Amelia’s Magazine | Javari Shoes for Show Exhibition Review

Katie Eary for Nike by Eccabin
Katie Eary for Nike by Eccabin.
 
As if we needed any more proof that shoes are a form of art, online shoe connoisseurs, Javari held a dazzling exhibition over the weekend, showcasing highly desirable footwear designed by some of the world’s most prominent designers.
 
Nicholas Kirkwood by Eccabin
Nicholas Kirkwood Alice in Wonderland Heels by Eccabin.
 
From the practical to the not so practical, men and women alike have been fascinated with the enchanting allure of shoes ever since cavemen figured out that walking around barefoot wasn’t exactly ideal. As a day to day essential, our little tootsies would be truly lost without the good old shoe, but we all know that societies love for footwear goes a little deeper than a mere practicality designed to get you from A to B.
 
Shoes for Show Nina Ricci Daphne Guinness
Nina Ricci for Daphne Guiness by Rebecca Higgins
Nina Ricci for Daphne Guinness by Rebecca Higgins.
 
Shoes for Show Natasha Marrow
Natacha Marro by Rebecca Higgins
Natacha Marro for Shoes for Show by Rebecca Higgins.
 
If there’s one thing that any self-respecting girl (or boy) knows, it’s the unstoppable power of well placed shoe. Clearly something the likes of Gareth Pugh, Christian Louboutin and Nina Ricci are all fully aware of. The exhibition was like a sweet shop for all fans of fancy footwear. Each shoe was presented within a structured cubic stand, mirroring the dramatic silhouettes of the shoes themselves, not to mention the mathematical genius surely required for creating such sky-scrapingly tall heels.

Shoes for Show Gareth Pugh Beyonce
Gareth Pugh for Beyonce.

Shoes for Show Katie Eary Nike
Katie Eary for Nike.

 Shoes for Show Nicholas Kirkwood Alice in Wonderland
Nicholas Kirkwood for Alice in Wonderland.
 
The exhibition was truly a feast for the eyes drawing together three sections: Fashion’s Catwalk Spectacle, Couture Clientele and Innovative Design, all of which presented one-off pieces by the likes of Katie Eary for Nike, Nina Ricci for Daphne Guinness and Christian Louboutin for Rodarte.

YouTube Preview ImageRun the World (Girls)

The shoes and boots sparkled in all their glory, whilst Gareth Pugh’s giant gold stompers dominated the Couture Clientele section, just as Beyoncé did when she debuted them in her Run the World video. Catching my eye, along with countless others no doubt, was the enchanting Alice in Wonderland Heels by Nicholas Kirkwood; intricately designed teacups, keys and chequerboard print heels were just as captivating as Lewis Carroll’s novel itself, delivering attention to detail like I’ve never seen before.

Shoes for Show Rupert Sanderson Aida
Rupert Sanderson for Aida.
 
Shoes for Show Niamh O'Conner & Emily Crane
Niamh O’Conner & Emily Crane.
 
Shoes for Show Sophie Grace Webster Manolo Blahnik
Sophie Grace Webster for Manolo Blahnik.
 
Shoes for Show did exactly what it says on the tin: these shoes are solely for show, not for touching and definitely not for trying on! It turns out many people at the exhibition didn’t quite grasp this concept, as a few sawdust-between-the-ears individuals asked if they could put their very own feet in these one-of-a-kind creations. I do sympathise with said individuals as I admit, it was a struggle keeping my hands off Meadham Kirchhoff’s green and pink glitter pom-pom wedges designed by Nicholas Kirkwood for S/S 2012.

Shoes for Show Nichola Kirkwood Meadham Kirchhoff
Meadham Kirchhoff by Justyna Sowa
Nicholas Kirkwood for Meadham Kirchhoff by Justyna Sowa.
 
Shoes for Show Christian Louboutin Rodarte
Christian Louboutin by Justyna Sowa
Christian Louboutin for Rodarte by Justyna Sowa.
 
Fashion over function was the resounding message at the exhibition as I witnessed first-hand some of the craziest, but utterly beautiful designs ever to grace the human foot. The tallest heel in the world came courtesy of Christian Louboutin’s freakishly high ballet pumps designed this year exclusively for the English National Ballet. We were also treated to a miniature version of Alexander McQueen’s Armadillo shoe: the extraordinary curve design footwear that you’ll all remember Lady Gaga teetering around in in last year’s Bad Romance video.

YouTube Preview ImageBad Romance
 
Shoes for Show Christian Louboutin Royal Ballet
Christian Louboutin for Royal Ballet.
 
Shoes for Show Minature McQueen Armadillo
Minature McQueen Armadillo.
 
Shoes for Show Terry de Havilland Ana Matronic
Terry de Havilland for Ana Matronic.
 
Shoes for Show Terry de Havilland for Agent Provocateur
Terry de Havilland for Agent Provocateur.

Fusing fashion and art, the exhibition presented a rare chance to see some of the most exclusive couture pieces of the last two centuries: pieces that have graced the feet of some of the most iconic stars of this generation. Though we all view and admire shoes for more than just their function, Shoes for Show took this admiration to a whole new level, appreciating footwear for its spectacle alone; a spectacle definitely not made for walking!

Categories ,Agent Provocateur, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Alice in Wonderland, ,Becky Turl, ,beyonce, ,Brick Lane, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Couture Clientele, ,Daphne Guinness, ,Eccabin, ,Emily Crane, ,English National Ballet, ,Fashion’s Catwalk Spectacle, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Innovative Design, ,Javari, ,Justyna Sowa, ,Katie Eary, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lewis Carroll, ,Meadham Kirchhoff, ,Natacha Barrow, ,Niamh O’Connor, ,Nicholas Kirkwood, ,Nina Ricci, ,Old Truman Brewery, ,Rebecca Higgins, ,Rodarte, ,Rupert Sanderson, ,S/S 2012, ,Sarah Deane, ,Shoes for Show, ,Sophie Grace Webster

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fash Off! Closing LFW Party

The Israli born Inbar Spector‘s gothic collection certainly raised eye brows and expectations in an explosion of delicate laces, ask buy more about zipped corsetry and mass of tulle. Her pieces consisted of futuristic and OTT couture-like constructivism with an edgy twist which made her designs captivating.

Taking the nomadic immigrant as her muse for autumn/winter 09-09, there was a mix of energetic movement created by the twisted chiffon, zips and pvc trousers, but there was also a sense of structure. Tight corsets, belted waists and armoured tops, ensured an empowered woman emerged.

