Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Ada Zanditon

Illustration by Kellie Black

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

Illustration by Kellie Black

The Headonsim exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, medicine behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. The xxxxx has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in and the only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read xxx post on the displays upstairs to find out who did it well.

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections. Illuminated promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, try followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. –

All photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

In the run up to London Fashion Week, stomach Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Bloomsbury, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,Ecover, ,estethica, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Ethical Fashion Forum, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Innovative Design Awards, ,Katie Antoniou, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lu Flux, ,onoff, ,Somerset House, ,SS11, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Clements Ribeiro


Illustration by Avril Kelly

Finally escaping the intermittent drizzle, pilule I find myself standing in a beautiful hall within the restored Northumberland House in Trafalgar Square. The ornate ceiling is touching the sky and the splendour of its Victorian past hushes the crowd. The audience here appears slightly subdued. Notepads out, here pens uncapped and eyes focused on the catwalk. Tiptoeing at the back, viagra 40mg I strain to view the runway. I’m anticipating what Suzanne Clements and Inacio Ribeiro will bring to the catwalk to tease our fashion palettes. Spotlights alight causing the last of the whispers to subside and all gaze expectantly at the white path ahead, as the soundtrack strikes.

Enter structured jackets embellished with heraldic embroidery and printed silk skirts, jumpsuits and dresses in autumn colours, burnt orange and berry red. The prints vary, from pretty paisleys to luxurious leopard print. I’m not usually attracted to animal print, but I’m longing for the paisley meets leopard print dress, sporting blue silk detail on the neck and shoulders. It’s simple and elegant but not at all banal. High necks, low cinched waists and midi length skirts in vivid blue and red make for graceful dresses that suggest a marriage of Victoriana and 1970s styles. Bold and neutral colours follow, sheathed in dazzling gems that revive nostalgia for the 1950s.


Live catwalk illustration by Jenny Robins

The colours fade into cloudy greys, biscuit beiges and ice blues for the inconspicuous in you and luxurious brocades make up beautiful jackets, not unlike those gentlemen’s smoking jackets of a bygone vintage era. The catwalk darkens and we’re engulfed in black. Black lace, black wool, black silk – all combine to forge pretty, yet formal, dresses and blouses. I’m rarely taken in by designs in black, but these really are lovely. The vintage inspired shoes and patterned tights play a key part in the presentation, complimenting a largely conservative but beautiful collection.

My height has failed me and my photographs are painfully poor, but I leave contented and pleased to have spied a wonderful show.

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Avril Kelly, ,Catwalk review, ,Classic, ,Clements Ribeiro, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Formal, ,Inacio Ribeiro, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Northumberland House, ,Suzanne Clements, ,The Show Space, ,Upcycling, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Clements Ribeiro


Illustration by Avril Kelly

Finally escaping the intermittent drizzle, pilule I find myself standing in a beautiful hall within the restored Northumberland House in Trafalgar Square. The ornate ceiling is touching the sky and the splendour of its Victorian past hushes the crowd. The audience here appears slightly subdued. Notepads out, here pens uncapped and eyes focused on the catwalk. Tiptoeing at the back, viagra 40mg I strain to view the runway. I’m anticipating what Suzanne Clements and Inacio Ribeiro will bring to the catwalk to tease our fashion palettes. Spotlights alight causing the last of the whispers to subside and all gaze expectantly at the white path ahead, as the soundtrack strikes.

Enter structured jackets embellished with heraldic embroidery and printed silk skirts, jumpsuits and dresses in autumn colours, burnt orange and berry red. The prints vary, from pretty paisleys to luxurious leopard print. I’m not usually attracted to animal print, but I’m longing for the paisley meets leopard print dress, sporting blue silk detail on the neck and shoulders. It’s simple and elegant but not at all banal. High necks, low cinched waists and midi length skirts in vivid blue and red make for graceful dresses that suggest a marriage of Victoriana and 1970s styles. Bold and neutral colours follow, sheathed in dazzling gems that revive nostalgia for the 1950s.


Live catwalk illustration by Jenny Robins

The colours fade into cloudy greys, biscuit beiges and ice blues for the inconspicuous in you and luxurious brocades make up beautiful jackets, not unlike those gentlemen’s smoking jackets of a bygone vintage era. The catwalk darkens and we’re engulfed in black. Black lace, black wool, black silk – all combine to forge pretty, yet formal, dresses and blouses. I’m rarely taken in by designs in black, but these really are lovely. The vintage inspired shoes and patterned tights play a key part in the presentation, complimenting a largely conservative but beautiful collection.

My height has failed me and my photographs are painfully poor, but I leave contented and pleased to have spied a wonderful show.

All photography by Akeela Bhattay

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Avril Kelly, ,Catwalk review, ,Classic, ,Clements Ribeiro, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Formal, ,Inacio Ribeiro, ,Jenny Robins, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Northumberland House, ,Suzanne Clements, ,The Show Space, ,Upcycling, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Amelia)

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

I will confess now. I may have gone over the top. Yes, nurse physician this blog is positively popping at the seams with illustrations. And it’s the FOURTH, clinic yes the FOURTH one to hit our website. But really it’s no surprise that Prophetik is such a big draw for both writers and illustrators, prostate peddling as he does an uber romantic view of the world that is steeped in a deep love for the natural environment.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson.

