Amelia’s Magazine | Sorapol at Old Vic Tunnels: A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Sorapol AW12 by Joanne Young

Sorapol AW12 by Joanne Young

I was excited to receive an invite for the A/W 2012 catwalk show of Sorapol because I had heard that the creative director of this young underground brand is the extravagant club kid Daniel Lismore. So I eagerly arrived at the graffitied, atmospheric venue of Old Vic Tunnels to meet photographer and burlesque performer Tigz Rice aka Tigzy aka Raven Six, who took some of the photos shown here. There was a palpable air of excitement in the long queue, which was chock full of beautiful beings. Some of them, like Boy George, were superstars, and others were well known and popular scenesters, fashionistas and nightlife luminaries, such as Jodie Harsh, Lady Lloyd or Philip Levine. The crowd began to complain when it descended into a disorderly mass to enter the show space via a too small archway, resulting in a serious amount of squeezing and ticket waving. At one point I really thought I had lost my chance to go in, which sadly happened to a large number of guests. A few really disappointed ones even started burning their Sorapol tickets in protest, I hear, but Sorapol could not have been more apologetic on their twitter feed and I am sure this will be something they will think through more carefully next time.

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 by Fay Myers

Sorapol AW12 by Fay Myers

Thankfully, once inside, the vibe was completely friendly, happy and relaxed. The show, entitled Iron Grip, opened in utter darkness aside from the lights behind a curtained archway, from which smoke crept down the catwalk against sounds of sirens, gunfire and explosions. After a few minutes the first model appeared and started walking slowly towards us as Charlie D Soprano sang in a majestic and slightly sinister opera style. I could not really make out what or in which language she was singing, but, intriguingly, the day before the show she wrote on her twitter feed that she was ‘translating pop songs into Russian for tomorrow’s gig’.

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

Sorapol AW12 by Nicola Ellen

Sorapol AW12 by Nicola Ellen

Indeed the outfits that Thai head designer and recent graduate from the London College of Fashion Sorapol Chawaphatnakul sent down the catwalk were so theatrical and adorned with such symbolic props, that one could not help wondering – I like to read the press release after a show – what was the specific reference point or message of this collection. What the press release revealed was that for his A/W 2012 collection Sorapol was inspired by a very specific storyline, which is rather helpful to know when looking at these creations. The story is that of Vasilia, an orphaned girl in pre-revolutionary Russia, who was adopted and raised by exiled Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov aka Lenin. The story then goes that Lenin took Vasilia and his communist ideas to the Russian cities intending to overthrow the aristocracy, but he found Vasilia a place in the Royal Household and there she fell in love with Prince Alexander. Suspicious of this, Lenin ordered the assassination of Prince Alexander. Love and aesthetic beauty won over her father’s ideology and Vasilia attempted to warn the prince but failed. So, enraged and heartbroken Vasilia joined the ranks of the white-clad soldiers fighting to restore Russia’s splendour.

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 by Tessa McSorley

Sorapol AW12 by Tessa McSorley

Via this fairytale, therefore, the A/W 2012 Sorapol collection was created from Vasilia’s point of view with an emphasis on the grandeur of the pre-revolution Russian culture, showing lots of opulent furs, long gowns and embellishments of pearls and gold. [A little parenthesis here to say that I really hope the fact that Sorapol Chawaphatnakul is a Buddhist means all this fur on show was not real.] There were also a lot of elements which suggested war, death and the clash between luxury, or beauty, and fighting. For instance the second outfit was a long red gown with a line of bullets running down from the shoulders to the waist on both sides, complemented by a very impressive tall beehive hairdo in which a gold gas mask had been incorporated. Another favourite hairdo was again a tall beehive this time with a gold skull poking out of it. The theme of death was further emphasised by a model holding a black skull prop in her hand and battle was spelt out by dresses with structured armour sleeves and a silver, gloriously sparkly military suit.

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

Sorapol AW12 by Joanne Young

Sorapol AW12 by Joanne Young

Sorapol AW12 by Joanne Young

The make up for the show was executed by Illamasqua. Unfortunately it is not properly evident in the photos, but it looked fantastic up close. A pale, whitish effect, with glittery touches here and there extended down to the models’ cleavages and brought to mind either corpses or the snowy Russian landscape or perhaps powdered aristocracy.

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW2012 by Janneke de Jong

Sorapol AW2012 by Janneke de Jong

The last couple of outfits were especially theatrical, featuring predominantly white and gold colours, and the crown worn by the last model suggested some kind of victory. This collection was far from commercial, and I can see how it would not be everybody’s cup of tea. As for myself, I was slightly disappointed that it was not more over the top, but then a lot of the time my ideal fashion design is something along the lines of Andrew Logan’s Alternative Miss World. In any case when the Sorapol spectacle ended the vibe was certainly one of victory, with Sorapol Chawaphatnakul running down the catwalk in really high spirits and the audience congratulating him with cheers and a standing ovation.

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Sorapol AW12 by Tigz Rice Studios

All photography by Tigz Rice Studios and Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,Alternative Miss World, ,Andrew Logan, ,Blow PR, ,boy george, ,Buddist, ,Burlesque, ,Charlie D Soprano, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fay Myers, ,graffiti, ,Illamasqua, ,Janneke de Jong, ,Joanne Young, ,Jodie Harsh, ,Lady Lloyd, ,Lenin, ,london, ,London College of Fashion, ,Luxury, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,military, ,Nicola Haigh, ,Philip Levine, ,Prince Alexander, ,Raven Six, ,Russian, ,Russian Revolution, ,Sorapol, ,Sorapol Chawaphatnakul, ,Story of Vasilia, ,Tessa McSorley, ,Thai, ,The Old Vic Tunnels, ,Tigzy, ,Tigzy Rice, ,Vasilia, ,Vladimir Illyich Ulyanov, ,war

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem (by Amelia)

This spring, sales the V&A presents a unique exhibition dedicated the Grand Master Japanese couturier, stuff Yohji Yamamoto. The exhibition will celebrate his life and work, and is the first of its kind in the UK. 30 years after Yamamoto debuted in Paris, the V&A has brought together rare examples of his visionary designs.

Here’s an exclusive interview with the exhibition’s curator, Ligaya Salazar. You can also read some of Salazar’s thoughts below, too.
On process
With this project I started roughly two and a half years ago to work on the idea and the concept behind the exhibition, its also a very particular project because you are working with a living designer who you are doing a single retrospective with, working with their team very closely, so in terms of curating, there is much more of a dialogue there than you would probably normally have with a slightly more thematic show.