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one of my favourites from the collection

The last two pieces twisted tulle ballgowns was greeted by whoops of applause. This was a perfect finish for a collection that bursted with intelligently conceived modern gothic pieces.

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i want this dress!

After a whole week of hot footing it to fashion shows and cocktail swigging after parties, help we wanted to celebrate the last day in style. Cue an invite to ‘Fash Off‘- a Closing LFW Party at the fancy Beach Blanket Babylon in association with Stimuli magazine.

When we first got there we were excited but we were soon confused at the long queue at the door. After much waiting around we were eventually let in. However I must note that there was a rather annoying PR lady who kept disappearing, information pills then reappearing only to haphazardly look at a chart and exclaim ‘only guess list!’ brushing people aside like flies. I like to think of her as dragon lady.

However when we were eventually in we went downstairs for a much needed drink. It wasn’t until 11ish that things hotted up with Skin spinning some tunes and people dancing along. Amongst those at the party were Daisy Lowe, the model Lara Stone and plenty of Stimuli magazine people. Although I was much more excited about the music and a big fan they had in a corner (perhaps you had to be there!)

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sarah and mel lookin’ beauuutiful

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sarah’s sexy fan pose

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…and it’s mel’s turn

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this girl even gets in on the act-gettin’ down and dirty on the floor

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what look is that guy trying to go for?! well at least he’s having fun!

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skin getting the party started

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and the crowd goes wild…well comparatively..

After toasting to this years LFW Sarah, Mel and I parted ways, with fond memories of all things fashion.

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with Emete and Amy from Make Lemonade

Woman in politics by Sandra Dieckmann

Illustration by Jenny Robins

I didn’t plan on staying up so late on Election night. I had well- meaning plans involving a cup of tea, viagra sale my pajamas and being tucked up in bed with a book by 10pm. But like many people, this as soon as the exit polls rolled in, more about I was hooked. My emotions swung from disbelief to elation, despair to complete confusion, the latter being the prevailing feeling.

I am not sure if there is any other point in the year where this is the case, but all eyes were on Sunderland. Initially I was baffled by the focus on rushing to count the votes. I would rather it was accurate than rushed, it isn’t Total Wipeout (although how I wish it was! Imagine- the party leaders racing round the course, being pounded with mechanical fists and squaring up to the Big Balls?!) But as the first, second and third result came in, I realized that for a brief, bizarre moment, we had a 100% female government. Imagine that. And bloomin bizarre it was. But why? Why is it so hard to imagine an all female government?

The sad reality is that women are still dramatically under-represented in key areas of public, political and economic life: In the last British Parliament of 646 there were only 126 female MPs. This is abysmal. We lag far far behind countries like Afghanistan, Rwanda, Senegal and Latvia when it comes to women’s representation. The majority of UK senior civil servants, directors of FTSE 100 companies, senior lawyers, and key figures in the media are men. No wonder so many teenage girls cite Katie Price as their role model, though that does make me want to eat my own face. If women are excluded from the top jobs, half the talent of the nation is wasted.

llustration by Jenny Robins

I went to bed around 2.30am unable to keep my eyes open any more, with an excited, but admittedly naïve, confidence that this election would see a significant increase In women in parliament. According to the Centre for Women and Democracy and the Fawcett Society, Thursday’s General Election resulted in… wait for it….. drum roll…… 142 women MPs. Yes! That’s an extra 16! Oh- no, wait a minute… 142 female MP’s in a parliament of 649…. that’s only 22% of parliament. On a positive note, this included Caroline Lucas, leader of the Green Party, and the election of Britain’s first ever female Asian MPs. A tiny bit better, but overall its pathetic, quite frankly. Fuck.

This has to change. We are well behind the majority of other European countries in this regard. If women’s representation continues to creep up in 1 or 2 percentage points like it has done up until now it will literally take decades before women are fairly represented in our country. Women only shortlists may sound drastic to some but when you consider the state of women’s representation nationally, you realize that it’s drastically needed.

And then there is proportional representation. Oh sweet, fair, idolized proportional representation! How we long for you! It is a clear olive branch standing out from the mushy confused mess of the election result. (Lib-lab, lab-con, Con-dem anyone?) The case for voter reform is more convincing than ever.

There are apparently gazilillions of different proportional representation systems, but roughly it means that if a party receives 10% of the vote, they receive 10% representation, which is hundreds of miles better than the system we have now when a party receives 51% of the vote but 100% of the influence in parliament. The Electoral Reform Society explains one system thus; “At present, constituencies are represented in parliament by just one MP. Under a Single Transferable Vote system, each constituency is represented by a small group of representatives…This makes it possible for representatives of different parties to be elected in each ward, thus allowing more people to have representatives of the parties of their choice.” Having a group of representatives in each constituency will mean that it will be even more blindingly obvious if women are not represented there (same for other minority groups too). In many other countries more women are nominated under PR and the more women are nominated the more they are elected. Proportional representation also means that people can vote according to what they actually believe in (like, for example, electing more women to parliament, amongst other things) rather than tactically to keep certain parties in or out.

So yes. Women are still dismally under represented. Yes, teenage girls are growing up saving for boob jobs. Yes, we heard more about the dresses of the leaders wives than we did the policies of the female candidates. But it is time to say no. We wont stand for our outdated, old fashioned, unfair voting system any more… Takebackparliament , a coalition of a range of different voter reform groups have organised a demonstration calling for voter reform on Saturday. When you’re talking to your kids and grandkids in years to come about this bonkers election, don’t say you watched it on facebook and TV. Say you got involved and made a difference.

Join them this Saturday At 2pm at Parliament Sq.

*climbs down off soap box and sneaks away quietly….*


Photograph by Matt Bramford

A few Saturdays ago when the sun was shining brightly (think hard, capsule you’ll remember sunny Saturdays) I met up with the girls behind Make Lemonade. We met at Yumchaa, the delightful tea shop in Soho. We should really have organised a picnic, and in hindsight it might have been the best day of the year for it.

Make Lemonade, both vintage e-store and fashion blog, is the baby of Emete Yarici and Amy ‘The Mysterious Blonde’. This fashionable pair are like chalk and cheese – Emete the cutesy type, resplendent in polka dots and denim, and Amy the more devilish, Debbie-Harry-esque part of the partnership dazzling in sequins. It seems Amy has a bit of a reputation – her friend arrived at Yumchaa moments into the interview accusing her of having a hangover. Charming!


