and trailing up both sides of the catwalk. Osman‘s got a bit of a reputation for putting on a good show and I liked the drama that this backdrop was already creating. There was a lot of fuss on the catwalk before proceedings began – Corinne Bailey Rae was one of many guests that had photographers in a flash bulb frenzy. But it was Osman‘s unique and vibrant colour palette and fashion-forward sense of shape that would really get the crowd going.


All photography by Matt Bramford

Incredible hues of pink and blue appeared before us. Osman Yousefzada always has a crafted ability to whet our appetites for the next summer while the current one is slipping away from us. Strong and dynamic shape was this season’s key theme – angular cuts were aplenty. Kimono shapes with a modern twist were teamed with high-waisted shorts, followed by tailored coats that curved to reveal more short shorts.


Osman S/S 2013 by Krister Selin

The collection progressed with embroidered love heart patterns. The same bold silhouettes were decorated with this beautiful design, having a slightly religious effect on certain dramatic overcoats. Brightly coloured hearts brought black garments to life while complimenting the blue and pink numbers.

More drama came later with Osman‘s unique forms: scooping necklines, wide sleeves, geometric patterns on tops, thick strips of fabric wrapped around models’ shoulders like shawls, sexily revealing only the collarbone.


Osman S/S 2013 by Antonia Parker

Less rigid looks followed with flowing skirts and fabric casually slung around models’ necks, but never without a hint of structure – tapered and cropped trousers defining many looks.

A few all black numbers heightened the drama towards the end – I particularly liked an all-in-one cape worn like a hood over skin-tight shiny trousers and a racy dress cut all the way up to the hip with bondage-like corsetry.

My favourite look was the penultimate outfit consisting of a white upper half with fabric draped all the way to the floor, following the model as she swaggered. It had all the qualities of Osman exuberance – femininity, drama and masses of sex appeal. I bet Osman fans new and old can’t bloody wait to get this stuff on come next year.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,BFC, ,Blue, ,Bondage, ,catwalk, ,colour, ,Corinne Bailey Rae, ,embroidery, ,hearts, ,Krister Selin, ,Kuoni, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,pink, ,review, ,S/S 2013, ,Somerset House, ,SS13, ,Tuesday, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre- London Fashion Week S/S 2011 On Schedule Womenswear, Part One: New Designers

London Fashion Week Illustration by teabelle

This September London Fashion Week enters the courtyard of Somerset House for its third season. Over the next week Amelia’s Magazine will be previewing both the on and off schedules, viagra 40mg naming the designers to firmly keep your eyes on.

For our first preview we have selected designers who have been showing solo for less than six seasons and have already caused quite a stir within the fashion industry.

Hannah Marshall

You may already be aware of Hannah Marshall’s darkly bold shapes without being aware that you are watching a Hannah Marshall in Florence and the Machine’s music video: The Drumming Song. As an introduction it does not prepare you for the exquisite inkiness of Marshall’s colour palate or embrace of the female figure her clothes propose.

Hannah Marshall by Naomi Law

Watching her S/S 2010 show in an old post office building in Holborn, look was breathtaking. As the models stalked through the space, viagra approved the inky blue effervesced in the dim lighting. Marshall’s A/W 2010 named ‘An Army of Me’ was a continuation of stark cuts along the shoulders, waists enhanced or lost by the cut of jacket alongside bodycon dresses produced in luscious velvet.

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou has been experimenting with the boundary pushing possibilities of digital print since her A/W show 2009. The occasional harshness of the prints are softened through Katrantzou’s application of the technique to silk.

The collections are a celebration of the decorative and her clothes are littered with references to the excess of the Baroque or the Rocco periods of art and architectural history.

Mary Katrantzou by Meeralee

However it would be a mistake to confuse these prints as a gimmick, Katrantzou’s interest spreads to the cut of the dress, producing a series of structural tailoring which serve embellish the texture of her designs from short frocks to elegant gowns. Amelia’s Magazine welcomes the break from the increasing dominance of minimalism.

Michael van der Ham

Michael Van Der Ham’s described his a/w 2010 collection of dresses as 3D collages, through which multiple fashion references were stated by an insatiable contrast of colours, fabrics and textures. During graduate season earlier this year his design influence could be felt across the catwalks. What will s/s 2011 bring for van der Haam?