The focus was more on to find a concept that would work for him, as a designer, because Yohji Yamamoto is very special in the deign world in terms of the way he approaches designing, so the way you want to show his work should be quite different as well….I spent more time looking at ways of displaying his work, ways of showing his work…

On garment selection
I had the incredible honour to be able to go into both his Paris and his Tokyo archives, the Tokyo archives no curator had ever been to, I had all of his archive to look at and to choose from, which made the editing process incredibly hard…it is something you spend a long time doing, talking to Yohji’s team, talking to the designer, making sure you have covered the iconic parts of his career, but also chosen pieces that are most emblematic of the themes that you want to bring out…I stated with an object list that was about six hundred pieces, and that was already a selection of the pieces I saw in the archive and then I had to bring it down to ninety, it was a long and quite arduous process.

On themes
Because it is an installation based exhibition, there isn’t a prescriptive story to tell, or a chronology, it was much more about how people would encounter the garments, for the first time what we are doing is to show everything on open display, on the same height as the viewer, so you are meeting your other, rather than looking up and behind glass, it’s a very different experience of the clothes.

Yohi Yamamoto is at the V&A and at The Wapping Project until 10th July 2011. Look out for a full review coming soon!

Marnie for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice
Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice.

Ziad Ghanem‘s Never End, sick Never End, Never End was one of those hotly tipped shows that all my contributors were desperate to go to, so I was promised performance catwalking at its best. What I hadn’t expected was to land a prime seat right opposite Boy George, looking remarkably svelte next to Daniel Lismore.

Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I remember the allure of Karma Chameleon, back when a dodgy video was sufficient accompaniment for pop songs of such genius. Colour by Numbers was actually the VERY FIRST album that I owned, given to me by my aunt on good old cassette tape.

YouTube Preview Image

But then, ah, the show!!! This collection was inspired by a horror video game called Silent Hill and the work of Romantic painter John Henry Fuseli, and it explored themes of gothic romance. The press release states that the same garment viewed in a dark, gothic context by one viewer will be interpreted as romantic and liberating by the next.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt.

The show opened with a stunning piece of performance, as a red-headed model appeared in gothic Tim Burton-esque make up, black skirts tumbling as she grew before our eyes into a 12 foot monster burlesque bride waving great green feathered fans. Thereafter followed a series of printed, billowing capes and tightly corseted dresses, all accessorised with veils, reddened eyes, cracked cheeks and Joker smiles. Apparently Ziad asked each model to choose their own favourite horror film make up for the show.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor.

Androgynous models wore chiffon and beaded dresses, a spooky ghost couple trailed rumpled netting behind as they faced the photographers together. Amidst the drama cleverly made outfits showcased traditional haute couture skills using bias cut vintage silk chiffons and duchess satin that flowed around the body.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A white faced creature smeared its face with black paint and make up took a turn towards our feathered friends: blue winged eyes echoing the giant bird prints on winged dresses. Out stepped a ballet dancer on pointe, edging down the catwalk in frilled lilac, her skull face shrouded in grey. As she retreated backwards a series of busty ladies swept down the catwalk in eminently wearable multi coloured chiffon dresses: amongst them walked transvestites, burlesque artists and a giant lady in grey. I particularly adored the bustle backed electric fuchsia number that emphasised every womanly curve.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Taking the art of the catwalk to fantastical heights, Ziad Ghanem proved that his shows really are worth the hype, with or without the added bonus of an 80s pop idol in a fabulous yellow fedora. You can read more about his unique selection of models here.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can also read Florence Massey’s review of the Ziad Ghanem show here.

Categories ,ballet, ,birds, ,boy george, ,Burlesque, ,Chiffon, ,Colour by Numbers, ,couture, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,gothic, ,Helen Crawford, ,Horror, ,Jamie McGregor, ,Jessica Holt, ,John Henry Fuseli, ,Karma Chameleon, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Never End, ,Romantic, ,Silent Hill, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Tigz Rice, ,tim burton, ,Transvestite, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem (by Amelia)

This spring, sales the V&A presents a unique exhibition dedicated the Grand Master Japanese couturier, stuff Yohji Yamamoto. The exhibition will celebrate his life and work, and is the first of its kind in the UK. 30 years after Yamamoto debuted in Paris, the V&A has brought together rare examples of his visionary designs.

Here’s an exclusive interview with the exhibition’s curator, Ligaya Salazar. You can also read some of Salazar’s thoughts below, too.
On process
With this project I started roughly two and a half years ago to work on the idea and the concept behind the exhibition, its also a very particular project because you are working with a living designer who you are doing a single retrospective with, working with their team very closely, so in terms of curating, there is much more of a dialogue there than you would probably normally have with a slightly more thematic show.

The focus was more on to find a concept that would work for him, as a designer, because Yohji Yamamoto is very special in the deign world in terms of the way he approaches designing, so the way you want to show his work should be quite different as well….I spent more time looking at ways of displaying his work, ways of showing his work…

On garment selection
I had the incredible honour to be able to go into both his Paris and his Tokyo archives, the Tokyo archives no curator had ever been to, I had all of his archive to look at and to choose from, which made the editing process incredibly hard…it is something you spend a long time doing, talking to Yohji’s team, talking to the designer, making sure you have covered the iconic parts of his career, but also chosen pieces that are most emblematic of the themes that you want to bring out…I stated with an object list that was about six hundred pieces, and that was already a selection of the pieces I saw in the archive and then I had to bring it down to ninety, it was a long and quite arduous process.

On themes
Because it is an installation based exhibition, there isn’t a prescriptive story to tell, or a chronology, it was much more about how people would encounter the garments, for the first time what we are doing is to show everything on open display, on the same height as the viewer, so you are meeting your other, rather than looking up and behind glass, it’s a very different experience of the clothes.

Yohi Yamamoto is at the V&A and at The Wapping Project until 10th July 2011. Look out for a full review coming soon!

Marnie for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice
Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice.

Ziad Ghanem‘s Never End, sick Never End, Never End was one of those hotly tipped shows that all my contributors were desperate to go to, so I was promised performance catwalking at its best. What I hadn’t expected was to land a prime seat right opposite Boy George, looking remarkably svelte next to Daniel Lismore.

Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I remember the allure of Karma Chameleon, back when a dodgy video was sufficient accompaniment for pop songs of such genius. Colour by Numbers was actually the VERY FIRST album that I owned, given to me by my aunt on good old cassette tape.

YouTube Preview Image

But then, ah, the show!!! This collection was inspired by a horror video game called Silent Hill and the work of Romantic painter John Henry Fuseli, and it explored themes of gothic romance. The press release states that the same garment viewed in a dark, gothic context by one viewer will be interpreted as romantic and liberating by the next.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt.

