Amelia’s Magazine | Royal College of Art: Fashion Design Graduate Show 2011 review. Menswear.

RCA Graduate Show 2011 Calum Harvey by Sam Parr
Calum Harvey by Sam Parr.

Fine tailoring appears to be an RCA speciality, find and several students had collaborated with high end Italian brand Brioni to produce a series of gorgeous tailored coats in shades of fawn, here dust, greyhound and sharp reds.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni photography by Amelia Gregory
RCA Brioni collaboration. Coat by Alexander Lamb. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni by Peter Bailey photography by Amelia Gregory
Brioni coat by Peter Bailey.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni by Rebecca Neary photography by Amelia Gregory
Brioni coat by Rebecca Neary.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni by Zac Marshall photography by Amelia Gregory
Brioni coat by Zac Marshall.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni by Benedicte Holmboe photography by Amelia Gregory
Brioni coat by Benedicte Holmboe.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Brioni Zac Marshall photography by Amelia Gregory
Brioni coat by Alex Mullins.

Over-sized round shoulders and trench coat styling was the order of the day, all worn with dark shades. Loved it all. Especially the ones above.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Aleksandra Domanevskaya photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Aleksandra Domanevskaya photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Aleksandra Domanevskaya photography by Amelia Gregory
Aleksandra Domanevskaya opted for a colourful collection based around stripey woven shantung silk in peach and caramel shades, also worn with moody sunglasses.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Sol Ahn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sol Ahn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sol Ahn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sol Ahn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Sol Ahn photography by Amelia Gregory
Sol Ahn created a sports casual collection, with inspiration taken from baseball jackets, faded denim, school boy shorts and traditional duffel coats. I liked the way that big waist rope ties became integral features of the look.
.
RCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Calum Harvey photography by Amelia Gregory
Calum Harvey‘s collection was a clear standout amongst a sea of great talent. Riffing on traditional shapes and fabrics he showed high belted tweed suits and long boxy coats in peachy shades, accessorised with wide shaggy collars and jaunty hats. I particularly liked the wide trousered grey tweed suit. Very stylish indeed. Check out Calum Harvey’s website here.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Josefine Jarzombek photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Josefine Jarzombek photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Josefine Jarzombek photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Josefine Jarzombek photography by Amelia Gregory
I wasn’t so keen on Josefine Jarzombek‘s collection, mainly because she did the fur sponsorship thing, but also because those orange leather gloves with the maroon silk shirt were a wee bit scary.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Bennet Loveday photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Bennet Loveday photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Bennet Loveday photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Bennet Loveday photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Bennet Loveday photography by Amelia Gregory
Bennet Loveday produced some wonderful print effects on the inside of long cardigan and kagoul-like lightweight coats. Loved the slouchy shapes and tie-waist detailing (again).

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Samuel Membery photo amelia gregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Samuel Membery photo amelia gregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Samuel Membery photo amelia gregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Samuel MemberyRCA graduate fashion 2011-Samuel Membery
Samuel Membery‘s collection combined tailoring with casual wear with varied success. I liked the marled grey knitwear. Catch him on his blog and website.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Emily Jane Murray photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Emily Jane Murray photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Emily Jane Murray photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Emily Jane Murray photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Emily Jane Murray photography by Amelia Gregory
Emily-Jane Murrays obsession with sandy coloured suede or suede type materials paid off in a very dapper collection. She has a website here.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Yejon Park photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Yejon Park photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Yejon Park photography by Amelia Gregory
Yejon Park launched his collection with an amazing tailored and zippered striped jacket, which was followed by some deconstructed tailoring and a fun bi-coloured jumpsuit.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Stefan Orschel-Read photography by Amelia Gregory
Stefan Orschel-Read has already been on my radar for some time as he is represented by Felicities PR and he’s also an old pro when it comes to catwalk shows. He showed an immaculately cut collection of sharp suits with intriguing detailing such as knitted shoulder cutouts and unusual collars. I loved the grey marl shorts suit.

Fah Chakshuvej by Sandra Contreras
Fah Chakshuvej by Sandra Contreras.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Fah Chakshuvej photography by Amelia Gregory
Fah Chakshuvej closed the menswear selection with a regal looking collection that included metallics, heavy embossing and laser cut detailing. High collars and horns completed the look. His website is FahChak.com and he has a twitter feed too.

Don’t forget to check out some excellent menswear knitwear design here too.