Michael van der Ham by Lulu Biazus

Louise Gray

Central Saint Martins MA Graduate, Louise Gray was a recipient of Lulu Kennedy’s and Fashion East’s ever on the button talent for spotting innovative designers. Gray showed with Fashion East for three seasons, before staging solo presentations with the support of NewGen.

A Louise Gray exhibition begins life at London Fashion Week almost completely bare, before exploding in riotious colour as the exquisite detritus from her presentations fill the space. The clothes, a combination of traditional stitch and embroidery create intriguing collections.

Louise Gray by Jessica Stokes

Amelia’s Magazine’s are delighted by Gray’s decision to stage the collection on a catwalk at On|Off for S/S 2011.

David Koma and Holly Fulton

For S/S 2011 Holly Fulton and David Koma. will share a catwalk, Amelia’s Magazine have been watching Koma since his debut as Fashion Scout’s merit winner a year ago this September and cannot wait to see what the designer holds in store.

David Koma by Stuart Whitton

Holly Fulton first blasted onto the scene as part of Fashion East for two seasons, before launching her successful solo a/w 10 collection at London Fashion Week in February 2010. Fulton’s monochromatic colour palate was interspersed with a healthy dose of pop art.

Holly Fulton by Francesca Bourne

The clothes structure referenced the Fulton’s interest in off duty/on duty French daywear crossed with the elegance of Dr Zavargo. Amelia’s Magazine found ourselves bewitched by the bold graphic prints bordering on the illustrative that adorned the collection.

Fashion East

For ten incredible years Fashion East have been at the forefront of spotting and supporting graduates who develop into ‘the’ sought-after designers of our generation.

Heikki by Gemma Randall

This year’s crop are as delectable as ever as Lulu Kennedy introduces Saint Martins MA graduate Simone Rocha and fellow Royal College Graduates Felicity Brown and Heikki Salone.

The excitement of a Fashion East catwalk lies in their ability to reinvent what it is to be feminine and this season is no exception.

For a/w 2010 Heikki Salone presented the tomboy, dressed in black cobwebbed knitwear, that you would wear until it crumbles finished with DM boots. A look -potentially- for fans of Janey from MTV’s hit TV series Daria.

Felicity Brown and Simone Rocha by Gareth A Hopkins

Felicity Brown’s delectable designs are a lesson in vibrant romanticism, a feat not surprising considering her training at Alberta Ferretti, Loewe, Lanvin and Mulberry.

In contrast Simone Rocha’s monochrome MA collection displayed structured modern cuts interspersed with a playful nod towards femininity by her inclusion of netted fuchsia headpieces.

Amelia’s Magazine wait with baited breath to see all of the aforementioned designers collections for s/s 2011.

Categories ,BFC, ,David Koma, ,Fashion East, ,Felicity Brown, ,Francesca Bourne, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gemma Randall, ,Hannah Marshall, ,Heikki Salone, ,Holly Fulton, ,Jessica Stokes, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Gray, ,Lulu Biazus, ,Lulu Kennedy, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Meeralee, ,Michael van der Ham, ,Naomi Law, ,On Schedule, ,Simone Rocha, ,Stuart Whitton, ,Teabell, ,teabelle

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

I don’t usually do much during fashion week on Mondays and Tuesdays. That’s because I have a day job. But when Amelia offered me tickets to Michael Van Der Ham during Monday lunchtime and Mary Katrantzou on Tuesday morning, no rx I couldn’t resist. It would be a push – a swift Boris from Southwark with moments to spare, see but I thought hell, side effects I’ll give it a go.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

By the time I arrived at Waterloo on Tuesday morning, a queue of standing ticket owners had already formed. Christ, these queues don’t half drag you down. I stood puffing on a cigarette as photographers run down the line to take pictures, interns offer The Daily and other free stuff while a whole host of people in enormous heels leg it inside. ‘Why am I bothering?!’ I thought to myself. Well, it only took the first look to appear at the start of Katrantzou‘s show to make me realise.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I didn’t have a hope in hell of getting my hand on a press release, lest a seat or one of Mary’s covetable, seasonal goodie bags, this time in black with a gorgeous fuchsia print (from what I could see). So I looked around the cavernous old Eurostar station for clues as to what Katrantzou might deliver this season. I didn’t have to look far. The entire runway had been transformed with a vast bank of erect carnations, framed from the back by a huge metal structure; a stark juxtaposition of natural and industrial which was to prevail as Katrantzou‘s inspiration for this stunning collection.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Karolina Burdon

I took a spot next to the photographer’s pit, manoeuvring behind anybody that looked remotely short – some mean feat at fashion week. The show started pretty soon after I finally entered the venue, which was literal music to my ears. It’s so easy to see why Mary Katrantzou has built up such an enormous following. What a breathtaking collection! I vaguely remember a quote in an interview that Katrantzou gave saying that she was worried if she pushed it any further, nobody would wear her clothes. Well there was no shortage of fans here today.