The show opened with a stunning piece of performance, as a red-headed model appeared in gothic Tim Burton-esque make up, black skirts tumbling as she grew before our eyes into a 12 foot monster burlesque bride waving great green feathered fans. Thereafter followed a series of printed, billowing capes and tightly corseted dresses, all accessorised with veils, reddened eyes, cracked cheeks and Joker smiles. Apparently Ziad asked each model to choose their own favourite horror film make up for the show.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor.

Androgynous models wore chiffon and beaded dresses, a spooky ghost couple trailed rumpled netting behind as they faced the photographers together. Amidst the drama cleverly made outfits showcased traditional haute couture skills using bias cut vintage silk chiffons and duchess satin that flowed around the body.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A white faced creature smeared its face with black paint and make up took a turn towards our feathered friends: blue winged eyes echoing the giant bird prints on winged dresses. Out stepped a ballet dancer on pointe, edging down the catwalk in frilled lilac, her skull face shrouded in grey. As she retreated backwards a series of busty ladies swept down the catwalk in eminently wearable multi coloured chiffon dresses: amongst them walked transvestites, burlesque artists and a giant lady in grey. I particularly adored the bustle backed electric fuchsia number that emphasised every womanly curve.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Taking the art of the catwalk to fantastical heights, Ziad Ghanem proved that his shows really are worth the hype, with or without the added bonus of an 80s pop idol in a fabulous yellow fedora. You can read more about his unique selection of models here.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can also read Florence Massey’s review of the Ziad Ghanem show here.

Categories ,ballet, ,birds, ,boy george, ,Burlesque, ,Chiffon, ,Colour by Numbers, ,couture, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,gothic, ,Helen Crawford, ,Horror, ,Jamie McGregor, ,Jessica Holt, ,John Henry Fuseli, ,Karma Chameleon, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Never End, ,Romantic, ,Silent Hill, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Tigz Rice, ,tim burton, ,Transvestite, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Coco de Mer Circus Child Catwalk Review

Central Saint Martins followed swiftly on from the Chelsea College of Art and Design’s graduate collections.

I loved the big fluffy creations of this designer.

Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Felipe Rojas Llanos presented blue and purple silk tailoring on pouty youths, pills this site a welcome diversion from womenswear.

Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen’s spiked dresses and jackets were dramatically sensual and dangerous.

Latitude 2010-fashion hat  by Amelia Gregory
Half hats and shaggy Mr Tomlinson trousers.

Fabulous curled entwined knitwear from Sabrina Brytesson.

Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Sports influenced tailoring from Lee Brown.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
80s influenced layered creations from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh were eminently wearable but the star of her collection was the stilt walker.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Sadly I only caught the best headers from Zoe Sherwood’s feathery collection from the back. However, if there’s one thing for sure she does backs well as this turquoise dress proves.

Latitude fashion 2010-family fun by Amelia Gregory

The fashion shows were delightfully laid back, and enjoyed by plenty of families and young girls who would otherwise not get to see such calibre of upcoming design talent. Despite the lack of information about the presenting designers and the sometimes klutzy new models (Elite, you might want to give a few of them some catwalk training) this was a brilliant addition to Latitude, and with a bit of fine-tuning will hopefully become a festival staple.
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory
Mademoiselle Adeline struts here stuff. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Following the Graduate Fashion Shows Coco de Mer also hit the Latitude Waterfront catwalk with a range of fun sequinned swimsuits, order little tailored jackets and hats by Victoria Grant. Inspired by a Victorian circus ringmaster, ailment sales of this bespoke collection will raise funds for the Circus Child charity.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Coco-de-Mer-Circus-Child-by-Mina-Bach
Illustration by Mina Bach.

Andrea Peterson Latitude waterfront fashion coco de mer
Illustration by Andrea Peterson.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

The skinny Elite new faces were completely overshadowed by the fabulous wriggling coquetry of the Burlesque artist who flounced down the catwalk with a pair of huge red feathered fans and a whole lot of sassiness. Now that’s what fit and healthy girls should look like with their clothes off.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Burlesque, ,Circus, ,Coco de mer, ,James Clare, ,Latitude Festival, ,Mademoiselle Adeline, ,Mina Bach., ,Victoria Grant, ,Victorian, ,Waterfront Stage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Latitude 2010: Coco de Mer Circus Child Catwalk Review

Central Saint Martins followed swiftly on from the Chelsea College of Art and Design’s graduate collections.

I loved the big fluffy creations of this designer.

Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Felipe Rojas Llanos by Amelia Gregory
Felipe Rojas Llanos presented blue and purple silk tailoring on pouty youths, pills this site a welcome diversion from womenswear.

Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen by Amelia Gregory
Anne Karine Thorbjoernsen’s spiked dresses and jackets were dramatically sensual and dangerous.

Latitude 2010-fashion hat  by Amelia Gregory
Half hats and shaggy Mr Tomlinson trousers.

Fabulous curled entwined knitwear from Sabrina Brytesson.

Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010 Lee Brown by Amelia Gregory
Sports influenced tailoring from Lee Brown.

Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Sorcha O’Raghallaigh by Amelia Gregory
80s influenced layered creations from Sorcha O’Raghallaigh were eminently wearable but the star of her collection was the stilt walker.

Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Zoe Sherwood by Amelia Gregory
Sadly I only caught the best headers from Zoe Sherwood’s feathery collection from the back. However, if there’s one thing for sure she does backs well as this turquoise dress proves.

Latitude fashion 2010-family fun by Amelia Gregory

The fashion shows were delightfully laid back, and enjoyed by plenty of families and young girls who would otherwise not get to see such calibre of upcoming design talent. Despite the lack of information about the presenting designers and the sometimes klutzy new models (Elite, you might want to give a few of them some catwalk training) this was a brilliant addition to Latitude, and with a bit of fine-tuning will hopefully become a festival staple.
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory
Mademoiselle Adeline struts here stuff. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Following the Graduate Fashion Shows Coco de Mer also hit the Latitude Waterfront catwalk with a range of fun sequinned swimsuits, order little tailored jackets and hats by Victoria Grant. Inspired by a Victorian circus ringmaster, ailment sales of this bespoke collection will raise funds for the Circus Child charity.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Coco-de-Mer-Circus-Child-by-Mina-Bach
Illustration by Mina Bach.

Andrea Peterson Latitude waterfront fashion coco de mer
Illustration by Andrea Peterson.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer Circus Child by Amelia Gregory
james_clare_Coco_De_Mer
Illustration by James Clare.