Categories ,2011, ,Aleksandra Domanevskaya, ,Alex Mullins, ,Alexander Lamb, ,Benedicte Holmboe, ,Bennet Loveday, ,Brioni, ,Calum Harvey, ,Coats, ,Embossing, ,Emily-Jane Murray, ,Fah Chak, ,Fah Chakshuvej, ,Felicities PR, ,Fur, ,Graduate Fashion Show, ,Italian, ,Josefine Jarzombek, ,menswear, ,metallics, ,Peter Bailey, ,rca, ,Rebecca Neary, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sam Parr, ,Samuel Membery, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Sol Ahn, ,Stefan Orschel-Read, ,tailoring, ,traditional, ,Tweed, ,Yejon Park, ,Zac Marshall

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Amelia’s Magazine | Royal College of Art: Fashion Design Graduate Show 2011 review. Womenswear Accessories.

Anna Schwamborn by Lorna Scobie
Anna Schwamborn by Lorna Scobie.

A couple of the collections on the catwalk at the RCA graduate show focused on accessories, medications namely millinery and bags.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Alexandra Gold photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Alexandra Gold photography by Amelia Gregory
Alexandra Gold opted to make the most of that pesky fur sponsorship, creating a series of oversized baseball caps, some of which were adorned with fur. Which just leaves me with the overwhelming question: WHY?

Paul Stafford by Lorna Scobie
Paul Stafford by Lorna Scobie.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Paul Stafford photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Paul Stafford photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Paul Stafford photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Paul Stafford photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Paul Stafford photography by Amelia Gregory

Paul Stafford did something far more interesting with oversized brims that loomed over the eyes. Some appeared to be part of a garment, fabric draped over the top of the hat then flowing down the body and belted in at the waist. Totally unwearable on an every day basis but nonetheless beautiful.

Anna Shwamborn by Sandra ContrerasAnna Shwamborn by Sandra Contreras
Anna Shwamborn by Sandra Contreras.

RCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia GregoryRCA graduate fashion 2011-Anna Schwamborn photography by Amelia Gregory
Anna Schwamborn presented an unusual bag collection that included some interesting tooled leather and ruffled collars and hand cuffs. Horned straps held capacious bags across the body. She has a website!

All photography by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,accessories, ,Alexandra Gold, ,Anna Schwamborn, ,Bags, ,Fur, ,Graduate fashion shows, ,hats, ,horns, ,Lorna Scobie, ,millinery, ,Paul Stafford, ,rca, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sandra Contreras, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Montreal Festimania 2011: Festival Mode et Design Review – Collectif: Fashion Pop

Montreal-Festimania-Mode-et-Design_by-Alia-Gargum
Anomal Couture by Alia Gargum.

Collectif: Fashion Pop took place on Friday afternoon at the Festival Mode et Design at Montreal Festimania. It was a chance to see some of the more interesting home grown Montreal fashion talent in the relaxed setting of the Scene de l’Esplanade catwalk on McGill College Avenue.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop photo by Amelia Gregory
Proceedings kicked off in style with ethical home grown label White Label, medications featuring chic LBDs with cut out mesh panels.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Anomal Couture photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Anomal Couture photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Anomal Couture photo by Amelia Gregory
Montreal Festimania Mode et Design  Anomal Couture by Lorna Scobie
Anomal Couture by Lorna Scobie.

Next up were a series of strong black sculptured pieces by Anomal Couture.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Ovate photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Ovate photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Ovate photo by Amelia Gregory
Ovate by Audrey Cantwell included some great grungey knitwear but I could live without the fur accessories.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Dane richards photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Dane richards photo by Amelia Gregory
Montreal Festimania Mode et Design Dane Richards by Lorna Scobie
Dane Richards by Lorna Scobie.

Next up was an outrageously colourful and bold collection from Dane Richards, salve featuring appliqued images of dead pop singer Aaliyah and plenty of fringing. Read an interview with Dane Richards on Blow PR here.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Betina Lou photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Betina Lou photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Betina Lou photo by Amelia Gregory
Betina Lou showed a very wearable collection of muted checked swing dresses and belted cardigans, no rx reminiscent of the 50s.

Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Lost & Found photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Lost & Found photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Lost & Found photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Lost & Found photo by Amelia Gregory
Fashion Mode Design Montreal Festimania 2011 Collectif: Fashion Pop Lost & Found photo by Amelia Gregory
Festival Mode et Design by Camille Block Lost & Found
Lost & Found by Camille Block.