For his A/W 2011 Artist Wonderment collection designer Jeff Garner once again referenced times past, this time the “frivolous snobbery” of the court of Louix XV, an epoch that for him epitomises the falsity of impulsive consumption. Having interviewed Jeff Garner for my book, Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration I know how important it is for him to live a fully accountable life, and it seems to me that the title of this collection refers to the purity of artistic vision which he himself attempts to put into practice in everything he does.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly RochesterProphetik A/W 2011 by Gilly RochesterProphetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

The show opened in typical Jeff style, with live vocals followed by a madly thrashing classical violinist, who strutted down the catwalk as if her life depended on it.

Analiza Ching by Amelia Gregory
Violinist Analiza Ching by Gabriel 'Gaarte' Ayala
Violinist Analiza Ching by Gabriel ‘Gaarte’ Ayala.

But it was the finer detailing which really stood out as the models swept past me. His ball gowns and corseted dresses were awash with gorgeously constructed patchwork, twirly brocade, gilded buttons and ruffles. At a time when trains, tails, hooped and boned structures of every description have been big across all runways, his is an aesthetic which makes total sense right now.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

For me the absolute stand outs were a couple of stupendous quilted jackets… and by quilted I really do actually mean made out of antique quilts, one of which belonged on his childhood bed that he must surely have baulked at destructing – just a tiny bit. But as his stylist Rebekah Roy pointed out to me later on, it makes absolute sense to refashion a quilt in this way – a quilt that in the very first place was made from fabric remnants.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson.

This approach of continuous upcycling is certainly innovative, and epitomises what I love most about Jeff: his dedication to sustainable practice. All his fabrics are painstakingly hand dyed with a magical potion of herbs in a process that takes many weeks to accomplish – this season’s special plum colour was obtained by mixing up a unique blend of madder root, sorrel, logwood and indigo.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Karina Yarv
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Karina Yarv.

The love he puts into every single part of his work is evident in the outcome, and of anyone on the ethical fashion scene I really feel that Prophetik is pushing the way forward by putting on a ambitious catwalk show that ensures excitement amongst mainstream fashionistas. Prophetik opened Fashion Scout for the third season running and the Freemasons Hall was packed to the rafters, including famous front row attendees in the form of Hilary Alexander and Livia Firth, erstwhile wife of Colin and celebrity advocate of ethical fashion. At the end Jeff took a demure bow dressed in a cream silky ruffled top and powder blue peddle pushers, sporting his trademark swept back ponytail: if there’s one major advocate for dressing this way it’s the ever dapper Jeff Garner himself.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen JabbarProphetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen Jabbar
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen Jabbar.

I can only hope that Jeff’s dedication to the ethical cause will rub off on other members of the fashion industry. Soon.

You can read Matt Bramford’s review here, Helen Martin’s review here and Katie Antoniou’s review here.

Prophetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read more about Jeff Garner‘s design philosophy in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Analiza Ching, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Artist Wonderment, ,Danielle Shepherd, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Farzeen Jabbar, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gaarte, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Jeff Garner, ,Karina Yarv, ,Livia Firth, ,Louix XV, ,Prophetik, ,Quilt, ,Rebekah Roy, ,Upcycling, ,Violinist

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Amelia’s Magazine | From Somewhere: Upcycled Fashion from Orsola de Castro

Abby Wright Fifi Bijoux rutile quartz
You were one of the first jewellery designers to take an ethical stance on manufacturing of high end jewellery in the UK. What have you achieved?
I set up the British Ethical Jewellery Association to create a set of auditable ethical standards for the industry. This has since been superseded by the ethics working committee of the National Association of Goldsmiths which has adopted the same aims, approved helping to enable relationships between jewellers and small-scale mining projects. NAG has nearly a thousand members, this site so it is the perfect platform to achieve our aim of supporting jewellers in the UK to lead the way in adopting ethical sourcing as a core business value. In the UK there is a real will to embrace better ethical practices and a fairtraded logo for jewellery will be agreed on shortly.

Have you seen much change in the industry since you started Fifi Bijoux?
The most remarkable change has come from gem and diamond-producing countries such as Tanzania, Madagascar and Namibia, who are now cutting and polishing the gems before export. This represents a huge shift in technical skills and economics since a large percentage of a gem’s value is added at this stage. The lapidary art of stone cutting requires a high degree of technical and scientific expertise in order to create the sophisticated facets expected by western customers, and this can be provided by modern lasers. Gravity mining provides a relatively low impact solution for gold extraction. It is really important that producers in developing countries are able to access markets and this is where organisations such as the Fairtrade Foundation and membership bodies like NAG can create quantum shifts; an individual jeweller may struggle with the process of sourcing gold, exporting it from a developing country, refining it and processing it into a usable material to create jewellery. However, by acting collectively with support resources in place, this becomes considerably less daunting.

