Amelia’s Magazine | The 2013 FAD Awards: London Fashion Week Catwalk Review


Stephanie Kitchen by Warren Clarke

The Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) Awards are always an end-of-fashion-week treat. After five days of the freshest fashion talent dominating the catwalks at the Fashion Scout venue, FAD looks even further into the future at the best of the country’s undergraduate talent, based each season around a different theme.


Louis Anderson-Bythell – all photography by Matt Bramford

There could be no better a theme in this age of global change and austerity than ‘Future Optimism‘, which was the brief for this year’s students. Over 100 undergraduates submitted work for the competition, with fifteen entries showcased at this climatic event.


Anna Kim by Gabriel Ayala

Here’s a quick photographic rundown of the fifteen entries:

MATTHEW O’BRIEN

LUCINDA ROBERTS

STEPHANOS KONSTANTIOU


Stephanos Konstantiou by Laura Hickman

ROBERT MILLS

STEPHANIE KITCHEN

JOSEPH HORTON

CHELSEY CROSSLAND

LOUIS ANDERSON-BYTHELL

AYSHA SIMPSON

NNEKA OKORIE

KIMBERLEY PHILLIPS

LAURA CHITTENDEN

ANNA KIM

ESTELA NEVINSKAITE

MORWENNA DARWELL

And so on to the winners. It must have been a tough job for Hilary Alexander, Fashion Scout’s Martyn Roberts, Topshops’ Geraldine O’Brien, FAD’s Claire Muldoon and our pal Milly Jackson (who won the 2011 Award) to choose a winner.


Sitting at the end of the catwalk is fantastic for shots of models but not so fantastic if the awards action takes place at the opposite end.

One of my personal favourites, Nneka Okorie‘s glorious menswear, took one of the runner up prizes. Her slick trench-coats with digital printing techniques brought both expert tailoring and vivid colours to the catwalk and I loved the discrete details of city skylights on a backpack and trouser hems.

Stephanos Konstantiou took the other runner up prize with his futuristic neoprene collection with rigid cutaway details. His laser-cut houndstooth pattern was completely original, and I enjoyed the sharp silhouettes that his collection projected. Nneka and Stephanos both take home five hundred quid and an industry placement. Well done, pals!

The winner, described by Hilary Alexander as ‘unanimous’ and ‘one to watch’ for the coming seasons, was, deservedly, Stephanie Kitchen. A final year student at Bath Spa University (always a good show at Graduate Fashion Week), Stephanie’s innovative cycle wear earned cheers when it first appeared at the beginning of the show and rapturous applause when it was announced Stephanie had won. This collection brought together wearability, sustainability, style and functionality all in one. The cycle sunglasses were a hit, too.

Stephanie wins £1000 and an industry placement and her designs were also shown at London Fashion Weekend. I don’t think this will be the last time we see Stephanie on the London fashion catwalks.


Winner Stephanie Kitchen by Milly Jackson for FAD

Categories ,2013, ,Anna Kim, ,Awards, ,Aysha Simpson, ,BA, ,catwalk, ,Chelsey Crossland, ,Estela Nevinskaite, ,FAD, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Joseph Horton, ,Kimberley Phillips, ,Laura Chittenden, ,Laura Hickman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louis Anderson-Bythell, ,Lucinda Roberts, ,Matt Bramford, ,Matthew O’Brien, ,menswear, ,Milly Jackson, ,Morwenna Darwell, ,Nneka Okorie, ,review, ,Robert Mills, ,Stephanie Kitchen, ,Stephanos Konstantinou, ,students, ,sustainability, ,undergraduate, ,Warren Clarke, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Real People do the Catwalk

realpeople1

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Last night I was delighted to be invited to the ICA for an emphatic catwalk show with a difference. The event was organised by former designer Elaine Foster-Gandey; director of Designer Sales UK.

Elaine developed Real People do the Catwalk after hosting a fashion show which included both dancers and models on stage. “I asked my customers about it and they said they related to the dancers and not the models”.

Spurred by this Elaine set about putting together a pioneering show to further the arguement that replacing super-thin models with people who reflect society could lead to increased sales for the fashion industry.

icacatwalk13

The show opened in silence with the models resembling extras from Scream in their attire of long black robes and white masks. Each model first vocalised how they felt the fashion industry related to them, stomach cheap followed by revealing their beautifully styled outfits and their real identities.

therealfaceofbritain

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

The driving force behind the model casting to show the fashion industry that different body shapes can be celebrated in fashion shows and advertising campaigns.

“It is about not creating an elite world where no one else can join in,” Explained Elaine. “So many people want a chance, but know that because they are five foot tall, or a size 14-16, they never will have.” The models featured within the show ranged from a 6’1” Drag Artiste to a 5’4” male; dress sizes 8 to 20 and ages between 25 to 60+.

What I enjoyed most about the show was the diversity and celebration of the models differences. It was fresh and modern with all the models having poise, confidence and importantly a great sense of humour. Their
good spirits and sense of fun gave the show an electric atmosphere.

icacatwalk8

The models’ charismatic personalities brought out something unique in the clothes that might not have been projected if worn by a ‘normal’ model. Whether this is because they were real people displaying how the clothes would fit on our own bodies or down to their insurmountable energy and passion for highlighting an issue intricately linked to the size zero debate.

Afterwards there was a riveting post-show debate featuring: Elaine Foster-Gandey; Real People do the Catwalk organiser, writer Dariush Alavi; Eleni Renton, founder of Leni’s Model Management; Hilary Alexander, esteemed fashion director at The Daily Telegraph and was chaired by writer and broadcaster Bidisha.

icacatwalk12

The debate began by Dariush Alavi somewhat controversially enquiring as to why Real People do the Catwalk
was produced to “enact a traditional fashion show.” Suggesting that by keeping the traditional format, could anything change by replacing the models with real people as it is not the models who are at fault but the stage on which they stand. Alavi suggested doing away with the catwalk altogether.

This prompted both Hilary Alexander and a member of the audience to defend the catwalk as “fashion’s world stage” and looked back to a John Galliano show where the entire collection was presented on an overhead track of basic clothes hangers. Dariush’s response suggested making models obsolete and displaying clothes on a fashion conveyer belt went down like a lead balloon. The audience and the rest of the panel remained sceptical of high fashion designers considering a presentation that in a format is more commonly associated with The Generation Game.

realpeople3

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Questions were raised about the morality of the fashion industry and the spotlight on the size zero debate intensified. Hilary spoke about the Telegraph not facing the same constraints from advertisers as glossy fashion titles and said that the newspaper’s “aim to strike a balance between real people and models and actively try to include both types of woman in spreads… the oldest woman we’ve ever featured was 94.”