Finally Lost & Found wowed with a swirling tourquoise all in one pants suit followed by a series of billowing printed see through dresses.

Pop Montreal host fashion, music, film and arts events all year round. Check out their website here.

Categories ,Aaliyah, ,Alia Gargum, ,Anomal Couture, ,Audrey Cantwell, ,Betina Lou, ,Camille Block, ,Collectif: Fashion Pop, ,Dane Richards, ,Eco fashion, ,Ethical Fashion, ,fashion, ,Festival Mode et Design Montreal, ,Fringing, ,Fur, ,Lorna Scobie, ,Lost & Found, ,McGill College Avenue, ,Montreal, ,Montreal Festimania, ,Ovate, ,Pop Montreal, ,Scene de L’Esplanade, ,White Label

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: David Koma

LFW David Koma Maria del Carmen Smith
David Koma by Maria del Carmen Smith.

Last Monday’s shows opened with a double whammy from David Koma and Holly Fulton, illness which I shall review in separate blogs.

LFW David Koma by Maria del Carmen Smith
David Koma by Maria del Carmen Smith.

We wrote about David Koma as far back as his longer named incarnation when he graduated from his Central Saint Martins BA way back in 2007. His rise in popularity since then has been unstoppable, clothing many high profile celebrities including modern day sweetheart Cheryl Cole – in a heavily embellished dress for the X Factor. It was an instant talking point.

His modern take on glamour owes much to an eclectic life, equally split between three countries where David has spent appreciable amounts of time and of which this 24 year old regards himself as equal citizen. He was born and spent his early years in Georgia before moving to St Petersburg to study classical drawing (and which is where he presumably met his Russian wife). He then relocated again to the UK, where he studied at Saint Martins under the expert tutelage of Louise Wilson, who he idolises.

LFW David Koma by Maria del Carmen Smith
David Koma by Maria del Carmen Smith.

For S/S 2011 his collection was inspired by The Mariinsky Theatre of Saint Petersburg, and memories of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake. A series of pleated skater dresses in sugary colours moved swiftly through abstract monochrome tailoring, shades of lemony yellow and onto gold party pieces, all accessorised by sky high platforms and big metal knuckledusters courtesy of a collaboration with Mawi.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

In official parlance this translates pretty much thus: Ballet silhouettes were combined with the more graphic shapes of cubist artist Fernand Leger to explore contradictions of fragility with physical and emotional strength.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
One cleverly cut dress even had me fooled that a model’s waist could be smaller than seems physically possible: I did an instant double take when I looked back at this photo.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

I loved this collection, so was a bit discombobulated when I discovered that David had used copious python skin in his show. Where does python come from? Were they caught in the wild or farmed? It’s not an industry I know much about, so when I ran into David at his New Gen stand I decided to give him a bit of a grilling.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

A quick question turned into a half an hour chat during which David was utterly charming the entire time. He’s determinedly upbeat about life and feels blessed to do what he loves the most; his precocious rise surely the result of much hard work as well as obvious talent.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So, back to that python skin. It comes from an accredited factory farm – for pythons and crocodiles are farmed much as mink is. I feel quite uncomfortable about this – I am okay with the use of leather for outer clothing and shoes, safe in the knowledge that it is very much the waste product of a meat industry that is unlikely to go anywhere anytime soon.

Somerset House SS2011 David Koma
David Koma at Somerset House.

But I don’t buy into the idea that it’s ethically okay to farm animals purely to provide us with luxury goods – and no matter how accredited a farm might be on paper there are always going to be corners cut in reality on the factory floor. David’s take on it is that he is against fast consumerism, and therefore wants to create luxury garments that will be treasured for a long time. For this to be possible he wants to chose the best possible materials available – and if that means stripping a snake then so be it – that they will live on in a beautiful garment is enough for him. And he does not feel that fake fur or leather is a particularly ethical substitute, a fact with which I tend to agree. Another fair point he makes is that he would rather buy from a reputable farm than encourage any kind of black market. But this surely begs the question, how is a black market encouraged – except by the use of python leather in luxury must-have items? If you are able to remove questions of provenance from your mind all that gold python is very very beautiful.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Knuckledusters from Mawi.

David also admitted that he is considering the use of fur in his next collection, but as we parted he said I had made him think a bit more about this. Whether my words have had any effect remains to be seen but I really appreciate that he didn’t balk under my questioning and seems genuinely to be interested in engaging in the origin of his materials: he’s a very talented and increasingly influential designer and I hope he’ll make educated decisions in the future. In the meantime enjoy our pictures… and forget about any real live snakes in cages if you can.