The skinny Elite new faces were completely overshadowed by the fabulous wriggling coquetry of the Burlesque artist who flounced down the catwalk with a pair of huge red feathered fans and a whole lot of sassiness. Now that’s what fit and healthy girls should look like with their clothes off.

Latitude 2010-Coco de Mer burlesque dancer by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Burlesque, ,Circus, ,Coco de mer, ,James Clare, ,Latitude Festival, ,Mademoiselle Adeline, ,Mina Bach., ,Victoria Grant, ,Victorian, ,Waterfront Stage

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Evening of Vintage Glamour with Powder Room Vintage

dannyandthechamps

Illustration by Abi Daker

If Laura Duret were to open a shop, buy Powder Room Vintage would be it’s name. At present, Laura holds the key to a vast collection of vintage clothing, accessories and small antiques, but hasn’t quite yet acquired the shop to display all her wares. So, in the meantime, Ms Duret is putting on events in glamorous locations, inviting local vintage dealers (including Gently Worn Vintage and Tizzy’s Vintage and Art) along to hold stalls and create evenings full of vintage splendour… 

Rows upon rows of rails of ravishing dresses glittered the aisles of the grand hall at Hotel Du Vin. Tables full of delicately embroidered clutch-bags, clusters of diamante earrings and brooches steeped in sentiment lined the hall. Ladies of all ages eyed-up outfits from eras past, some held them up to their bodies and twirled in front of mirrors. Other younger fashion-conscious students plucked at pieces lost and found, content in the knowledge that their buys were unique, making them hungry for more… 

‘There is not that much going on in the way of events that is open to every woman and appealing to all ages, so this seems to strike a cord with the subject of glamour as at the back of every womans’ mind is the desire to feel and look special,’ Laura explains.

A catwalk ensued, with delicately curved models sporting fabulously set victory curls and wearing demure dresses from the 40s and 50s. ‘My favourite eras are the 40s through to the early 50s, I love the whole look of the done hair, the fabulous rouge lips, the matching hat, bag and gloves, and the shapes that accentuated women in the most flattering of ways’, Laura says. ‘There are other eras I love but going back much further as a vintage dealer is difficult as pieces are less accessible as have not weathered so well with age.’ 


Illustration by Jenny Costello

To top the evening off, a jaw- dropping performance from Burlesque dancer Felicity Fox left the crowds hot and woo-ing. 

The next event will be held again at Hotel Du Vin in Tunbridge Wells on November 18th, so put it in your diaries and make sure you get down to Kent – (it’s not all doom and gloom down here) for some seriously fabulous vintage buys! For more information, email Laura here.

Photographs by Sophie Hill

Categories ,1940s, ,1950s, ,Abi Daker, ,Burlesque, ,catwalk, ,fashion, ,Felicity Fox, ,Gently Worn Vintage, ,Glamour, ,Hipstamatic, ,Hotel Du Vin, ,Jenny Costello, ,kent, ,ladies, ,Laura Duret, ,Powder Room Vintage, ,Tizzy’s Vintage and Art, ,Tunbridge Wells, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Ziad Ghanem

JASPER GARVIDA lfw s/s 2011 Rachel Clare Price
A selection of Jessie’s corsarges

Walking around Broadway Market, approved one cold wintery Saturday, feeling hungry and looking at all the delicious food I could ill afford, (oh the joys of being a student!). I came across a treasure trove of a stall run by the delightful Jessie and Buddug and instantly fell in love with their charming designs. Since this initial visit, I have returned time and time again to buy unique necklaces as birthday (incredibly successful!) gifts.

So you can imagine my delight coming across their Columbia Road shop, originally located in the upstairs of one the picturesque houses adorning the street. Jessie and Buddug have recently expanded ‘downstairs’, and in celebration of their success, I had the pleasure of interviewing the talented textile artists for Amelia’s Magazine.

I first noticed your designs at Broadway Market on Saturday, was this your first venture?

Buddug: We started broadway market after we graduated 5 years ago and got the shop 2 years ago.

What was your experience of the market? Do you still have a stall there?

Buddug: We still have a stall at Broadway Market, we feel it has grown so much since we started. It’s been cold and wet at times but it’s been great learning what people buy. Its been great socially too, speaking with our friends and customers.

As friends from home, what has it been like to work together?

Buddug: We met when we were on art foundation and always said we we would like to collaborate together in the future. We find it easier that we both do our own work and then display together because we both have different working hours.

You previously occupied an upstairs room in Columbia Road, how did the opportunity to expand into a downstairs space arise?

Buddug: We got offered a place at ground level by Bev who had the shop before us, she made handmade clothes and toys etc, she offered it to us before anyone else which was an honour and we jumped at the chance.

What was your experience of the Goldsmiths Textiles course (which sadly no longer exists?)

Jessie: I was at Goldsmiths, at a very tricky time, the course was going through a real denial period, as they were finding the debate about what to do with textiles and fine art really hard. Which made it hard for us as students and as someone who is passionate about cloth and textiles and most of all making, I found the course incredibly frustrating!

But I had very supportive parents; Primmy Chorley and I am close friends with Audrey Walker and Eirian and Denys Short. So I always had a huge back up behind me in the textile world. I did feel incredibly pulled between the two worlds though and I was lucky enough to come out fighting, determined to set up my own business and to carry on my making process.

Overall I am pleased I went through the Goldsmiths experience, as the academic and written side of it, (for me) has helped me today to think the way I do and pushed me in other ways.

What course did you study Buddug and what was your experiences?

I studied at London Guildhall (now London Metropolitan University)in Jewellery, silversmithing and other crafts. I enjoyed the experimenting with different materials. It was very much a hands on course.

Buddug’s designs for Urban Outfitters.

Buddug, what was it like to work for Urban Outfitters?

It was quite difficult working for URBAN OUTFITTERS, due to the ammount i had to make! and I waited a long time for payment!

Jessie, what role does recycling play in your practice? Why is it important to you and how did you first become interested in using recycled materials?

Recycled materials has and I believe will always be a huge part of my work, I like it that it creates a timeless feeling, I guess it started from the scrap books I made with my Mum when I was young and colleting and using found and recycled items for me creates a story, old clothes and books hold some kind of story and depth to them.

A detail from Jessie’s seating plan for her Wedding Collection.

And how did the wedding collection develop?

I was asked to create a whole wedding theme for a lady who used to buy my cards at Broadway Market, I handmade her invites, table names and a seating plan and really from here I got other customers and then early this year I designed some invites which were slightly quicker to make and I did a huge wedding show in London and its kind of gone from here I have made for several weddings this summer and I am already making for 2011-2012 weddings.