Illustration by Matt Thomas

As we settled into our teas (after Amy had dropped the lid of her teapot into her teacup, but we won’t dwell on that), the girls swiftly turned the tables on me to ask how long I’d been with Amelia’s Magazine. As I began describing the tale, I suddenly realised it was me who was being interviewed! I quickly put a stop to that.

We’d decided to meet up and have a chat because the Make Lemonade site had recently been given the Pearl Law treatment – one of our finest illustrative contributors, Pearl has revamped the site with fun illustrations of the pair at work.


Make Lemonade website illustration by Pearl Law

Make Lemonade began as Emete’s fashion blog in 2007. She was interested in contributing to the ever-expanding fashion blogosphere, but inevitably needed a source of income (I hear ya, sister). She decided to set up a ‘blog shop’ through Big Cartel, and landed a buying slot at a local vintage wholesale outlet. The girls went to uni together, and Emete naturally called upon Amy to go with her to the sale. Make Lemonade the store was thus born.

‘We found that we really liked working together, and that the pieces we picked out complimented each other,’ revealed Emete, or Amy, I can’t quite remember because it was so long ago. It also transpired that they each went for different items – Emete for trousers, Amy for tops.

The girls also run the odd real-life stall here and there, which have been huge successes. ‘In two days, we cleared almost three rails of items,’ Amy told me. Emete revealed that they might have sold more if Amy had not tried half of the things on and refused to let them go, casually explaining that, when worn with the tag hanging out, it would boost sales. I guess that’s the trouble with retailing a product you genuinely love, and that’s clear from this pair.

Their philosophy, they told me, came from the all-too-familar fact that ‘so many vintage shops rip you off’ and it has always been their policy to retail clothes under £20 – little on the site (go on, have a look) sells for over £15. The website has been met with acclaim by many a fashion blogger and stylist, and they’ve heralded a lot of respect from the industry. I find the idea of vintage shopping online, where items have been cherry-picked by two vintage-lovers, far better than in a vast warehouse where any old thing will be squashed onto a rail.

Both the e-store and the blog act as a ‘creative outlet’ for both Emete and Amy, who are currently studying at the London College of Fashion and have a range of part-time jobs, too.

So what influences them when they’re on their buying trips, or in general? ‘The 70s!’ declares Emete. ‘I like the floaty, romanticism of that era. I also love looking at old family photographs, old magazines, that kind of thing. The LCF library is incredible. They have every edition of Vogue. I can spend ages down there!’

Amy, in contrast, is a 1980s child. ‘I love Debbie Harry, and everything 80s!’ she tells me. She’s a big music lover, too, so naturally is influenced by a range of bands. It’s this stark contrast that makes the site work, they (and I) believe. Sometimes you meet people who totally overestimate their influences but with this pair you can see all of these things at work.


Illustration by Pieter de Groot

The name stems from the olde English saying ‘If life gives you lemons, make lemonade’ but there doesn’t seem to be many sour lemons with this twosome. They get on so well – that is clear – at times I totally lost control of the interview with either me, them or all three of us in hysteric fits of laughter. I find it difficult imagining them ever disagreeing about anything. Of course, as an intrepid journalist, I had to ask. ‘We do argue,’ confesses Emete, ‘but hardly ever, and it’s always sorted within minutes.’ They pretend to have meetings, telling friends and family that they are discussing the future of the business when really they’re out looking for the best place to drink tea, or, on one occasion, sipping champagne at Fortnum & Mason.

Emete is the self-declared realist, while Amy is a dreamer. Amy tells me ‘Emete does get a little stressed sometimes, while I’m shouting ‘We’ll be FAMOUS!’, so I have to pat her head every now and again!’ The success of the site is in part thanks to friends and family who’ve been ‘roped in’ on numerous occasions – driving vans, designing leaflets, and loads of other tasks. They often feel guilty about this but most often everybody’s happy to help.


Illustration by Matt Thomas

So how did the collaboration with Pearl come around? ‘Pearl had been a customer of the site,’ the girls explained. ‘She bought a tweed jacket, and had emailed to ask how she could alter it. We got chatting from there, and told her we were looking to revamp.’ They gave Pearl a brief, discussed how the website works, et voila! As Pearl is a vintage-lover, they naturally paid her in clothes.

We chatted about influences, likes and dislikes, reading lists, that sort of thing – both Amy and Emete read Vogue Magazine as a base and vary their reading from there. Emete confesses to ‘occasionally’ reading Look magazine. She told me, Sometimes, Beyoncé just does it for you,’ – a statement with which I agree wholeheartedly.

So what does the future hold for Make Lemonade? ‘We want to grow the site,’ the girls told me, ‘and make MakeLemonade more than a shop. We’d like to create a community of people, through hosting events, workshops, that kind of thing. Something that draws people together.’

Already on the agenda is to increase the quantity of menswear, a t-shirt collaboration, and the girls recently branched out into being London tour guides (well, who better to ask than a pair who have meetings at Fortnum & Mason?) They produced this cute little guide detailing where and when to visit London hotspots, using lemons and as a meter. More lemons = more expensive. Simple!

As much as I could have enjoyed drinking tea and discussing Beyoncé all day, we all had things to do, including taking some snaps of the girls, one of which appears at the top of this article. Naturally I looked like a prize pervert photographing two girls in Soho Square at 11.30 in the morning, but it was a fun end to a fun meeting.

You can find both the store and the blog here.

Categories ,1970s, ,1980s, ,Amy, ,beyonce, ,Big Cartel, ,Debbie Harry, ,Emete Yarici, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Look magazine, ,Make Lemonade, ,Matt Thomas, ,Pearl Law, ,Pieter de Groot, ,Polka dots, ,Soho, ,Soho Square, ,tea, ,vintage, ,Vogue magazine, ,Yumchaa

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with fashion designer Fam Irvoll


Illustration by Dee Andrews

Fam irvoll is is a Central Saint Martins graduate with a star studded following including Lady Gaga and Marina Diamandis (remember that pink flamingo dress?). Her cupcake headbands were an instant hit, nurse her Alice in Wonderland style collections and adverts create a sense of accessible fantasy and she is just about to launch her floral themed S/S 2011 collection. It features exaggerated flowers alongside pop-art influenced speech bubbles, graphic print makeup and big bold red lips. Not one to shy away from brights, she is known for creating fun, quirky designs in glaringly bold colours, and fresh shapes.