Panellist Eleni Renton mentioned that the Editor of UK Vogue Alexandra Shulman spoke out against size zero in June accusing designers of making magazines hire models with “jutting bones and no breasts or hips” by supplying them with “minuscule” garments for their photo shoots. She claimed that Vogue frequently “retouched” photographs to make models look larger. In response Hilary questioned whether things had begun to change at UK Vogue as they still fail to represent body diversity within their pages, suggesting it would become apparent what their real stance on size zero is over the coming months.

realpeople2

(photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Elaine added that whilst magazine images are not healthy for women, they have a considerable impact on impressionable teenagers who start to believe they need to emulate perfect bodies in order to be considered beautiful and successful.

“Look around, everything we see is airbrushed… these aren’t real images.”

To emphasise her point Elaine spoke of teenagers being more body conscious than any generation before citing her own children as an example: “I have a six-year-old daughter and 11 and 15-year-old stepdaughters who are constantly looking in the mirror. My stepdaughters are so skinny and so conscious about what they eat and what they see in the media. They are constantly aware of body image issues. It is a big issue for adolescent girls and boys.”

icacatwalk14

The panel and audience agreed that the media are responsible for putting different demographics into the mainstream and popularising diversity, and that they have a moral responsibility to society to not glamorise super skinny body shapes. Elaine believes that there has “been a spike in our body consciousness” in recent years and we have turned into a society “afraid of flesh, hair and wrinkles”.

Eleni, director of Leni’s Model Management only works with girls “who are sizes 8 to 12… They are the type of girls you see in the street and think, ‘I would like a body like hers.”

As the debate drew to a close the supermodel era was discussed, with Hilary citing that the greats in the industry: Linda, Kate and Naomi all had personality, and that was what made them famous, rather than their figures. On the flip side other great supermodels such as Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington and Sophie Dahl were celebrated for having curves.

Through the conversations it became apparent that the only modern day equivalent of a curvaceous celebrity pushing the boundaries of what is acceptable in mainstream is Beth Ditto, who won LOVE magazine a prestigious industry award for her iconic nude cover

love-magazine

The overall outcome was for women to take responsibility for themselves and their bodies and actively promote positive body attitudes to their daughters, friends and grandchildren. Everyone agreed that while it is easy to blame the media for the size zero trend, consumers need to use our buying power to actively challenge the fashion industry into reconsidering their design practices and elitism.

I left the ICA feeling very empowered, wanting to help revolutionise the fashion industry from the outside in.

Categories ,Bidisha, ,Dariush Alavi, ,Designer Sales UK, ,Dove Real Beauty Campaign, ,Elaine Foster-Gandey, ,Eleni Renton, ,Hilary Alexander, ,ica, ,Kate Moss, ,Leni’s Model Management, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mark Fast, ,Naomi Cambell, ,Real People do the Catwalk ICA, ,Size Zero Debate, ,The Daily Telegraph, ,The Guardian

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Amelia’s Magazine | Real People do the Catwalk

realpeople1

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Last night I was delighted to be invited to the ICA for an emphatic catwalk show with a difference. The event was organised by former designer Elaine Foster-Gandey; director of Designer Sales UK.

Elaine developed Real People do the Catwalk after hosting a fashion show which included both dancers and models on stage. “I asked my customers about it and they said they related to the dancers and not the models”.

Spurred by this Elaine set about putting together a pioneering show to further the arguement that replacing super-thin models with people who reflect society could lead to increased sales for the fashion industry.

icacatwalk13

The show opened in silence with the models resembling extras from Scream in their attire of long black robes and white masks. Each model first vocalised how they felt the fashion industry related to them, followed by revealing their beautifully styled outfits and their real identities.

therealfaceofbritain

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

The driving force behind the model casting to show the fashion industry that different body shapes can be celebrated in fashion shows and advertising campaigns.

“It is about not creating an elite world where no one else can join in,” Explained Elaine. “So many people want a chance, but know that because they are five foot tall, or a size 14-16, they never will have.” The models featured within the show ranged from a 6’1” Drag Artiste to a 5’4” male; dress sizes 8 to 20 and ages between 25 to 60+.

What I enjoyed most about the show was the diversity and celebration of the models differences. It was fresh and modern with all the models having poise, confidence and importantly a great sense of humour. Their
good spirits and sense of fun gave the show an electric atmosphere.

icacatwalk8

The models’ charismatic personalities brought out something unique in the clothes that might not have been projected if worn by a ‘normal’ model. Whether this is because they were real people displaying how the clothes would fit on our own bodies or down to their insurmountable energy and passion for highlighting an issue intricately linked to the size zero debate.

Afterwards there was a riveting post-show debate featuring: Elaine Foster-Gandey; Real People do the Catwalk organiser, writer Dariush Alavi; Eleni Renton, founder of Leni’s Model Management; Hilary Alexander, esteemed fashion director at The Daily Telegraph and was chaired by writer and broadcaster Bidisha.

icacatwalk12

The debate began by Dariush Alavi somewhat controversially enquiring as to why Real People do the Catwalk
was produced to “enact a traditional fashion show.” Suggesting that by keeping the traditional format, could anything change by replacing the models with real people as it is not the models who are at fault but the stage on which they stand. Alavi suggested doing away with the catwalk altogether.

This prompted both Hilary Alexander and a member of the audience to defend the catwalk as “fashion’s world stage” and looked back to a John Galliano show where the entire collection was presented on an overhead track of basic clothes hangers. Dariush’s response suggested making models obsolete and displaying clothes on a fashion conveyer belt went down like a lead balloon. The audience and the rest of the panel remained sceptical of high fashion designers considering a presentation that in a format is more commonly associated with The Generation Game.

realpeople3

(Photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Questions were raised about the morality of the fashion industry and the spotlight on the size zero debate intensified. Hilary spoke about the Telegraph not facing the same constraints from advertisers as glossy fashion titles and said that the newspaper’s “aim to strike a balance between real people and models and actively try to include both types of woman in spreads… the oldest woman we’ve ever featured was 94.”

