Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Lako Bukia

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Being ushered past the growing queues for Lakio Bukia and presented with the offer to take a seat, approved I’m suddenly transported back to one of my very first catwalk shows and my very first front row experience at London Fashion Week earlier this year. Lako Bukia’s A/W 2011 collection captivated me with its rich use of colour, price flattering fabrics and innovative design and I had thoroughly enjoyed the show (read my review of the Lako Bukia A/W 2011 CHOXA collection) so I was excited to see the designer’s presentation of her S/S 2012 collection.

Crowd at Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

I’ve read Lako Bukia’s S/S 2012 Preview Interview with Amelia’s Magazine, help so I have an inkling of what to expect, but that hasn’t diluted my interest at all; in fact I’m further intrigued, and eager for the show to commence. The auditorium is filling up rapidly and I observe the melting pot of characters gathered at the Fashion Scout venue. A group of splendidly preened and styled front-row fashionistas chat animatedly from across the room, willing for someone to take their picture. So I do, as one does.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

The dimming of the lights signals the start of the show and the now crowded arena settles into silence inviting the first model to glide on to the runway. The Lako Bukia ethos promises to create beautiful clothing for all women and I champion Lako’s commitment to continue the upholding of that code. The unrestrictive blouses and sweeping skirts hold the potential to flatter all body shapes.

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The contentious subject of the sexualisation of femininity is something Lako Bukia isn’t afraid to challenge and I love that about her. Lako attempts to change the attitudes of men and women alike, regarding the two seemingly inextricably entwined identities that are synonymous with figure-hugging and revealing clothing. With her designs, Lako Bukia effectively demonstrates that women can look and feel feminine and sexy in garments that do not simply focus on body shape. In Lako Bukia‘s interview with Amelia, she says ‘the women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape’ and I’m inclined to agree.

Lako-Bukia - LFW (SS-2012) by-Barb-Royal

Lako-Bukia - LFW SS-2012 by-Barb-Royal

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Barb Royal.

For her spring/summer collection, Lako Bukia has chosen a palette of bold, contrasting colours that reflect her often, kaleidoscopic personality; black, red, white and shades of grey paint the pieces for this season’s crop. The black and white eye make-up adheres to the theme as do the neat and up-do hairstyles.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 LFW by Hannah Hope

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Hannah Hope

It’s the first time Lako Bukia is using print and her hand painted Asian inspired flowers and trees shroud the billowing chiffon and silk pieces. The Asian inspiration is further exposed in the mandarin collars adorning many of the blouses and dresses. My favourite detail is the neat row of tiny fabric covered buttons, reminiscent of the 1930s, placed on a variety of positions, most notably on the structured bodices and on the seams of the Jodhpur like trousers. The gathered waistline is also a trending theme in the collection.

Lako Bukia - London Fashion Week S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The catwalk is performed in a unique fashion, which is fantastic for those sitting closer to the end of the runway, but as I’m not, getting a decent photo is a lot to ask for. I do hope the choreography for next year’s shows revert back to a simpler style (or I learn to position myself more strategically).

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Lako Bukia SS 2012 London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

Photography by Amelia Gregory

The talented designer has decidedly stated that her new collection will be one that is wearable and saleable and with the beautiful garments swishing past me on the catwalk, I undoubtedly recognise this to be true. The commercial element of fashion has obviously penetrated the creative process, but Lako Bukia’s unique branding has not been diminished. However, I do hope too see a spark of the former eccentricity of the brand in future designs.

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Lako Bukia - S/S 2012 London Fashion Week by Akeela Bhattay

Photography by Akeela Bhattay

As the show comes to an end the sweet Georgian designer takes to the catwalk, to be applauded enthusiastically by her audience.

Watch the show here.

Lako Bukia SS12 Full Show from VAUXHALL FASHION SCOUT on Vimeo.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Article, ,Asian, ,Barb Royal, ,black, ,Blog Post, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Felicities PR, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Grey, ,Hand Painted, ,Hannah Hope, ,Images, ,japanese, ,Joana Faria, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Photos, ,print, ,Red, ,review, ,S/S 2012, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,trees, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,White

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Emilio de la Morena (by Helen)

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, store illness whole foods, order and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, ed before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, dosage no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes. In fact, treatment maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, order in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. None, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Faberge eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in both print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate this type of vision onto clothing.
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, information pills LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, information pills whole foods, clinic and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, viagra buy LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, store whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here : http://audio.talitres.com/thelaw. Download now.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, approved no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes. In fact, maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. None, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in both print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate this type of vision onto clothing.
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Lesley Barnes.