From reviews and images of your shows, it seems that you like to entertain people, is that important to your designs?
Yes! It’s a huge part of what I do, as my clothes are not really commercial pieces I just want to go all the way and make it as anti-commercial during the show as I possibly can. I love crazy and that’s what I’m trying to portray with my work and with the entertainment. I always have either a film, dancers, singers or burlesque acts to entertain the people and to supplement the red tread throughout the catwalk show. People seem to really like it.


Illustration by Jenny Costello

They certainly do, a lot of high profile people have worn your designs, who has flattered you the most by wearing your clothes?
Lots of amazing people; off the top of my head, the lovely Marina (Diamandis), Beyonce, Lady Gaga, Mika, Katy Perry, Paloma Faith and a lot of Norwegian singers.

?Who is your ultimate muse?
I would have to say Marina from Marina and the Diamonds. She is just really lovely and I know she genuinely likes my stuff; at the same time she’s an amazing singer and a beautiful woman that you really can put anything on and it would look amazing. I really do love her style in general; it’s quirky and fun, just like me!

?The collections you design are always so fun and full of energy, where do you find your inspiration?
Usually from art, toys, films, food and just by going to London and going out clubbing and watching people. I love the London gay tranny scene; there are so many amazing people so it’s extremely easy to get inspired. We don’t really have a scene like that back home in Norway, so I feel really fortunate to have so many crazy looking friends in London that I can go and visit…I must say I really miss the good old times with Boombox every Sunday in Hoxton Square.


Illustration by Farzeen Jabbar

So, do you miss living in London?
I absolutely loved London and CSM, those must have been my best years so far. I love love, love, love London and everything you can do there. London is the city that never sleeps, with all the cool freaks. I made so many amazing friends during that time and did so many crazy things. CSM was also a really good experience; I love all the creativity that goes on behind all those doors. It’s amazing and I’m so happy I got in there.

Onto the collections…There are flamingos, tea cups and croquet resonant in your work, where did the fascination with Alice in Wonderland begin?
?It started in my final year of fashion school in Norway, in 2005. The year Gwen Stefani’s ‘What You Waiting For?’ video came out. I think I died for a second the first time I saw that amazing Alice in Wonderland video. It made me rethink my whole final collection. I’ve always loved the film and the book but it never really came into place before that video came out.

As well as an abundance of flowers for this collection, candy and cupcakes feature in a lot of your designs, do you like sweet things? Do you like cake?
I actually don’t really like cake, only cheesecakes. But I love looking at sweet things and I do get inspired by candy and pastry, but I’m more of a Scandi-salty-liquorish-kind of gal!

Roy Lichtenstein appears to be a huge influence on your most recent collection, and carried through to the makeup on the models. How did you arrive at the concept?
I have a massively huge Lichtenstein picture in my living room and that’s where the makeup came from. I called the make up artist that does fashion week and asked if it would be possible to do it in the amount of time that we had before the show and she was really positive to the idea of trying it out. My whole collection was inspired by Pop Art and by Salvador Dali; I have always been a huge fan of the movement and I have collected art books from this era for ages – so I finallt got to do a tiny tribute.


Illustration by Avril Kelly

A lot of your clothes and accessories requires some good knitting skills to create, do you knit?
Well, I have a BA in womenswear from ESMOD in Oslo and then I have a Fashion Knitwear BA from CSM in London, so yes I do knit. But usually I only do the samples and then someone else will do the rest, because I don’t have time to do it all. My mum actually started to knit and did lots of different courses so that she could help me! ?

It’s a floral theme so finally, what’s your favourite flower?
?The rose, because of all the different beautiful colours you can get them in.

Categories ,Avril Kelly, ,beyonce, ,Boombox, ,Burlesque, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Cheesecake, ,cupcakes, ,Dee Andrews, ,Fam Irvoll, ,Farzeen Jabbar, ,Flowers, ,Katy Perry, ,knitwear, ,Lady Gaga, ,london, ,Marina and The Diamonds, ,Mika, ,Norway, ,paloma faith, ,Pop Art, ,Salvador Dali, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration (ACOFI) Book Launch Party… by Matt


123 Bethnal Green Road, side effects illustrated by Naomi Law

The build up for the Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration launch party was immense. The #ACOFI hashtag on Twitter went mental in the run up, pilule with people planning their outfits and talking about meeting for the first time. The invites had all been sent, find Amelia’s kitchen was impossible to manoeuvre due to boxes piled high with goodies and 123 Bethnal Green Road‘s Scout Hut had been transformed.


Jenny Robins applies her make up surrounded by ACOFI goodie bags…

The day started as I rushed to Amelia’s with 8 potential outfits and a tote bag full of press releases. When I arrived, Amelia looking ever so slightly drained (having had about 4 minutes sleep in the previous week) and after responding to yet more emails asking for an invitation and picking nail varnish (for Amelia, not me) Ross from 123BGR arrived with his van. Contributor Sally turned up laden with her camera equipment, and we loaded everything into the van – box after box of Dr.Hauschka goodies, Moleskine notebooks, Tatty Devine necklaces, postcards, Amelia’s Magazine Issue 10, sh*tloads of ACOFI books and Amelia’s Nina Dolcetti shoes.

The atmosphere at 123 Bethnal Green Road was a a bit of a farce, as we unloaded the van, took everything downstairs and started to unpack it all. It was a bit intense, but I just couldn’t stop giggling. How were we going to make up 200 goodie bags each containing nearly 20 items? Well, with a little help from our friends at Forward PR, we managed it.


Lily Vanilli’s magnificent cake, illustrated by Jo Cheung


Holly from Make Lemonade, illustrated by Joana Faria

As the final Pukka tea sachet went into the last bag and Lily Vanilli arrived with her mindblowing ACOFI-inspired cake, the first few guests arrived including a very prompt Holly from Make Lemonade. I legged it to the top of the 123 building to get changed, and by the time I returned the tea party was in full swing. It was bloody packed, with illustrators creating images of guests and tea being served in gorgeous miss-matched vintage teacups and Felicity from Dr.Hauschka giving hand massages. Those who were lucky enough to enjoy her skillz came away from her table with the appearance of taking mild narcotics and I was desperate to get in there myself but just didn’t get the chance.


