Amelia’s Magazine | S/S 2011 Press Days – An illustrated round-up


Ada Zanditon, website like this illustrated by Sara Chew

Wahoooo! Summer is finally here. No really, dosage it is. Seriously I don’t care how damp and dreary it is outside that office window, summer is most definitely here. I’m toasty warm and looking at shorts, t-shirts and dresses ranging from ethereal to barely there. Skipping round London in the increasingly cold weather this can be hard to believe, but that’s how it goes. Here’s a little look at some of the summer outfits I’ve been looking at…

Ada Zanditon
Held eight stories up in Holborn with a stunning view out over the Thames to the Oxo Tower, Ada showed her latest collection. A quick chat with the designer revealed a charming, intelligent woman and in her own words ‘geeky’. Who else would be so inspired by maths and formulas that they borrow text books from libraries? Well if that’s where inspiration comes from, long may it last. Ada is not just a lovely person but also incredibly talented. Three dimensional sculptural pyramids burst forth from the intelligently structured garments.

Even the prints were inspired by fractal geometry and swept across many garments from a particularly stunning floor length bias cut 1930s dress with backless detail to a leather minidress complete with a chiffon front panel. Hard seaming was juxtaposed with soft fabrics and details. The jewellery carried the same prints as the dress and were another hard counterpoint to some of the softness. Look out for more on Ada’s ethical collection in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Giorgio Armani

Armani called and off to Bond Street I went. Giorgio showed some great pieces with open weave jackets and low-breaking double-breasted jackets for the men, soft and light in beige, grey and smoke. T-shirts emphasised the lightness with sheer elements. Maybe this is a way to get the ‘heavage’ out without looking like a modern day medallion man. The shoes and accessories were simple and classic, from a soft leather briefcase to a brown woven leather shoe catching my eye in particular. Suede and salmon skin belts helped to further soften the tone. All very simple and invoking a cool Italian summers evening.

On the far side of the partition was the womenswear. Strong tailoring was paired with sheer blouses in varying shades of blue and deep purple. Skirts were long and flared slightly to the hem, though I will admit it was the shoes and accessories that stood out. High perspex wedges with wooden platforms excuded both freshness and class. Chunky cuffs, twisted silver necklaces and amulets of large dark blue/black stones hung on leather and fabric. Powerful, yet clean and sophisticated.

Emporio Armani

Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent
Emporio, the delinquent nephew of Giorgio, was my next visit. There may have been a similar colour palette across the brands, but that’s pretty much where the similarities ended. No Giorgio man is ever going to be seen in a chainlink bondage harness. The use of sheer panels as highlights was also shared, this time showing off what one imagines will be gym-honed biceps. The highlight for me was a double-fronted crock effect suit. Hiding underneath the croc, a layer of leather gave the hint of something more to come.

Draping and ruffles were mixed with simple clean lines in womenswear. A grey and purple halterneck knee length dress particularly appealed, not to mention vertiginous heels. A dainty black chiffon bow, gave the vampiest pieces a demure side. Combining both the soft and the sharp, a draped jersey dress was teamed with a pale grey cap sleeve tailored jacket. It’s youthful and energetic but with a business edge.

Paul Costelloe

Illustration by Karolina Burdon

Showing menswear for the third season Paul opened London Fashion Week with a strong summer collection including short suits, lightweight long coats, and intricate print details. The menswear of this brand is growing on a season by season basis and whilst the formalwear is available in stockists such as John Lewis and Austin Reed, it’s hoped the casualwear and the odd catwalk piece should start hitting the shops soon.


Illustration by Natsuki Otani

You can see reviews of Paul’s collections by Matt and Amelia here and here.

Snake & Dagger

This London based denim company are growing stronger and stronger. Having trained in Japan, they hope to bring a more traditional feel to the denim market. The quality of the denim and the range of finishes are exquisite and the designers behind the brand bring together the best of their training and the city of London to create a unique look.

Aqua

Illustration by Joana Faria

Wherever you thought you were going to buy your Christmas party dress, forget it. Scrub that idea now. Go straight to Aqua and get yourself sorted. This Christmas’ collection ‘Out to Sleigh’ is affordable glamour at its best.

The pieces are daringly cut but clever and in no way trashy. More importantly, whilst you’ve been eyeing up that dress on the high street for the last three weeks so has every other girl in your office, but it’s unlikely you’ll be in the same number if you visit Aqua.

Morphe

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Having previously shown in India, Morphe is thankfully launching in the UK. Playing with shape and form, the pieces are both dramatic and cutting edge. Born from countless hours of work, the statement pieces are surprisingly easy to wear, if somewhat out there.

However, the true gems in the collection include a one shoulder dress with silver trim along the neckline. Creating more than a simple point of interest this is a brand to watch as they develop their continued success in India.

Asher Levine

This was a fantastic collection from a burgeoning menswear designer. In particular, the asymmetric leather biker jackets were right on trend. Using differing leathers as well as digital printing, Asher showed a dynamic and contemporary collection.

Eleanor Amoroso

Most certainly one to watch. Eleanor graduated this summer from the University of Westminster. Her work with fringing has to be seen to be believed. Genuinely unique and fresh, I can only hope the future holds big things for Amoroso. This is one young designer who definitely needs to be nourished.

There were more…far more people that I saw during the press days. From the sublime to the ridiculous and everything inbetween. Trying to contain yourself when browsing all these wonders is a challenge, as is trying to get enough photos and remember everything. But I can safely say S/S 2011 is going to be a very, very good season.

All photography by Nick Bain

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustratio, ,Aqua by Aqua, ,Asher Levine, ,Blow PR, ,Bond Street, ,Eleanor Amoroso, ,Emporio Armani, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Giorgio Armani, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,london, ,menswear, ,Morphe, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Press days, ,S/S 2011, ,Sara Chew, ,Snake & Dagger, ,Spring Summer, ,Stéphanie Thieullent, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sugar and spice: Make Lemonade opens vintage fashion pop-up shop

gabby-young

Emete Yarici by Jenny Lloyd

It’s impossible to miss the Make Lemonade pop-up shop as you walk up Chalton Street Market, help with big windows displaying the warm and cosy scene for everyone to see. Even standing across the street you can see Make Lemonade founder Emete Yarici pottering around, stomach accompanied by her interns Holly-ann Ladd and Bettina Krohn.


Make Lemonade pop-up shop

Step inside and you’ll find a myriad of treasure, starting with clothes from the Make Lemonade range of one-off vintage finds. As Emete talks me through the contributions from the various designers and artists around the shop it becomes clear this is very much a collaboration. ‘I have been working on getting a shop for over a year, but it’s been a mad rush at putting everything together as I only found out I was getting this shop last week,’ says Emete.


Illustration by Joana Faria

Holly-ann has been collecting vintage charms and made them into necklaces, explains Emete, while more accessories are on display from knitwear designer Louise Dungate. The walls are covered by charity shop finds, as well as prints from graphic designers Dan Sayle and Oschon Wespi-Tschopp. This comes from a tie-up with environmentally friendly printers Hato Press. ‘We will be doing a live screenprinting session here on Saturday, where people can choose a design and have it printed on a bag,’ says Emete.

On Wednesday 26th there will be a free styling evening, followed by a music night on the 28th. Norwegian pop and jazz singer Jenny Moe will provide entertainment, alongside the group The Youth. ‘People can bring their own drinks and there will be lots of cushions, so people can come and talk and chill out,’ says Emete. More details of this and other events, including a film screening yet to be confirmed, can be found on the Make Lemonade Facebook page.

Textile print designer Temitope Tijani has provided a special range of her colourful handmade bags and jewellery, while Supermarket Sarah has created a wall of items from the shop – these will go on sale from Supermarket Sarah’s website from 31st January. In addition to clothing, this includes a 1970s coffee set and a very clever apple-a-day calendar from Ken Kirton, who is also responsible for the Make Lemonade logo.


Temitope Tijani illustrated by Genie Espinosa

‘I wanted the shop to be a platform for many people to show their work, not just for our own stuff,’ says Emete, adding that most of the artists are friends, or friends of friends. Camden Council sponsors Make Lemonade’s rent for the pop-up shop, as part of a scheme to bring new business to Somers Town. This area between Euston and King’s Cross stations isn’t necessarily a retail destination, but the locals have been very welcoming, says Emete.

Make Lemonade will exist mainly on the internet for a while to come, but Emete doesn’t rule out a permanent shop down the line. But the next goal to get the brand into shops as permanent concessions, as well as continuing the collaboration with Asos and focusing on the blog. Along with Bettina, Emete will go to Paris this spring to scout for some higher-range vintage lines, but she wants to stay true to the initial idea of creating a reasonably priced vintage shop – something that isn’t that easy to find in London. ‘We want to make sure we stay close to our roots and remain a brand people want to be part of,’ says Emete, suddenly all shy when she has to be in front of the camera instead of behind the scenes.