David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
David Koma Gold Python on White By Fiona M Chapelle
David Koma “Gold Python on White” by Fiona M Chapelle.

Categories ,ballet, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Cheryl Cole, ,David Koma, ,Fernand Leger, ,Fiona M Chapelle, ,Fur, ,georgia, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Wilson, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Mawi, ,New Gen, ,Python skin, ,Russia!, ,Somerset House, ,St Petersburg, ,Swan Lake, ,The Mariinsky Theatre, ,X Factor

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Louise Amstrup


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, discount for God’s sake, tadalafil and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, information pills for God’s sake, thumb and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, cure for God’s sake, and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

All photography by Matt Bramford


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, abortion for God’s sake, and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, cheapest I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Fur, ,Hilary Alexander, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Amstrup, ,onoff, ,Stephanie Parr, ,twitter, ,Victoria House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: KTZ


Illustration by Antonia Parker

Over at Osman, this sleek silhouettes glided gracefully down the beautiful blue ink-blotched catwalk on models sporting blunt Cleopatra bobs with eyelash-skimming fringes.

Osman Yousefzada showed a sophisticated palette featuring lot of ivory and charcoal in sharp yet flowing shapes. Colour flooded in, information pills taking the form of feature linings and leather trims in rust, scarlet, pale aqua, neon pink and lime. The show opened with a beautiful ivory dress, featuring a v-shaped accent to the bodice in bright cobalt, echoing the beauiful inky stripe printed on the catwalk itself.


Illustrations by Donya Todd

The chic and sharply flared wide leg trousers were particularly prominent, billowing around the models’ legs as they sashayed their way towards the photographers’ pit. I was sitting way back in the sixth row but semi-successfully found a gap in the rows of heads to capture some of the looks. Key pieces seemed to keep on coming; dresses with contrast-lined capelets, black leather with hot pink horizontal stripes, a Morticia-length charcoal wool dress, a leather-fronted blouse with bright orange floor-length tied tails to the back, the list goes on.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates


Photography by Naomi Law

There was a hint of the 1960s with a-line shapes and geometric capped sleeves, but pattern or ornamentation was minimal, save for one striking orange chiffon dress with chocolate brown embroidery. The collection managed to make crayon brights into something more sophisticated – the careful balance of colour and monotone combined with expert tailoring in subtly varyied textures was sharp, modern and crisp.


Illustrations by Rachel Lewis

There were two show-stopping floor-length black dresses with dramatic fluffy sleeves so huge I assumed they must be fake fur (hence asking two of our illustrators to work from these designs). I was disgusted to discover later that Osman has made the vile decision to use real fur in his collections. It’s nasty enough that anyone would choose to use animal fur in the first place, but even harder to understand when they’re going to end up dyeing it a completely unnatural colour anyway. Unfortunately this took the shine off the collection, none of this next season thank you!


Illustration by Antonia Parker

See more of Antonia Parker’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=viagra approved aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, page aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, approved aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing. This collection was by no means for the faint hearted, but that, in my book, is a very good thing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away after the show through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for the styling; she also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,80s, ,ACOFI, ,Alex Noble, ,Alexander Calder, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Anna Trevelyan, ,Antonia Parker, ,Artist Andrea, ,BFC Tent, ,Bosnia, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Dan Stafford, ,Diary of a Clothes Horse, ,Dynasty, ,Fake Fur, ,Front Row, ,Fur, ,Kayleigh Bluck, ,Kellie Black, ,Kokon To Zai, ,KTZ, ,Leroy, ,Lida Hujic, ,LJG Art and Illustration, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Memphis, ,Mondrian, ,Prince Cassius, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Somerset House, ,stylist

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Amelia)

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

Osman. Not a name that I’m overly familiar with, story cheapest although we have frequently written about designer Osman Yousefzada. He’s trained the likes of the super talented Henrietta Ludgate and when he showed as part of Fashion in Motion at the V&A we were there to admire his work.