Rosie and Harriet of Tatty Devine, illustrated by Zarina Liew


Joana Faria sketches a guest


Amazing treats by Lily Vanilli

In between flirting with journalists and taking photographs I enjoyed a green spiced-chai Pukka tea with cinnamon and star anise and my fair share of Lily Vanilli’s delicious pearlescent scones. Thank God there wasn’t a bloody cupcake in sight. I hate cupcakes at these events; they’re impossible to eat and on more than one occasion I’ve ended up wearing more around my mouth than I’ve actually eaten: not a good luck when schmoozing peers.


Adorngirl, illustrated by Abby Wright


The gorgeous Gabby Young and Stephen, illustrated by Zarina Liew


Susie Bubble‘s covetable Dr. Martens


Amelia with stylist Rebekah Roy


Ellen Grace Jones from The Real Runway


Felicity from Dr. Hauschka gives a guest a relaxing massage


It’s Amelia’s parents!

Such a diverse range of guests came through the door, from high-end fashion glossies to Amelia’s parents (not that they’re not high-end, of course, but you know what I mean!)

The daytime bit was over in a flash, and it was a mad dash to throw all the vintage teacups into the sink before heading upstairs, where yet more guests arrived and the cavernous Scout Hut soon became packed wall-to-wall with illustrators, their guests, the fashion press and a host of other creative types.

Amelia’s amazing Nina Dolcetti shoes

The fabulous 6 Day Riot then blew the crowds away with their folky fun, before the Pipettes DJed to much dancing while I took photographs, met even more of the fabulous illustrators who have worked so hard over the last year to make Amelia’s Magazine what it is, and consumed my fair share of Vodka O and Adnams beers. My thanks goes to the Pipettes and later Will from the Mystery Jets (who played us out surrounded by honeys) for playing Single Ladies twice. My only explanation for my ludicrous shape-throwing is that I was so relieved to finally be on the dancefloor that I, y’know, sort of let go a bit. I also blame the sugar rush from Lily Vanilli’s incredible ACOFI-inspired cake.


Were these hired dancers…?!


Amelia with Nicola from Beautiful Soul


Amisha Ghadiali, illustrated by Antonia Parker

I could go on, but here are my top ten ACOFI moments (in no particular order)

1. When Amelia’s Joanna Cave earrings turned up at the 11th hour. Stunning!

2. When Amelia acquired tourettes and told me, as I descended the 123 stairs, that I looked ‘dreadful…erm, DREADFUL? I mean amazeballs!’ (Not verbatim, but you get the picture…)

3. When I told Gareth A Hopkins that somebody had come to the daytime do with a toilet seat on their head and he believed me.

4. When fashion photographer Liz Johnson-Artur took a picture of stylist Sabrina Bangladesh and the flash was so bright that her squeals could be heard in Walthamstow.

5. When I threw myself at the wall trying to be Beyoncé for Maggie Angus‘ benefit…

6. The great cover samples disappearance mystery, which later turned up in Amelia’s Nina Dolcetti shoebox. Well, this wasn’t exactly a favourite moment, but I wanted to mention it anyway…

7. Eating the cake.

8. Having my first taste of Vodka O and ginger ale, and then watching Nick from Forward PR (who was my only rival in the dance stakes) giving out ‘New York’ measures (no wonder I could barely stand up and everybody reported dreadful hangovers on Twitter the next day…)

9. When 6 Day Riot asked the crowd to join them on a chorus singing ‘Yadda yadda ya’ and lead singer Tamara said ‘I know we’re in East London, but come on!”


Sally Mumby-Croft filming

10. Suggesting that contributor Sally’s video edit would turn out like that scene in Love Actually where he films the wedding (more of a dream than a suggestion…)


Lovely guests… (from top) Illustrator Aniela Murphy and her boy, Jo Cheung and June Chanpoomidole, fashion designer Lira Leirner and Illustrator Faye West with the foxy red Chanel lips.

Finally, of course – so I guess number 11 – meeting all the wonderful illustrators and fashion types who I’ve got to know so well on Twitter and seeing them in the flesh! Glorious!

Can we do it again, please?

Read Amelia’s review of the launch party here, check out the in-store Eco Pop Up shop at 123 Bethnal Green Road (as part of the ACOFI fun) here, watch the illustrators talk all about the work on our YouTube channel AND buy the book here!

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Parker, ,beyonce, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Jo Cheung, ,Joanna Cave, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Lily Vanilli, ,Lira Leirner, ,Make Lemonade, ,Moleskine, ,Mystery Jets, ,Naomi Law, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Pukka tea, ,Scout Hut, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Pipettes, ,Zarina Liew

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with Designer Joseph Turvey – Part 1


Joseph Turvey A/W 2013 by Krister Selin

While everybody else viewed next season’s collections at the A/W 2013 London Collections: Men shows in January, I spent the week on a rather tedious stint of jury service. For days I sat doing nowt, following the shows and presentations on my iPhone through the usual channels. Twitter, Facebook and Instagram went wild for the latest offerings and it was Joseph Turvey‘s incredible dalmatian-themed collection that I most enjoyed viewing at 640 pixels wide.


Joseph Turvey

Back in 2010 I saw Joseph present his BA graduate womenswear collection at Graduate Fashion Week. Inspired by Margaret Rutherford and complete with ethereal masks, it was a sharp, polished collection with elements of menswear tailoring. I interviewed Joe shortly afterwards; a brief, standard post-GFW interview. Joseph then contributed illustrations to Amelia’s Magazine (amongst many other publications). But it was during Ones to Watch A/W 2012, merging his illustrative style with his talent for tailoring and eye for experimental materials, that propelled him on to the menswear scene. Also, Beyoncé once touched his hand during a performance of Halo.


Joseph Turvey A/W 2013 by Dom&Ink

I meet Joe in the hip offices of Coffin on Cake PR – a labyrinth of rooms above Redchurch Street with all sorts of weird and wonderful objects adorning walls. Joe is waiting in the showroom at the end of a long corridor, with other brands overshadowed by his incredible S/S and A/W 2013 collections. On sight of the dalmatian print enveloping his latest designs, I leap towards it to finally see it in the flesh. I’ve met Joe before but I’d forgotten how tall he was. His gentle personality and new-found confidence are instantly infectious. I launch into a series of typical questions, surmounting the urge to chat about Beyoncé – that will have to wait.