Emete Yarici

Make Lemonade pop-up shop will be at 24 Chalton Street, London NW1 1JH until 1st February – after that find them on their website. For more information see our listing and the Make Lemonade Facebook page.

Categories ,ASOS, ,Bettina Krohn, ,Chalton Street Market, ,Dan Sayle, ,Emete Yarici, ,fashion, ,Genie Espinosa, ,Hato Press, ,Holly-ann Ladd, ,Jenny Lloyd, ,Jenny Moe, ,Joana Faria, ,Ken Kirton, ,london, ,Louise Dungate, ,Make Lemonade, ,Oschon Wespi-Tschopp, ,Pop-up Shop, ,Somers Town, ,Supermarket Sarah, ,Temitope Tijani, ,The Youth, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sugar and spice: Make Lemonade opens vintage fashion pop-up shop

gabby-young

Emete Yarici by Jenny Lloyd

It’s impossible to miss the Make Lemonade pop-up shop as you walk up Chalton Street Market, help with big windows displaying the warm and cosy scene for everyone to see. Even standing across the street you can see Make Lemonade founder Emete Yarici pottering around, stomach accompanied by her interns Holly-ann Ladd and Bettina Krohn.


Make Lemonade pop-up shop

Step inside and you’ll find a myriad of treasure, starting with clothes from the Make Lemonade range of one-off vintage finds. As Emete talks me through the contributions from the various designers and artists around the shop it becomes clear this is very much a collaboration. ‘I have been working on getting a shop for over a year, but it’s been a mad rush at putting everything together as I only found out I was getting this shop last week,’ says Emete.


Illustration by Joana Faria

Holly-ann has been collecting vintage charms and made them into necklaces, explains Emete, while more accessories are on display from knitwear designer Louise Dungate. The walls are covered by charity shop finds, as well as prints from graphic designers Dan Sayle and Oschon Wespi-Tschopp. This comes from a tie-up with environmentally friendly printers Hato Press. ‘We will be doing a live screenprinting session here on Saturday, where people can choose a design and have it printed on a bag,’ says Emete.

On Wednesday 26th there will be a free styling evening, followed by a music night on the 28th. Norwegian pop and jazz singer Jenny Moe will provide entertainment, alongside the group The Youth. ‘People can bring their own drinks and there will be lots of cushions, so people can come and talk and chill out,’ says Emete. More details of this and other events, including a film screening yet to be confirmed, can be found on the Make Lemonade Facebook page.

Textile print designer Temitope Tijani has provided a special range of her colourful handmade bags and jewellery, while Supermarket Sarah has created a wall of items from the shop – these will go on sale from Supermarket Sarah’s website from 31st January. In addition to clothing, this includes a 1970s coffee set and a very clever apple-a-day calendar from Ken Kirton, who is also responsible for the Make Lemonade logo.


Temitope Tijani illustrated by Genie Espinosa

‘I wanted the shop to be a platform for many people to show their work, not just for our own stuff,’ says Emete, adding that most of the artists are friends, or friends of friends. Camden Council sponsors Make Lemonade’s rent for the pop-up shop, as part of a scheme to bring new business to Somers Town. This area between Euston and King’s Cross stations isn’t necessarily a retail destination, but the locals have been very welcoming, says Emete.

Make Lemonade will exist mainly on the internet for a while to come, but Emete doesn’t rule out a permanent shop down the line. But the next goal to get the brand into shops as permanent concessions, as well as continuing the collaboration with Asos and focusing on the blog. Along with Bettina, Emete will go to Paris this spring to scout for some higher-range vintage lines, but she wants to stay true to the initial idea of creating a reasonably priced vintage shop – something that isn’t that easy to find in London. ‘We want to make sure we stay close to our roots and remain a brand people want to be part of,’ says Emete, suddenly all shy when she has to be in front of the camera instead of behind the scenes.


Emete Yarici

Make Lemonade pop-up shop will be at 24 Chalton Street, London NW1 1JH until 1st February – after that find them on their website. For more information see our listing and the Make Lemonade Facebook page.

Categories ,ASOS, ,Bettina Krohn, ,Chalton Street Market, ,Dan Sayle, ,Emete Yarici, ,fashion, ,Genie Espinosa, ,Hato Press, ,Holly-ann Ladd, ,Jenny Lloyd, ,Jenny Moe, ,Joana Faria, ,Ken Kirton, ,london, ,Louise Dungate, ,Make Lemonade, ,Oschon Wespi-Tschopp, ,Pop-up Shop, ,Somers Town, ,Supermarket Sarah, ,Temitope Tijani, ,The Youth, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | The 3rd Annual Fashioning the Future Awards


Caryn Franklin hosting the ceremony, by Antonia Parker

The third annual Fashioning the Future Awards took place last Thursday, where guests from the world of fashion, business and sustainable living came together to celebrate international sustainable fashion talent. Supported by the United Nations, the awards promote students who produce fashion with conscience.

The setting for this glamorous occasion – the East Wintergarden, part of the Canary Wharf complex – seemed a little unusual in the wake of the current financial crisis, and it’s not the first destination I’d think of if I wanted to host a conscious do. But, I was to learn, that Canary Wharf are committed to environmental issues. The Canary Wharf Group is, in fact, one of the country’s top ‘green’ companies.


Two of the finalists’ work by Joana Faria

Inside the venue, a load of wooden cogs had been dotted around the room, on which frozen models posed for the duration of the evening. Large zoetropes descended from the ceiling, requiring manmade kinetic power to operate that involved guests turning winches in order for them to animate. Drinks flowed and there was no obvious stage or focal point, creating a strange but enjoyable atmosphere that allowed guests to freely mingle amongst the spools and lights.


All photography by Matt Bramford

Circular tubes also hung from the celing, a little lower than average height, in which guests could stand, head fully immersed inside, and listen to interviews with the shortlisted nominees while looking a little silly. It all made for good fun and took the sometimes stifling atmosphere of these kind of events quickly away.

The ceremony itself was delayed in the hope that the members of the celebrity judging panel who could make it (Erin O’Connor and Lucy Siegle had already pulled out for unspecified reasons) would eventually show up. It was repeatedly announced that Jo Wood and BFC chairman Harold Tillman were, together, stuck in traffic. Eventually the producers of the awards gave up and the show commenced, glamourously hosted by fashion protagonist Caryn Franklin. The lights dimmed and Caryn took her place in the centre of the room under one of the zoetropes. Guests were invited to sit, anywhere, or stand to view the ceremony.


Jo Wood and Harold Tillman stuck in traffic by Gareth A Hopkins

Five awards were presented across a diverse range of subjects, including design and innovation, under this year’s theme: Biodiversity.


One of the finalists’ work by Jaymie O Callaghan

Unique Balance
Sara Emilie Terp Hansen scooped the coveted prize for Unique Balance with her intriguing and aesthetically brilliant collection made from cork. The judges said Sara Emilie had ‘found an opportunity to utilise an unexpected material in a fashion context, allowing nature to dictate design.’ It was quite the striking collection and Sara, one of the only recipients to collect her award in person, looked heartwarmingly shocked to receive the award.


One of the finalists’ work by Justyna Sowa

Unique Materials and Processes
The second award, for Unique Materials and Processes, was due to be presented by the aforementioned Jo Wood. Guests still hoped she would leg it in last minute and snatch the mic, but still no joy. Massive props must go to Alex McIntosh from the Centre for Sustainable Fashion who took to the stage (metaphorically speaking as there wasn’t one, of course) and presented also absent Evelyn Lebis‘ wearable light collection with the award.


One of the finalists’ work by Katrina Conquista

Unique Enterprise
Australian Alice Payne scooped the Enterprise award for her conceptual approach to business. ‘Think Lifecycle’ is a sort of social media platform for big companies, allowing them to harness environmental sustainability across the entire business. No, I didn’t completely understand it either, but I did like her spider diagrams.

Unique Design
LCF graduate Lara Torres picked up the award for Unique Design. Professor Frances Corner OBE, head of the LCF, said ‘ironically the design category was the hardest to judge; it’s very hard not to fixate on the idea that the winning entry has to be a perfectly realised garment’. In fact, it wasn’t – Lara’s entry examined the role of the fashion designer in modern society and the relationship we have with the clothing we wear.

The Body Shop One to Watch Award
The final award, presented by Ann Massal, International Brand Director of The Body Shop, went to Ashley Brock, who had flown all the way from the USA for the occasion. Eek. It was a sort of all-encompassing award for the prize student who hadn’t been acknowledged in the other categories. Ashley’s collection showed how ‘seemingly obsolete garments can be re-purposed’.


Erin O’ Connor realxing in the shower and Jo Wood stuck in traffic by Antonia Parker

And so the awards were wrapped up with a brief catwalk show where models stood up from their spools, sashayed around the room and then formed an imposing group under the centre spotlight. Still no sign of Jo Wood or Harold Tillman. It was a marvellous ceremony – genuinely unique – and a celebration of wearable sustainable fashion. I did wonder if it was entirely appropriate that these two were sitting in a car somewhere when they were supposed to be part of an environmentally-aware event (why they didn’t just get out of their bloody cars and get on the bloody tube is beyond me) but infact it didn’t matter; it made the evening entirely about the fashion, the winners, and the real message.