I’m so pleased I caught this show, despite my horrendous view: Katrantzou’s fascination with artificial against organic had been magically infused into this bright and bold collection. Digital prints featuring abstract elements of tin cans, microphones and car parts were the mainstay on mid-length dresses with translucent trains floating from the back. Saturated colours of all kinds – burnt organ, plum, greens, yellows, hot pink and cyan were aplenty, as if they had been painted onto the garments as the models wore them. You would be forgiven for thinking that it was all a bit of a mismatch, but discreet changes in cut and colour and the dramatic setting brought the collection together wonderfully.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Mary‘s inimitable cocktail dresses this time seemed a little softer; dresses that began from one shoulder nipped in at the waist before blossoming out again to create an ideal silhouette. Katrantzou also showed sharp tailoring with blazers and trousers that were married together with the same vivid colours and abstract prints. But it will be the dynamic cutting of dresses and the breathtaking finale – a bias cut creation made entirely from brightly colour metals – that we’ll remember this collection for.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

At the risk of sounding like an absolute berk, it was a real fashion moment. And I never say that. I left reeling. I’m sure the BFC are bending over backwards to keep Mary on our London Fashion Week schedule, but I fear it won’t be long before, like our other exceptional talent, she flies the nest to meet the demands of the global fashion market. For now, though, I feel privileged to have witnessed such an phenomenal display of world class fashion.


All photography by Matt Bramford

See the show here:

Categories ,BFC, ,catwalk, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Digital Prints, ,Eurostar Terminal, ,fashion, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Machine, ,Man made, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Matt Bramford, ,metallics, ,nature, ,organic, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,tailoring, ,Topshop Space, ,Waterloo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Mary Katrantzou


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

I don’t usually do much during fashion week on Mondays and Tuesdays. That’s because I have a day job. But when Amelia offered me tickets to Michael Van Der Ham during Monday lunchtime and Mary Katrantzou on Tuesday morning, I couldn’t resist. It would be a push – a swift Boris from Southwark with moments to spare, but I thought hell, I’ll give it a go.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

By the time I arrived at Waterloo on Tuesday morning, a queue of standing ticket owners had already formed. Christ, these queues don’t half drag you down. I stood puffing on a cigarette as photographers run down the line to take pictures, interns offer The Daily and other free stuff while a whole host of people in enormous heels leg it inside. ‘Why am I bothering?!’ I thought to myself. Well, it only took the first look to appear at the start of Katrantzou’s show to make me realise.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I didn’t have a hope in hell of getting my hand on a press release, lest a seat or one of Mary’s covetable, seasonal goodie bags, this time in black with a gorgeous fuchsia print (from what I could see). So I looked around the cavernous old Eurostar station for clues as to what Katrantzou might deliver this season. I didn’t have to look far. The entire runway had been transformed with a vast bank of erect carnations, framed from the back by a huge metal structure; a stark juxtaposition of natural and industrial which was to prevail as Katrantzou’s inspiration for this stunning collection.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Karolina Burdon

I took a spot next to the photographer’s pit, manoeuvring behind anybody that looked remotely short – some mean feat at fashion week. The show started pretty soon after I finally entered the venue, which was literal music to my ears. It’s so easy to see why Mary Katrantzou has built up such an enormous following. What a breathtaking collection! I vaguely remember a quote in an interview that Katrantzou gave saying that she was worried if she pushed it any further, nobody would wear her clothes. Well there was no shortage of fans here today.