Osman. Photography by Tim Adey
Osman. Photography by Tim Adey.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

So it was that with enthusiasm I went to my first Osman show, drug dosage settling on the front row to much amusement as another contributor befriended the head buyer of Browns. Next along some buyers threw a hissy fit when asked to move in favour of Liberty, at which they threatened to leave the show and what’s worse, cancel their Osman orders. I do find these insights into the actual trade part of LFW most intriguing – buyers are massively important at the shows where large orders from key retailers really matter… namely the shows in the BFC tent. And it’s the Liberty and Browns of this world which are Gods, something which lesser shop buyers may discover the embarrassing way. Needless to say I kept my head down and stuck to admiring the ink splodge catwalk, protected the entire length by guards.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
How much do I love this dress?!

Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Osman A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

The Afghan designer is fabled for his clean, regal lines and this was much in evidence as the show opened with a stunning white and royal blue dress that mirrored the catwalk design, which in turn was inspired by a series of lightbox installations by the artist Catherine Yass. Satu Fox wrote in 2009 of Osman’s refusal to follow current trends and this still felt very true in a beautifully elegant show where pared down tailoring was absolutely the order of the day.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger
Osman A/W 2011 by Holly Monger.

Wide legged trousers, A-line maxi-dresses, a caped dress underscored with a splash of orange, beautiful marled grey boucle wool fabrics… and an intriguing gold apron outfit which opened at the back. I could imagine almost every outfit being worn and admired… there was no filler here. The show ended with a return to the royal blue splotch theme, this time across the breast area of a searing fuchsia maxi-dress. This was an extremely confident collection that explained to me precisely why Osman has the buyers salivating. Absolutely gorgeous. If only he hadn’t ruined it with that one piece of what I presume was fur… entirely unnecessary.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Fur? Or an interesting use of alpaca wool? We’re not sure, and nor is anyone else… I really do hope the latter.

Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Osman A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read Naomi Law’s equally admiring review here.

Categories ,Afghan, ,BFC Tent, ,Browns, ,Buyers, ,Catherine Yass, ,Decommissioned, ,Ellie Sutton, ,Fur, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Holly Monger, ,lfw, ,liberty, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Satu Fox, ,Somerset House, ,Tim Adey

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Osman (by Naomi)


Illustration by Jenny Robins

I remember blogging about Eun Jeong eons ago, order enticed by her pretty minimalism with a crisp all-white palette one season. For me, sickness she most certainly stood out amongst even the top hot-ticketers of London Fashion Week and I had an inkling she wouldn’t be a one-seasoner. I was therefore thrilled and curious upon bagging an invitation to one of her two fashion shows in Covent Garden during fashion week.??

I sat next to a lovely blogger named Hannah Newton of London Town’s a go go in another clever catwalk invention of a loop around the room, with audience-members sitting on rows inside and outside of the square. We both shamelessly ruffled through our large goody bags with tiny goodies – cosmetics and a little heart-shaped purse by Kipling. And we didn’t bother with ‘acting the part of a fashionista’ all nonchalant and ‘oh! I get free overpriced make-up on a daily basis, sweetheart. It’s no biggie.’  We’re students and we were blooming happy with our freebies.??

We just knew that the intimate set-up would result in bagging some great up-close shots of the clothes and getting a good look at the detail and fabric. Then, after a long wait sitting by the runway (as is always the way with fashion shows), 1930s music was suddenly bouncing off the walls and the models took to the oddly-shaped catwalk.

It looked to me as if the collection had been inspired by Britain in war-time. Every model wore bronzed make-up with bronzed skin all over their body and the clothes themselves were British in many respects – pleats and wool and ruffles with lady-like cuts all over the joint. There were elegant camel-coloured coats and full-skirts that began at the waist and dropped to the floor in pressed pleats.

Bows and lace were everywhere. They both seem to be a common theme this season. Delicate bows were placed on skinny leather waist-belts and thick white lace acted as beautiful underskirts.

It wasn’t all classic tea-party tailoring, however. There were a fair few twists and turns along the way. Pleated skirts bore asymmetric ruffles and tails down one side and a certain set of dresses definitely seemed to stand-out amongst the thick fabrics and classic lady-wear – bright yellow numbers that screamed out an utterly architectural print, resembling the San Francisco Bridge.

Jeong’s seemingly favourite design ethos of white white white reappeared this season with a fair few outfits almost entirely in creams and white that flowed down in thick luscious fabric – a pure and almost evangelical look that passed off beautifully.

I now know why I was taken with Eun Jeong right from her Fashion Fringe debut. Her clothes are beautiful, classic, unique and, most of all, wearable. I could, for example, most definitely see an strong office woman walking into work every day and turning heads in Eun Jeong’s statement-take on both the classical and the quintessentially British. I loved it.