Panellist Eleni Renton mentioned that the Editor of UK Vogue Alexandra Shulman spoke out against size zero in June accusing designers of making magazines hire models with “jutting bones and no breasts or hips” by supplying them with “minuscule” garments for their photo shoots. She claimed that Vogue frequently “retouched” photographs to make models look larger. In response Hilary questioned whether things had begun to change at UK Vogue as they still fail to represent body diversity within their pages, suggesting it would become apparent what their real stance on size zero is over the coming months.

realpeople2

(photograph by Natasha Caruana)

Elaine added that whilst magazine images are not healthy for women, they have a considerable impact on impressionable teenagers who start to believe they need to emulate perfect bodies in order to be considered beautiful and successful.

“Look around, everything we see is airbrushed… these aren’t real images.”

To emphasise her point Elaine spoke of teenagers being more body conscious than any generation before citing her own children as an example: “I have a six-year-old daughter and 11 and 15-year-old stepdaughters who are constantly looking in the mirror. My stepdaughters are so skinny and so conscious about what they eat and what they see in the media. They are constantly aware of body image issues. It is a big issue for adolescent girls and boys.”

icacatwalk14

The panel and audience agreed that the media are responsible for putting different demographics into the mainstream and popularising diversity, and that they have a moral responsibility to society to not glamorise super skinny body shapes. Elaine believes that there has “been a spike in our body consciousness” in recent years and we have turned into a society “afraid of flesh, hair and wrinkles”.

Eleni, director of Leni’s Model Management only works with girls “who are sizes 8 to 12… They are the type of girls you see in the street and think, ‘I would like a body like hers.”

As the debate drew to a close the supermodel era was discussed, with Hilary citing that the greats in the industry: Linda, Kate and Naomi all had personality, and that was what made them famous, rather than their figures. On the flip side other great supermodels such as Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington and Sophie Dahl were celebrated for having curves.

Through the conversations it became apparent that the only modern day equivalent of a curvaceous celebrity pushing the boundaries of what is acceptable in mainstream is Beth Ditto, who won LOVE magazine a prestigious industry award for her iconic nude cover

love-magazine

The overall outcome was for women to take responsibility for themselves and their bodies and actively promote positive body attitudes to their daughters, friends and grandchildren. Everyone agreed that while it is easy to blame the media for the size zero trend, consumers need to use our buying power to actively challenge the fashion industry into reconsidering their design practices and elitism.

I left the ICA feeling very empowered, wanting to help revolutionise the fashion industry from the outside in.

Categories ,Bidisha, ,Dariush Alavi, ,Designer Sales UK, ,Dove Real Beauty Campaign, ,Elaine Foster-Gandey, ,Eleni Renton, ,Hilary Alexander, ,ica, ,Kate Moss, ,Leni’s Model Management, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mark Fast, ,Naomi Cambell, ,Real People do the Catwalk ICA, ,Size Zero Debate, ,The Daily Telegraph, ,The Guardian

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Paul Costelloe

Paul Costello 3_by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Butterflies doing cartwheels in my tummy and the feeling that my consciousness has surreptitiously tiptoed away, adiposity wanting to take in everything… right now; it can only be the start of London Fashion Week.

Paul Costelloe  by Amber Cassidy, <a target=order London Fashion Week, mind SS 2012″ title=”Paul Costelloe by Amber Cassidy, London Fashion Week, SS 2012″ width=”480″ height=”680″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-49295″ />
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello London Fashion Week SS 2012 Akeela Bhattay
All photography by Amelia Gregory, Akeela Bhattay and Matt Bramford

It’s the first show of the day and there’s a rush of excitement bustling through Somerset House. I wait impatiently in the queue for the Paul Costelloe show, surrounded by familiar press talk and the occasional exclamation of ‘Darling!‘ kiss kiss – a scene which will be re-enacted many times during the this week.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul costello Joana Faria SS 12 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 Joana Faria

Once inside, I find my seat at the front, secure my goody bag, retrieve my camera from my exhausted looking satchel and decide that taking notes and photographs at the same time is not achievable (for me, that is), so do away with my notebook. There’s a flurry of photographers suddenly surrounding guests further down the row and I want to see what all the fuss is about; It’s Jimmy Choo and Autumn Philips. A quick ‘snap snap’ with my decrepit camera and back to my seat before the show starts.

Jimmy Choo at Paul Costelloe SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe SS 2011 review-Autumn Philips
Jimmy Choo and Autumn Philips.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul Costello 2_by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Out glides the first model, her hair in large messy but firm pin curls and knots pinned close to the head with eye-make up in pea green (one of my favourite colours) that jumps out at you. She wears a tailored suit in café au lait, with the jacket in a 1940’s inspired style; slightly puffed sleeves, tapered collar and a slim belt accentuating the waist. The skirt however conforms more to the style of the mini-skirt and with loose pleats the outfit looks effortlessly chic.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello London Fashion Week SS 2012 Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costelloe  by Amber Cassidy SS 2012 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Amber Cassidy

Hues of cream, grey and monochrome forge ahead; structured suits with pleated detail and baby doll dresses with flouncy sleeves and cap sleeves, high collars and ruff collars, and high waists, distinctive of the 1960s mod fashion. The 60’s influence continues through most of the collection, with sailor collars, high waists and short hemlines. Billowing sleeves meanwhile, and wide neck collars hint of the medieval.

LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 PaulCostelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul costello Joana Faria SS 2012 London Fashion Week
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

The muted colours bloom into a concoction of pastels that remind me of a box of Parisian macaroons, in candy floss pink, bittersweet peach and mint ice-cream green. The rich brocade fabrics in these delectable colours ooze femininity and an inhibited playfulness, a characteristic synonymous with the 1960’s. The tailored jackets and shift dresses , evocative of Jackie Kennedy and Mad Men, too celebrate femininity.

Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 Paul Costelloe by Matt Bramford
Paul Costello 1 by Gilly Rochester LFW SS 2012
Paul Costelloe S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

LFW London Fashion Week SS2012 Paul Costelloe by Matt Bramford

The menswear collection harks to an era much further away with, Edwardian austerity pleasantly combined with the coquettishness of the New Romantics and a becoming bow to the seventies. Like the womenswear, the tailoring is excellent but never restrictive and is softened by rhythmic pleats, ruffles and capacious gauze and linen shirts. The colours adhere the relaxed and almost playful demeanour of the collection, from soft neautrals and intense indigo to colours of candy.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory

I especially love the way each outfit moves, simply and fluently and functionally! The pleats which seem to feature in many of the outfits are mesmerising to watch and sit beautifully on each piece. Paul Costelloe asserts his view on sandals and socks; a resounding yes to sandals with socks.