Categories ,Alex McIntosh, ,Alice Payne, ,Ann Massal, ,Antonia Parker, ,BFC, ,Biodiversity, ,Canary Wharf, ,Caryn Franklin, ,Centre for Sustainable Fashion, ,Ceremony, ,East Wintergarden, ,Enterprise, ,environmental, ,Erin O’ Connor, ,ethical, ,Evelyn Lebis, ,fashion, ,Fashion the Future Awards, ,Frances Corner OBE, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,green, ,Harold Tillman, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Jo Wood, ,Joana Faria, ,Justyna Sowa, ,Katrina Conquista, ,Lara Torres, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Lucy Siegle, ,Matt Bramford, ,Sara Emilie Terp Hansen, ,The Body Shop, ,unique, ,united nations, ,Womenswear, ,Zoetropes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentines Day: Gifts and Ideas


Illustration by Matilde Sazio

“This song is about fucking up against the wall, unhealthyJoan Wasser announces to introduce “Hard white wall”, a track from her second album To Survive at her Barbican gig. Never the shrinking violet, Joan is standing in an all-in-one fitted black leather number, slashed at the back, as the spotlights converge on her small frame. Last Sunday was the seventh time I have seen Joan As Police Woman in London.

The first time I saw Joan play was on a balmy summer’s evening in 2006 at now defunct The Spitz in Spitalfields, which in my opinion, used to put on some of the best gigs in London. The venue was at capacity that night and the air inside was clammy to the point where every surface I touched, whether it was a table or wall, seemed to be coated with a film of sweat. Fresh from a tour supporting Guillemots, Joan took the stage in a silver metallic floor length gown and wowed the audience with her electric solo set. No big stage productions, no fancy costume changes, not even a band; just Joan with her powerful, soulful vocals, Korg keyboard and guitar. I am certain that she gained some lifelong fans that night, of which I am one.

The truth is my enthusiasm for Joan extends beyond just liking her records and appreciating her live performances. There’s something about her music – in the same vein as Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Cat Power and Regina Spektor – which deeply resonates with me. Her sound is raw, honest, pure and sung from the heart in a way which isn’t bland, overdone or contrived. The combination of her emotive vocals, attention to detail in the form of a subtle stroke of cymbal here and an echo of string instruments there, has had the power to reduce me to tears in the past (although I have been known to cry at most things!).

Over the years, Joan has seen me through the best and worst of times: she’s been the soundtrack to exciting train and coach journeys across South East Asia and South America as I have admired the ever-changing landscapes, accompanied me as I have trudged miserably into work on an overheated tube wedged up against some hairy obese man’s armpit, and comforted me through the pain of a relationship break-up where I often found myself lying kidney-bean shaped, feeling sorry for myself (on this last point, what I have learned is that boyfriends may come and go, but if you discover a good artist, they have an unparalleled reliance. Joan has consistently delivered the goods since her first album and that Spitz gig in 2006, which is far more than what can be said of any of my recent relationships).

A multi-instrumentalist who flits effortlessly from piano to guitar to violin, Joan has worked and performed with the likes of Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Lou Reed, Nick Cave and Elton John to name but a few. Much is made of the fact that she was the girlfriend of the luminous late-Jeff Buckley when he died, whose “Everybody Here Wants You” track is rumoured to be inspired by her, but for Joan to be defined by this alone is grossly unfair. The recognition that she deserves should be based purely on her own talent of epic proportions.

In the same vein as Antony and Rufus, much of Joan’s charm lies in her musical arrangements and unique which can be spine-tingling, served tender or harsh. Her new album, The Deep Field unfurls her lust for life and presents to us a more positive and upbeat individual compared to her earlier offerings, Real Life (2006) and To Survive (2008). In her own words, it is her “most open, joyous record” to date. Although the record is a departure from her more typical sombre sound, its essence is consistent with her previous work where she continues to demonstrate mood, depth, authenticity and sophisticated musical arrangements, which is a rare gem amongst some of the generic, non-memorable cack that passes for music today.

When I meet Joan for tea at the K-West Hotel in Shepherd’s Bush for our interview, she is friendly and upbeat, but appears visibly tired after having spent two days trekking across the UK to do promo work. I try to act cool and calm, but I am sweating like hell and on my way to the hotel, I slip over and land on my bottom to the amusement of two young teenage boys who break out into hysterics, which makes for a nice ice-breaker as I re-tell my story.

Wearing a brown leather jacket, a matching pair of trousers and a bright yellow t-shirt with “Strut ‘n’ Stuff” emblazoned across the front that she picked up from a thrift store, with her thick unkempt dark brown hair and flawless skin, Joan looks much younger than her years – much closer to 30 than 40.

As we sit on a comfy sofa in the library area of the hotel, Joan is oblivious to the two men in suits sitting behind us having a business meeting, who shoot a few disapproving glances in our direction as her voice gets progressively louder over the course of the interview. Speaking animatedly with a cup of herbal tea (she is trying to cut back on the coffee) in one hand and some neatly cut slices of apple in the other, Joan and I discuss life before Joan As Police Woman, the inspiration behind her new record, being in a better place and who’s house she’d most like to be a fly on the wall at, all in the good company of some soft-porn inspired saxophone music, playing softly in the background…

You trained as a classical musician and spent some time performing as one. What was the catalyst for you to explore being an alternative musician?
I always listened to different kinds of music as I was growing up and throughout my classical training. Classical music and non-classical music is all music so for me; it wasn’t all that big of a stretch making other music. I loved studying classical music, but I wasn’t really interested in making it my life’s work because I really wanted to make new music. There were also plenty of people who were better equipped at bringing new insight to the Beethoven violin concerto and I was not one of them. I loved learning the discipline behind that but pursuing a career in it didn’t interest me so when I moved to Boston to go to school I started playing in bands then because all my friends were in bands and the rest, I guess they say, is history.

You’ve been in several bands since you started out as a musician, including playing violin with Rufus Wainwright and Antony and the Johnsons, yet it as only in 2004 that you decided to front your own band. Why was there this delay?
Well I played violin exclusively for some time so I was mostly contributing to other peoples’ bands which I loved doing. I was playing an instrument that is like a voice in itself. You don’t write songs on the violin so I had no way of writing. I picked up a guitar in 1997 to see what it was like; I wanted to figure out if I could write songs and started writing. I put a band together called Black Beetle and wrote a few songs with them and I joined Antony’s band. At this stage, I was still playing with lots of people doing string arranging, but I also wanted to try out my voice which sounded horrible to me at the time. In the beginning you’re not used to what it sounds like and it doesn’t feel natural.

But surely you must have had reassurance from your friends that your voice is anything but horrible…
Well no one heard it. I started playing but I didn’t tell many people. I did get a lot of support from my friends which helped a lot, even if you think they’re lying because they love you.

So it was all very much about stepping slowly out of your comfort zone…
Yes, very much so. Antony had me open with one of his songs solo sometimes. It was a very anxious experience, especially as I was around a lot of astounding vocal performers. It was really scary, but I’m that kind of person where I jump into the deep end. It’s the only way to do things. I was making a record with Black Beetle that never got released, which was part of the learning process and then that band broke up in 2002 but I kept going; playing on my own and then I got a drummer to play with me and then Rufus asked me to go on tour and open for him and it just all went from there.

The first time I saw you perform was at The Spitz in 2006, and even back then you seemed to be a very natural performer. Has performing always been second nature to you?
At that point I felt a lot better. Opening for Rufus (Wainwright) was a good experience – you can’t really be opening for a crowd of total music lovers without getting your act together. Also, the fact that I come to a city that isn’t mine and tonnes of people show up. It makes you feel great; it makes you think: “OK – well at least I’m doing something right”.

When did you start recording the new album and what were your inspirations for the record?
I started by making a covers record which was fun for me to do. I wanted to get out of my head; my own songwriting. I think it really helped me to direct my songwriting on this record. I’m in a great place these days so I feel really open and joyful and I really wanted to get this across in the record. I first recorded seven songs that I had been writing since my last record; some of which I had been playing live, some I hadn’t been. I did that in March and completed those songs and surveyed the scene and decided what the record needed and then spent a few months writing five more songs to fill out the record the way I saw it in June and then mixed the whole thing at the end of last summer. It was really fun because I really had never done that before. Before I would record what I had and decide what it needed and then wrote that kind of song to fit the record so this time, the new approach was a fun exercise for me. I recorded at the same studio with the same producer and I feel very comfortable there; it makes me feel like I’m coming home. And then I just got all of my favourite musicians to contribute to the record. It was just an absolute glorious experience.

How do you think your sound has evolved since Real Life and To Survive?
It’s interesting because when I listen to my songs, I think all the time: “Where did that come from?” It’s beyond me. But I feel like I’m in a different place now…much more relaxed with myself in general. This is one of the treasures of spending more time alive because you get more comfortable with yourself and your surroundings.