An enamel plate by Buddug.

Buddug, how did you start designing the Home Ornaments collection?

I’ve always been interested in developing the enamel process since university and always liked/inspired by objects mother and grandmother had in the kitchen, I invested in a bigger kiln, which was a challenge to make bigger things!

What materials do you like working with and why?

Jessie: Fabrics, worn clothing, paper they all hold such a good quality and are embedded with an excisting narrative

Designs by Jessie Chorley

Buddug: I’ve always tried to use things that are around me and be inventive with the materials i already have/been thrown away and in old/secound hand things, there’s such a quality in materials and making process and a added charm in old things and it’s actually nicer to use…

Broach by Buddug

I like to combine different materials metal and fabric. fabric and paper or wood…but i mostly enjoy metal and enamel. I really like the solidness of metal and the duribility of it as a raw material.

What was it like to make the stage set for: the launch of Laura Dockrill’s book Ugly Shy Girl and how did you became involved in this?

Buddug: I can’t remember were we met Laura Dockrill, but she asked if we were interested in doing the stage for her. It was quite a challenge because we didn’t know the size of the stage but the best thing was Jessie’s bunting it was really big and yellow!

Have you made or participated in Set Design before? Is this something you will continue to participate in?

Jessie: Yes for me it is a real passion, I love to create things and watch others create a story with the objects I make. A lot of quite random masks and house like boxes which I display in the shop are often borrowed for shoots, and I always like the outcome. For me styling our shop is like creating a stage set I love making it all different each week and then watching the customers come in and their response to it!

My degree show was also about staging and the response of the audience and the creator, for this I made a huge seven foot book which you could walk inside.

Buddug: I haven’t done much set design before, but wold love to, it’s been quite good having practice doing the shop window.

What are the inspirations for your collections?

Jessie: Story telling, people places and preserving memories creating beautiful things from lost or found objects.

Buddug My inspiration for my work is a collection of things I find and come across, I usually collect and draw in sketch books. Nature, a sense of home comforts and memories/naustalgic sences. It’a quite a mish mash of ideas and influencs.

Design by Buddug

We have a few pieces in the shop were we bring things together such as the fabric bows with enamel buttons, but we find it easier to make our own work and display together.

Do you both run and participate in the organisation of the workshops?

Jessie: No I run the workshops I have done for quite a few years now. For me I love to go out and meet other people and hopefully change the way they see the world through making, I have worked with a lot of charities, which is both frustrating and very rewarding at the same time, I am always touched by certain characters which can feed directly in to my work.

The whole workshop trend has gone huge now though and people expect so much more, and have so much more since places like hobby craft became so big and shows like The Knit and Stitch.

I am currently organising my Christmas workshops which will be in November in North London. I will have some day workshops creating simple gift wrap and gifts.

Jess Chorley

Buddug Jess does a lot of workshops, I’m yet to start, but it might be something I would be interested in doing when I’m a bit older.

What’s next for Jess Chorley and Buddug?

Buddug: At the moment we are preparing for christmas, thinking of making stocking filler ideas and promoting our little shop. Nothing too big, taking up projects as they come along…

To find out more please visit: www.jessiechorley.com, www.buddug.com and www.jandbtheshop.com

We started broadway market after we graduated 5 years ago and got a shop 2 years ago.

We still have a stall at Broadway Market, medical we feel it has grown so much since we started. It’s been cold and wet at times but it’s been great learning what people buy. Its been great socially too, prescription speaking with our friends and customers.

We got offered a place at ground level by Bev who had the shop before us, she made hand made clothes and toys etc, she offered it to us before anyone else which was an honour and we jumped at the chance.

We met when we were on art foundation and always said we we wold like to collaborate together in he future.We find it easier that we both do our own work and then display together because we both have different working hours.

What was your experience of the Goldsmiths Textiles course (which sadly no longer exists?)

Jessie
I was at Goldsmiths at a very tricky time the course was going through a real denial period they were finding the whole debate to do with textiles and fine art very hard which made it hard for us a students so as someone who is passionate about cloth and textiles and most of all making I found the course incredibly frustrating! But I had very supportive parents Primmy Chorley and I am close friend with Audrey walker and Eirian and Denys Short so I always had a huge back up behind me in the textile world. I did feel incredibly pulled between the two words though and I was luck enough to come out fighting and to be determined to set up my own business and to carry on my making process. But overall I am please I went through the Goldsmiths experience as the academic and written side of it for me has helped me today to think the way I do and pushed me in other ways.

BUDDUG
I studied at London Guildhall (now London Metropolitan University) Jewellery, silversmithing and other crafts. I enjoyed the experimenting in different materials, it was very much a hands on course.

BUDDUG

it was quite difficult working for URBAN OUTFITTERS, due to the ammount i had to make! and I waited a long time for payment!

What role does recycling play in your practice? Why is it important to you and how did you first become interested in using recycled materials?

Jessie

Recycled materials has and I believe will always be a huge part of my work I like it that it creates a timeless feeling, I guess it started from the scrap books I made with my Mum when I was young and colleting and using found and recycled items for me creates a story, old clothes and books hold some kind of story and depth to them.
How did the wedding collection develop?
I was asked to create a whole wedding theme for a lady who used to buy y cards at Broadway Market, I hand made her invites, table names and a seating plan and really from here I got other customers and then early this year I designed some invites which were slightly quicker to make and I did a huge wedding show in London and its kind of gone from here I have made for several weddings this summer and I am already making for 2011-2012 weddings.

BUDDUG
(home ornaments)
I’ve always been interested in developing the enamel process since university and always liked/inspired by objects mother and grandmother had in the kitchen, i invested in a bigger kiln, and was a challenge to make bigger things!

What materials do you like working with and why?
Jessie
Fabrics, worn clothing, paper they all hold such a good quality and are embedded with an excisting narrative

BUDDUG
I’ve always tried to use things that are around me and be inventive with the materials i already have/been thrown away and in old/secound hand things, there’s such a quality in materials and making process and a added charm in old things and it’s actually nicer to use…

I like to combine different materials metal and fabric. fabric and paper or wood…but i mostyl enjoy metal and enamel. i really like the solidness of metal and the duribility of it as a raw material.

BUDDUG
I can’t remmeber were we met Laura Dokrill, but she asked if we were interested in doing the stage.It was quite a challenge because we didn’t know the size of the stage but the best thing was jessie’s bunting it was really big and yellow!

Have you made or participated in Set design before? Is this something you will continue to participate in?