Paul Costelloe SS 2012 review London Fashion Week by Amelia Gregory
Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay
Paul Costelloe set out to produce a collection that combines the signature Costelloe style together with elements of vintage Parisian chic – I do believe he has succeeded.

Paul Costello SS 2012 London Fashion Week Akeela Bhattay

If the consistent creativity and quality of Paul Costelloe’s collections are signs of things to come, I cannot wait to see his take on Autumn Winter 2012.


Play the video and watch the show.

Categories ,1940s, ,1960s, ,1970s, ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Amber Cassidy, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Autumn Philips, ,Baby Doll dress, ,british fashion council, ,Brocade, ,Chase PR, ,Coral, ,designer, ,Edwardian, ,Feminine, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Jackie Kennedy, ,Jimmy Choo, ,Joana Faria, ,LFW TV, ,Live Show, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mad Men, ,Matt Bramford, ,medieval, ,menswear, ,Mint, ,Mod, ,Parisian, ,Paul Costelloe, ,pink, ,S/S 2012, ,Shift Dress, ,Somerset House, ,spring, ,summer, ,Swing Coat, ,video, ,vintage, ,Watch Online, ,Womanswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Louise Amstrup (again)

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, stomach I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

And then, story whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, mind and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander’s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season stay away from the fur sponsorship Louise. But do say yes to Dr.Hauschka again. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, view I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, stomach whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, treatment and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander’s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season stay away from the fur sponsorship Louise. But do say yes to Dr.Hauschka again. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, discount I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, cheapest whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, viagra 40mg and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander’s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season stay away from the fur sponsorship Louise. But do say yes to Dr.Hauschka again. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, ailment I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, viagra 100mg whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, viagra I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, side effects I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, order whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, approved I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, ed whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, malady and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out but Louise sneaked one past me. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Illustration by Kayleigh Bluck

As I was writing this, story Amelia’s review and photos from the same show popped up on twitter. Fortunately I did not end up unwittingly taking home a mink tail keying and cannot fathom why one would include that in a goody bag. I have to admit that the mink coat slipped past me as well, but bad goody bag gifts aside, here is my review of the show.

The queue was the most disorganized I’ve seen all week but the most amazing guy with a flat cap and matching cockney accent made up for it as he pulled people from the hustle and bustle and ushered them in. His haphazard methods have probably won my favour because I seemed to fit his undecipherable criteria of people who could come in.

I sat perched on the end of a row (always a good place for photos, even if you’re not in the front row), where I had a vantage point allowing me to ogle at two items whilst I waited for the show to begin. 1- Hilary Alexander’s great leopard print leggings on my left (great illustration in Amelia’s write up) and 2- an amazing pair of spike encrusted stilettos being worn on my right.

Without being bland, the Louise Amstrup collection is an entirely wearable S/S 2011 wardrobe (except for the beekeeper/sahara desert style hats). Oversized mens shirts, loose wide-leg trousers and paneled baggy dresses were all great keep-cool-in-hot-sun clothes. She has hit the nail on the head with clothes that are easy to move around in, are made from light fabrics and that look nice – seems simple, but somehow every summer I end up wearing things that leave me feeling decidedly UN-cooled.

Illustration by Kellie Black

Basic mute colours and the occasional shot of dark print made up the palette; the creams, pale yellows, blues (I refuse to say baby blue) and light pinks created a subtle but not ice creamy feel. From the press release I have learnt that this reflects the collections attempt to marry together Sissy Spacek’s innocence in the film Badlands (1973)with Marriane Sagebrecht’s character in Bagdad Café (1987). So, a mixture of feminine darkness and purity. The second theme of a traveller in the desert was most evident with the dark print (feminine darkness!), which was of thunderstorms and lightning in the night sky. Actually my favourite piece was the floor length dress made entirely of the print in question.

Illustration by Kayleigh Bluck

The mark of a well established designer is a key technique or stylistic flair evident in all their collections. As Basso & Brooke are notorious for their eclectic mixing of prints, Louise Amstrup collections are becoming increasingly known for featuring rather well placed fabric paneling. The S/S 2011 pieces use panels of leather, framed with frayed cotton, in strips on both the skirts, the trousers and the dresses. Layering too, was used extensively on the skirts, again using frayed cotton edging for a more delicate appearance on some of the lighter pieces.

Categories ,Baggy Clothes, ,Hilary Alexander, ,illustration, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Amstrup, ,Muted Colours, ,print, ,S/S 2011, ,Sissy Spacek, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Louise Amstrup


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, discount for God’s sake, tadalafil and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, information pills for God’s sake, thumb and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, cure for God’s sake, and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

All photography by Matt Bramford


Illustration by Krister Selin

I was very excited to see what NEWGEN winner Michael Van Der Ham would have in store this season at his first solo show. He’s quickly rising up the fashion ranks – he only bloody graduated a year ago, abortion for God’s sake, and it was inevitable that this was going to be a good ‘un.

A quick cycle across Waterloo Bridge took me to the erstwhile Eurostar Terminal at Waterloo Station. London Fashion Week is SO much better by bike. Despite the odd trauma here and there, specific to my unlucky self, to be able to zip between the many venues without relying on public transport is a Godsend.

The building is like a ghost town these days since the firm’s relocation to St Pancras. Apparently it’s costing millions to upkeep, so hopefully Topshop’s little foray into hosting fashion events there has helped. Sir Phillip Green certainly doesn’t need the money, that’s for sure.

Directed by awkward looking teenagers dressed in grey branded bolier suits, we were ushered through the labyrinth that is left behind. There’s something a bit spooky about it – escalators are motionless, luggage belts are empty and all electrical devices like light-up signs for directions are, of course, turned off. There’s also a sense of poignancy in the air in this abandoned haunt. Nobody else seemed to sense this misery as they clacked around on their heels, so this might have been due to the eight coffees I had consumed that morning. Arriving at the top with the beautiful afternoon light bathing through the glass roof was quite something, though.

I had a little wander around, Ham-ing it up and taking a few pics of people glugging booze, and then a loud speaker announced that we should take our seats. The catwalk was the very last platform on the south side of the building, with tiered seating on one side only. Those models sure were close to the track. I did worry, especially after the trend of tumbling models we’ve seen this season.