On arrival at the Topshop space in Billingsgate for Mary Katrantzou I pulled up my Pashley beneath a phalanx of official LFW cars and blacked out big name magazine people carriers. I usually find it takes me approximately the same amount of time to race between venues on my bike alongside said official cars, illness no doubt being looked down upon by wealthy magazines’ fashion editors from behind those blacked out panes, order but maybe I should post an ode to my preferred transport, link in much the same vein that Susie Bubble has been posting about her sponsored Orla Kiely car?

Pashley
My Pashley locked up outside Somerset House.

I love cycling but it was a struggle – as usual – to lock my bike against a post without it, me and my cycling pannier capsizing in an (un)attractive pile. At times like these I very much hope I’m not being watched by those who are able to elegantly descend from their car in vertiginous heels.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

We were only granted one ticket to Mary Katrantzou, beautifully pearlised and colourfully printed on heavy card. Clearly then, there was no chance that anyone else was going to lay their hands on it. Having scoped the layout during Michael Van Der Ham the day before I headed straight for what I considered the best position in the cavernous hall and discovered that I was sitting next to the proud mother of Mary’s right hand man, one Alexander Giantsis, also of Greek extraction… she quickly voiced her motherly worries about her son’s lack of sleep. That would be none then, the night before.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Mira Tazkia.

My spot proved the perfect place to capture the models as they swung around to face the bank of cameras right at the end of the looong catwalk. Mum Stephanie kept up a running commentary as I tried to concentrate on capturing the clothes whirring past me at the hyper fast pace that has characterised the catwalk shows this season.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Jessica Singh.

Despite her own concerns that she’s pushing the parameters of what people will wear Mary Katrantzou has quickly built up a glowing reputation for her clashing prints and clever architectural constructions. Last season she took architecture as her starting point but this time she looked to interiors, quoting the Marchesa Luisa Casati in her press release: “I want to be a living work of art.”

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Clever hooping was attached at waist level to create a kind of riser inspired by the shape of vases, Fabergé eggs and porcelain bowls – beautiful, but the kind of thing that only the thinnest of girls can get away with wearing. More successful for bigger girls would be the wide hipped dresses, curved shoulders and over skirts that stood proud from the figure. Clashing prints inspired by “priceless objets d’art” were cut and merged to create a profusion of pattern and colour in print, embroidery and intarsia knits.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana FariaMary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

One dress featured an extraordinary skirt covered in three dimensional roses in a diagonal pattern – certainly not for the faint hearted… or those who would like to be comfortable when sitting down. Towards the end a series of chiffon skirts swept onto the catwalk, billowing dramatically around the figure.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011 by Sarah Matthews.

This A/W show was everything I had hoped for: Mary Katrantzou, a fashion designer after my own maximalist heart. I’m so glad that someone out there is confident enough to translate my type of design onto clothing.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMary Katrantzou A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mary Katrantzou A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more fashion illustration by Lesley Barnes in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, discount LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, stomach whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, illness LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, drug LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, information pills whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. And here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, salve whole foods, and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emily Jane White by LJG Art & Illustration
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, case LG Illustration

I know that folk music isn’t all organic, ampoule whole foods, see and love – or indeed deep lust – buried in a haystack. Happy all day, before campfires and passions at night. No, folk musicians don’t spend their days wearing slightly grubby lumberjacks or floaty, ethereal frocks. See evidence: Grizzly Bear aren’t happy all the time and Bon Iver is a delightfully melancholy chap. And then just listen to Nick Drake and young Laura Marling. To be honest I’m not really sure where I got the skippy, clappy, dancing in the hazy afternoon sunshine vision from. Perhaps it’s because folk artists tend to sing about the earth, nature and love in one breath. There is no chat of ‘honeys’ or ‘bling’. Gah, And of course, folkers may be generally creative and appreciative of the natural world, but it in no means leaves them exempt of sadness, hurt and darkness. I wonder, does it in actual fact make them more open and adept to describing their feelings than the blingers? Regardless, folk is often as rhythmic and warming as the grandfather clock that my 40s’ Grandpa chopped the bottom of, to fit in his house. Tick, tock. Folk is cosy and true, which is why it feels so pure – which is why it makes me want to reside in a yurt.