Read the rest of this interview with Fifi Bijoux in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Abby Wright Fifi Bijoux rutile quartz
Rutile quartz jewellery by Fifi Bijoux. Illustrated by Abby Wright.

You were one of the first jewellery designers to take an ethical stance on manufacturing of high end jewellery in the UK. What have you achieved?
I set up the British Ethical Jewellery Association to create a set of auditable ethical standards for the industry. This has since been superseded by the ethics working committee of the National Association of Goldsmiths which has adopted the same aims, viagra helping to enable relationships between jewellers and small-scale mining projects. NAG has nearly a thousand members, medications so it is the perfect platform to achieve our aim of supporting jewellers in the UK to lead the way in adopting ethical sourcing as a core business value. In the UK there is a real will to embrace better ethical practices and a fairtraded logo for jewellery will be agreed on shortly.

Have you seen much change in the industry since you started Fifi Bijoux?
The most remarkable change has come from gem and diamond-producing countries such as Tanzania, Madagascar and Namibia, who are now cutting and polishing the gems before export. This represents a huge shift in technical skills and economics since a large percentage of a gem’s value is added at this stage. The lapidary art of stone cutting requires a high degree of technical and scientific expertise in order to create the sophisticated facets expected by western customers, and this can be provided by modern lasers. Gravity mining provides a relatively low impact solution for gold extraction. It is really important that producers in developing countries are able to access markets and this is where organisations such as the Fairtrade Foundation and membership bodies like NAG can create quantum shifts; an individual jeweller may struggle with the process of sourcing gold, exporting it from a developing country, refining it and processing it into a usable material to create jewellery. However, by acting collectively with support resources in place, this becomes considerably less daunting.

Read the rest of this interview with Fifi Bijoux in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Abby Wright Fifi Bijoux rutile quartz
Rutile quartz jewellery by Fifi Bijoux. Illustrated by Abby Wright.

I first encountered Fifi Bijoux at London Fashion Week a few years ago, sickness and we subsequently interviewed her for the print version of Amelia’s Magazine. Since then she’s achieved an amazing amount in ethical jewellery production…

You were one of the first jewellery designers to take an ethical stance on manufacturing of high end jewellery in the UK. What have you achieved?
I set up the British Ethical Jewellery Association to create a set of auditable ethical standards for the industry. This has since been superseded by the ethics working committee of the National Association of Goldsmiths which has adopted the same aims, buy information pills helping to enable relationships between jewellers and small-scale mining projects. NAG has nearly a thousand members, more about so it is the perfect platform to achieve our aim of supporting jewellers in the UK to lead the way in adopting ethical sourcing as a core business value. In the UK there is a real will to embrace better ethical practices and a fairtraded logo for jewellery will be agreed on shortly.

Have you seen much change in the industry since you started Fifi Bijoux?
The most remarkable change has come from gem and diamond-producing countries such as Tanzania, Madagascar and Namibia, who are now cutting and polishing the gems before export. This represents a huge shift in technical skills and economics since a large percentage of a gem’s value is added at this stage. The lapidary art of stone cutting requires a high degree of technical and scientific expertise in order to create the sophisticated facets expected by western customers, and this can be provided by modern lasers. Gravity mining provides a relatively low impact solution for gold extraction. It is really important that producers in developing countries are able to access markets and this is where organisations such as the Fairtrade Foundation and membership bodies like NAG can create quantum shifts; an individual jeweller may struggle with the process of sourcing gold, exporting it from a developing country, refining it and processing it into a usable material to create jewellery. However, by acting collectively with support resources in place, this becomes considerably less daunting.

Read the rest of this interview with Fifi Bijoux in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Joana Faria_Emma Ware_S-S 2011
Emma Ware by Joana Faria.

Jewellery from tyres.
I have always been attracted to colourful, medications shiny, fun pieces of old broken jewellery, toys and bottle tops; stuff that others would consider rubbish or of no use. It doesn’t make ecological or economic sense to manufacture new materials when there is so much out there already. Reusing materials changes the way you design because it forces you to work within the limits of the material you have and I am constantly on the lookout for new waste materials to use. One day my friend had a puncture, and seeing potential in the rubber ring of the inner tube I had a go at chopping it up and immediately knew I was onto something.

Elegance in rubber.
I create designs based on what the rubber wants me to do, playing with the natural shapes when it is cut up in different ways. Making repetitive cuts in graduated sizes of inner tubes rings seems to result in designs that imitate naturally occurring organic patterns; similar to those found in wings, feathers, leaves, shells or even waves. My signature pieces are based on cutting the tube in a specific way, from which I figure out how I can make something to complement the human form…

Read the rest of this interview with Emma Ware in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011by Rachel de Ste. Croix
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

You were one of the first fashion designers to embrace sustainability, this web way back in 1997. What prompted you to design in this way?
Back then it was not about the planet. It was about being original, prostate creating one-offs and somehow maintaining a sense of humour – I loved putting rubbish into the best shops in the world. Eventually, as we progressed and realised how much was being dumped, both by the consumer and by the fashion and textile industry, it became an environmental issue – a design solution to an environmental problem.