You reached a milestone age last summer (Joan turned 40) – were there any anxieties?
I was really excited about it because I felt like it was a demarcation point of where I really didn’t have to give a shit about anything anymore. I never had to before, but I could just actually free myself of all the youth stuff because I have experienced a lot of stuff and it’s really been worth it even though things were very difficult at times. I feel really lucky that everyday feels a bit better than the last day because I’m determined to live a full life.

How did you celebrate?
I had a big party on my roof at home (just outside New York). It was really nice because I was there for the first time on my birthday and I really embraced it.

What advice would you give a 20 year old Joan and 30 year old Joan?
I would just reassure the 20 year old Joan that things are definitely going to get better – I did not think that then. At 30…I don’t know…the thing is I wouldn’t ever do anything differently. You have to learn everything the way you learn them, unfortunately sometimes.

What do you do to switch off?
I definitely have to exercise or I go crazy. I need that in my life so I do that a lot. I spend a certain amount of time with my friends being ridiculous and making jokes as terrible as possible. Oh and drinking way too much coffee.

Who’s house would you most like to be a fly on the wall at?
Prince…definitely! He’s the only person who I think: “What is he doing right now?”. Because you know it’s something weird…or fascinating. He’s just incredible; amazing.

Joan’s new album The Deep Field is out now on PIAS records and she is playing across the UK until 13 February.


Illustration by Matilde Sazio

“This song is about fucking up against the wall, discountJoan Wasser announces to introduce “Hard white wall”, adiposity a track from her second album To Survive at her Barbican gig. Never the shrinking violet, recipe Joan is standing in an all-in-one fitted black leather number, slashed at the back, as the spotlights converge on her small frame. Last Sunday was the seventh time I have seen Joan As Police Woman in London.

The first time I saw Joan play was on a balmy summer’s evening in 2006 at now defunct The Spitz in Spitalfields, which in my opinion, used to put on some of the best gigs in London. The venue was at capacity that night and the air inside was clammy to the point where every surface I touched, whether it was a table or wall, seemed to be coated with a film of sweat. Fresh from a tour supporting Guillemots, Joan took the stage in a silver metallic floor length gown and wowed the audience with her electric solo set. No big stage productions, no fancy costume changes, not even a band; just Joan with her powerful, soulful vocals, Korg keyboard and guitar. I am certain that she gained some lifelong fans that night, of which I am one.


Illustration by Darren Fletcher

The truth is my enthusiasm for Joan extends beyond just liking her records and appreciating her live performances. There’s something about her music – in the same vein as Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Cat Power and Regina Spektor – which deeply resonates with me. Her sound is raw, honest, pure and sung from the heart in a way which isn’t bland, overdone or contrived. The combination of her emotive vocals, attention to detail in the form of a subtle stroke of cymbal here and an echo of string instruments there, has had the power to reduce me to tears in the past (although I have been known to cry at most things!).

Over the years, Joan has seen me through the best and worst of times: she’s been the soundtrack to exciting train and coach journeys across South East Asia and South America as I have admired the ever-changing landscapes, accompanied me as I have trudged miserably into work on an overheated tube wedged up against some hairy obese man’s armpit, and comforted me through the pain of a relationship break-up where I often found myself lying kidney-bean shaped, feeling sorry for myself (on this last point, what I have learned is that boyfriends may come and go, but if you discover a good artist, they have an unparalleled reliance. Joan has consistently delivered the goods since her first album and that Spitz gig in 2006, which is far more than what can be said of any of my recent relationships).


Illustration by Darren Fletcher

A multi-instrumentalist who flits effortlessly from piano to guitar to violin, Joan has worked and performed with the likes of Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Lou Reed, Nick Cave and Elton John to name but a few. Much is made of the fact that she was the girlfriend of the luminous late-Jeff Buckley when he died, whose “Everybody Here Wants You” track is rumoured to be inspired by her, but for Joan to be defined by this alone is grossly unfair. The recognition that she deserves should be based purely on her own talent of epic proportions.

In the same vein as Antony and Rufus, much of Joan’s charm lies in her musical arrangements and unique which can be spine-tingling, served tender or harsh. Her new album, The Deep Field unfurls her lust for life and presents to us a more positive and upbeat individual compared to her earlier offerings, Real Life (2006) and To Survive (2008). In her own words, it is her “most open, joyous record” to date. Although the record is a departure from her more typical sombre sound, its essence is consistent with her previous work where she continues to demonstrate mood, depth, authenticity and sophisticated musical arrangements, which is a rare gem amongst some of the generic, non-memorable cack that passes for music today.


Illustration by Matilde Sazio

When I meet Joan for tea at the K-West Hotel in Shepherd’s Bush for our interview, she is friendly and upbeat, but appears visibly tired after having spent two days trekking across the UK to do promo work. I try to act cool and calm, but I am sweating like hell and on my way to the hotel, I slip over and land on my bottom to the amusement of two young teenage boys who break out into hysterics, which makes for a nice ice-breaker as I re-tell my story.

Wearing a brown leather jacket, a matching pair of trousers and a bright yellow t-shirt with “Strut ‘n’ Stuff” emblazoned across the front that she picked up from a thrift store, with her thick unkempt dark brown hair and flawless skin, Joan looks much younger than her years – much closer to 30 than 40.

As we sit on a comfy sofa in the library area of the hotel, Joan is oblivious to the two men in suits sitting behind us having a business meeting, who shoot a few disapproving glances in our direction as her voice gets progressively louder over the course of the interview. Speaking animatedly with a cup of herbal tea (she is trying to cut back on the coffee) in one hand and some neatly cut slices of apple in the other, Joan and I discuss life before Joan As Police Woman, the inspiration behind her new record, being in a better place and who’s house she’d most like to be a fly on the wall at, all in the good company of some soft-porn inspired saxophone music, playing softly in the background…

You trained as a classical musician and spent some time performing as one. What was the catalyst for you to explore being an alternative musician?
I always listened to different kinds of music as I was growing up and throughout my classical training. Classical music and non-classical music is all music so for me; it wasn’t all that big of a stretch making other music. I loved studying classical music, but I wasn’t really interested in making it my life’s work because I really wanted to make new music. There were also plenty of people who were better equipped at bringing new insight to the Beethoven violin concerto and I was not one of them. I loved learning the discipline behind that but pursuing a career in it didn’t interest me so when I moved to Boston to go to school I started playing in bands then because all my friends were in bands and the rest, I guess they say, is history.

You’ve been in several bands since you started out as a musician, including playing violin with Rufus Wainwright and Antony and the Johnsons, yet it as only in 2004 that you decided to front your own band. Why was there this delay?
Well I played violin exclusively for some time so I was mostly contributing to other peoples’ bands which I loved doing. I was playing an instrument that is like a voice in itself. You don’t write songs on the violin so I had no way of writing. I picked up a guitar in 1997 to see what it was like; I wanted to figure out if I could write songs and started writing. I put a band together called Black Beetle and wrote a few songs with them and I joined Antony’s band. At this stage, I was still playing with lots of people doing string arranging, but I also wanted to try out my voice which sounded horrible to me at the time. In the beginning you’re not used to what it sounds like and it doesn’t feel natural.


But surely you must have had reassurance from your friends that your voice is anything but horrible…
Well no one heard it. I started playing but I didn’t tell many people. I did get a lot of support from my friends which helped a lot, even if you think they’re lying because they love you.

So it was all very much about stepping slowly out of your comfort zone…
Yes, very much so. Antony had me open with one of his songs solo sometimes. It was a very anxious experience, especially as I was around a lot of astounding vocal performers. It was really scary, but I’m that kind of person where I jump into the deep end. It’s the only way to do things. I was making a record with Black Beetle that never got released, which was part of the learning process and then that band broke up in 2002 but I kept going; playing on my own and then I got a drummer to play with me and then Rufus asked me to go on tour and open for him and it just all went from there.

The first time I saw you perform was at The Spitz in 2006, and even back then you seemed to be a very natural performer. Has performing always been second nature to you?
At that point I felt a lot better. Opening for Rufus (Wainwright) was a good experience – you can’t really be opening for a crowd of total music lovers without getting your act together. Also, the fact that I come to a city that isn’t mine and tonnes of people show up. It makes you feel great; it makes you think: “OK – well at least I’m doing something right”.

When did you start recording the new album and what were your inspirations for the record?
I started by making a covers record which was fun for me to do. I wanted to get out of my head; my own songwriting. I think it really helped me to direct my songwriting on this record. I’m in a great place these days so I feel really open and joyful and I really wanted to get this across in the record. I first recorded seven songs that I had been writing since my last record; some of which I had been playing live, some I hadn’t been. I did that in March and completed those songs and surveyed the scene and decided what the record needed and then spent a few months writing five more songs to fill out the record the way I saw it in June and then mixed the whole thing at the end of last summer. It was really fun because I really had never done that before. Before I would record what I had and decide what it needed and then wrote that kind of song to fit the record so this time, the new approach was a fun exercise for me. I recorded at the same studio with the same producer and I feel very comfortable there; it makes me feel like I’m coming home. And then I just got all of my favourite musicians to contribute to the record. It was just an absolute glorious experience.