Emily Jane White - Sarah Matthews
Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Let me introduce you to Emily Jane White. The PR sheet in-front of me says that her album is: ‘a collection of ten opulent, uncluttered and captivating ballads.’ A friend asked me other day, “If you had to only use one adjective for the rest of your life, what would it be?” If I was a news writer, I would say: “Peh, what even are adjectives?”. As a PR I would pass out. Whilst as a writer of my own devices, I would say – ‘blissful’. Then I could put ‘anti’ in-front of a word perhaps. Awkward. Anyway, off on a tangent again: Emily Jane White’s music is BLISSFUL.

See:

She is melancholy. But in the way that makes you feel perhaps strangely, very contented. Maybe it is because in a sense Emily is making peace with herself and her thoughts through the act of writing her music. She said that she found writing her latest album, Ode To Sentience, out now on Talitres Records, cathartic to write: “They speak to the emotional simplicity and complexity of human relationship. I chose to call the record Ode To Sentience because it is the capacity to feel that creates a share human experience of music. We all share the potency of music by having the capacity to feel, and I found the simplicity of this fact very beautiful.”

‘Tis true.

emily Jane White
Illustration by Laura Godfrey, LG Illustration

Her album is about leaving home, her’s was California – I Lay To Rest (California) – the drawn out strings longing to leave. The sharper notes; the sadness of leaving it. Clipped Wings is ghostly and full of yearning, reflections of love’s passed. The Cliff holds classic American twangs, whilst Oh Katherine, is a string filled heaven of a song. Her voice is as soft and delicate as a peach, whilst her fearless approach to singing from the darker depths of her consciousness matches the strings perfectly.

She is much like a Californian Kate Bush, but less obviously ethereal and screaming. Or she could be a gentler Alela Diane or singular Mountain Man. Black Silk has to be my personal favourite. The Law is guitar based, slow and… actually quite a lot like my Grandpa’s Grandfather clock. It wraps you up. Says it’s all ok. For a little bit of this, here we have ‘The Law’, for you to download for free: here. Download it now.

Emily Jane White’s Album, Ode to Sentience is available now on Talitres Records.

Emilio de la Morena by Faye West
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Illustration by Faye West

Apparently Emilio de la Morena has lengthened his silhouette. His pieces are now touching, viagra sale or over the knee, nurse ‘signalling a new direction that is stricter and more refined.’ The body con is still there of course, thumb remaining tighter than a wetsuit, and both wigglier and feistier than Mad Men’s, Joan. That’s exactly what the collection made me think of: Joan and Jessica Rabbit. This translates to: HOT… but sophisticated.

Red Charlotte Olympia shoes featured throughout the show. Now, I’ve always been a fan of red shoes. From ballet to sky scraping, red shoes are sweet vixens, minxes, all playful and naughty. But less; “stop it Roger” and more; “Roger I want champagne, oysters and Chanel. Get them!” She needs a man, not a wimp. She will wear her shoes in the bath, and probably won’t speak to Roger much before or after – whatever happens between them. She’s an old school dressed WOMAN, not a girl, and she expects to be treated with respect. Like the stroppier ones in James Bond films, this woman can kick some ass. And answer back with cutting looks and witty, snappy words.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Other Charlotte Olympia shoes included a suede ankle boot and platform sandals in three colours, black, red, powder pink and ivory. All utterly lust-worthy. Heaven. The colour palette mirrors Emilio de la Morena Autumn/Winter collection, which focuses on black, dark purple and RED. The sombre tones of this show, inspired by the work of the American photographer Francesca Woodman and the circumstances surrounding her suicide in New York, in 1981, aged just 22. Her photographs are hauntingly beautiful and predominantly black and white. Emilio de la Morena wanted to reflect these sad circumstances, with his use of passionate, bruised and mourning colours. These give way however, to ivory and powder pink, making for delicate prettiness, next to the block melancholy. Together, the designs look classy, serious and fantastic. I see these beautiful women by the graves of Italian gangsters, weeping. They are hard, stunning and controlled, but what they love – they adore with all their hearts.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Victoriana also featured within Emilio de la Morena’s collection, but with a modern, sheer twist. Bib decoration and high necklines created from sheer, frayed and tufted organza, make it lighter, sexier and contemporary. The longer length, wool pencil skirts also featured sheer organza. With panels, embroidered in swirling, zig zagging ribbon, created in the material, as well as silk inserts. The additions allowing for fluidity of movement.