Jessie:

Yes for me it is a real passion I love to create things and watch others create a story with the objects I make a lot of quite randon masks and house like boxes which I display in the shop and people ofter borrow them for shoots, and I always like the outcome. For me styling our shop is like creating a stage set I love making it all different each week and then watching the customers come in and there responsis to it!
My degree show was also about staging and the response of the audience and the creator, for this a made a huge seven foot book which you could walk inside of.

BUDDUG
I haven’t done much set design before, but wold love to, it’s been quite good having practice doing the shop window.

What are the inspirations for your collections?

Jessie:
Story telling, people places and preserving memories creating beautiful things from lost or found objects.

BUDDUG
My inspiration for my work is a collection of things I find and come across, i usually collect and draw in sketch books. Nature, a sense of home comforts and memories/naustalgic sences. It’a quite a mish mash of ideas and influencs.

We have a few pieces in the shop were we bring things together such as the fabric bows with enamel buttons, but we find it easier to make our own work and display together.

Do you both run and participate in the organisation of the workshops?

Jessie
No I run the workshops I have done for quite a few years now for me I love to go out and meet other people and to hopefully change the way they see the world through making, I have worked in a lot of charities which is both frustrating and very rewarding at the same time, I always touched by certain characters which can feed directly in to my work.
The whole workshop trend has gone huge now though and people expect so much more, and have so much more since places like hobby craft got so big and shows like the Knit and Stitch.

I am currently organising my Christmas workshops which will be in Nov in North London I will have some day workshops creating simple gift wrap and gifts.

BUDDUG
Jess does a lot of workshops, I’m yet to start, but might be something I would be interested in doing when I’m a bit older.


Immodesty Blaize wearing Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, buy illustrated by Krister Selin

At Fashion Week in February, flailing after a weekend of shows and struggling to even stand up, I was dragged to a late evening show by previous fashion editor Sally Mumby Croft. ‘You’ll LOVE it!’ she exclaimed. I couldn’t say no, could I? So off we popped to see the Autumn/Winter 2010 collection of one Ziad Ghanem.

Wow. I had never seen anything like it in my life, and it was, by and large, the highlight of my fashion week (and my year, probs.) Ziad Ghanem is a trained couturier, which smacks you in the face when you first see his clothes. It almost feels a little disrespectful to call Ghanem’s creation ‘clothes’ – such a meaningless word to describe these works of art.


Photography by Matt Bramford

I couldn’t wait to find out more about the designer. The name sounded so familiar; it turned out I’d bought a Ziad Ghanem t-shirt a few years ago in a sample sale. I was delirious!

The show featured the most beautiful creations, modelled by tattooed models of all shapes and sizes, with a breathtaking finale featuring Immodesty Blaize. The show was a lesson in how to undress, and Immodesty certainly did – with the final show piece being three dresses, each removed to reveal the next. The audience went crazy, as did I.

I’ve been waiting since February to have a chat with Ziad about his collection and what the future holds, and last week, I finally got the chance.


Ziad Ghanem, illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

Hi Ziad! What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on my new collection for spring/summer 2011. I am making a film for it…

What is it about fashion and making beautiful clothes that keeps you hooked?
I love to dress people. I am ever so grateful to my models and to my supportive clients. They are my muses. I also love the fact that I can do what ever I wish and I don’t have to listen to any fashion ‘rules’ that the industry forces on other designers.

You work both in ready-to-wear and couture. Do you have a preference?
I would rather work in couture. I understand it more.


Ziad Ghanem couture, illustrated by Joana Faria

What techniques do you use? Are the array of embellishments and features handmade?
Most features are hand made, especially in couture – we always use traditional methods.I love printing and beading. I am a trained couturier.

Your astounding AW2010 show was the highlight of my fashion week, by far. Can you tell us a bit about it? Were you pleased with the outcome?
Thank you, I was very pleased – I am so happy with all the positive feedback. I want everybody to know that you made my day.

The finalé featuring Immodesty Blaize and the 3-piece ensemble was incredible. How did this collaboration come about?
My collection was about the art of dressing and undressing. On catwalks, particularly in the fashion shows of the 1950s, models really worked the outfits. I wanted a burlesque artist to undress – they do it best. I didn’t want it to be about nudity – it is about the art of undressing. I met Immodesty and asked her to model in my show and I am very grateful that she did. She is an amazing performer and artist.






Photography by Matt Bramford

The models you used were incredibly diverse, as if each piece had been tailored to an individual. We also see recurring models, like Jme and Polly Fey, throughout your work. What’s the story behind your models?
I love working ‘in family’ I only use models that understand and read my work. My models are artists that want to wear and perform in my clothes. I let the model be themselves and I ask and take their opinion into consideration.
My shows are a platform and a chance for people I love to show off. I love helping and I love getting help back. It is the secret of a healthy society.

Going back to your SS2010 collection, there was a strong sustainability ethic with recycled couture and a reaction to consumerism. Are these issues important to you?
Yes. I respect the world and the planet I live in. I am anti-fur and anti-cruelty to people and animals. I want happy people to work with my clothes so I am anti-sweatshop labour. But, I am realistic in knowing where to draw the ethical line.

Your inspiration over the past few seasons has been cited as anything from Victoriana to the Middle East. Can you talk us through where your inspiration comes from, and how it translates to the catwalk?
I am inspired by many cultures and I love music and films.I want be a film maker when I grow up. At the moment I’m still a baby playing dressing up… hahahahaha!


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Naomi Law

We’ve recently had a chat with Marnie Hollande about the film on which she collaborated with you. Where you happy with the result? What was the aim of this film?
Marnie is a wonderful artist and a lovely person. I am more than happy and thankful for her work and talent. There will be more and more to come. She is a lady… and I want apologise about the dirty talk in my studio. I blame Aiden Connor, my assistant…!

What can we expect from Ziad Ghanem SS2011?
Romance and a carnival of print and a performance. I love it when my clothes perform and my models always do a great job. 
Plenty of organic silk. A very simple silhouette

What does the future hold for Ziad Ghanem?
The present is wonderful I can hear and feel my self breathing and nothing can replace that. The future is a bonus and I welcome it with open arms.


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illuustrated by Amy Martino

To see our review of Ziad’s autumn/winter show, click here, and to see more photographs, click here.