The usual front rowers were there, including Alexandra Shulman, Brix Smith Start, Anna Dello Russo, and Sarah Mower. While it was nice to be in the daylight, the building doesn’t allow for any dramatic changes in light, so without any prior warning the show began. It’s a long catwalk n’all – there I was, worrying again that these models might not have eaten and would pass out from all that exercise.


Illustration by Krister Selin

Michael Van Der Ham’s clothing is a little odd when you first view it – seams are all over the place, fabrics are diverse, colours clash, outfits are classifiable on one side and then something totally different by the other. But somehow, they work. Rich tones of blue, pale and hot pinks, graphic patterns and pale colours all combine to make unique pieces and were styled very simply to allow them to have maximum impact. Themes like disco and dance spring to mind.

Because of Michael’s expert fusing of varying fabrics and cuts, there isn’t really any kind of silhouette to talk about – skirts were short, and then long; necklines were high, and then low; waists were diagonal and then horizontal, sleeves were short and then high – there was bias cut, flattering fabrics, body-con fabrics, the lot… I was a nervous wreck by the time the show finished. It’s all pretty baffling but beautiful to look at.

My favourite elements were crushed velours and velvets, embellished skirts, skirts that had been gathered to create gorgeous, soft shapes, and floating translucent fabrics that were attached like super-hero capes.

It’s a brave woman that can pull off the Michael Van Der Ham look. But those who can, should.

All photography by Matt Bramford

Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Now, cheapest I was going to write something really nice about how underrated Louise Amstrup is… how she deserves wider recognition and a bigger audience. The clothes were understated but clever. I enjoyed the show.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

And then, whilst I was eating my tea last night I finally decided to go through the goodie bag, and discovered a big promotional catalogue for a fur brand. Missed the fur piece – this was the spring/summer collection for cripes sake, I wasn’t looking for fur. Must have tuned it out. So far so not particularly acceptable, but I have grown to accept that the odd bit of fur will creep into the collections of those who aren’t bothered by its production or ethics. And inevitably its presence will have been sponsored, for what up and coming designer has the readies to splash on dead animals reincarnated as extra curricular human hides?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

So Louise quite likes her fur. I think we’ve got the point, but was that it? Oh no…. I was in for a much bigger treat. And one that was guaranteed to hack off anyone who is remotely anti-fur. I know, why not wipe out a whole group of possibly complimentary press by agreeing to give away A FUCKING FUR KEYRING. So there I am, munching on my dinner, when I unsuspectingly open a little pouch, and I kid you not, out flopped the tail of a fucking mink. Slithered right onto my table like it was still half alive. FUCKING EWWWWWW. Why?! Why antagonise a whole section of press?

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

So. With that over with, enough of the fucks and on with the show… Well, under attended as I’ve said, but then it was Sunday and it’s always a little slow and sleepy, attracting only the most hardcore fashionistas.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr
Louise Amstrup by Stephanie Parr.

Dewy eyed models strode into the lights in a selection of high waisted trousers, shorts or floaty print dresses accessorised with carefully layered bib like kercheifs and protected with wide brimmed hats and floaty scarves. The colour palette was muted – predominately sand, beige, cream and dusty purples and blues. This collection was apparently inspired by the vast expanses of the American desert *what the fuck do I need a fur coat there for? I’d be blooming sweltering* Sorry woops thought I was going to steer clear of the swearing there for a moment, but I seem to have developed temporary Tourettes.

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Was this the fur coat? Hard to tell really.

And I really enjoyed Hilary Alexander‘s enthusiastic whooping as the models hit the catwalk for a final turn, but I can’t remember what the track was I’m afraid because I was too busy smiling at Hilary’s outfit… let’s just say I’m very glad to know that one is never too old for leopard print leggings. And whilst I’m on the subject of Hilary – have you seen her twitter feed? The woman is even more celeb obsessed than the rest of us. The woman is a fucking legend. Oh dear, there I go again.

Hilary-Alexander-London-Fashion-Week-S-S-2011-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Hilary Alexander in her superfly leopard print leggings, by Antonia Parker.

So, how would I sum up? Well, next season: less fur, more Dr.Hauschka please. Did I mention that the goodie bag was very full, and I was decidedly more keen on the offerings from this “cult, biodynamic, pioneering skincare brand.”

Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Louise Amstrup SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Fur, ,Hilary Alexander, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louise Amstrup, ,onoff, ,Stephanie Parr, ,twitter, ,Victoria House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: What is everybody wearing?!


Illustrations by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The Orla Kiely presentation gets more popular every year and I’m sure it’s not just because they always have pastries there, tadalafil doctor no matter what time of day – our lovely illustrators were keen to draw her collection too and we didn’t even give them pastries. This year Orla dispensed with models entirely in favour of just having people who offer you food, for sale i.e. they’re playing to their strengths. Cardboard cutouts of the cute, this web preppy frocks are there but take a back seat – in fact I almost forgot to take any photographs of them but funnily enough took lots of the retro tubs of popcorn constantly on hand.

Eating the pastries turned out to be a rookie mistake as I instantly sugar crashed and was later found by a colleague slumped over in the press room using a bag of crisps as a pillow. But before I slipped into a sugar coma, I vaguely remember watching a video presentation (which you can watch here) that takes the very orange-and-brown-print 1970s style of Orla Kiely back a decade to the 1960s, specifically Swinging Sixties London.

It’s made by Gia Coppola, who is indeed related to those other Coppolas, although the vid is much more jaunty than The Virgin Suicides or The Godfather. Actually I haven’t seen those films (I know, GASP) but I’m guessing they are a tad more intense than a video of a smiling blonde lady running around town in miniskirts. Correct me if I’m wrong though.

I was underwhelmed by the video presentation to be honest but it doesn’t dent my love for Orla. In a season where everything is once again colourful and sweet as a cupcake on a stick (yes, they had these – whose amazing idea was it to put it on a stick?) I think the wave of appreciation for Orla has reached its frothy, bubbly apex and the label is being seen as less twee and more wearable by fashion types. It’s definitely for girly girls and you wouldn’t find one of its collared dresses or frilled bikinis in the same wardrobe as anything from Hannah Marshall, but variety is the spice of life and if everyone wore clothing inspired by the insides of squid etc. it wouldn’t look cool anymore so really the edgy people should be grateful to us. But ARE they? No.