From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

How has the process of designing sustainably changed over the years?
When we discovered pre-consumer waste – offcuts, proofs, colour charts, damaged fabrics and end-of-line stock – design immediately became more challenging because we were no longer just customising anymore. It radically changed the quality of our garments and our capacity to fulfil bigger orders, thus reaching more shops, many internationally.

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of From Somewhere’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,colour charts, ,damaged fabrics, ,Eco fashion, ,End-of-line stock, ,Ethical Fashion, ,From Somewhere, ,nd-of-line stock, ,pre-consumer waste – offcuts, ,proofs, ,Rachel De Ste. Croix, ,recycling, ,Speedo Collection, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Goodone Clothing – Ethically desirable

work_hiorns_seizure

Turner Prize

Enrico David, price treatment Roger Hiorns, search Lucy Skaer and Richard Wright are the lucky shortlisted ones on the Turner Prize’s notepad this year and it’s been noted that the Prize has gone for less shock and awe than usual, buy information pills resulting in a more thoughtful set of works on show. You will probably have at least heard of Roger Hiorns via his incredible work coating an entire flat in blue crystals.But it’s not about the fame of course. From Tuesday, you can go along to the Tate Britain and see for yourself.

wolf-hall

Booker Prize
Announced Tuesday

The 2009 Booker prize shortlist is full of big-hitters, in the form of Sarah Waters (The Little Stranger), JM Coetzee (Summertime) and A.S. Byatt (The Children’s Book), as well as historical fiction from Hilary Mantel (Wolf Hall) and lesser known authors Adam Foulds (The Quickening Maze) and Simon Mawer (The Glass Room). If you’re not sure what to read next the Booker shortlist is always a good place to get ideas outside of lists of the 100 Greatest Books of All Time. If you’re quick enough to have read them all already, look out for the winner announcement on Tuesday to see if you, in your wisdom, agree with the judges’ decision.

Grayson~Perry~

Grayson Perry’s Walthamstow tapestry

Grayson Perry is trying his hand at something other than ceramics with his “Walthamstow Tapestry”, an amazing, detailed piece of work a bit like a Bayeaux Tapestry for 2009. They cared about war, we care about shopping, it seems. Perry examines our consumerism but has also made something that is anti-consumerist: a one-off object that is the opposite of fast fashion or instant gratification.

Cloud-Gate-Theatre-Lin-Hw-001

Dance Umbrella

In recent years we’ve all rediscovered how amazing it is to watch and do dancing that is more involved than shuffling from one foot to the other while hoping that person over there will notice you. A big part of this change, other than Strictly of course, is Dance Umbrella. The influential dance festival-makers annual season kicks off this week, with the theme “African Crossroads”. They are staging performances and “days out” where you can get a little taster of lots of the shows going on around London over the next few weeks.

origin london craft fair

Origin London Craft Fair

There’s something special about an item that’s been made with love by another human being and not just generated by a machine or made under duress in a sweatshop. All the 300-odd artisans at this craft fair at Somerset House make beautiful pieces that are worth treasuring or just getting inspiration for your own Autum projects from.
good_one

Goodone clothing is a classic example of super-apt naming. Only ‘good conscience, online good clothing’ would be a more fitting term. The clothing brand based in the fashion mecca of East London designs quirky pieces all girls want to wear, discount sourced from recyclable materials that everyone’s conscience can appreciate (must be why they are stocked at Fashion Conscience, approved that emporium of ethical fashion). Everything is that most coveted of all must-have clothing qualities- individually hand-made and therefore one off, not to mention, kickass and street-cool.

Goodone 3

Recently short listed for the ‘Re-new Designer of the Year’ Award. Goodone are aiming to shake up people’s expectations of ‘recycled’ clothing, with designs that are not obviously second-take or old-hat. Instead Goodone offer fresh, modern pieces made through reusing existing fabrics (aptly coined upcycling). By working closely with other retailers and designers, the Goodone team are able to provide (and champion!) a way of creating sustainable fashion from other people’s ‘waste’. Good not just in the quality then, but in heart, you can see what I mean about perfect naming. ‘Rubbish’ has never looked so good.

goodone2

Featured in street-bible i.D magazine, Juice magazine and shown at London Fashion Week through collaboration with NOKI NHS at Fashion East. Goodone certainly seem to cater to their target audience; fashion conscious, ethic conscious, bright young things set to change the world.

goldone

It’s no surprise then that shop-gods Asos have snapped up some pieces for sale from next month. One glance at Goodone’s online shop currently and our drool glands are in overflow, so it’s no wonder that Asos have jumped on the game. The team design on-trend 80s bodycon dresses in black and white (made from recycled Breast Cancer T-shirts and to raise money for the same charity). As well as futuristic t-shirt dresses with playful coloured breast detail – these are pieces a girl would drop dead for in Topshop – and that’s meant as a compliment! Coming in several different colour schemes, some including extra designs, there’s definitely a dress to suit everyone, with slouchy jumper bodycon to cross-over long sleeved designs. It’s all very reminiscent of youth-hero Christopher Kane with the fluro and the bodycon, and we
like it.

go

There are basics-a-plenty in store. The WWF hoody is a highlight, taking on the world in a boxer-esque manner in neon-fluro-brights. The panelled-body is another case in point, providing solid clothing we can move in, perfect for those ethical rallies and climate change demonstrations! These guys aren’t afraid to design wearable clothes – its street style gone ethical and completely in tune with what we want. Take a look at the knot back tee and the diamond slouch dress and you’ll see what we mean.