Categories ,1950s, ,A/W 2010, ,Aiden Connor, ,Amy Martino, ,Burlesque, ,couture, ,fashion, ,film, ,Immodesty Blaize, ,Jme, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Hollande, ,Middle East, ,Naomi Law, ,Nudity, ,performance, ,Polly Fey, ,print, ,Ready-to-wear, ,Romance, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Undressing, ,Victoriana, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with couturier Ziad Ghanem


Immodesty Blaize wearing Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Krister Selin

At Fashion Week in February, flailing after a weekend of shows and struggling to even stand up, I was dragged to a late evening show by previous fashion editor Sally Mumby Croft. ‘You’ll LOVE it!’ she exclaimed. I couldn’t say no, could I? So off we popped to see the Autumn/Winter 2010 collection of one Ziad Ghanem.

Wow. I had never seen anything like it in my life, and it was, by and large, the highlight of my fashion week (and my year, probs.) Ziad Ghanem is a trained couturier, which smacks you in the face when you first see his clothes. It almost feels a little disrespectful to call Ghanem’s creation ‘clothes’ – such a meaningless word to describe these works of art.


Photography by Matt Bramford

I couldn’t wait to find out more about the designer. The name sounded so familiar; it turned out I’d bought a Ziad Ghanem t-shirt a few years ago in a sample sale. I was delirious!

The show featured the most beautiful creations, modelled by tattooed models of all shapes and sizes, with a breathtaking finale featuring Immodesty Blaize. The show was a lesson in how to undress, and Immodesty certainly did – with the final show piece being three dresses, each removed to reveal the next. The audience went crazy, as did I.

I’ve been waiting since February to have a chat with Ziad about his collection and what the future holds, and last week, I finally got the chance.


Ziad Ghanem, illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

Hi Ziad! What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on my new collection for spring/summer 2011. I am making a film for it…

What is it about fashion and making beautiful clothes that keeps you hooked?
I love to dress people. I am ever so grateful to my models and to my supportive clients. They are my muses. I also love the fact that I can do what ever I wish and I don’t have to listen to any fashion ‘rules’ that the industry forces on other designers.

You work both in ready-to-wear and couture. Do you have a preference?
I would rather work in couture. I understand it more.


Ziad Ghanem couture, illustrated by Joana Faria

What techniques do you use? Are the array of embellishments and features handmade?
Most features are hand made, especially in couture – we always use traditional methods.I love printing and beading. I am a trained couturier.

Your astounding AW2010 show was the highlight of my fashion week, by far. Can you tell us a bit about it? Were you pleased with the outcome?
Thank you, I was very pleased – I am so happy with all the positive feedback. I want everybody to know that you made my day.

The finalé featuring Immodesty Blaize and the 3-piece ensemble was incredible. How did this collaboration come about?
My collection was about the art of dressing and undressing. On catwalks, particularly in the fashion shows of the 1950s, models really worked the outfits. I wanted a burlesque artist to undress – they do it best. I didn’t want it to be about nudity – it is about the art of undressing. I met Immodesty and asked her to model in my show and I am very grateful that she did. She is an amazing performer and artist.






Photography by Matt Bramford

The models you used were incredibly diverse, as if each piece had been tailored to an individual. We also see recurring models, like Jme and Polly Fey, throughout your work. What’s the story behind your models?
I love working ‘in family’ I only use models that understand and read my work. My models are artists that want to wear and perform in my clothes. I let the model be themselves and I ask and take their opinion into consideration.
My shows are a platform and a chance for people I love to show off. I love helping and I love getting help back. It is the secret of a healthy society.

Going back to your SS2010 collection, there was a strong sustainability ethic with recycled couture and a reaction to consumerism. Are these issues important to you?
Yes. I respect the world and the planet I live in. I am anti-fur and anti-cruelty to people and animals. I want happy people to work with my clothes so I am anti-sweatshop labour. But, I am realistic in knowing where to draw the ethical line.

Your inspiration over the past few seasons has been cited as anything from Victoriana to the Middle East. Can you talk us through where your inspiration comes from, and how it translates to the catwalk?
I am inspired by many cultures and I love music and films.I want be a film maker when I grow up. At the moment I’m still a baby playing dressing up… hahahahaha!


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Naomi Law

We’ve recently had a chat with Marnie Hollande about the film on which she collaborated with you. Where you happy with the result? What was the aim of this film?
Marnie is a wonderful artist and a lovely person. I am more than happy and thankful for her work and talent. There will be more and more to come. She is a lady… and I want apologise about the dirty talk in my studio. I blame Aiden Connor, my assistant…!

What can we expect from Ziad Ghanem SS2011?
Romance and a carnival of print and a performance. I love it when my clothes perform and my models always do a great job. 
Plenty of organic silk. A very simple silhouette

What does the future hold for Ziad Ghanem?
The present is wonderful I can hear and feel my self breathing and nothing can replace that. The future is a bonus and I welcome it with open arms.


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illuustrated by Amy Martino

To see our review of Ziad’s autumn/winter show, click here, and to see more photographs, click here.



Categories ,1950s, ,A/W 2010, ,Aiden Connor, ,Amy Martino, ,Burlesque, ,couture, ,fashion, ,film, ,Immodesty Blaize, ,Jme, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Hollande, ,Middle East, ,Naomi Law, ,Nudity, ,performance, ,Polly Fey, ,print, ,Ready-to-wear, ,Romance, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Undressing, ,Victoriana, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with fashion designer Fam Irvoll


Illustration by Dee Andrews

Fam irvoll is is a Central Saint Martins graduate with a star studded following including Lady Gaga and Marina Diamandis (remember that pink flamingo dress?). Her cupcake headbands were an instant hit, nurse her Alice in Wonderland style collections and adverts create a sense of accessible fantasy and she is just about to launch her floral themed S/S 2011 collection. It features exaggerated flowers alongside pop-art influenced speech bubbles, graphic print makeup and big bold red lips. Not one to shy away from brights, she is known for creating fun, quirky designs in glaringly bold colours, and fresh shapes.

From reviews and images of your shows, it seems that you like to entertain people, is that important to your designs?
Yes! It’s a huge part of what I do, as my clothes are not really commercial pieces I just want to go all the way and make it as anti-commercial during the show as I possibly can. I love crazy and that’s what I’m trying to portray with my work and with the entertainment. I always have either a film, dancers, singers or burlesque acts to entertain the people and to supplement the red tread throughout the catwalk show. People seem to really like it.


Illustration by Jenny Costello

They certainly do, a lot of high profile people have worn your designs, who has flattered you the most by wearing your clothes?
Lots of amazing people; off the top of my head, the lovely Marina (Diamandis), Beyonce, Lady Gaga, Mika, Katy Perry, Paloma Faith and a lot of Norwegian singers.

?Who is your ultimate muse?
I would have to say Marina from Marina and the Diamonds. She is just really lovely and I know she genuinely likes my stuff; at the same time she’s an amazing singer and a beautiful woman that you really can put anything on and it would look amazing. I really do love her style in general; it’s quirky and fun, just like me!