The collection felt serious and respectfully attractive. Not flirty, terribly young, overly romantic or precocious. Instead very sensual and confident. The red stole the show. However, like red lipstick on a make up less face, it looked the most alluring, when it was paired with the other other colours. The eyes and lips are too much – alone they are beautiful. Such a bright red needed the other colours to avoid being lost, and to stand out as a solitary statement. And you know, if the three women were sobbing by the grave, each with an accent of red, just imagine… scandalous, stylish, powerful and mysterious RED.

Categories ,Amelia Gregory, ,BFC Catwalk Space, ,Charlotte Olympia, ,Christina Hendricks, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Faye West, ,Feminine, ,Helen Martin, ,Hot, ,Italian, ,Jessica Rabbit, ,ladylike, ,lfw, ,LFW 2011, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mad Men, ,Melancholy, ,photography, ,Red, ,Victoriana

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jean Pierre Braganza (by Matt)

After the safety of school, stuff facing the real world can make artists feel a bit lost – this is why the working artists at the Core Gallery started ‘DIY Educate’. Starting from Saturday 26th February, this there will be workshops, prostate critiques and lectures to help with the practical aspects of art life.

Rosalind Davis

‘I came out of five years of education with a BA and an MA, but I still didn’t know where to begin when it came to knowing how the art world works,’ says Rosalind Davis, co-director of the Core Gallery. A lot of people who graduated university with an arts or humanities degree are likely to identify with this sentiment; while art school is good for finding your voice, it’s not so good when it comes to teaching you about running a business. This is where Rosalind, and her fellow Core Gallery artists, hope to be able to help.

Enver Gursev

The Core Gallery was set up in April 2010, and puts on exhibitions by emerging curators. ‘We want to be a dynamic, exploratory space,’ says Rosalind. Their DIY Educate programme kicks off this spring, focusing firmly on ‘what they don’t teach you in school’: how to apply for an exhibition, how to sell your work, how to approach a gallery. The workshops will also go over how to find grants, or how to find an arts-related side-job to keep food on the table. One-on-one tutorials are also part of the package, with esteemed painter Graham Crowley offering his honest opinion for starters, with more names to be added. ‘There will also be peer critique sessions, and the opportunity to exchange ideas in a friendly place’, says Rosalind, emphasising how the most important thing is to create a space where artists feel nurtured.

Graham Crowley

‘Lots of art school practice is about the concept and processes of art, and there is less focus on the business side,’ says Rosalind. ‘But artists can be shy about marketing themselves, and they will often need encouragement.’

I ask Rosalind why the business side this isn’t covered better in school, and she says it’s difficult to say, but part of the reason may be that artist teachers in university may not be that great at promoting themselves either. She lectures about the business side of art herself, but she thinks it should be a mandatory subject to better prepare students for what’s to come.

Arnold Borgerth

DIY Educate will include talks by curators and artists, plus practical workshops. Membership costs £18 per year, granting free or reduced price access to events. Non-members can attend too, paying full price. DIY Educate is a not-for-profit programme that receives no independent funding, and Rosalind hopes to be able to expand offerings as things get going.

Elizabeth Murton

The programme kicks off this Saturday, 26th February, with a peer critique sesson followed by an artist and curator dialogue. On Tuesday night, 1st March, there will be a ‘nuts and bolt’ workshop on how to be an artist.

‘We plan to have one of these ‘nuts and bolts’ workshop every other month or so, plus a series of art workshops through the spring and summer,’ Rosalind explains. Initially the gallery plans to have two tutorials a month, but this could grow as more artists join Graham Crowley in offering them.

All images courtesy of Core Gallery and its resident artists.

The DIY Educate website is here – find the Core Gallery in Deptford: C101 Faircharm Trading Estate, 8-12 Creekside, London SE8 3DX

Illustration by Joana Faria

If I ever meet Jean Pierre Braganza in person, buy I might give him a little squeeze. His A/W 2011 show on Friday leaps right into my top 5 – and I’m writing this at the end of a very long and pretty stressful Day 3.