Illustration by Jenny Robins

I remember blogging about Eun Jeong eons ago, find enticed by her pretty minimalism with a crisp all-white palette one season. For me, she most certainly stood out amongst even the top hot-ticketers of London Fashion Week and I had an inkling she wouldn’t be a one-seasoner. I was therefore thrilled and curious upon bagging an invitation to one of her two fashion shows in Covent Garden during fashion week.??


All photography by Georgia Takacs

I sat next to a lovely blogger named Hannah Newton of London Town’s a go go in another clever catwalk invention of a loop around the room, with audience-members sitting on rows inside and outside of the square. We both shamelessly ruffled through our large goody bags with tiny goodies – cosmetics and a little heart-shaped purse by Kipling. And we didn’t bother with ‘acting the part of a fashionista’ all nonchalant and ‘oh! I get free overpriced make-up on a daily basis, sweetheart. It’s no biggie.’  We’re students and we were blooming happy with our freebies.??


Illustration by Kerri-Ann Hulme

We just knew that the intimate set-up would result in bagging some great up-close shots of the clothes and getting a good look at the detail and fabric. Then, after a long wait sitting by the runway (as is always the way with fashion shows), 1930s music was suddenly bouncing off the walls and the models took to the oddly-shaped catwalk.

It looked to me as if the collection had been inspired by Britain in war-time. Every model wore bronzed make-up with bronzed skin all over their body and the clothes themselves were British in many respects – pleats and wool and ruffles with lady-like cuts all over the joint. There were elegant camel-coloured coats and full-skirts that began at the waist and dropped to the floor in pressed pleats.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates

Bows and lace were everywhere. They both seem to be a common theme this season. Delicate bows were placed on skinny leather waist-belts and thick white lace acted as beautiful underskirts.

It wasn’t all classic tea-party tailoring, however. There were a fair few twists and turns along the way. Pleated skirts bore asymmetric ruffles and tails down one side and a certain set of dresses definitely seemed to stand-out amongst the thick fabrics and classic lady-wear – bright yellow numbers that screamed out an utterly architectural print, resembling the San Francisco Bridge.

Jeong’s seemingly favourite design ethos of white white white reappeared this season with a fair few outfits almost entirely in creams and white that flowed down in thick luscious fabric – a pure and almost evangelical look that passed off beautifully.

I now know why I was taken with Eun Jeong right from her Fashion Fringe debut. Her clothes are beautiful, classic, unique and, most of all, wearable. I could, for example, most definitely see an strong office woman walking into work every day and turning heads in Eun Jeong’s statement-take on both the classical and the quintessentially British. I loved it.

See more of Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Jenny Robins

I remember blogging about Eun Jeong eons ago, sildenafil enticed by her pretty minimalism with a crisp all-white palette one season. For me, cost she most certainly stood out amongst even the top hot-ticketers of London Fashion Week and I had an inkling she wouldn’t be a one-seasoner. I was therefore thrilled and curious upon bagging an invitation to one of her two fashion shows in Covent Garden during fashion week.??


All photography by Georgia Takacs

I sat next to a lovely blogger named Hannah Newton of London Town’s a go go in another clever catwalk invention of a loop around the room, more about with audience-members sitting on rows inside and outside of the square. We both shamelessly ruffled through our large goody bags with tiny goodies – cosmetics and a little heart-shaped purse by Kipling. And we didn’t bother with ‘acting the part of a fashionista’ all nonchalant and ‘oh! I get free overpriced make-up on a daily basis, sweetheart. It’s no biggie.’  We’re students and we were blooming happy with our freebies.??


Illustration by Kerri-Ann Hulme

We just knew that the intimate set-up would result in bagging some great up-close shots of the clothes and getting a good look at the detail and fabric. Then, after a long wait sitting by the runway (as is always the way with fashion shows), 1930s music was suddenly bouncing off the walls and the models took to the oddly-shaped catwalk.

It looked to me as if the collection had been inspired by Britain in war-time. Every model wore bronzed make-up with bronzed skin all over their body and the clothes themselves were British in many respects – pleats and wool and ruffles with lady-like cuts all over the joint. There were elegant camel-coloured coats and full-skirts that began at the waist and dropped to the floor in pressed pleats.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates

Bows and lace were everywhere. They both seem to be a common theme this season. Delicate bows were placed on skinny leather waist-belts and thick white lace acted as beautiful underskirts.