?The collections you design are always so fun and full of energy, where do you find your inspiration?
Usually from art, toys, films, food and just by going to London and going out clubbing and watching people. I love the London gay tranny scene; there are so many amazing people so it’s extremely easy to get inspired. We don’t really have a scene like that back home in Norway, so I feel really fortunate to have so many crazy looking friends in London that I can go and visit…I must say I really miss the good old times with Boombox every Sunday in Hoxton Square.


Illustration by Farzeen Jabbar

So, do you miss living in London?
I absolutely loved London and CSM, those must have been my best years so far. I love love, love, love London and everything you can do there. London is the city that never sleeps, with all the cool freaks. I made so many amazing friends during that time and did so many crazy things. CSM was also a really good experience; I love all the creativity that goes on behind all those doors. It’s amazing and I’m so happy I got in there.

Onto the collections…There are flamingos, tea cups and croquet resonant in your work, where did the fascination with Alice in Wonderland begin?
?It started in my final year of fashion school in Norway, in 2005. The year Gwen Stefani’s ‘What You Waiting For?’ video came out. I think I died for a second the first time I saw that amazing Alice in Wonderland video. It made me rethink my whole final collection. I’ve always loved the film and the book but it never really came into place before that video came out.

As well as an abundance of flowers for this collection, candy and cupcakes feature in a lot of your designs, do you like sweet things? Do you like cake?
I actually don’t really like cake, only cheesecakes. But I love looking at sweet things and I do get inspired by candy and pastry, but I’m more of a Scandi-salty-liquorish-kind of gal!

Roy Lichtenstein appears to be a huge influence on your most recent collection, and carried through to the makeup on the models. How did you arrive at the concept?
I have a massively huge Lichtenstein picture in my living room and that’s where the makeup came from. I called the make up artist that does fashion week and asked if it would be possible to do it in the amount of time that we had before the show and she was really positive to the idea of trying it out. My whole collection was inspired by Pop Art and by Salvador Dali; I have always been a huge fan of the movement and I have collected art books from this era for ages – so I finallt got to do a tiny tribute.


Illustration by Avril Kelly

A lot of your clothes and accessories requires some good knitting skills to create, do you knit?
Well, I have a BA in womenswear from ESMOD in Oslo and then I have a Fashion Knitwear BA from CSM in London, so yes I do knit. But usually I only do the samples and then someone else will do the rest, because I don’t have time to do it all. My mum actually started to knit and did lots of different courses so that she could help me! ?

It’s a floral theme so finally, what’s your favourite flower?
?The rose, because of all the different beautiful colours you can get them in.

Categories ,Avril Kelly, ,beyonce, ,Boombox, ,Burlesque, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Cheesecake, ,cupcakes, ,Dee Andrews, ,Fam Irvoll, ,Farzeen Jabbar, ,Flowers, ,Katy Perry, ,knitwear, ,Lady Gaga, ,london, ,Marina and The Diamonds, ,Mika, ,Norway, ,paloma faith, ,Pop Art, ,Salvador Dali, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Alternative Fashion Week 2010 at Spitalfields Market: more from Day 5

latitude festival
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Born in Brazil but resident of Milan, no rx Cristiane Chaves brought us a ‘subliminal message of seduction from Italy’ with her Cyberwitch look. A google search on this designer throws up an intriguing website Temporary Label, prostate which suggests that Cristiane puts a lot of thought into the execution of her work, using dissolvable labels that remove all trace of the original designer’s input. I think you’d want to remember who’d designed these highly accomplished draped and roped garments if you managed to get your paws on one.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Cristiane Chaves
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Cristiane Chaves
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Cristiane Chaves
Cristiane Chaves.

I found Olivia Grogan‘s collection of stripy print dresses cute but nothing special. A textiles graduate from Northampton University, these were sweet halter neck outfits to wear to a summer party.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Olivia Grogan

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010
Hat lady looks a bit less stressed by the end of day five. Thank goodness for that!

Toni Ann Haines was quite frankly frightening: plastic coats over ill-fitting boned bodies. No thanks.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Toni Ann Haines
Toni Ann Haines.

From Germany, Wilfried Pletzinger showed a brilliant collection of recycled sportswear. Thanks to a bit of clever ruching, jumbling everything upside down this way and that, he gave us something new and highly desirable. From day to day clothes to evening wear he aims to challenge the role of ‘sportswear’ and he does a really good job of making this happen – take a look at his website to get inspired by more of his creations. This is how all sportswear should end it’s days (or merely start them once more, to be upcycled all over again?)

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Wilfried Pletzinger
Wilfried Pletzinger brings a whole new meaning to upcycling.

Immani Da Silva, inspired by the worlds of fetish and burlesque (no shit Sherlock), presented a truly frightening collection of clothing fit only for the most outrageous trannies. It didn’t hold together in any way at all, but I enjoyed shooting the models, posers, the lot of them.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani da silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani da silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Immani Da Silva
Immani Da Silva models have fun with the photographers.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010
Does she belong with Immani? I’m not sure.

Make up artist Maya was lurking around backstage during the Immani show, looking fabulous again. And then I espied another young girl sporting amazing rainbow eye make up. Related? What do you think? I was too chicken to ask.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Make up artist maya
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Make up artist maya

And last but very not least I absolutely adored the collection – Sock it to Me (Make Do and Mend) – made by the students of Waltham Forest College, the entirety of which was made out of old socks and presented on the most hilarious gaggle of models shod in floral welly boots. In bright pink Barbara Cartland lipstick with zingy blue eyeshadow they were utterly brilliant exhibitionists who couldn’t stop posing once they’d left the catwalk. Who would have thought that recycled socks could be so sexy? Just gorgeous. I’d photograph these girls again any day.

Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College
Alternative Fashion Week Day 5 2010 Waltham Forest College

For some good footage from the catwalk on Friday check out Ballad Of here.
You can read part one of this blog post here.
Look out for my last post, which will be ways in which to make the best impression at Alternative Fashion Week. Something to read for next year maybe!

If I have got any credits wrong please email me and let me know. I’ve done my best.

Categories ,Alternative Fashion Week, ,Ballad Of, ,barbara cartland, ,Burlesque, ,Cristiane Chaves, ,Fetishwear, ,Germany, ,Immani Da Silva, ,Olivia Grogan, ,recycling, ,Socks, ,Toni Ann Haines, ,Upcycling, ,Waltham Forest College, ,Wilfried Pletzinger

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