One of my favourite things during fashion week is getting to see interesting buildings that I never knew existed and wouldn’t normally take the slightest interest in. Braganza’s show was to take place at the ‘Show Space‘ – part of one of those centuries-old hotels with Baroque interiors and branded soaps. Me and Amelia skipped the queue and sneaked inside to find the most beautiful chandeliers and lots of OTT dressed punters. The actual room in which the show was to take place was equally as decadent, save for the make-shift catwalk that looked like it could topple at any second – and the tiny gap down the side of said catwalk through which we all had to squeeze. ‘I predict a bottle neck’ I thought as we entered, and my premonition came true on the way out.


Illustrations by Krister Selin

A little wait ensued while it was ensured that every inch of carpet had somebody to occupy it, so I took a few snaps of the room and got a bit excited about the juxtaposition of this past interior and Braganza’s future aesthetic.

On with the show with bangin’ beats and gorgeous models wearing more gorgeous clothes. Masculine tailoring appeared first, dynamically cut and decorated with a transfixing splatter pattern in tonal greys. This pattern was set to become a theme, appearing in both menswear and womenswear. After only a few pieces I instantly thought that Braganza’s collections are always meticulous and polished – rich, full fabrics are combined with unique cuts and expert craftsmanship – the entire collection was technically faultless.

Models appeared one after the other, pausing a third of the way down the catwalk so we could all get a good look. I like this set up – much better for pictures (and I’ve really struggled with pictures this season – bloody A/W and it’s sea of dark colours).


Illustrations by Krister Selin

Branganza took the collection forward concentrating on luxe materials that have high aesthetic value: rich and heavy knits, leather and mohair; add a science-fiction influence and you’ve got a real fashion forward collection.

Geometric cuts featured patches of contrasting materials. Nautical stripes in monochrome contrasted with the smoothness of jersey; gents wore Cuban heels with their military tailoring with contrasting sleeves. Braganza has an incredible ability to combine leather architectural pieces with beautifully elegant silk frocks – sounds hideous on paper but as a collection it was completely coherent.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I usually can’t get it up for a predominantly black collection, but with Jean Pierre Braganza’s vision of the future I most certainly can. Bursts of lipstick red shook things up a bit: a gent’s suit with a synched back and skinny trousers that finished with points; embellished onto a mind-blowing shift dress; on short skirts. But it will be Braganza’s black that I remember this collection for: leather sleeves for gents and cutaway dresses in leather with a hint of bondage that oozed sex appeal for the ladies. Eyes peeled folks, this is what the future looks like.

All photography by Matt Bramford

See more of Joana Faria and Krister Selin’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,architectural, ,baroque, ,black, ,Catwalk review, ,Croydon face lift, ,Cuban heels, ,Futuristic, ,geometric, ,Jean Pierre Braganza, ,Joana Faria, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Northumberland Avenue, ,Red, ,The Show Space, ,Trace Publicity

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11 as Illustrated by Lisa Stannard
Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Betty Jackson by Lisa Stannard

I’ve always had a personal love of Betty Jackson’s clothes, mind she was one of the first big designers that I got my ticket to see and there’s something that resonates there as an old friend I suppose. Jackson’s collections do always leave me in complete awe too; true they’re not always the most controversial but but that doesn’t mean you can call them boring. And boom out walked the first model to a mix up of Neil Diamond’s “Girl you’ll be a Woman soon” and David Bowie’s “John I’m only Dancing” wearing a fusion of camel (thought it was gone last season well it’s back) and red. Instantly it’s a hit!

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

It definitely was a collection that allowed us to be our most womanly, help full of midi length skirts and dresses in the aforementioned respectable reds (a colour I’ve always loved but never really worn for some strange reason) but Jackson mixed up the ladylikeness of the whole thing by teaming ever look with white tights or thigh high socks. Now that’s certainly not an accessory that all of us can pull off without looking like a doll or a small child but when teamed with a midi leaving just the calves on show (i.e. the thinnest part of the leg) then I think we can all work it. Or try at least.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Moving through the collection though Jackson showed a different side to the look with 90’s-esque grungy striped knits and fleece jackets. Yep I did just say fleece! Do you remember the ones you were made to wear as a small child walking through parks? Well this is nothing like that thank god; in fact this is posh fleeces in long line jackets but still I say wear with caution, information pills it looks good on the catwalk but real life may throw up some slightly different conclusions.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Now there was a neutral element to some pieces too. It wasn’t quite a full camel look but more of a darker shade of pale in the shape of mohair coats and cinched in dresses with waist belts. On the opposite end of the scale was the black lace maxi skirts and chiffon dresses and lace jumpers. Maybe not such a practical choice for every day as Jackson paraded them worn with nothing underneath….I’m sure that would be a no so attractive occasion for cold nipples to do their worst.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