Goodone 1

It’s not only Asos who have pricked their ears to Goodone. Japanese-version-of-the-BBC, NHK, have been following the gang around with cameras to make a soon to be aired documentary entitled ‘Inspirational European Lives’. It seems then that these East-Londoners with hearts of gold are going to get the rewarding recognition their endeavours deserve all too soon. Watch this space and keep checking Asos for their stuff!

Categories ,Fashion East, ,Goodone Clothing, ,London Fashion Week, ,Noki NHS, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Goodone: eco fashion designer Nin Castle talks upcycling and collaborations

From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.
You were one of the first fashion designers to embrace sustainability, erectile way back in 1997. What prompted you to design in this way?
Back then it was not about the planet. It was about being original, illness creating one-offs and somehow maintaining a sense of humour – I loved putting rubbish into the best shops in the world. Eventually, as we progressed and realised how much was being dumped, both by the consumer and by the fashion and textile industry, it became an environmental issue – a design solution to an environmental problem.

How has the process of designing sustainably changed over the years?
When we discovered pre-consumer waste – offcuts, proofs, colour charts, damaged fabrics and end-of-line stock – design immediately became more challenging because we were no longer just customising anymore. It radically changed the quality of our garments and our capacity to fulfil bigger orders, thus reaching more shops, many internationally.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011by Rachel de Ste. Croix
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

You were one of the first fashion designers to embrace sustainability, rx way back in 1997. What prompted you to design in this way?
Back then it was not about the planet. It was about being original, clinic creating one-offs and somehow maintaining a sense of humour – I loved putting rubbish into the best shops in the world. Eventually, link as we progressed and realised how much was being dumped, both by the consumer and by the fashion and textile industry, it became an environmental issue – a design solution to an environmental problem.

From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

How has the process of designing sustainably changed over the years?
When we discovered pre-consumer waste – offcuts, proofs, colour charts, damaged fabrics and end-of-line stock – design immediately became more challenging because we were no longer just customising anymore. It radically changed the quality of our garments and our capacity to fulfil bigger orders, thus reaching more shops, many internationally.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011by Rachel de Ste. Croix
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

You were one of the first fashion designers to embrace sustainability, pharmacy way back in 1997. What prompted you to design in this way?
Back then it was not about the planet. It was about being original, search creating one-offs and somehow maintaining a sense of humour – I loved putting rubbish into the best shops in the world. Eventually, as we progressed and realised how much was being dumped, both by the consumer and by the fashion and textile industry, it became an environmental issue – a design solution to an environmental problem.

From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.
From Somewhere Speedo Collection S/S 2011 by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

How has the process of designing sustainably changed over the years?
When we discovered pre-consumer waste – offcuts, proofs, colour charts, damaged fabrics and end-of-line stock – design immediately became more challenging because we were no longer just customising anymore. It radically changed the quality of our garments and our capacity to fulfil bigger orders, thus reaching more shops, many internationally.

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of From Somewhere’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Goodone A/W 2009 by Natasha Thompson
Goodone A/W 2009 by Natasha Thompson.

Goodone is a tight-knit team who share a passion for sustainable design and fair business practice. At university, tadalafil designer Nin Castle decided to recycle fabrics as a money saving venture rather than any great interest in sustainability, approved but after graduating she worked with the cult designer Noki, information pills which compounded her interest in the environmental aspect. Once I realised how much textile waste is out there it was natural for me to use it. Since then she has been designing clothes that are either 100% upcycled or incorporate elements of upcycling in the design somewhere. She uses reclaimed industrial waste, including offcuts and faulty fabrics, alongside fabrics manufactured in British mills. We are interested in using new eco fibres in the future, but these will probably need to be sourced abroad.

Goodone has become known for its body-con knitted dresses but there is plenty more in the pipeline. Nin takes fashion trends into consideration when designing because that’s the nature of the beast. To make an impact on an industry with very well established ideas of pace and schedules it is important to work with what people expect, then there is more opportunity to influence them. ASOS bought her A/W 2009 collection, for which she made some special colourways, and she has also done a range for Topshop

Read the rest of this interview with Goodone and see more illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,ASOS, ,Eco fashion, ,Ethical Fashion, ,goodone, ,Natasha Thompson, ,Nin Castle, ,Noki, ,recycling, ,topshop, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Hetty Rose: how to create beautiful shoes from old kimonos

Tania Kowalski was a workshop manager at a well-known contemporary jewellery gallery in London when Synnove Saelthun arrived from New York to join the design team. They soon discovered that they had similar views on design and business ethics, more about cialis 40mg and became good friends. Several years later they started the Oria brand, prescription using Synnove’s design skills and Tania’s production expertise. Synnove is a technically brilliant goldsmith with a passion for design and an eye for detail. Tania is a trained jeweller, viagra with a wide range of experience in the jewellery industry, from design creation through to production. Her expertise includes sourcing ethical materials and ensuring fair business practice.