How do you think your sound has evolved since Real Life and To Survive?
It’s interesting because when I listen to my songs, I think all the time: “Where did that come from?” It’s beyond me. But I feel like I’m in a different place now…much more relaxed with myself in general. This is one of the treasures of spending more time alive because you get more comfortable with yourself and your surroundings.

You reached a milestone age last summer (Joan turned 40) – were there any anxieties?
I was really excited about it because I felt like it was a demarcation point of where I really didn’t have to give a shit about anything anymore. I never had to before, but I could just actually free myself of all the youth stuff because I have experienced a lot of stuff and it’s really been worth it even though things were very difficult at times. I feel really lucky that everyday feels a bit better than the last day because I’m determined to live a full life.

How did you celebrate?
I had a big party on my roof at home (just outside New York). It was really nice because I was there for the first time on my birthday and I really embraced it.

What advice would you give a 20 year old Joan and 30 year old Joan?
I would just reassure the 20 year old Joan that things are definitely going to get better – I did not think that then. At 30…I don’t know…the thing is I wouldn’t ever do anything differently. You have to learn everything the way you learn them, unfortunately sometimes.

What do you do to switch off?
I definitely have to exercise or I go crazy. I need that in my life so I do that a lot. I spend a certain amount of time with my friends being ridiculous and making jokes as terrible as possible. Oh and drinking way too much coffee.

Who’s house would you most like to be a fly on the wall at?
Prince…definitely! He’s the only person who I think: “What is he doing right now?”. Because you know it’s something weird…or fascinating. He’s just incredible; amazing.

Joan’s new album The Deep Field is out now on PIAS records and she is playing across the UK until 13 February.


Illustration by Matilde Sazio

“This song is about fucking up against the wall, viagra ” announces Joan Wasser to introduce “Hard white wall”, a track from her second album To Survive at her Barbican gig. Never the shrinking violet, Joan is standing in an all-in-one fitted black leather number, slashed at the back, as the spotlights converge on her small frame. Last Sunday was the seventh time I have seen Joan As Police Woman in London.

The first time I saw Joan play was on a balmy summer’s evening in 2006 at now defunct The Spitz in Spitalfields, which in my opinion, used to put on some of the best gigs in London. The venue was at capacity that night and the air inside was clammy to the point where every surface I touched, whether it was a table or wall, seemed to be coated with a film of sweat. Fresh from a tour supporting Guillemots, Joan took the stage in a silver metallic floor length gown and wowed the audience with her electric solo set. No big stage productions, no fancy costume changes, not even a band; just Joan with her powerful, soulful vocals, Korg keyboard and guitar. I am certain that she gained some lifelong fans that night, of which I am one.


Illustration by Darren Fletcher

The truth is my enthusiasm for Joan extends beyond just liking her records and appreciating her live performances. There’s something about her music – in the same vein as Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Cat Power and Regina Spektor – which deeply resonates with me. Her sound is raw, honest, pure and sung from the heart in a way which isn’t bland, overdone or contrived. The combination of her emotive vocals, attention to detail in the form of a subtle stroke of cymbal here and an echo of string instruments there, has had the power to reduce me to tears in the past (although I have been known to cry at most things!).

Over the years, Joan has seen me through the best and worst of times: she’s been the soundtrack to exciting train and coach journeys across South East Asia and South America as I have admired the ever-changing landscapes, accompanied me as I have trudged miserably into work on an overheated tube wedged up against some hairy obese man’s armpit, and comforted me through the pain of a relationship break-up where I often found myself lying kidney-bean shaped, feeling sorry for myself (on this last point, what I have learned is that boyfriends may come and go, but if you discover a good artist, they have an unparalleled reliance. Joan has consistently delivered the goods since her first album and that Spitz gig in 2006, which is far more than what can be said of any of my recent relationships).


Illustration by Darren Fletcher

A multi-instrumentalist who flits effortlessly from piano to guitar to violin, Joan has worked and performed with the likes of Antony and the Johnsons, Rufus Wainwright, Lou Reed, Nick Cave and Elton John to name but a few. Much is made of the fact that she was the girlfriend of the luminous late-Jeff Buckley when he died, whose “Everybody Here Wants You” track is rumoured to be inspired by her, but for Joan to be defined by this alone is grossly unfair. The recognition that she deserves should be based purely on her own talent of epic proportions.

In the same vein as Antony and Rufus, much of Joan’s charm lies in her musical arrangements and unique which can be spine-tingling, served tender or harsh. Her new album, The Deep Field unfurls her lust for life and presents to us a more positive and upbeat individual compared to her earlier offerings, Real Life (2006) and To Survive (2008). In her own words, it is her “most open, joyous record” to date. Although the record is a departure from her more typical sombre sound, its essence is consistent with her previous work where she continues to demonstrate mood, depth, authenticity and sophisticated musical arrangements, which is a rare gem amongst some of the generic, non-memorable cack that passes for music today.


Illustration by Matilde Sazio

When I meet Joan for tea at the K-West Hotel in Shepherd’s Bush for our interview, she is friendly and upbeat, but appears visibly tired after having spent two days trekking across the UK to do promo work. I try to act cool and calm, but I am sweating like hell and on my way to the hotel, I slip over and land on my bottom to the amusement of two young teenage boys who break out into hysterics, which makes for a nice ice-breaker as I re-tell my story.

Wearing a brown leather jacket, a matching pair of trousers and a bright yellow t-shirt with “Strut ‘n’ Stuff” emblazoned across the front that she picked up from a thrift store, with her thick unkempt dark brown hair and flawless skin, Joan looks much younger than her years – much closer to 30 than 40.

As we sit on a comfy sofa in the library area of the hotel, Joan is oblivious to the two men in suits sitting behind us having a business meeting, who shoot a few disapproving glances in our direction as her voice gets progressively louder over the course of the interview. Speaking animatedly with a cup of herbal tea (she is trying to cut back on the coffee) in one hand and some neatly cut slices of apple in the other, Joan and I discuss life before Joan As Police Woman, the inspiration behind her new record, being in a better place and who’s house she’d most like to be a fly on the wall at, all in the good company of some soft-porn inspired saxophone music, playing softly in the background…

You trained as a classical musician and spent some time performing as one. What was the catalyst for you to explore being an alternative musician?
I always listened to different kinds of music as I was growing up and throughout my classical training. Classical music and non-classical music is all music so for me; it wasn’t all that big of a stretch making other music. I loved studying classical music, but I wasn’t really interested in making it my life’s work because I really wanted to make new music. There were also plenty of people who were better equipped at bringing new insight to the Beethoven violin concerto and I was not one of them. I loved learning the discipline behind that but pursuing a career in it didn’t interest me so when I moved to Boston to go to school I started playing in bands then because all my friends were in bands and the rest, I guess they say, is history.

You’ve been in several bands since you started out as a musician, including playing violin with Rufus Wainwright and Antony and the Johnsons, yet it as only in 2004 that you decided to front your own band. Why was there this delay?
Well I played violin exclusively for some time so I was mostly contributing to other peoples’ bands which I loved doing. I was playing an instrument that is like a voice in itself. You don’t write songs on the violin so I had no way of writing. I picked up a guitar in 1997 to see what it was like; I wanted to figure out if I could write songs and started writing. I put a band together called Black Beetle and wrote a few songs with them and I joined Antony’s band. At this stage, I was still playing with lots of people doing string arranging, but I also wanted to try out my voice which sounded horrible to me at the time. In the beginning you’re not used to what it sounds like and it doesn’t feel natural.


But surely you must have had reassurance from your friends that your voice is anything but horrible…
Well no one heard it. I started playing but I didn’t tell many people. I did get a lot of support from my friends which helped a lot, even if you think they’re lying because they love you.

So it was all very much about stepping slowly out of your comfort zone…
Yes, very much so. Antony had me open with one of his songs solo sometimes. It was a very anxious experience, especially as I was around a lot of astounding vocal performers. It was really scary, but I’m that kind of person where I jump into the deep end. It’s the only way to do things. I was making a record with Black Beetle that never got released, which was part of the learning process and then that band broke up in 2002 but I kept going; playing on my own and then I got a drummer to play with me and then Rufus asked me to go on tour and open for him and it just all went from there.

The first time I saw you perform was at The Spitz in 2006, and even back then you seemed to be a very natural performer. Has performing always been second nature to you?
At that point I felt a lot better. Opening for Rufus (Wainwright) was a good experience – you can’t really be opening for a crowd of total music lovers without getting your act together. Also, the fact that I come to a city that isn’t mine and tonnes of people show up. It makes you feel great; it makes you think: “OK – well at least I’m doing something right”.