A definite thing to note from Jackson for winter though is that this season is going to be a bright one. Others have shown us variations on mulberry and dusky pinks but there’s no doubt that red is a key look too. Wear it with pride and white tights with platform patent shoes. Slightly reminiscent of childhood dressing but then maybe that’s why it’s such a perfect combination.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Lisa Stannard

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

And of course what would a catwalk show be without it’s celebs; we got ours in the form of none other than T4’s Jameela Jamil who’s quicly becoming part of the fashion A List as Alexa Chung rose to the dizzy heights from the same path. But that girl has the longest legs I have ever seen. Wearing a super cute tangerine mini lantern dress and leopard print heels all I could stare at were her legs. But at least the paparazzi were pleased.

Jameela Jamil at Betty Jackson London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

You can see more of Lisa Stannard’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,AW11, ,Betty Jackson, ,black lace, ,Bryony Crane, ,camel, ,jameela jamil, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London Fashion Week, ,Red, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Corrie Nielsen (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, find buy information pills illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.

Jenny Robins’ and Abby Wright’s illustrations can also be found in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,1800s, ,1900s, ,19th century, ,60s, ,Abby Wright, ,black, ,blonde, ,Corrie Nielsen, ,Elizabeth I, ,Elizabethan, ,Feminine, ,fitted, ,gothic, ,headbands, ,Helen Martin, ,heroine, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,models, ,pencil skirt, ,Queen, ,Queen Victoria, ,Red, ,teal, ,Tess of the D’Urbervilles, ,Thomas Hardy, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,Wuthering Heights, ,Yorkshire Moors

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Corrie Nielsen (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, find buy information pills illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.

Jenny Robins’ and Abby Wright’s illustrations can also be found in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,1800s, ,1900s, ,19th century, ,60s, ,Abby Wright, ,black, ,blonde, ,Corrie Nielsen, ,Elizabeth I, ,Elizabethan, ,Feminine, ,fitted, ,gothic, ,headbands, ,Helen Martin, ,heroine, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,models, ,pencil skirt, ,Queen, ,Queen Victoria, ,Red, ,teal, ,Tess of the D’Urbervilles, ,Thomas Hardy, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,Wuthering Heights, ,Yorkshire Moors

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Emilio de la Morena (by Amelia)


Illustration by June Chanpoomidole

To those of you that have been to any of the Start boutiques in Shoreditch you’ll know they represent a relaxed luxury that more than compliments the clothes. This is most true for the mens formalwear boutique. I love it and could quiet happily spend hours in there. So when I saw that the Mr Start presentation was being held in One Aldwych I was very excited. Having graced the lobby bar with my presence on at least  one occasion to sip their very tasty cocktails, here I couldn’t think of a more suitable venue. Sadly we were shuffled downstairs to a tiny and ill-lit room. Pleased we’d arrived early to avoid the mounting queues, more about myself and Matt surveyed the clothes.  


Illustration by Joana Faria

Thankfully the collection more than made up for the choice of venue, website like this as did the dynamicism of Mr Start himself, and the lovely Brix Smith Start. Seeing people passionate about what they do never fails to lift my spirits. Despite living my life in jeans, I have a love of all things formal. I long for the day that dress down Fridays are a thing of the past; I’m just too lazy to do it myself. Very hypocritical, you might say. Suits, jackets and ties are almost always appropriate attire, however, they often take more consideration and thought than I am capable of bleary eyed at 7am on workday morning.  


All photography by Matt Bramford

This collection would inspire me to rise just that little bit earlier and make just a bit more effort. Mixing heritage fabrics such as Harris Tweeds with a modern cut, the collection worked really well. The colours chosen also lifted this collection from being too stayed; crushed grape and turquoise green statement jackets provided a subtle lift to everything. But we weren’t just treated to suits, elegantly tailored shirts in a variety of collar shapes were also a sight to behold. A clean colour palette of white, black and grey, the shirts complimented the suiting without overpowering it; my favourite being a smaller but starkly cutaway collar. I’d say understated luxury for those in the know was a common theme of the whole collection but the deep velvet suit and dinner jackets were far from understated.  