Tania’s passion for other cultures has led her to visit remote tribes in the Amazon of Brazil, hill tribes in Nepal and the Dogon people of Mali. It was during these travels that she became fascinated with the cultural importance and symbolic meaning of tribal adornment. When designing a new collection, the couple sit down together to discuss what the new collection will symbolise. They research and refine story boards, and after ensuring that the designs are technically feasible Synnove makes an initial prototype, the best of which will go into production.

The use of the phoenix is a symbol of honesty and justice in Chinese mythology, and is one of the inspirations for the Nina collection. The lotus symbolises purity and beauty in many different cultures, and it inspired their silver lotus collection.

Working in Nepal Tania discovered that the safe working conditions and fair living wages which we take for granted in the West are not necessarily the norm in other parts of the world. This early experience was important in persuading Tania to commit to fairtrade sourcing as a founding principle of Oria.

Vintage fashion, about it illustrated by Matilde Sazio

Kim Sklinar, viagra sale aka Preloved Reloved, cheap has set herself an interesting New Year’s challenge. For the duration of 2011, Kim isn’t going to buy any new clothes. No more high-street bargains, no more feeding corporate giants, no more fast-fashion waste, no siree. ‘Another one?’ I hear you cry – and you’d be right. But this one is a little different.

While Kim hopes to raise awareness about the amount of cheap clothing we purchase and what effects that has on the environment and people’s lives, there’s also a bigger reason closer to home. Kim’s father was diagnosed with cancer over 18 months ago, and she decided to set up the project to raise funds for Macmillan, the cancer care and support charity. Unfortunately, as of only last week, Kim’s dad won’t see the project through its fruition. But Kim will dedicate the project to his memory.

So, how do you do it? Well, Kim’s vowed to buy only vintage and from outlets like eBay, and she’ll spend more time in charity shops which also benefits all of the organisations that run them. I had a chat with her about the project and how she thinks she’ll manage it all…


Vintage shop, illustrated by Karolina Burdon

What gave you the idea for Preloved, Reloved in the first place?
Well I always like to dress a little differently. My style is mainstream with a retro edge, I suppose. I always seem to end up with a daft New Year’s resolution – last year I cycled from London to Paris for The Institute of Cancer Research. I like using my time to help others and spread awareness.

Were you a fan of vintage and upcycling before you started the project?
Yes! I always admire my friends’ outfits; well, those who wear vintage and second-hand fashion. Upcycling is something I have experimented with for ages at home and now is the time to make sure I actually finish some projects!

Where will you source your outfits?
Charity shops, vintage stores, eBay, my mum’s wardrobe…! I made a lined cape last night from linen and satin for balmy summer nights (booking a holiday soon!).


Charity shops, illustrated by Rukmunal Hakim

What does the project hope to achieve?
I want to raise awareness of numerous charities related to my Dad’s illnesses. I want my friends to know that too much of an unhealthy lifestyle is probably going to lead to an early demise. I also want to raise the profile of vintage and second-hand fashion; I remember as a kid we use to take the mick out of anyone who dressed from a charity shop. I myself as a student had a stigma against them. Now it’s become kitsch, cool and quirky. It’s good for the environment.

How much do you hope to raise and what are the funds likely to be used for?
£2500 is my Just Giving target – it goes directly to Macmillan. However, with my shopping at many different charity shops, my cash goes straight to them – win win all round! I have my thinking cap on about how to expand the project though.


eBay! Illustration by Avril Kelly

Why did you choose Macmillan?
My dad (and his dad) had cancer – he died last week unfortunately. And it wasn’t the cancer that killed him, it was his heart and his adult-onset diabetes. A poor lifestyle in his twenties and thirties caused it and he was only 57 when he passed. So as I said before, this project benefits other charities focussing on these causes too through me spending money at their outlets.

Not that far in, but have you come accross any problems so far? Has anything that happened that you weren’t expecting?
Avoiding shops is quite hard as I realised I can’t just pop into the Topshop sale and treat myself – which I suppose is good for my wallet and I’m going to do less impulse-buying on the way home from work.
With my Dad passing, I haven’t had as much time to go browsing shops as much as I’d like. This weekend, however, I’m going to the Girls of Guildford vintage fair and gig – for some serious retail therapy, cupcake-nomming and also to check out some great live music away from the bustle of London.


Vintage, illustrated by Jess Holt

What are you wearing today? Where’s it all from?
Dark blue skinny jeans, leather knee boots that I already owned with black and cream patterned blouse from River Island that I bought from Cancer Research UK. I’m also wearing red rose earrings from Magnolia Jewellery.

Do you plan to make or alter any of your clothes? If so, how?
Yes – I love sewing and making jewellery too – I made a cape last week and have upcycled a pair of old, torn jeans from my uni days into a denim mini. I have a small collection of retro patterns including a lovely dress with a pussy bow. I love being able to create something out of fabric I love: last year I went to a lovely Indian wedding and couldn’t find The Outfit – so I made a purple maxi-dress with a halterneck and glammed it up with ribbons dangling down my back. Saved myself a fortune too!