When did you start recording the new album and what were your inspirations for the record?
I started by making a covers record which was fun for me to do. I wanted to get out of my head; my own songwriting. I think it really helped me to direct my songwriting on this record. I’m in a great place these days so I feel really open and joyful and I really wanted to get this across in the record. I first recorded seven songs that I had been writing since my last record; some of which I had been playing live, some I hadn’t been. I did that in March and completed those songs and surveyed the scene and decided what the record needed and then spent a few months writing five more songs to fill out the record the way I saw it in June and then mixed the whole thing at the end of last summer. It was really fun because I really had never done that before. Before I would record what I had and decide what it needed and then wrote that kind of song to fit the record so this time, the new approach was a fun exercise for me. I recorded at the same studio with the same producer and I feel very comfortable there; it makes me feel like I’m coming home. And then I just got all of my favourite musicians to contribute to the record. It was just an absolute glorious experience.

How do you think your sound has evolved since Real Life and To Survive?
It’s interesting because when I listen to my songs, I think all the time: “Where did that come from?” It’s beyond me. But I feel like I’m in a different place now…much more relaxed with myself in general. This is one of the treasures of spending more time alive because you get more comfortable with yourself and your surroundings.

You reached a milestone age last summer (Joan turned 40) – were there any anxieties?
I was really excited about it because I felt like it was a demarcation point of where I really didn’t have to give a shit about anything anymore. I never had to before, but I could just actually free myself of all the youth stuff because I have experienced a lot of stuff and it’s really been worth it even though things were very difficult at times. I feel really lucky that everyday feels a bit better than the last day because I’m determined to live a full life.

How did you celebrate?
I had a big party on my roof at home (just outside New York). It was really nice because I was there for the first time on my birthday and I really embraced it.

What advice would you give a 20 year old Joan and 30 year old Joan?
I would just reassure the 20 year old Joan that things are definitely going to get better – I did not think that then. At 30…I don’t know…the thing is I wouldn’t ever do anything differently. You have to learn everything the way you learn them, unfortunately sometimes.

What do you do to switch off?
I definitely have to exercise or I go crazy. I need that in my life so I do that a lot. I spend a certain amount of time with my friends being ridiculous and making jokes as terrible as possible. Oh and drinking way too much coffee.

Who’s house would you most like to be a fly on the wall at?
Prince…definitely! He’s the only person who I think: “What is he doing right now?”. Because you know it’s something weird…or fascinating. He’s just incredible; amazing.

Joan’s new album The Deep Field is out now on PIAS records and she is playing across the UK until 13 February.

valentines foxes by bex glover
Valentines Foxes by Bex Glover.

By now if you have any interest in the upcoming consumer fest that is Valentines Day you will probably already have read Hannah’s slightly bah humbug Valentines blog post, recipe which nevertheless gave some great tips on how to best celebrate this festival of luuuurve.

Peacock Heart by Jenny Lloyd
Peacock Heart by Jenny Lloyd. Available to buy as a print over on Society 6.

Last year I detailed how Valentines has been for me in the past – in almost every instance a non event unless I went to the trouble of sending friends and family something special.

jenny robins - red valentine
Red Valentine by Jenny Robins. You can buy her Book of Love here on Etsy.

But I’ve been in my current relationship for quite awhile now and this year Valentines Day throws up all sorts of new worries for me… Will he feel pressurised to take me out? Do I even want to go out and join the masses, here now that the option may in fact be available? What do I feel about how I should be treated and what, at the end of the day, is the best expression of love? Don’t laugh, I’ve seriously never had to think about these things before: my love life has been that rubbish for so long.

valentine's day by Natsuki-Otani
LSD Love by Natsuki Otani – available to buy online at Society 6.

Well, unsurprisingly I have to say that my views remain pretty much the same as they did last year. For me the best way to show that you care about someone is to put a bit of thought into whatever you decide to do on Valentines Day, whether you are showing that kindness to friends and family or a special partner – something that it goes without saying should really be an ongoing year-round state of affairs.

youmakemetick by Adam Smith
youmakemetick by Adam Smith.

Whatever you do steer clear of the crazed demands to BUY BUY BUY, and instead think of what your loved one truly appreciates – which is most likely to be your time and your energy. For me receiving something hand made is always the most appreciated gift there is – time having become such a precious resource in itself. There are some really sweet ideas that cost barely a penny over on Hannah’s blog.

Valentines Icecream by Gemma Smith
Valentines Icecream by Gemma Smith.

Failing that a gift hand made by someone else is definitely a close second best. So in the spirit of collaboration I asked people to send me their hand made Valentines gift ideas via twitter – here’s my pick of the best:

Anko Fairy Steps pendant
Ankolie has contributed to Amelia’s Magazine as an illustrator – here’s her lovely little Fairy Steps necklace which features really cute heart links and a central cabochon that features one of her paintings, available on Etsy.

lovebirds-becca thorne
Becca Thorne offers this adorable love birds linoprint on Etsy.

stay over toothbrush pendant by plastic seconds
On the recycled jewellery front how about this jokey Stay Over toothbrush necklace from Plastic Seconds? Also seen in the ICA shop.

Prick Your Finger hearts
Prick Your Finger offer these lovely knitted wool hearts that were knitted by Mary in the Shetlands: a steal at £4.50

Rob Ryan Valentines
He’s the king of romantic whimsy so I felt duty bound to include the now obligatory Rob Ryan laser cut piece Can We Shall We – miraculously there appear to still be some of these in stock at Soma Gallery. Grab em whilst you can.

Valentines fisheye camera by Gemma Smith
Valentines fisheye camera by Gemma Smith.

Lomography have brought out a special edition Diana F+ camera encrusted in naked people and a Fisheye 2 in syrupy sweet pink. If your lover is not yet a hipstamatic aficionado now may might be a good time for them to try analogue again.

I Heart Music by Liz Lewis
I Heart Music by Liz Lewis.

Flowers would never ever go amiss… so long as they haven’t been flown in from some beleaguered country far away.

LOVE by Lou Cloud
LOVE by Lou Cloud.

And I like jewellery. Don’t know why. I just do. I think it’s something about the fact that a treasured piece can be worn almost all the time as a reminder of someone’s devotion, which is why I respond very well to delicate pieces… particularly in gold.

Laura Gravestock
Love these rose gold pieces by Laura Gravestock, and quite reasonably priced too.

Peppermint Patty. An oil painting by Artist Andrea
Peppermint Patty. An oil painting by Artist Andrea.

Speaking of which, the much anticipated UK Fairtrade ethical gold standard came into force only yesterday, so here’s hoping that it will soon become very much easier to buy luxury jewellery that is made without harm to people or planet. Because, after all, where’s the love in that?

Oria-blossom-bird
Over at EC One ethical jewellery brand Oria (featured in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration) offer their lovely lovebird earrings – as illustrated in my book. Purrrrfect, and they come with a totally clear conscience.

Finally, if you’re looking for something to do that’s a bit out of the ordinary, how about a trip to the Museum of Everything to see the current Peter Blake curated exhibition for the last time? There will be things to watch all over the weekend, including live music, and a film showing.

Je t'aime by Anieszka Banks
Je t’aime by Anieszka Banks.

The School for Life is well known for hosting some ever so intriguing seminars. On February 14th they ask:
Who’d be in a relationship?
At its best, love can make us deliriously happy. At worst, it makes us more miserable than anything on earth. It robs us of our autonomy, freedom and financial independence. It can bring disillusion, heartbreak and betrayal.
Who’d be single?
We’re confined to the prison of our established and frequently very boring selves. At best, singleness allows us to be free agents, able to fulfill our desires. At worst, it drags us down to the depths of loneliness. It robs us of intimacy, personal engagement, and an understanding that true happiness is about giving oneself away. 

Paris by Joanna Faria
Paris by Joana Faria.

So why not book an evening with author Simon Critchley? He’ll be talking at The School for Life which is located at 70 Marchmont Street, London WC1N 1AB.

Elliott_Quince_Linocut_illustration Quinky Art
And if you’re still feeling a bit grumpy about the whole affair how about this free downloadable Zombie Valentines lino cut from Quinky Art?

No pressure on the boyfriend at all then. But between this lot there’s a little something for everyone don’t you think? Especially the ladies amongst us…

emma_block_Oria_jewellery
Oria Lovebird necklace as featured in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. Illustration by Emma Block.