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Another great piece was the double breasted cropped peacoat. We’ve seen these on every boy band and All Saints clone in the past few seasons, but there was still something fresh about this piece. Mr Start’s accessories were equally strong with many of the fashion pack gushing over the suede brogues and loafers. They have a definite place on my wishlist, but I fear no amount of scotchguarding will protect them from my clumsy ways.  

In store this collection will shine even brighter than it did during the presentation, and leaving the store dressed head to toe in Mr Start will be a feat of inordinate self control. It’s just a shame the lighting and crowding let things down a little. Here’s looking forward to next seasons presentation, and a quick/expensive trip to Shoreditch in the meantime.  

See more from June Chanpoomidole and Joana Faria in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by June Chanpoomidole

To those of you that have been to any of the Start boutiques in Shoreditch you’ll know they represent a relaxed luxury that more than compliments the clothes. This is most true for the mens formalwear boutique. I love it and could quiet happily spend hours in there. So when I saw that the Mr Start presentation was being held in One Aldwych I was very excited. Having graced the lobby bar with my presence on at least  one occasion to sip their very tasty cocktails, web I couldn’t think of a more suitable venue. Sadly we were shuffled downstairs to a tiny and ill-lit room. Pleased we’d arrived early to avoid the mounting queues, myself and Matt surveyed the clothes.  


Illustration by Joana Faria

Thankfully the collection more than made up for the choice of venue, as did the dynamicism of Mr Start himself, and the lovely Brix Smith Start. Seeing people passionate about what they do never fails to lift my spirits. Despite living my life in jeans, I have a love of all things formal. I long for the day that dress down Fridays are a thing of the past; I’m just too lazy to do it myself. Very hypocritical, you might say. Suits, jackets and ties are almost always appropriate attire, however, they often take more consideration and thought than I am capable of bleary eyed at 7am on workday morning.  


All photography by Matt Bramford

This collection would inspire me to rise just that little bit earlier and make just a bit more effort. Mixing heritage fabrics such as Harris Tweeds with a modern cut, the collection worked really well. The colours chosen also lifted this collection from being too stayed; crushed grape and turquoise green statement jackets provided a subtle lift to everything. But we weren’t just treated to suits, elegantly tailored shirts in a variety of collar shapes were also a sight to behold. A clean colour palette of white, black and grey, the shirts complimented the suiting without overpowering it; my favourite being a smaller but starkly cutaway collar. I’d say understated luxury for those in the know was a common theme of the whole collection but the deep velvet suit and dinner jackets were far from understated.  


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Another great piece was the double breasted cropped peacoat. We’ve seen these on every boy band and All Saints clone in the past few seasons, but there was still something fresh about this piece. Mr Start’s accessories were equally strong with many of the fashion pack gushing over the suede brogues and loafers. They have a definite place on my wishlist, but I fear no amount of scotchguarding will protect them from my clumsy ways.  

In store this collection will shine even brighter than it did during the presentation, and leaving the store dressed head to toe in Mr Start will be a feat of inordinate self control. It’s just a shame the lighting and crowding let things down a little. Here’s looking forward to next seasons presentation, and a quick/expensive trip to Shoreditch in the meantime.  

See more from June Chanpoomidole and Joana Faria in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Emilio de la Morena by Sandra Contreras
Emilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

Emilio de la Morena really took this season’s colour to heart, more about and then some. His sleekly elegant aesthetic was emphasised by models with loosely scraped back long hair and tomato red lips, their svelte calves encased in mid length dresses with a slight lingerie flavour in the tight ridging, dangling ribbons and sheer panels – proof that sexy doesn’t have to mean revealing. Each individual panel was painstakingly stitched together to create a grid-like design, sometimes bordered with spaghetti thin leather tubing, and then with tiny beads.

Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard
Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Emilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

Delightful reds and orange were counter-balanced with the introduction of pale pink, ivory and plum. Swirling zig-zag ribbon details appeared in organza bib panels that layered over calf length skirts. Severe black wool suits were broken with bands of silvery lurex and metallic red threads. Shoes by Charlotte Olympia were particularly delicious: suede platforms tied tightly with silky ribbons, very high and very red.

Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard
Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard
Emilio de la Morena by Lisa Stannard.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Emilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras.