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

What else do you get up to?
I run Never Enough Notes – a music e-zine, and I’m cycling the London-Brighton this summer with my brother and friends to raise money for the British Heart Foundation.

What would be your perfect Preloved, Reloved outfit?
For daytime it would easily be vintage jeans, brown boots that look a bit worn-out, a floaty shirt or cheeky tee, a tweed jacket and a battered satchel.
For evening, I love ball gowns and retro dresses so would be something glam that I could wear with a pair of 1970s heels! Oh there’s way too much choice, I love it!


Photographs by Kim Sklinar

You can follow Kim’s efforts at the Preloved, Reloved blog; donate online here.
Junky Styling S/S 2010 by Aniela Murphy
Junky Styling S/S 2010 by Aniela Murphy.

Annika Sanders and Kerry Seager are self-taught fashion designers. They started up Junky Styling after they received lots of compliments for their deconstructed and restyled secondhand suits made to go out clubbing in during the 1990’s.

What prompted your approach to dressmaking?
Our approach was initially borne out of a lack of money but it soon became a necessity for individuality and quality. At first Annika’s mother did most of the sewing so our designs were heavily directed by her.

Have you seen many changes over the years?
Aside from all the wrinkles on our faces? We have seen the tangible development of a marketplace that never existed before. Education has enabled the sustainable movement to become more widely accepted and understood, approved and now many new brands think about sustainability before they even start designing.

Where did you go out in the past and do you still go clubbing?
We went to a wide mixture of venues that hosted a similar dressy scene. It was such a brilliant time, and we still enjoy socialising and a bit of a shuffle. But we always try to ensure that we are not the oldest at the bar…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Junky Styling’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
You’ve been going for a very long time. Have attitudes to ethical fashion started to change yet?
Consumers are starting to question the huge exploitation of people and the environment that permits their clothing to be so cheap, treat because it doesn’t add up. There is still a long way to go but the fashion industry is slowly changing the way it does business.

What has the People Tree brand achieved?
We support 5, website like this 000 farmers, case artisans and their families in developing countries by producing well designed fairtrade and sustainable products. For us it’s about creating sustainable livelihoods that put food on the table at the end of the day.

You’ve collaborated with both Bora Aksu and Karen Nichol. What have they brought to People Tree?
We’ve worked with Bora for four years because we share the view that good fashion design should last for years. He is a master of beautiful, feminine draped designs that we produce in organic and fairtrade cotton, and we’ve already started designing an exciting new collection for S/S 2012. Like me Karen is passionate about handicrafts and she loves traditional Japanese textiles and designs. She works with our hand knitters in Nepal to create beautiful appliquéd and hand embroidered embellishments
You’ve been going for a very long time. Have attitudes to ethical fashion started to change yet?
Consumers are starting to question the huge exploitation of people and the environment that permits their clothing to be so cheap, see because it doesn’t add up. There is still a long way to go but the fashion industry is slowly changing the way it does business.

What has the People Tree brand achieved?
We support 5, try 000 farmers, artisans and their families in developing countries by producing well designed fairtrade and sustainable products. For us it’s about creating sustainable livelihoods that put food on the table at the end of the day.

You’ve collaborated with both Bora Aksu and Karen Nichol. What have they brought to People Tree?
We’ve worked with Bora for four years because we share the view that good fashion design should last for years. He is a master of beautiful, feminine draped designs that we produce in organic and fairtrade cotton, and we’ve already started designing an exciting new collection for S/S 2012. Like me Karen is passionate about handicrafts and she loves traditional Japanese textiles and designs. She works with our hand knitters in Nepal to create beautiful appliquéd and hand embroidered embellishments
How did the idea of working with old porcelain come about? 
I was tired of producing other peoples’ ideas (as a stage producer) so in 2007 I decided to start working on my own project, dosage which soon developed into my rapidly growing label, stomach Sägen. I go to flea markets as often as I can for inspiration and to collect source material; I have amassed a huge collection of vintage buttons as well as piles of chipped and damaged porcelain that is no longer wanted. I like to work with my hands and I love turning items from the past into modern accessories. 

Sägen means Old Saga in Swedish – why did you chose this name for your brand?
I come from a small island called Gotland in the middle of the Baltic Sea and I have wonderful memories of listening to all the old myths when I was a kid. I came up with the idea for Sägen when I was there and the name reflects my interest in recycling a little bit of history into new treasures, so I find the name very suitable.

How do you cut the porcelain and set it in silver?
I cut and grind the porcelain with machines, which is a very dirty, dusty and dangerous job: I have been close to losing my fingers many times. When I am working in my basement studio I forget about everything else, instead focusing on the patterns that I am obsessed with. I decide what shapes to make up depending on the motifs in the porcelain, then I set the porcelain in silver (which is 98% recycled) so that it curves, bends and stretches around the shape I have cut out.
Ivana Basilotta S/S 2011 by Bex Glover
Ivana Basilotta S/S 2011 by Bex Glover.