Joseph Turvey A/W 2013 by youdesignme

When I ask him how his day has been, he tells me he’s been rushed off his feet and hasn’t stopped – photoshoots, meetings, and walking his beloved cockapoo. This takes us nicely into chatting about his current collection. ‘I’m obsessed with dogs,’ he tells me, ‘I’m surrounded by dog owners and I love the idea of dog owners dressing like their dogs.’ I ask about the A/W 2013 presentation that garnered so much attention. ‘I got obsessed with having dalmatian puppies at the show… they came up from Devon!’ he says. I play devil’s advocate and ponder what PETA might think. ‘They were very well looked after… they were on rotation, and they’re show dogs – one of the girl pups absolutely loved the attention!’.

Each collection has had a central figure as inspiration and it will come as no surprise to learn that this season’s was Cruella de Vil; the result, a slick collection featuring suiting, bombers, sweaters and t-shirts adorned with dalmatian print. The installation at the AW13 showcase was ‘intense’ – two hours of ‘hardcore’ attention and showmanship. He describes it as ‘overwhelming’ and ‘scary’ and remembers the drama, with hushed whispers of PRs introducing attendees and figures like Natalie Massenet checking things out.

Joe launched himself straight onto the MA at London College of Fashion after graduating from the University of Birmingham. It was a tutor there who commented on the masculine feel of his womenswear collections, and so he decided to move in that direction. I ask Joe if he’d like to return to womenswear. ‘You never know what’s going to happen’, he says, coyly, ‘I just want to make the menswear the best it can be.’

Part two to follow tomorrow!

Photography by Matt Bramford except images of A/W 2013 presentation – courtesy of Coffin on Cake PR.

Categories ,A/W’13, ,beyonce, ,Coffin on Cake PR, ,Cruella de Vil, ,Dalmatians, ,Dogs, ,interview, ,Joseph Turvey, ,Krister Selin, ,London Collections Men, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Ones To Watch, ,puppies, ,SS13, ,Style, ,youdesignme

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with Designer Joseph Turvey – Part 2


Joseph Turvey S/S 2013 by Gemma Cotterell

Joe’s MA collection: vibrant orange and magenta lace with transparent panels and translucent trenches was a massive hit. Fake Tokyo completely sold out and they’re backing him again this season, amongst many others. I sense that Joe is pretty busy minded. He’s conquering Asia step-by-step. He opened Shanghai Fashion Week with said MA collection, an experience he’ll never forget. ‘The catwalk was MASSIVE!’ he tells me, ‘it was like a Madonna tour!’

Joseph Turvey MA collection

We take a look through the current Spring/Summer collection – a range of dazzling neon hues married with white t-shirts and his synonymous illustrative portraits. Joe demonstrates the heat-sensitive technique he’s pioneered for spring/summer, so the model’s face becomes clear when worn. I ask if the faces we’re now so familiar with are based on anyone in particular. ‘Not really,’ he says, ‘I merge a few faces together. A bit like Frankenstein’, he laughs. Joe tells me that people always ask the story behind his personal interpretations and influences on his collections. ‘People always look for hidden meanings,’ he says. ‘Maybe I should be more like Taylor Swift and feature exes.’

What else is in the pipeline? ‘I really like collaborations,’ he says, ‘I like the juxtaposition of things.’ Joe’s currently collaborating with Hush Puppies, pioneer of the men’s comfort shoe but currently undergoing a massive relaunch under the creative direction of Jack Hemingway. He’s excited to work with established brands and put his stamp on menswear staples.

I ask how S/S 2014 is going. ‘I’ve nearly finished!’ he says, excitedly. I ask what we might expect. ‘It’s very colourful,’ he tells me, careful not to reveal too much. ‘There’s a central figure, again, and it’s very illustrative.’ He’s obsessed with the aesthetics of fabrics and innovative textures and his ethos is to always move things forward: lace, vinyl-peaked caps, laser-cut florals; the contrast of gloss spots on a black bomber. Joe works closely with acclaimed London textile company Insley & Nash in his constant endeavours to advance fashion techniques.


Joseph Turvey S/S 2013 by Karina Järv

I take a few photographs of both collections as we chat about everything else. What other brands does he admire? Baartmans and Siegel (who are ‘amazing’) and close pal Domingo Rodriguez are high on his list, as is Christopher Kane, who manages to make clothes ‘sellable but with his stamp on it.’

What advice would Joe give to current graduates looking to follow in his footsteps? ‘The best thing I did was the MA,’ he declares. With Savile Row tutoring and free reign on his future, Joe developed his unique approach we’ve become so quickly familiar with. ‘I’d say – don’t rush in to anything. I spent a lot of money doing it, but it really helped me focus. It’s about developing your skills. Make it exactly what you want it to be.’

Categories ,Asia, ,beyonce, ,Fake Tokyo, ,fashion, ,Gemma Cotterell, ,interview, ,Joseph Turvey, ,Karina Jarv, ,lace, ,ma, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Shanghai Fashion Week, ,SS13

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Amelia’s Magazine | Now What: University of Brighton Illustration Ba Hons Graduate Show 2012 Review

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Pippa Toole
Image by Pippa Toole.

There were a host of specially curated graduate design exhibitions in London last week – including work by my old gaff, the University of Brighton. The intriguingly titled Now What took place in trendy Netil House at the north end of Broadway Market, a spacious venue that allowed the graduates to spread out and make imaginative use of the space. Although poor lighting made it hard to take decent photos of some of the work I found plenty of student talent to admire: first up the graduating illustrators, many of whom played extensively with the medium: working in 3D, photography and set design.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Lucy Kirk
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Lucy Kirk
Lucy Kirk describes herself as an illustrator, model maker and farmer’s daughter, and her Farm Sale display featured a delightful combination of energetic line drawings and ceramic models of farm workers and their beasts at work and play.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Beautiful painterly illustrations and interesting mark making from Scarlett Wilson.

Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
I loved Pippa Toole‘s gothic work, inspired by gang culture and slogans on bikes and leather jackets: all tattoos, posturing and meaty limbs.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 Jonathan Andrew Taylor
Now what university of Brighton 2012 Jonathan Andrew Taylor
Jonathan Andrew Taylor had created strange little characters and also has a website called theinternetmakesmetired.com – which features a shaking distressed man crumpled on the floor. I know how he feels at times.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Joanna Rutter
Joanna rutter
Joanna Rutter mixed print with textile design in her beautifully laid out display.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 Emily Frances Barrett
Emily Frances Barrett created strange worlds teetering and tilting with wooden Ewok style walkways and platforms bearing exotic plants. I’d like to tell you more about the thought processes behind her models but the website on her business card doesn’t work. Doh.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Alex Wells
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Alex Wells
Inspired by octopi, Alex Wells had created a stunning decorative typeface.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Jack Felgate
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Jack Felgate
Jack Felgate‘s work was titled A General Dissatisfaction with the World and featured an assortment of intriguing subjects painted in photo-realistic style on wood (a nuclear bomb, a penis shaped cacti).

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Kotryna Abromaityte
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Kotryna Abromaityte
Black lino cut prints by Kotryna Abromaityte were inspired by folk tales from around the world – most notably a sadistic Lithuanian tale.

amy eyelyn hughes
Strange watery people from Amy Eyelyn Hughes. Nebuchadnezzar: ‘sniggering at a banana or a peculiar shaped tree stump.’

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Rufus Day
Pretty typography by Mia Warner on skateboards by Rufus Day, clearly an enthusiast (of skating).

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Zoe Landry screenprinted on cardboard for Houses to Build. I was also intrigued by The Endless Forest, a small installation consisting of wool, wire and mirrors.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Elisa MacDougall
I really like the way that Elisa MacDougall draws people in loose ink brushes: strange that her website too (like theinternetmakesmetired.com) features a cowed person on the floor. What does it all mean?

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Sarah Julia Clark
Who Runs the World? GIRLS – Genius collaged screenprints featuring well known lyrics bathed in a metallic glow, by avid feminist Sarah Julia Clark of Studio Her.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Tom Matthews
Bag Head, Red Face, Cracked Milk, by Tom Matthews.

Now what university of Brighton 2012
For sale: an assortment of brilliant artworks. I really wanted to buy that ace Beyonce poster but I had no money on me. Next up: a review of the graphic designers, also on show at Now What. You can read my reviews of last year’s University of Brighton illustration show here and here.

Categories ,2012, ,3D, ,A General Dissatisfaction with the World, ,Alex Wells, ,Bag Head, ,beyonce, ,Broadway Market, ,Cracked Milk, ,Elisa MacDougall, ,Emily Frances Barrett, ,Farm Sale, ,graduate, ,Houses to Build, ,illustration, ,Jack Felgate, ,Joanna Rutter, ,Jonathan Andrew Taylor, ,Kotryna Abromaityte, ,Lucy Kirk, ,Mia Warner, ,Model Making, ,Nebuchadnezzar, ,Netil House, ,Pippa Toole, ,Red Face, ,review, ,Rufus Day, ,Sarah Julia Clark, ,Scarlett Wilson, ,Set Design, ,Studio Her, ,The Endless Forest, ,Tom Matthews, ,typography, ,University of Brighton, ,Zoe Landry

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Amelia’s Magazine | Now What: University of Brighton Illustration Ba Hons Graduate Show 2012 Review

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Pippa Toole
Image by Pippa Toole.

There were a host of specially curated graduate design exhibitions in London last week – including work by my old gaff, the University of Brighton. The intriguingly titled Now What took place in trendy Netil House at the north end of Broadway Market, a spacious venue that allowed the graduates to spread out and make imaginative use of the space. Although poor lighting made it hard to take decent photos of some of the work I found plenty of student talent to admire: first up the graduating illustrators, many of whom played extensively with the medium: working in 3D, photography and set design.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Lucy Kirk
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Lucy Kirk
Lucy Kirk describes herself as an illustrator, model maker and farmer’s daughter, and her Farm Sale display featured a delightful combination of energetic line drawings and ceramic models of farm workers and their beasts at work and play.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Scarlett Wilson
Beautiful painterly illustrations and interesting mark making from Scarlett Wilson.

Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
Pippa Toole Brighton What Now
I loved Pippa Toole‘s gothic work, inspired by gang culture and slogans on bikes and leather jackets: all tattoos, posturing and meaty limbs.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 Jonathan Andrew Taylor
Now what university of Brighton 2012 Jonathan Andrew Taylor
Jonathan Andrew Taylor had created strange little characters and also has a website called theinternetmakesmetired.com – which features a shaking distressed man crumpled on the floor. I know how he feels at times.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Joanna Rutter
Joanna rutter
Joanna Rutter mixed print with textile design in her beautifully laid out display.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 Emily Frances Barrett
Emily Frances Barrett created strange worlds teetering and tilting with wooden Ewok style walkways and platforms bearing exotic plants. I’d like to tell you more about the thought processes behind her models but the website on her business card doesn’t work. Doh.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Alex Wells
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Alex Wells
Inspired by octopi, Alex Wells had created a stunning decorative typeface.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Jack Felgate
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Jack Felgate
Jack Felgate‘s work was titled A General Dissatisfaction with the World and featured an assortment of intriguing subjects painted in photo-realistic style on wood (a nuclear bomb, a penis shaped cacti).

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Kotryna Abromaityte
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Kotryna Abromaityte
Black lino cut prints by Kotryna Abromaityte were inspired by folk tales from around the world – most notably a sadistic Lithuanian tale.

amy eyelyn hughes
Strange watery people from Amy Eyelyn Hughes. Nebuchadnezzar: ‘sniggering at a banana or a peculiar shaped tree stump.’

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Rufus Day
Pretty typography by Mia Warner on skateboards by Rufus Day, clearly an enthusiast (of skating).

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Zoe Landry
Zoe Landry screenprinted on cardboard for Houses to Build. I was also intrigued by The Endless Forest, a small installation consisting of wool, wire and mirrors.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Elisa MacDougall
I really like the way that Elisa MacDougall draws people in loose ink brushes: strange that her website too (like theinternetmakesmetired.com) features a cowed person on the floor. What does it all mean?

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Sarah Julia Clark
Who Runs the World? GIRLS – Genius collaged screenprints featuring well known lyrics bathed in a metallic glow, by avid feminist Sarah Julia Clark of Studio Her.

Now what university of Brighton 2012 -Tom Matthews
Bag Head, Red Face, Cracked Milk, by Tom Matthews.

Now what university of Brighton 2012
For sale: an assortment of brilliant artworks. I really wanted to buy that ace Beyonce poster but I had no money on me. Next up: a review of the graphic designers, also on show at Now What. You can read my reviews of last year’s University of Brighton illustration show here and here.