It wasn’t all classic tea-party tailoring, however. There were a fair few twists and turns along the way. Pleated skirts bore asymmetric ruffles and tails down one side and a certain set of dresses definitely seemed to stand-out amongst the thick fabrics and classic lady-wear – bright yellow numbers that screamed out an utterly architectural print, resembling the Golden Gate Bridge.

Jeong’s seemingly favourite design ethos of white white white reappeared this season with a fair few outfits almost entirely in creams and white that flowed down in thick luscious fabric – a pure and almost evangelical look that passed off beautifully.

I now know why I was taken with Eun Jeong right from her Fashion Fringe debut. Her clothes are beautiful, classic, unique and, most of all, wearable. I could, for example, most definitely see an strong office woman walking into work every day and turning heads in Eun Jeong’s statement-take on both the classical and the quintessentially British. I loved it.

See more of Jenny Robins’ illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Illustration by Antonia Parker

Over at Osman, clinic sleek silhouettes glided gracefully down the beautiful blue ink-blotched catwalk on models sporting blunt Cleopatra bobs with eyelash-skimming fringes.


Illustrations by Alexandra Rolfe

Osman Yousefzada showed a sophisticated palette featuring lot of ivory and charcoal in sharp yet flowing shapes. Colour flooded in, and taking the form of feature linings and leather trims in rust, store scarlet, pale aqua, neon pink and lime. The show opened with a beautiful ivory dress, featuring a v-shaped accent to the bodice in bright cobalt, echoing the beauiful inky stripe printed on the catwalk itself.


Illustrations by Donya Todd

The chic and sharply flared wide leg trousers were particularly prominent, billowing around the models’ legs as they sashayed their way towards the photographers’ pit. I was sitting way back in the sixth row but semi-successfully found a gap in the rows of heads to capture some of the looks. Key pieces seemed to keep on coming; dresses with contrast-lined capelets, black leather with hot pink horizontal stripes, a Morticia-length charcoal wool dress, a leather-fronted blouse with bright orange floor-length tied tails to the back, the list goes on.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates


Illustrations by Kerri-Ann Hulme


Photography by Naomi Law

There was a hint of the 1960s with a-line shapes and geometric capped sleeves, but pattern or ornamentation was minimal, save for one striking orange chiffon dress with chocolate brown embroidery. The collection managed to make crayon brights into something more sophisticated – the careful balance of colour and monotone combined with expert tailoring in subtly varyied textures was sharp, modern and crisp.


Illustrations by Rachel Lewis

There were two show-stopping floor-length black dresses with dramatic fluffy sleeves so huge I assumed they must be fake fur (hence asking two of our illustrators to work from these designs). I was disgusted to discover later that Osman has made the vile decision to use real fur in his collections. It’s nasty enough that anyone would choose to use animal fur in the first place, but even harder to understand when they’re going to end up dyeing it a completely unnatural colour anyway. Unfortunately this took the shine off the collection, none of this next season thank you!


Illustration by Antonia Parker

See more of Antonia Parker’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Categories ,1960s, ,A/W 2011, ,Alexandra Rolfe, ,Antonia Parker, ,BFC, ,Brights, ,Catwalk review, ,Chic, ,Cleopatra, ,Cobalt, ,Donya Todd, ,fashion, ,Fur, ,Hot Pink, ,Kerri-Ann Hulme, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Law, ,Osman Yousefzada, ,Rachel Lewis, ,Somerset House, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Preview: Ada Zanditon on Sustainability

Oscars – Georgia Coote thumb
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, approved who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, cialis 40mg on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, abortion Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit
Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone
An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 Preview by Rebecca Strickson
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 Preview by Rebecca Strickson.

For Ada process is everything. “I don’t want to sit at a desk using Illustrator to design clothes that will be made many miles away. I love the hands on process of choosing the fabrics and creating the clothes.” But she does want to conquer the luxury goods market. “I want to make clothes that are desirable and exciting but also ecological.” The luxury goods market is one that is saturated with leathers and furs, ed but Ada will only use leather by products that have been vegetable tanned. “It’s very hard to find good enough quality fake leather and the biggest crime is waste, approved so it is better that skin is used. Things are getting better but we still have a long way to go.” She describes a trip to the Wastesavers deep in Huddersfield as part of an initiative with Jane Shepherdson and Oxfam. There was such a huge amount of waste that it boggled her mind. She dreads to think how much more goes into landfill every day.

Ada Zanditon comission by The Lovely Wars
Ada Zanditon (commission) by The Lovely Wars.