I’m so pleased I caught this show, despite my horrendous view: Katrantzou’s fascination with artificial against organic had been magically infused into this bright and bold collection. Digital prints featuring abstract elements of tin cans, microphones and car parts were the mainstay on mid-length dresses with translucent trains floating from the back. Saturated colours of all kinds – burnt organ, plum, greens, yellows, hot pink and cyan were aplenty, as if they had been painted onto the garments as the models wore them. You would be forgiven for thinking that it was all a bit of a mismatch, but discreet changes in cut and colour and the dramatic setting brought the collection together wonderfully.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Mary’s inimitable cocktail dresses this time seemed a little softer; dresses that began from one shoulder nipped in at the waist before blossoming out again to create an ideal silhouette. Katrantzou also showed sharp tailoring with blazers and trousers that were married together with the same vivid colours and abstract prints. But it will be the dynamic cutting of dresses and the breathtaking finale – a bias cut creation made entirely from brightly colour metals – that we’ll remember this collection for.


Mary Katrantzou S/S 2012 by Lesley Barnes

At the risk of sounding like an absolute berk, it was a real fashion moment. And I never say that. I left reeling. I’m sure the BFC are bending over backwards to keep Mary on our London Fashion Week schedule, but I fear it won’t be long before, like our other exceptional talent, she flies the nest to meet the demands of the global fashion market. For now, though, I feel privileged to have witnessed such an phenomenal display of world class fashion.


All photography by Matt Bramford

See the show here:

Categories ,BFC, ,catwalk, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Digital Prints, ,Eurostar Terminal, ,fashion, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Lesley Barnes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Machine, ,Man made, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Matt Bramford, ,metallics, ,nature, ,organic, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,tailoring, ,Topshop Space, ,Waterloo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Menswear Day Catwalk Review: Christopher Shannon


Christopher Shannon S/S 2012 by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

I’d received two standing tickets for Christopher Shannon‘s S/S 2012 show; the first show I would see on glorious menswear day. I only have two legs and while I know I’ve put on a few pounds, cure I thought two a little excessive. I also forgot to print either of them out, discount so I joined the queue for people with no tickets; the chancers’ queue, pilule you might call it. Mere moments before the show started we were allowed in, to find the BFC venue about 75% full. Pfft.


Christopher Shannon S/S 2012, illustrated by Naomi Law

I didn’t have much chance to do anything before the show started. I’m not sure what I’d do exactly, but it is nice to do a bit of people watching. There was no time for that this morning as no sooner had I got my camera out of my bag than the lights had fallen and the music started – this season a jazzed-up blend of indie tunes including the Happy Mondays. A sort of cardboard jungle had been constructed at the beginning of the catwalk, from which appeared Shannon’s first model. It seems his sports-luxe aesthetic is here to stay (and quite rightly so). A nylon knee-length coat with a crisp white shirt and black polka dot shorts soon had us all imagining what was to follow.


All photography by Matt Bramford

Next came more nylon jackets and windbreakers with shirt collars and hoods that juxtaposed sporty nylon with softer cottons in geometric shapes. A palette of slate, black and pastel blue seemed a little more A/W than S/S, but as the collection progressed bright tassels on the hems of tops and vibrant Madras patterns that split shirts in half provided a welcome burst of colour. Hasidic-inspired hairstyles complimented these influenced looks.


Christopher Shannon S/S 2012 by Sam Parr

There was an enviable mix of formal wear and casual wear – grey marl joggers looked ace teamed with a navy shirt that had bright coloured panels towards the lower half. Sharp tailored shorts were given a slight dressing down by the aforementioned Madras tops.

Slick hair-dos, now becoming a Shannon trademark, made a glorious return. I wish I could do that with my barnet. Some models wore a selection of combs as headpieces, which was a little silly on reflection, but in the moment you can’t help being drawn into Shannon‘s mysterious but oh-so-stylish world.


Christopher Shannon S/S 2012 by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

I’m pleased to report that there’s still an element of chav to Christopher Shannon‘s collections, although this one did feel like his most grown-up to date, whilst still retaining his inimitable blend of sportswear and tribal influences. And long may it continue.

Watch the video here:

Categories ,1990s, ,BFC, ,catwalk, ,chavs, ,Christopher Shannon, ,Combs, ,Happy Mondays, ,Hasidic, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madras, ,menswear, ,MenswearSS12, ,Nylon, ,Polka dots, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,Shorts, ,Somerset House, ,sportswear, ,tailoring, ,Tassels

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2010 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

pierre garroudi – lfw – ss11 – sketch crowd – jenny robins
Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Turns out London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike and is thoroughly recommended when hot tailing it between various Bloomsbury venues, doctor as inevitably shows fall within minutes of each other. Actually I throughly recommend traveling around London by bike, one word of warning; once started it becomes increasingly difficult to pour yourself onto the tube. Anyway, I digress from FASHION and within Amelia’s Magazine archive there are posts dedicated to the joys of cycling. In fact why not read Amelia’s interview with Bobbin Bicycles?