Categories ,2012, ,3D, ,A General Dissatisfaction with the World, ,Alex Wells, ,Bag Head, ,beyonce, ,Broadway Market, ,Cracked Milk, ,Elisa MacDougall, ,Emily Frances Barrett, ,Farm Sale, ,graduate, ,Houses to Build, ,illustration, ,Jack Felgate, ,Joanna Rutter, ,Jonathan Andrew Taylor, ,Kotryna Abromaityte, ,Lucy Kirk, ,Mia Warner, ,Model Making, ,Nebuchadnezzar, ,Netil House, ,Pippa Toole, ,Red Face, ,review, ,Rufus Day, ,Sarah Julia Clark, ,Scarlett Wilson, ,Set Design, ,Studio Her, ,The Endless Forest, ,Tom Matthews, ,typography, ,University of Brighton, ,Zoe Landry

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Amelia’s Magazine | Christmas Gift Ideas 2012: Best Design Gifts For Women

by hand london elisalex dress
The Elisalex dress from By Hand London.
Looking for some last minute gift ideas to please the lady who loves good design, handmade goods and occasionally creating her own? Well go no further…

It was with much happiness that I ran into Elisalex de Castro Peake at the recent East London Design Show – daughter of ethical fashion doyenne Orsola de Castro and one time creator of ethical shoe brand Nina Dolcetti – Elisalex is back with a brand new project based on her love of hand sewing. Easy to follow patterns come in a lovely box designed by business partner Charlotte Hintzen.

by hand london charlotte skirt
The first two patterns available are classic shapes named after the founders, and they will be adding to these soon. In the meantime if someone is kind enough to buy you the fab peplum skirt pattern, then why not join the Charlotte skirt sewalong in the New Year? For those who are novices to sewing the site includes ace tutorials such as how to make a DIY skirt.

Lauren Baker skull Frankie
Some of Lauren Baker‘s more extravagant creations might require you to remortgage your home, but this artwork is reasonably priced. Frankie, above, was inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead. He is cast from a human skull and then painstakingly hand decorated with beads and acrylic.

TOFT crochet_hippo_amigurumi_pattern
At the Toft Alpaca Shop find a one stop shop to buy the yarns and the designs to create cute crocheted Amigurumi toys – or commission their crafters to make one of the little guys for you.

Bianca Green BOLD iphone cover
On the gadget front this gorgeous abstract BOLD design by Bianca Green fits perfectly into our ongoing love affair with all things tribal.

dom and ink iphone skin ophelia
Or go for something a bit more illustrative: how about contributor Dom & Ink‘s fabulous portrait of Ophelia on an iphone skin? It’s bound to be a talking point.

Batter My Heart Dom and Ink
dom and ink batter my heart zine
dom and ink batter my heart zine
I’m also loving Dom & Ink‘s Batter My Heart zine – chock full of great illustrations, wry observations and insights on the theme of relationships. It’s guaranteed to appeal to anyone who is or has been heartbroken.

Rebecca Desnos Petal Scarf Wrapped
On an eco conscious tip take a look at these beautifully crafted bamboo scarves by Rebecca Desnos: each geometric design is handmade with plant dyes using a Japanese technique called Shibori.

lowie fingerless gloves
And I adore these eye catching merino wool fingerless gloves by ethical woollen brand Lowie. They are decorated with an interesting thistle design and are long enough to cover your entire wrist area for extra warmth.

chelsea doll Red Heart Bobble Trapper Hat
On the more affordable front, I really love this cute woollen trapper hat with fleecy lining at Chelsea Doll.

thriftola lola hanger
Leona runs Thriftola, a website dedicated to bringing you the best in vintage gems. She was formerly the brains behind much loved jewellery brand Lady Luck Rules OK and she has finally decided to make a new product: meet Lola. Lola is a stylish hand illustrated clothes hanger designed to showcase your favourite garment to perfection.

COCO BOHEME RECYCLED CARDBOARD ANIMAL HANGER
Or if you fancy something a bit sillier you could look to these Coco Boheme hangers, made out of strong recycled cardboard and printed in environmentally friendly ink.

emma hamshare
Fashion brand äelska specialises in beautifully made collars, and I absolutely adore this buttery soft sequinned version that would look great with a party outfit, here modelled by creator Emma Hamshare, who once upon a time helped make Amelia’s Magazine in print.

carmen woods clutch
For bag fans look no further than the new range of British made goods by Carmen Woods, all made using the finest leathers. I love the bright pattern on this clutch.

Kelly Moore Libby Camera Bag
And for the serious photography fan, check out these newly discovered Kelly Moore camera bags: incredibly stylish totes to keep your equipment safe. Above is the Kelly Moore Libby Camera Bag. So want one to cart my SLR around in during LFW!

pumpkin sputnk notebook betty
Thinking about some luxury stationery? How about this gorgeous hand stitched journal, which comes with a timeless photographic hydrangea design, by Pumpkin Sputnik.

Melly bee notebookswrapped
Or something simpler: Mellybee makes slim pocket-sized notebooks, screenprinted by hand onto 100% recycled card with a delightful anchor design.

Who Runs the World Girls by Studio Her
Finally and by no means least, may I draw your attention to this genius screenprint from Studio Her? It first caught my eye at Sarah Julia Clark‘s graduate exhibition and she was kind enough to send me one in all its golden feminist glory: now you or your loved one can own your very own version for she has finally set up an online Studio Her shop. Hell yeah: Beyonce for the wall!

Categories ,2012, ,äelska, ,Amigurumi, ,art, ,Batter My Heart, ,beyonce, ,Camera Bags, ,Carmen Woods, ,Charlotte Hintzen, ,Chelsea Doll, ,Christmas, ,Coco Boheme, ,Day of the Dead, ,design, ,Dom & Ink, ,East London Design Show, ,Elisalex de Castro Peake, ,Emma Hamshare, ,fashion, ,Frankie, ,gifts, ,Kelly Moore, ,Lady Luck Rules OK, ,Lauren Baker, ,Leona, ,Lola, ,Lowie, ,Mellybee, ,Mexican, ,mosaic, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Ophelia, ,Orsola Castro, ,Orsola De Castro, ,Pumpkin Sputnik, ,Rebecca Desnos, ,Sarah Julia Clark, ,Shibori, ,SLR, ,Studio Her, ,Thriftola, ,Toft Alpaca Shop

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