You can read more about my abysmal love life in my Valentines blog post from 2010.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Adam Smith, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Anieszka Banks, ,Ankolie, ,Artist Andrea, ,Becca Thorne, ,Bex Glover, ,Can We Shall We, ,Diana F+, ,EC One, ,Emma Block, ,Ethical Gold, ,etsy, ,fairtrade, ,Fisheye 2, ,Flowers, ,Gemma Smith, ,gifts, ,Gold, ,hearts, ,ica, ,Je t’aime, ,Jenny Lloyd, ,Jenny Robins, ,jewellery, ,Joana Faria, ,Laura Gravestock, ,Liz Lewis, ,Lou Cloud, ,Museum of Everything, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Oria, ,Peacock Heart, ,Peter Blake, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Prick your Finger, ,Quinky Art, ,rob ryan, ,Simon Critchley, ,Society 6, ,Soma Gallery, ,The School of Life, ,Valentine’s Day

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Amelia’s Magazine | Prangsta Costumiers – In Pictures

large_Caitlin_Rose

Illustrations by Emma Black

In a genre steeped in tradition, seek Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, information pills Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, pills her voice rings clear and true, viagra 60mg especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, thumb Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, see her voice rings clear and true, viagra especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, viagra approved Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, doctor Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, sildenafil her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th. Recently we emailed Caitlin a bunch of questions, to find out a little bit more about the twenty-three year old girl who is already drawing comparisons to Patsy Cline.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Minna S/S 2010, here illustrated by Yelena Bryksenkova

Ever uttered the words “I’d love to make my own clothes” but then never actually got round to it? Well you wouldn’t be alone, ampoule myself included. I have the basic skills and desire to want to make my own clothes but find it so easy not to do when you succumb to the call of vintage and second hand shops. The impulse and excitement of rummaging makes you forget your previous desire to be your own individual stylist. But moving into the world of creator actually has massive satisfaction and many bragging benefits.  

There have been so many beautiful trends this summer to inspire us but the one that stood out the most to anyone who is thinking of making their own clothing is lace.

Lace is everywhere, on the catwalks, on the high street, and even on our net curtains! Grannies worldwide will have a stash of vintage lace table cloths and curtains prime for the picking to create beautiful one off designs (Which your friends will never be able to copy), and will please your eco-conscience. 


Illustration by Naomi Law

The high street is a great start for inspiration for design, but there are also some amazing individual finds on the internet too. Check out eco-designer Minna Hepburn; her ‘Minna Classics’ collection is a treasure trove of gorgeous lace designs, feminine and playful, and all manufactured in the UK to help support local businesses. If you’re thinking of starting small, Minna offers inspiration not only in clothing but jewellery too, her ‘Kristiina‘ necklace is entirely hand made and created using recycled fabrics including lace and decorated with buttons and beads, something we could all aspire to do. 

When your creativity has peaked and your fingers are itching with excitement for what your about make, head over to www.instructables.com. this website has pretty much anything you could hope to make on it. Blog updates allow you to fill your days by becoming a crafty expert – not only with lace, you can expand your skills to run on for seasons with the amount of ideas and tutorials.

If your still needing that shopping fix, though – as so many of us do, head down to your local second hand book shop where your most likely to find some great new and old pattern books, where you can cut out the patterns and follow the instructions in detail. 


Illustration by Faye West

Whatever you decide to make enjoy the pleasure of creating your own one off, hand made pieces of clothing. It’s time to start paying visits to your friends and families, wardrobes, cupboards, lofts, and basements, for the treasures you never knew you had. Just remember though, – wait until your grannies have finished with their lace net curtains before you start cutting holes in them and fashioning them into on-trend emsembles!  


Lace detail (and one above) by Yelena Bryksenkova

Look out for an interview with Minna soon… but for now, check out our previous chat with her here.


Prangsta, stuff illustrated by Joana Faria

Now, visit web here’s a treat. Hopefully you caught Georgia Takacs’ wonderful insight into the awe-inspiring world of Prangsta Costumiers last week: the celebrated (if somewhat unconventional) Alice in Wonderland-esque bazaar in New Cross.

Now I would never in a million years suggest that readers of Amelia’s Magazine come to the site just to look at pretty pictures, what with our bursting-at-the-seams stock of fabulous writers, but in order to bring a little sunshine and entertainment to a so far grey Wednesday, feast your eyes on some glorious images and illustrations from Prangsta.

Georgia, who wrote the article, took part in a shoot with the team there, capturing the many faces that pass through the doors and even more of the craft-packed corners of this wonderful find. So here they are. I’m convinced you could look at this place all day and never get bored – I hope you agree!


Illustration by Krister Selin

The latest shoot focuses on a somewhat macabre Snow White, shown with an array of weird and wonderful friends:






Illustration by Rachel de Ste. Croix

Prangsta also worked with ethereal fashion photographer Ellen Rogers, and the result is astonishing. Rogers’ photographs make heavy use of photographic techniques from long ago, evoking (for me at least) images of Marlene Dietrich in Hot Venus and the eery portraits of death popular in the Victorian age. Whatever they evoke, this marriage of Prangsta and Rogers is incredible.




Photographs by Ellen Rogers

To read the original article about the wonderful world of Prangsta, click here.

Categories ,Alice in Wonderland, ,Dwarves, ,Ellen Rogers, ,Georgia Takacs, ,illustration, ,Joana Faria, ,Krister Selin, ,Lion, ,london, ,Matt Bramford, ,New Cross, ,photography, ,Prangsta Costumiers, ,Rachel De Ste. Croix, ,snow white

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)


Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, salve visit this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewelery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, nurse everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, recipe a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery, the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Andrea Peterson

As part of Designers Remix, shop designer Charlotte Eskildsen, discount who is creative director of the enterprise published their signature collection last week. After winning the prestigious Danish Design Guldknappen award she has become a force to be reckoned with in international fashion since starting the line in 2002. Her S/S 2011 collection ‘Liquid Sky’ is inspired by cloud formations.

Draped fabrics. Origami folds. A flash orange dress. Scraped back hair tied in tight knots. The show, diagnosis held in the Portico rooms was one of my favourites of the week. Like many others, it stuck strongly to a muted colour range, beginning with pieces in greys, creams and blacks. Small details like the delicate lace insets and just-seen underskirts pulled the collection together extremely well.

Charlotte’s skill lies in how well she collects the fabric together and makes it hang. Ruffles on the shoulders of her cream dresses are restrained and kept from looking fussy, the great bright orange dress (which I desperately want) is understated in all other ways bar the colour and the waterfall collars on the jackets carried the theme of softness through even on heavier fabrics.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The clothes ranged from smart black dresses, to sand toned wafty jackets and ruffled party frocks in various shades of cream. This is a collection that is just good. I can’t put my finger on an exact feature or piece that puts it into a higher category for me and I think that’s why I like it.

More than just a wearable summer collection, it mars together a floaty casual look with added details of specialness without being over the top. If I wanted to sound very fashiony I would call it perfect ‘understated chic’, but hopefully I’ve described it better than that!


Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being banded around the press releases this season – it sappears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposidly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, information pills an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, price the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such has Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases this season – it appears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, physician an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, more about the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s ‘Africa’ inspired show. This season there was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases – it appears designers forget Africa is not simply ‘Africa’ but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, prescription an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, try the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, pills Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?


Illustration by Joana Faria

On Tuesday night Amelia, approved myself and Zandra Rhodes met at the Freemason’s Hall to attend the FAD Junior Fashion Awards. Well, advice Zandra was there, adiposity across the catwalk, she didn’t technically ARRIVE with us. We’d been invited by email: an email that was gushing in gratitude for the work we had done to support this charity. I am ashamed to admit that I didn’t have a clue what this lovely lady was talking about – there’s so much good stuff on here that I occasionally miss the odd article. But Fran from FAD was happy, and I was to attend!

The usual beginning ensued – I quiverred in the background having forgotten my ticket while Amelia dragged me by the arm, kicking and screaming, onto the front row. I have to say that I am finally starting to get used to all this and by the A/W 2012 shows I’ll be poised at the front of the queues, shoulders back, sunglasses on, marching to the front.

The Freemason’s was absolutely boiling as always (please sort some air conditioning out for next year, VFS!). In fact, somebody should have supplied fans in goodie bags. Imagine! You could show bin bags covered in sh*t and people would say nice things if you kept them cool.

Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) are a charity who work with young people to give them the confidence to get into fashion. Where do I sign up?! One of last year’s students, Prash Muraleetharan, delivered the most inspirational speech that I was almost in tears, and the show hadn’t even started. Amelia and I scrambled to write down what he had said. All this before we’d seen a single badly made dressed or batiked skirt (as I imagined).


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Amelia and I continually remarked throughout the show about how young these budding designers were. I can honestly say that there was very little difference between this show and those on the BFC catwalk (you know, the on-schedule one that is supposedly the creme-de-la-creme of current British fashion).

You can read Amelia’s full report here. I couldn’t make head nor tail of who was who – the looks appeared, the names changed so quickly, and the running order was in the wrong order. AND, to top it off, it was impossible to take pictures because a certain somebody kept telling me off for getting in the way. Tehe.

This year’s theme had been inspired by the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries at the V&A, which was evident on the catwalk, but not in a typically student way by any means. When the theme was announced, before the show, I thought ‘Oh hear we go – cue silly headgear and bucket top boots’. No such thing – the inspiration had been handled with such sophistication that it acted as a discrete point of reference rather than a fancy dress theme.

So to the winners. The winning collection was David Short’s medieval emerald number, crowning him the first boy ever to scoop the coveted prize.


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

My favourite was Andre Augusto’s body-con number with exaggerated sleeves and strap detail – an Alexander McQueen in the making.