But returning to day two of London Fashion Week, in which Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I met super early outside My Beautiful Fashion for Bernard Chandran before hot-peddling it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection in the elegant settings of the Portico Rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden via the trusty bike to collect the YSL manifesto, I easily returned to Somerset House in time for my 1pm appointment with Betty Jackson. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I am strangely intrigued about Betty Jackson.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I was the only one to be so clueless, as the tent was packed to the rafters and as the lights dimmed, and the runway cover was removed, the usual dash to seat the VIP’s caused a mini-pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions or squeezed into any available gap.

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the audience are plunged into darkness, as the first model arrives on the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the chattering murmur of minutes before is replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash.

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer Collections, especially when designers’ tempt you with beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Betty Jackson’s S/S 2011 was beautiful simplicity in her presentation of updated 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which were most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love.”

Illustration by Gemma Randall

Luckily after being lulled into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Betty Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before returning the collection to soft muted browns, delectably realised in the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall.

During shows, one occasionally glances around the room – fashion shows are a great place to watch peoples’ expressions – perhaps to see how the collection is going down or to try and catch a glimpse of the outfits from various angles. In the course of watching a model stalk up to the photographers pit, I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking, it has to be said completely unperturbed) by the door.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were well made in their simplicity and the designer maintained the crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of lengthy cut black garments. Mind you, it appears all designers suffer slightly from an obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it! As showcased in our extremely popular (and excellent) coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford.

Categories ,Betty Jackson, ,BFC, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Edge of Love, ,Flesh, ,Jennifer Saunders, ,Jo Wood, ,Land Girls, ,London Fashion Week, ,Spring Summer, ,SS 11, ,Tracey Emin

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Michael Van Der Ham

Michael Van Der Ham by Joe Turvey
Michael van der Ham S/S 2012 by Joe Turvey

You can tell that Michael has fun with his designs; much like, troche say, fellow Newgen designers Louise Gray and Meadham Kirchhoff. He seems to have a less disciplined and somewhat more carefree vibe that runs through his work and for his Spring/Summer 2012 collection this revealed itself in playful prints that darted from block colour to illustrative lines to teeny-tiny florals. It was gorgeous! And landed itself firmly in my LFW top three.

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Anna Dello Russo, posing as soon as she spotted Amelia‘s camera.

He had the front row that London designers dream of – Alexandra Schulman, Hilary Alexander, Anna Dello Russo (who looked ah-mazing in Prada), good ol’ Harold Tillman and many fashion editors, including ELLE UK fashion director Anne-Marie Curtis (many wouldn’t recognise the ELLE UK team, but I’m a little obsessed. I went into still shock when Rebecca Lowthorpe passed me at Erdem last season; best fashion writer ever). And all without a popstar poser in sight! Okay, I know that it may be fun and exciting to have Marina Diamond or Paloma Faith sit their buttocks on your front row, but there must be something about having this professional fash pack that makes your work feel truly respected.

Harold Tillman BFC at Michael Van Der Ham S/S 2012 - by Georgia Takacs
Harold Tillman, Chairman of the British Fashion Council. Photograph by Georgia Takacs.

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It’s been a treat to follow Michael’s journey since his initial sponsorship by BFC Newgen (OH those Newgen designers!) and his collage creations have always been seen as, well, a little bit mad (see Spring/Summer 2011). And his recent collaboration with equally mad Bjork (I love her) on her Biophilia project is clear patchwork evidence of this. Naturally, however, I have often found his designs so playful and daring that they’re often un-wearable. But with this collection? I wanted it all. And so, I imagine, did every other woman in the room. A bold statement, yes. But with a perfectly balanced Spring/Summer colour scheme, casual-luxe dressmaking and just the right amount of garish glamour, Michael was almost spot on.