Illustration by Krister Selin

Charles Anastase S/S 2011 collection saw a return to form after A/W saw the designer labours with last year’s experiment with deconstruction achieve mixed results – some were fantastic – where as others were clearly a struggle. This season saw a return to the pieces Anastase so exceeds at, and delicately polka dotted dresses were complete with Peter Pan collars.

Illustration by Krister Selin

For the dresses and skirts the designer experimented with hems of a varying length, shop none of which rose higher than the knee. A sense of femininity was maintained through the fit of the longer skirts, ambulance the modern bob and pretty pleats which adorned the sheer dresses.

Illustration by Krister Selin

A favourite piece was the dresses which came adorned in the Paul Klee style print which adorned the invite.

The colours remained blocky – a purple t-shirt adorned white trousers.

Drop hems and exaggerated collars.

Jaquard made is second apparence in an intriguing playsuit and ankle skimming trousers.


Weird glasses rabbit girl, sildenafil illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

The international fashion press often remark that fashion journalists come to London to see what the people on the street are wearing rather than what the models on the catwalks are wearing – and so with tremedous pleasure I present to you a (small) selection of peeps who I’ve spotted out and about so far. Some weird, sildenafil some wonderful. Some go for understated chic. I like. Some appear to have got dressed in the dark and warrant the NHS installing mirrors in all bedrooms. I like even more. I’ve also thrown a few celebs in for good measure.

Here you go! (Plays trumpet)

Love it:

Elle’s Alistair Guy:

LOVE this guy’s look. Oh, patient hang on a minute…

The rough one from the Sugababes (who actually looked gorge):

I like this guy’s scarf, a lot:

My pal, Hilary Alexander:

LOVE Brix: (but my love is conditional and if that fur is real, good riddance) It’s not fur! Thank you, Brix!


Weird pirate boy, last seen at the opening of 123 Bethnal Green Road, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

This gal makes her own hats. Evidently:

Brix today:

These are both men.

Love this trousers:

A vision in blue:


Super chic girl, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

LOVE this:

Oh pal. It looked so much better as a scarf. You wally.

SO chic:

What better way to finish than with a pic of Suzy Menkes, OBE? I LOVE her and her trademark pompadour do. I would do anything to give her a little squeeze.

Categories ,Alistair Guy, ,Brix Smith Start, ,Hilary Alexander, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Papped, ,S/S 2011, ,streetstyle, ,Style, ,Suzy Menkes, ,Weird, ,Wonderful

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: What is everybody wearing?!


Illustrations by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The Orla Kiely presentation gets more popular every year and I’m sure it’s not just because they always have pastries there, tadalafil doctor no matter what time of day – our lovely illustrators were keen to draw her collection too and we didn’t even give them pastries. This year Orla dispensed with models entirely in favour of just having people who offer you food, for sale i.e. they’re playing to their strengths. Cardboard cutouts of the cute, this web preppy frocks are there but take a back seat – in fact I almost forgot to take any photographs of them but funnily enough took lots of the retro tubs of popcorn constantly on hand.

Eating the pastries turned out to be a rookie mistake as I instantly sugar crashed and was later found by a colleague slumped over in the press room using a bag of crisps as a pillow. But before I slipped into a sugar coma, I vaguely remember watching a video presentation (which you can watch here) that takes the very orange-and-brown-print 1970s style of Orla Kiely back a decade to the 1960s, specifically Swinging Sixties London.

It’s made by Gia Coppola, who is indeed related to those other Coppolas, although the vid is much more jaunty than The Virgin Suicides or The Godfather. Actually I haven’t seen those films (I know, GASP) but I’m guessing they are a tad more intense than a video of a smiling blonde lady running around town in miniskirts. Correct me if I’m wrong though.

I was underwhelmed by the video presentation to be honest but it doesn’t dent my love for Orla. In a season where everything is once again colourful and sweet as a cupcake on a stick (yes, they had these – whose amazing idea was it to put it on a stick?) I think the wave of appreciation for Orla has reached its frothy, bubbly apex and the label is being seen as less twee and more wearable by fashion types. It’s definitely for girly girls and you wouldn’t find one of its collared dresses or frilled bikinis in the same wardrobe as anything from Hannah Marshall, but variety is the spice of life and if everyone wore clothing inspired by the insides of squid etc. it wouldn’t look cool anymore so really the edgy people should be grateful to us. But ARE they? No.

Illustration by Krister Selin

Charles Anastase S/S 2011 collection saw a return to form after A/W saw the designer labours with last year’s experiment with deconstruction achieve mixed results – some were fantastic – where as others were clearly a struggle. This season saw a return to the pieces Anastase so exceeds at, and delicately polka dotted dresses were complete with Peter Pan collars.

Illustration by Krister Selin

For the dresses and skirts the designer experimented with hems of a varying length, shop none of which rose higher than the knee. A sense of femininity was maintained through the fit of the longer skirts, ambulance the modern bob and pretty pleats which adorned the sheer dresses.

Illustration by Krister Selin

A favourite piece was the dresses which came adorned in the Paul Klee style print which adorned the invite.

The colours remained blocky – a purple t-shirt adorned white trousers.

Drop hems and exaggerated collars.

Jaquard made is second apparence in an intriguing playsuit and ankle skimming trousers.


Weird glasses rabbit girl, sildenafil illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

The international fashion press often remark that fashion journalists come to London to see what the people on the street are wearing rather than what the models on the catwalks are wearing – and so with tremedous pleasure I present to you a (small) selection of peeps who I’ve spotted out and about so far. Some weird, sildenafil some wonderful. Some go for understated chic. I like. Some appear to have got dressed in the dark and warrant the NHS installing mirrors in all bedrooms. I like even more. I’ve also thrown a few celebs in for good measure.

Here you go! (Plays trumpet)

Love it:

Elle’s Alistair Guy:

LOVE this guy’s look. Oh, patient hang on a minute…

The rough one from the Sugababes (who actually looked gorge):

I like this guy’s scarf, a lot:

My pal, Hilary Alexander:

LOVE Brix: (but my love is conditional and if that fur is real, good riddance) It’s not fur! Thank you, Brix!


Weird pirate boy, last seen at the opening of 123 Bethnal Green Road, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

This gal makes her own hats. Evidently:

Brix today:

These are both men.

Love this trousers:

A vision in blue:


Super chic girl, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

LOVE this:

Oh pal. It looked so much better as a scarf. You wally.