Sarah Kilkenny’s simple a-line dress with rope detail scooped the Award for Research.

Karmen-Marie Parker burst into tears when Zandra Rhodes (my Zandra) presented her with the award for Commercial Innovation – her sports-luxe denim creation had real style.

A totally inspirational show, which reduced me to tears and left me reeling. In amongst all the ridiculous ludicrousness of fashion week, this was the perfect antidote.

Oh do pop over to Amelia’s review because she’s far more diligent than I am and has listed all the other fabulous youngsters and their creations – and has more gratuitous shots of MY Zandra for your delectation. Oh and here’s a video, in which you can probably see me blubbing somewhere on the left…

Photography by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford

Categories ,Aniela Murphy, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Awareness Direct, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Joana Faria, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,M&S, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)


Illustration by Joana Faria

On Tuesday night Amelia, myself and Zandra Rhodes met at the Freemason’s Hall to attend the FAD Junior Fashion Awards. Well, Zandra was there, across the catwalk, she didn’t technically ARRIVE with us. We’d been invited by email: an email that was gushing in gratitude for the work we had done to support this charity. I am ashamed to admit that I didn’t have a clue what this lovely lady was talking about – there’s so much good stuff on here that I occasionally miss the odd article. But Fran from FAD was happy, and I was to attend!

The usual beginning ensued – I quiverred in the background having forgotten my ticket while Amelia dragged me by the arm, kicking and screaming, onto the front row. I have to say that I am finally starting to get used to all this and by the A/W 2012 shows I’ll be poised at the front of the queues, shoulders back, sunglasses on, marching to the front.

The Freemason’s was absolutely boiling as always (please sort some air conditioning out for next year, VFS!). In fact, somebody should have supplied fans in goodie bags. Imagine! You could show bin bags covered in sh*t and people would say nice things if you kept them cool.

Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) are a charity who work with young people to give them the confidence to get into fashion. Where do I sign up?! One of last year’s students, Prash Muraleetharan, delivered the most inspirational speech that I was almost in tears, and the show hadn’t even started. Amelia and I scrambled to write down what he had said. All this before we’d seen a single badly made dressed or batiked skirt (as I imagined).


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Amelia and I continually remarked throughout the show about how young these budding designers were. I can honestly say that there was very little difference between this show and those on the BFC catwalk (you know, the on-schedule one that is supposedly the creme-de-la-creme of current British fashion).

You can read Amelia’s full report here. I couldn’t make head nor tail of who was who – the looks appeared, the names changed so quickly, and the running order was in the wrong order. AND, to top it off, it was impossible to take pictures because a certain somebody kept telling me off for getting in the way. Tehe.

This year’s theme had been inspired by the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries at the V&A, which was evident on the catwalk, but not in a typically student way by any means. When the theme was announced, before the show, I thought ‘Oh hear we go – cue silly headgear and bucket top boots’. No such thing – the inspiration had been handled with such sophistication that it acted as a discrete point of reference rather than a fancy dress theme.

So to the winners. The winning collection was David Short’s medieval emerald number, crowning him the first boy ever to scoop the coveted prize.


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

My favourite was Andre Augusto’s body-con number with exaggerated sleeves and strap detail – an Alexander McQueen in the making.

Sarah Kilkenny’s simple a-line dress with rope detail scooped the Award for Research.

Karmen-Marie Parker burst into tears when Zandra Rhodes (my Zandra) presented her with the award for Commercial Innovation – her sports-luxe denim creation had real style.

A totally inspirational show, which reduced me to tears and left me reeling. In amongst all the ridiculous ludicrousness of fashion week, this was the perfect antidote.

Oh do pop over to Amelia’s review because she’s far more diligent than I am and has listed all the other fabulous youngsters and their creations – and has more gratuitous shots of MY Zandra for your delectation. Oh and here’s a video, in which you can probably see me blubbing somewhere on the left…

Photography by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford

Categories ,Aniela Murphy, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Awareness Direct, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Joana Faria, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,M&S, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Behind the Scenes: Elisa Palomino

Elisa Palomino - SS 12 LFW by Amber Cassidy

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

If you’ve read my Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 preview interview with the designer, viagra sale you’ll know I’m already in love with her designs. The designer had invited me to pop backstage before the show to view her spring/summer collection up close and as I’d not experienced before, prostate the behind the scenes affairs of a fashion show, my curiosity was most definitely piqued!

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Zooming past the infinite queue at Vauxhall Fashion Scout, I am escorted backstage by the lovely people of Blow PR, to the organised chaos of the catwalk performance in construction. I’m told Elisa is preoccupied right now, but if I return after the show, I may speak to her then. In the meantime, I decide to hover for a while, take in the scene and take some pictures.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS 12 LFW by Joana Faria

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

With about twenty odd statuesque and fat free women towering over me, I’m feeling a little like a munchkin, but they look as nervous as I’m feeling, so I smile in support and swoon over their exaggerated 1920s style make-up and exquisite head-pieces. One minute they’re having their make-up applied and the next they’ve changed into one of Elisa’s opulent garments; everything is moving dizzyingly fast and the anticipation is transparent.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

I spy Elisa, attired in her signature pink and adorning a pretty floral head-piece – she flits from one model to another, making sure all is as it should be. I realise I may be getting in the way as the phrase “excuse me” is directed at me for the umpteenth time and so I withdraw from the orderly pandemonium and retreat to the beautiful amphitheatre to await the performance.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW by Hannah Hope

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

Read my review of the Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 catwalk show.

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

Categories ,1920s, ,1930s, ,A Fairy Dance, ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Angel Amor, ,Appliqué, ,Article, ,backstage, ,behind the scenes, ,bird cage, ,BLOW online, ,Blow PR, ,Bobbin, ,catwalk show, ,Christian Dior, ,Diane Von Furstenberg, ,Elisa Palomino, ,embroidery, ,Emma Block, ,Flapper, ,gabby young, ,Gabby Young and Other Animals, ,Gilly Rochester, ,hair pieces, ,Hannah Hope, ,head dress, ,Hummingbirds, ,interview, ,Japanese art, ,Joana Faria, ,John Galliano, ,Lan Nguyen, ,Lillies, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madrid, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Pre-Raphaelites, ,qa, ,queues, ,review, ,Roaring Twenties, ,Roberto Cavalli, ,S/S 2012, ,Spiga 2, ,The Body Shop, ,Tony & Guy, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Victorian Fairy Painting Movement, ,vintage, ,Yamato-e

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Behind the Scenes: Elisa Palomino

Elisa Palomino - SS 12 LFW by Amber Cassidy

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

If you’ve read my Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 preview interview with the designer, you’ll know I’m already in love with her designs. The designer had invited me to pop backstage before the show to view her spring/summer collection up close and as I’d not experienced before, the behind the scenes affairs of a fashion show, my curiosity was most definitely piqued!

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Zooming past the infinite queue at Vauxhall Fashion Scout, I am escorted backstage by the lovely people of Blow PR, to the organised chaos of the catwalk performance in construction. I’m told Elisa is preoccupied right now, but if I return after the show, I may speak to her then. In the meantime, I decide to hover for a while, take in the scene and take some pictures.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS 12 LFW by Joana Faria

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

With about twenty odd statuesque and fat free women towering over me, I’m feeling a little like a munchkin, but they look as nervous as I’m feeling, so I smile in support and swoon over their exaggerated 1920s style make-up and exquisite head-pieces. One minute they’re having their make-up applied and the next they’ve changed into one of Elisa’s opulent garments; everything is moving dizzyingly fast and the anticipation is transparent.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW Backstage by Akeela Bhattay

I spy Elisa, attired in her signature pink and adorning a pretty floral head-piece – she flits from one model to another, making sure all is as it should be. I realise I may be getting in the way as the phrase “excuse me” is directed at me for the umpteenth time and so I withdraw from the orderly pandemonium and retreat to the beautiful amphitheatre to await the performance.

Elisa Palomino SS12 LFW by Hannah Hope

Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

Read my review of the Elisa Palomino S/S 2012 catwalk show.

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

Categories ,1920s, ,1930s, ,A Fairy Dance, ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Angel Amor, ,Appliqué, ,Article, ,backstage, ,behind the scenes, ,bird cage, ,BLOW online, ,Blow PR, ,Bobbin, ,catwalk show, ,Christian Dior, ,Diane Von Furstenberg, ,Elisa Palomino, ,embroidery, ,Emma Block, ,Flapper, ,gabby young, ,Gabby Young and Other Animals, ,Gilly Rochester, ,hair pieces, ,Hannah Hope, ,head dress, ,Hummingbirds, ,interview, ,Japanese art, ,Joana Faria, ,John Galliano, ,Lan Nguyen, ,Lillies, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madrid, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Pre-Raphaelites, ,qa, ,queues, ,review, ,Roaring Twenties, ,Roberto Cavalli, ,S/S 2012, ,Spiga 2, ,The Body Shop, ,Tony & Guy, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Victorian Fairy Painting Movement, ,vintage, ,Yamato-e

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