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Michael Van Der Ham 2 by Nicola Ellen
Michael van der Ham S/S 2012 by Nicola Ellen

The collection’s appeal all lay in the casual, feminine dresses and pencil trouser/shirt combo that was all oh-so-embellished with colour and print upon a subtle mix of matte, jersey and sheer textures. That extra-long sentence made it all seem too much, I know. But there was absolutely nothing try-hard about this collection. There was no black floor-skimming dress in the finale (it’s done much too much) or crazed props sticking out of heads or hanging off models. It was straight-forward, good womenswear that still remained surprising and unpredictable as each look was revealed.

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And not forgetting the accessories, which were the type that, rather than giving a brief appreciative nod, were all-round oggleworthy; you just wanted to stare at them and look in closer at their bright, ornate detail. These bold, chunky-but-delicate pieces acted as an extension of the mismatched intricate print, as did the sequined colourful clutches (some of which had the overdone Chanel-esque chain straps that I’m no longer a fan of) which were carried by many of the models.

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Michael van der Ham S/S 2012 by Nicola Ellen

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Michael Van Der Ham S/S 2012 - by Georgia Takacs
Photograph by Georgia Takacs. All other photography by Amelia Gregory.

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Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Since his initial sponsorship from BFC’s Newgen, Michael van der Ham has grown up in leaps and bounds. There was a hype around him this season that has evolved from the previous ‘Keep an eye on him! He’s up-and-coming!’ to the sort that screams ‘I’m an established designer, showing my work at London Fashion Week; respect.’ And we do, Michael. We do.

Categories ,Alexandra Schulman, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Anna Dello Russo, ,BFC, ,BFC Newgen, ,bjork, ,british fashion council, ,chanel, ,Collage Dresses, ,Elle, ,Erdem, ,fashion, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Georgia Takacs, ,Harold Tillman, ,Hilary Alexander, ,jewellery, ,Joe Turvey, ,Joseph Turvey, ,lfw, ,LFW S/S 2012, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Fashion Week S/S 2012, ,Louise Gray, ,Marina Diamond, ,Meadham Kirchhoff, ,Michael van der Ham, ,Newgen, ,Nicola Ellen, ,paloma faith, ,Prada, ,print, ,Rebecca Lowthorpe, ,Topshop Newgen, ,Topshop Venue, ,vogue

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2010 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

pierre garroudi – lfw – ss11 – sketch crowd – jenny robins
Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Turns out London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike and is thoroughly recommended when hot tailing it between various Bloomsbury venues, doctor as inevitably shows fall within minutes of each other. Actually I throughly recommend traveling around London by bike, one word of warning; once started it becomes increasingly difficult to pour yourself onto the tube. Anyway, I digress from FASHION and within Amelia’s Magazine archive there are posts dedicated to the joys of cycling. In fact why not read Amelia’s interview with Bobbin Bicycles?

But returning to day two of London Fashion Week, in which Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I met super early outside My Beautiful Fashion for Bernard Chandran before hot-peddling it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection in the elegant settings of the Portico Rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden via the trusty bike to collect the YSL manifesto, I easily returned to Somerset House in time for my 1pm appointment with Betty Jackson. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I am strangely intrigued about Betty Jackson.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I was the only one to be so clueless, as the tent was packed to the rafters and as the lights dimmed, and the runway cover was removed, the usual dash to seat the VIP’s caused a mini-pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions or squeezed into any available gap.

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the audience are plunged into darkness, as the first model arrives on the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the chattering murmur of minutes before is replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash.

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer Collections, especially when designers’ tempt you with beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Betty Jackson’s S/S 2011 was beautiful simplicity in her presentation of updated 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which were most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love.”

Illustration by Gemma Randall

Luckily after being lulled into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Betty Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before returning the collection to soft muted browns, delectably realised in the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall.

During shows, one occasionally glances around the room – fashion shows are a great place to watch peoples’ expressions – perhaps to see how the collection is going down or to try and catch a glimpse of the outfits from various angles. In the course of watching a model stalk up to the photographers pit, I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking, it has to be said completely unperturbed) by the door.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were well made in their simplicity and the designer maintained the crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of lengthy cut black garments. Mind you, it appears all designers suffer slightly from an obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it! As showcased in our extremely popular (and excellent) coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford.

Categories ,Betty Jackson, ,BFC, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Edge of Love, ,Flesh, ,Jennifer Saunders, ,Jo Wood, ,Land Girls, ,London Fashion Week, ,Spring Summer, ,SS 11, ,Tracey Emin

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