SO chic:

What better way to finish than with a pic of Suzy Menkes, OBE? I LOVE her and her trademark pompadour do. I would do anything to give her a little squeeze.

Categories ,Alistair Guy, ,Brix Smith Start, ,Hilary Alexander, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Papped, ,S/S 2011, ,streetstyle, ,Style, ,Suzy Menkes, ,Weird, ,Wonderful

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012: Catwalk Review: Holly Fulton

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

I was blown away by Holly’s debut in A/W 2009 – a collection of designs influenced by my favourite movement, generic art deco. Mix that with jewel colours, rx luxurious materials and contemporary shapes, and I don’t see what there isn’t to love. When my ticket arrived, I didn’t care that it was standing, I was in that queue at 1.30pm, ready and waiting. I checked Twitter before the show, and saw that Marie Davies, the Junior Fashion Editor at Drapers had tweeted details from the show notes as being ‘dressed for Vegas but holidaying in Margate’, and that she was expecting ‘fruit machines and neon lights’. I thought that Holly’s previous collections had already channelled a little bit of Vegas ‘glamour’, but what would come of the British seaside resort combination?

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Geiko Louve

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Geiko Louve

When I got into the BFC Tent, I was determined to ensure that I got a good spot to take photos of Holly’s creations. I found myself at the end of the catwalk, and deliberated on where to stand – floor, or step, floor or step. The lady next to me, also holding a camera, smiled at me, and made way for me to stand next to her. I asked her if she had spotted who was on the front row (Hilary Alexander flying the Fulton flag in one of her printed dresses). She told me that she hadn’t noticed anyone, and that Holly was one of the few shows she attended, and solely because of her ‘pretty special’ jewellery. Suddenly, this lady’s name came to me, Julia Hutton-Squire, the editor of Adorn London, a jewellery-dedicated website that I read religiously. She was welcoming and friendly, and it was a pleasure to meet and enjoy the show with her.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 – All photography by Miranda Williams

In the darkness, the Aeroplane remix of the Cassius song The Sound of Violence began to play, a favourite of mine, so a very good start. To match this upbeat tempo, Holly opened her show with a signature bright canary yellow look. A pair of wide cut trousers, detailed with a black deco print, and a short sleeve checkerboard pattern top, in the same colours. And straight off, some jewellery! As the model walked, a huge pair of sea shell hoop earrings swung from her ears. Holly’s press release had said the show would take some influences from the sea, shell grottoes actually… were sea themed accessories going to be it? Mermaid-models having finished dressing in their eclectic outfits, to load themselves up with the spoils of the sea bed? Fantastic!

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

Holly’s Versace influences became clear over the next few looks – when I spotted a peek of zebra print in a clutch bag that a model wearing a retro style brown and orange printed playsuit carried with her. This animal print stood out, in the middle of the looks, and worked as the collection’s most Vegas-fabulous designs. The first was a zebra print bomber jacket, cropped enough to rise and show an enviable flat stomach, which was paired with a white mini skirt, printed with an art deco and zebra pattern. The second was a flowing, European-esque jumpsuit, teamed with those shell earrings again. In a later look, a zebra pattern strapless top was worn underneath a white patent leather mini skirt, which was embroidered with a beautiful red coral design. This strapless top, from my position, looked like silk, but I learned later that it was actually intarsia knit, and part of a collaboration with Caerlee Mills, a Scottish textile mill who produced a number of pieces for this collection. Looking back at the photos from the show, these pieces are now easy to spot, but it is only with close inspection that you can see they are knitted and not printed silk. I loved the combination of these woven materials with Holly’s usual printed silks.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

The exotic vibe carried on, with Holly presenting some of her signature body-con mini dresses and a couple of sexy swimwear looks. Holly also cited the work of American photographer Slim Aarons as an influence, who notably took photos of the social elite. It is his 1960’s pool-scene photos that reverberate in this collection. I was previously familiar with Aaron’s work, as one of my favourite jewellery designers, Merle O’Grady, was influenced by the same set of photos for her S/S 2011 collection. The photos are supremely kitsch and stylish, and I would recommend that you go and check them out. The bandeau swimwear was great, a nice addition for the range – although the white and black deco print bikini was worn by the most gorgeous model, and it was actually her I couldn’t keep my eyes off, rather than the bikini!

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

On either side of the swimwear, were some fantastic mini dresses that were adorned with pop colour fringing, macramé beads and sequins. The sea theme continued through with shell, coral and wave prints popping over the dresses in blue and pink hues. This was definitely a show that said ‘Welcome to Summer‘. All Holly needed to top these off was a fantastic pair of shades – and there were Cutler and Gross to step in with some pretty special acetate sunnies to complete the look.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Holly loves a contrast, and we spanned a decade to the 1970’s with some silk wide leg trousers and a grand flowing maxi dress in sea flora prints. These were stark black, mixed with electric turquoise and would work as a glam evening choice. The continued narrative of prints, the sea, animal or natural, really helped bring this collection together. The illustrations of the coral, the seahorses, and the waves were kitsch, playing back to Slim Aaron’s photography. These looks also made the best of the Louboutin mules in patent black. It really is Holly’s choice of accessories that make her stand out for me – this run saw glossy totes, angular bags, in monochrome checks, studded cuffs, and of course the necklaces, which have become part of the Holly Fulton signature as much as the mini dresses.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams
The show closed with a short mini shift, that came down the catwalk as a delicious offering of influences all at once – tribal zebra, delicate sea shells, and clashing colours, orange, black and white, finished off with dreamy pink tones. Add the pink sea shell earrings and patent peep toe shoes, and it was signature Holly Fulton.

Some critics may say that this collection didn’t see Holly push any boundaries, and show us something new, but for me it was a confident show, and she is building an aesthetic that her brand will no doubt grow steadily and successfully upon. Let’s give dues to a designer who can make the unlikely combinations of sequin, fringing and body con work with seashells, zebra print and Vegas influences. For me it was fantastic Fulton.