The collection was partly inspired by the tragic photos of Francesca Woodman, who killed herself at the age of 22, but also by the stoic elegance of Victorian ladies on film, which was most revealed in the necks, which were almost ubiquitously high and ruffled.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Joana FariaEmilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Emilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

I profiled Emilio de la Morena in issue 08 of Amelia’s Magazine (still available here) many years ago, and this collection reminded me exactly why I had been attracted to him in the first place: he makes beautiful, sexy and wearable clothes with an elegant hand-crafted twist. This was an absolutely stunning collection. If only I were tall and graceful enough to wear such creations myself.

Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryEmilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Emilio de la Morena LFW A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Emilio de la Morena A/W 2011 by Sandra Contreras
Emilio de la Morena by Sandra Contreras.

You can see more of Lisa Stannard and Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion, and read Helen Martin’s rather more eloquent review of this show here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,BFC, ,Charlotte Olympia, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Joana Faria, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Red, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Somerset House, ,Victoriana

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Amelia’s Magazine | Holly Fulton: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Holly Fulton - lfw a/w 2013 - amelias magazine - Isher Dhiman
Holly Fulton A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman

The line of freezing cold fashionistas standing outside Me London early on Saturday morning clutched Holly Fulton tickets bearing a giant red cartoon heart, like an I Love NY heart. I was almost surprised not to see an I Love HF shirt in the collection this year as Holly Fulton has embraced high kitsch in a big way, albeit without losing any of her signature sophistication and art deco-esque patterns. The place was so packed I barely managed to see a snatch of side view, so was unable to get any good photos. My catwalk sketches and illustrations will have to do for this article, but do seek out the photographic proof of this collection’s brilliance.

holly fulton - lfw - aw13 - jenny robins - amelias magazine
Holly Fulton A/W 2013 by Jenny Robins.

In September it was roses and pin-ups, this season it’s hearts, tigers, polar bears, calligraphy swirls, shiny feathers and lipsticks. Lots of lipsticks. The A/W 2013 collection celebrated a fierce, fun femininity and it made a big impact that was backed up with a sea of detail. I loved it.

1 Holly Fulton by Isher Dhiman
Holly Fulton A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman

Holly Fulton sees A/W 2013 mostly in black, white and red, with strong geometric shapes offset by more fluid touches – gauzy sleeves and a giant puffy white skirt featuring a pixelated black and white tiger (tigers seem to be everywhere this season). Even the room was drenched in red light, whilst details such as heart shaped earrings and hearts on the back of jackets gave the collection a distinctly Valentine’s vibe. The models emerged from a giant red circle that reminded me of a Japanese flag, and walked in black shoes down a red catwalk. Guess what colour their lipstick was?

holly fulton 2 - lfw - aw13 - jenny robins - amelias magazine
Holly Fulton A/W 2013 by Jenny Robins.

There were yards of graphic repeating prints that included cultural icons such as cassette tapes, safety pins and ring pull can tops. These throw-away commodities were paired with sumptuous fabrics and clean tailoring to create an intriguing mix. I can’t wait to see how this designer continues to develop.

Categories ,A/W 2013, ,black, ,calligraphy, ,fashion, ,geometric, ,heart, ,Holly Fulton, ,I love NY, ,Isher Dhiman, ,kitsch, ,lfw, ,Lipstick, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,me london, ,polar bear, ,Red, ,Tiger

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland A/W 2011 in Łódź: Natasha Pavluchenko

Natasha Pavluchenko Lodz Fashion Week AW 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou
Natasha Pavluchenko A/W 2011 by Michalis Christodoulou.

Over at Expo on Saturday the Designers Avenue kicked off with Natasha Pavluchenko‘s urban fusion, try all trendy indie music crossed with melodious harmonicas. Models wore mussed up ponytails, floppy bows, capes and quilting, all accessorised with flat brogues, thick paper eyelashes and red drop earrings. I particularly liked the skinny trousers and a flash of red under a tailcoat with a cross front, but there was a weird sheen to some fabrics which made them look cheap. There was fun with backless shapes and coats in general were a strong point.. stand outs as the colour palette veered from black to cream to the much favoured red. The denouement was a stunning full shaped quilted coat dress in red. But by this point it had gone on waaaaay too long, yet again. Polish designers really need to learn to make tighter edits if they want to appear on the world stage.

Natasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryNatasha Pavluchenko ?ód? Fashion Week AW 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory
Natasha Pavluchenko A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Designers’ Avenue, ,Expo, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Fashion Week Poland, ,Fusion, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Natasha Pavluchenko, ,Paper Eyelashes, ,Quilting, ,Red

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