We ponder the ethics of sustainably produced fur where the animals are treated well, but she’s not really interested in fur from a aesthetic point of view, and worries too much about the air miles and poor conditions of most farmed animals.

Ada Zanditon SS 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Ada tries to fly as little as possible – preferring instead to find inspiration in the English countryside when she goes on holiday. “My favourite way to travel is by Eurostar!” She is not interested in the idea of being against things, and would rather look at the relevant alternatives and ways in which to do things with purpose.

Ada Zanditon by Avril Kelly
Ada Zanditon by Avril Kelly.

She is analytical in her approach to sustainable practise. “A lot of the environmental debate comes from an emotional place,” she says. “I used to be both veggie and vegan but now I just try to buy local, organic and free range… I find that meat answers my needs as an adult who needs a lot of energy.” But then her decision to stop eating meat was never based on the killing of animals in itself – she ponders the irony of vegetarians who wear non organic cotton – the pesticides from which have no doubt adversely affected local wildlife.

Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by Dee Andrews
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by Dee Andrews.

She thinks that there is a lot of fluffy thinking in western culture and much prefers to take a scientific perspective. “It takes emotion out of the equation. Emotion is good when it comes to fashion, but sustainable design needs a common sense approach to see ideas with clarity.” With her analytical mind she looks for ways to reduce environmental impacts and ensure positive outcomes within resource management and production.

Ada Zanditon by Dee Andrews
Ada Zanditon by Dee Andrews.

Even though she is a designer of high fashion she concedes that how to make affordable sustainable clothing is one of the biggest problems that needs tackling. “I have my own part in the wheel, but it would be false for me to design differently than what comes naturally.” Despite the possibility of an adverse “trickle-down effect” whereby her high fashion designs could easily be copied at a cheaper price level without using sustainable materials Ada is hopeful that her values of using sustainable materials and local production will inspire others if she can communicate them strongly and excitingly enough. I am inclined to agree.

Ada Zanditon by Maria del Carmen Smith
Ada Zanditon by Maria del Carmen Smith.

Ada occasionally lectures students, and is about to embark on a project in fashion and sustainability at La Cambre in Brussels. “To teach fashion you have to put a lot in. I love giving one off lectures and working on specific projects but I don’t have time for more.” One of the things she finds most inspiring in ethical fashion is that there are more people who are now coming to ethical fashion from a fashion perspective. “In the past ethical fashion companies were set up by environmentalists, but nowadays designers who come from a fashion background are able to bring a distinct handwriting to their designs.” She classifies herself amongst this new wave of designers, alongside names such as Beautiful Soul, Christopher Raeburn, Goodone, The North Circular and Henrietta Ludgate (all of whom feature in my new book). “We feel supportive of each other and it’s really good to see a relevant aesthetic growing and gaining momentum.”

Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews
Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews.

Most recently Ada has been commissioned for a couple of exciting fair-trade projects: a collective collaboration with ASOS, for which she designed a scarf to coincide with the launch of Fairtrade Fortnight and a project in conjunction with Vogue Magazine to celebrate the release of fair-trade gold. “They rang on Thursday wanting a substantial geometric piece that spoke of luxury: the perfect project for me. And by Saturday it was sorted!” Ada rightly feels that it is really important to show that fine jewellery can be made sustainably and with awareness for the impact of manufacture on human lives.

Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews
Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews.

Her business partner is entrepreneur Philip Levine, who is good at networking and looking out for opportunities. “There is so much pressure on young brands to build a successful business at the same time as being creative,” she says, “but people spread themselves too thinly and can’t always see the best choices in business. Many fashion brands come and go but I want longevity.” She loves evolving illustrations into prints and hopes to expand her prints onto a wide range of products in the future.

At just 28 years old it looks as though Ada Zanditon is already building a brand to remember, and most importantly of all, it is a fashion brand that has ethics at the very heart of it. I look forward to her LFW presentation this Friday with much anticipation. Read our taster of what to expect right here.

Ada Zanditon features in my new book: Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Ani Saunders, ,ASOS, ,Avril Kelly, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Brussels, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,Dee Andrews, ,Eurostar, ,Fairtrade Fortnight, ,Fur, ,goodone, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Jane Shepherdson, ,jewellery, ,La Cambre, ,leather, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,oxfam, ,Philip Levine, ,Rebecca Strickson, ,Sarah Matthews, ,Stylist Magazine, ,sustainability, ,The Lovely Wars, ,The North Circular, ,vegan, ,vegetarian, ,vogue, ,Wastesavers

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