Categories ,1960s, ,1970s, ,Aaron Slims, ,accessories, ,Adorn London, ,Art Deco, ,bodycon, ,Caerlee Mills, ,cassius, ,Cutler and Gross, ,Drapers, ,Emmi Ojala, ,fashion, ,Geiko Louve, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Holly Fulton, ,jewellery, ,Joana Faria, ,knit, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louboutin, ,Megan Thomas, ,Merle O’Grady, ,Merle O’Grady, ,print, ,rca, ,S/S 2012, ,scotland, ,Slim Aarons, ,Swimwear, ,twitter, ,Vegas, ,Versace, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012: Catwalk Review: Holly Fulton

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Megan Thomas

I was blown away by Holly’s debut in A/W 2009 – a collection of designs influenced by my favourite movement, generic art deco. Mix that with jewel colours, rx luxurious materials and contemporary shapes, and I don’t see what there isn’t to love. When my ticket arrived, I didn’t care that it was standing, I was in that queue at 1.30pm, ready and waiting. I checked Twitter before the show, and saw that Marie Davies, the Junior Fashion Editor at Drapers had tweeted details from the show notes as being ‘dressed for Vegas but holidaying in Margate’, and that she was expecting ‘fruit machines and neon lights’. I thought that Holly’s previous collections had already channelled a little bit of Vegas ‘glamour’, but what would come of the British seaside resort combination?

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Geiko Louve

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Geiko Louve

When I got into the BFC Tent, I was determined to ensure that I got a good spot to take photos of Holly’s creations. I found myself at the end of the catwalk, and deliberated on where to stand – floor, or step, floor or step. The lady next to me, also holding a camera, smiled at me, and made way for me to stand next to her. I asked her if she had spotted who was on the front row (Hilary Alexander flying the Fulton flag in one of her printed dresses). She told me that she hadn’t noticed anyone, and that Holly was one of the few shows she attended, and solely because of her ‘pretty special’ jewellery. Suddenly, this lady’s name came to me, Julia Hutton-Squire, the editor of Adorn London, a jewellery-dedicated website that I read religiously. She was welcoming and friendly, and it was a pleasure to meet and enjoy the show with her.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 – All photography by Miranda Williams

In the darkness, the Aeroplane remix of the Cassius song The Sound of Violence began to play, a favourite of mine, so a very good start. To match this upbeat tempo, Holly opened her show with a signature bright canary yellow look. A pair of wide cut trousers, detailed with a black deco print, and a short sleeve checkerboard pattern top, in the same colours. And straight off, some jewellery! As the model walked, a huge pair of sea shell hoop earrings swung from her ears. Holly’s press release had said the show would take some influences from the sea, shell grottoes actually… were sea themed accessories going to be it? Mermaid-models having finished dressing in their eclectic outfits, to load themselves up with the spoils of the sea bed? Fantastic!

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

Holly’s Versace influences became clear over the next few looks – when I spotted a peek of zebra print in a clutch bag that a model wearing a retro style brown and orange printed playsuit carried with her. This animal print stood out, in the middle of the looks, and worked as the collection’s most Vegas-fabulous designs. The first was a zebra print bomber jacket, cropped enough to rise and show an enviable flat stomach, which was paired with a white mini skirt, printed with an art deco and zebra pattern. The second was a flowing, European-esque jumpsuit, teamed with those shell earrings again. In a later look, a zebra pattern strapless top was worn underneath a white patent leather mini skirt, which was embroidered with a beautiful red coral design. This strapless top, from my position, looked like silk, but I learned later that it was actually intarsia knit, and part of a collaboration with Caerlee Mills, a Scottish textile mill who produced a number of pieces for this collection. Looking back at the photos from the show, these pieces are now easy to spot, but it is only with close inspection that you can see they are knitted and not printed silk. I loved the combination of these woven materials with Holly’s usual printed silks.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Emmi Ojala

The exotic vibe carried on, with Holly presenting some of her signature body-con mini dresses and a couple of sexy swimwear looks. Holly also cited the work of American photographer Slim Aarons as an influence, who notably took photos of the social elite. It is his 1960’s pool-scene photos that reverberate in this collection. I was previously familiar with Aaron’s work, as one of my favourite jewellery designers, Merle O’Grady, was influenced by the same set of photos for her S/S 2011 collection. The photos are supremely kitsch and stylish, and I would recommend that you go and check them out. The bandeau swimwear was great, a nice addition for the range – although the white and black deco print bikini was worn by the most gorgeous model, and it was actually her I couldn’t keep my eyes off, rather than the bikini!

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams

On either side of the swimwear, were some fantastic mini dresses that were adorned with pop colour fringing, macramé beads and sequins. The sea theme continued through with shell, coral and wave prints popping over the dresses in blue and pink hues. This was definitely a show that said ‘Welcome to Summer‘. All Holly needed to top these off was a fantastic pair of shades – and there were Cutler and Gross to step in with some pretty special acetate sunnies to complete the look.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Joana Faria

Holly loves a contrast, and we spanned a decade to the 1970’s with some silk wide leg trousers and a grand flowing maxi dress in sea flora prints. These were stark black, mixed with electric turquoise and would work as a glam evening choice. The continued narrative of prints, the sea, animal or natural, really helped bring this collection together. The illustrations of the coral, the seahorses, and the waves were kitsch, playing back to Slim Aaron’s photography. These looks also made the best of the Louboutin mules in patent black. It really is Holly’s choice of accessories that make her stand out for me – this run saw glossy totes, angular bags, in monochrome checks, studded cuffs, and of course the necklaces, which have become part of the Holly Fulton signature as much as the mini dresses.

Holly Fulton S/S 2012 by Miranda Williams
The show closed with a short mini shift, that came down the catwalk as a delicious offering of influences all at once – tribal zebra, delicate sea shells, and clashing colours, orange, black and white, finished off with dreamy pink tones. Add the pink sea shell earrings and patent peep toe shoes, and it was signature Holly Fulton.

Some critics may say that this collection didn’t see Holly push any boundaries, and show us something new, but for me it was a confident show, and she is building an aesthetic that her brand will no doubt grow steadily and successfully upon. Let’s give dues to a designer who can make the unlikely combinations of sequin, fringing and body con work with seashells, zebra print and Vegas influences. For me it was fantastic Fulton.

Categories ,1960s, ,1970s, ,Aaron Slims, ,accessories, ,Adorn London, ,Art Deco, ,bodycon, ,Caerlee Mills, ,cassius, ,Cutler and Gross, ,Drapers, ,Emmi Ojala, ,fashion, ,Geiko Louve, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Holly Fulton, ,jewellery, ,Joana Faria, ,knit, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louboutin, ,Megan Thomas, ,Merle O’Grady, ,Merle O’Grady, ,print, ,rca, ,S/S 2012, ,scotland, ,Slim Aarons, ,Swimwear, ,twitter, ,Vegas, ,Versace, ,Womenswear

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