Ivana Basilotta is Italian but has lived in Germany as well as the UK. She channels her observations of different cultures into her work, treatment sometimes the ideas flowing so fast that her pen can’t keep up and her scissors can’t cut the fabric fast enough. Quite often she only realises she was inspired by a certain idea once the collection has been finished. Having previously studied business Ivana is well placed to run her label, prostate and feels that a good business knowledge is as important as the creative force of a design house.

A committed vegetarian, she designs with peace silk, which is made in India without the killing of the silk moth. Because peace silk is spun as a fibre rather than reeled as a thread it is warmer and softer than ordinary silk. “I cannot imagine eating meat,” she says. “I find it strange that people eat dead animals.” She feels that being a vegetarian brings a great sense of freedom and well being, and it is an easy way to lead a greener life. “Farm land that could directly produce food for humans is used to farm and feed animals for slaughter, which uses up far more resources.” She does not like to imagine the stress and sorrow that farmed animals must experience, and wants no part in it…

Read the rest of this interview with Ivana Basilotta in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
bex_glover_howies_collection
Howies by Bex Glover.

Howies has since 1995 pioneered the creation of ethical active clothing with a strong design aesthetic. Based in Cardigan Bay, case Wales, remedy the company has built up a devoted fan base via its affiliation with outdoor sports such as surfing, order mountain biking and skateboarding. Products are made from high performing sustainable fabrics that will last, with a proportion of profits ploughed back into grassroots social and environmental projects via the Earth Tax. Although some clothes are made in China and Turkey they ensure best practice by employing the same factories as other companies they trust, such as M&S…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Howie’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Hetty Rose by Lesley Barnes
Hetty Rose by Lesley Barnes.

You make bespoke shoes… if I wanted a pair of shoes for myself how would the process work?
I create a collection each season from which clients can choose a design, ailment then they decide which vintage Japanese kimono fabric they would like their shoes made up in. Clients can alter the shape and height of the heel so that the shoes are totally unique to them. I usually meet them personally if they are UK based, and we have tea whilst I measure their feet and bring them fabric samples to muse through. It’s a very interactive purchase, with the client involved in every step of the design because I want them to have an emotional attachment to the shoes so that they will treasure them and love wearing them. I email them photos during the process of making the shoes so they can see them being created. At the halfway point they are ready for a fitting and after that I finish off the sole and attach the heels. The whole process takes around six to eight weeks and prices start from £350. With international clients everything is done via email – it’s exciting for them to receive a pair of shoes all the way from a little workshop in England.

How else can someone get a pair of your shoes?
Following increased sales and press attention we have decided to extend the Hetty Rose brand to a wider audience, who will be able to own a precious piece of designer footwear at a more affordable price point and without the long wait for a pair of bespoke shoes. Our Ready to Wear collection features some of our best selling styles in kimono fabrics, and can be bought directly from our website. In the future I plan to add more accessories such as bags, baby shoes, homewares and ties for men…

Read the rest of this interview with Hetty Rose in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,bespoke, ,Eco fashion, ,Essex, ,Ethical Fashion, ,footwear, ,Henrietta Samuels, ,Hetty Rose, ,japanese, ,kimono fabric, ,Lesley Barnes, ,menswear, ,Ready-to-wear, ,recycling, ,shoes, ,Ties, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Junky Styling Junky Air and Ju.St A/W 2011 Catwalk Show Review

Ross Harrison, ed advice Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, see Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, salve when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Screengrabs from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

Finally are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


Ross Harrison, clinic Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

Film Still from Beyond the Brink

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Film Stills from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

To take the provocative question from Beyond the Brink’s website: “Are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


Ross Harrison, stomach Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, viagra Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, ed when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

Film Still from Beyond the Brink

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Film Stills from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

To take the provocative question from Beyond the Brink’s website: “Are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


March 26 2011-UK UncutUK Uncut gathers on the South Bank on Saturday 26th March 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Unless you have been living under a rock you will be aware that there was a huge anti-cuts March for the Alternative on Saturday 26th March 2011. In the days since then the press has been dominated with both outrage from the government that “hooligans” should be allowed to roam the streets, viagra 100mg and on the other side, visit this site shock at the way in which once again the police and media have mistreated protestors. As anyone who was following me on Twitter will know I was involved on the UK Uncut action, which involved an occupation of Fortnum & Mason… yet another large corporation culpable of massive tax avoidance: This action led to by far the largest numbers of arrests and charges on the day: a staggering 138 of the 149.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

On my way through London I saw the most enormous amount of creativity, from pound coin shields to a Trojan Horse cunningly installed at the centre of Oxford Circus – and of course plenty of banners bursting with witty one liners: included in this blog post are just a few of the amazing sights from the day. With a march numbering possibly half a million and upwards (something the government has been quick to downplay) there were surely many great ones that I missed – especially the legendary message “I was told there would be biscuits” carried by a small child on someone’s shoulders. I broke away from the march early on to take part in UK Uncut actions on Oxford Street and then at Fortnum & Mason.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Demonised by the press for their behaviour, UK Uncut have been quick to fight back with their version of events: really, the police and media should know better. Both UK Uncut and Green & Black Cross – the support network that provided legal observers and arrestee support – have grown out of Climate Camp networks and ways of organising to take on completely new identities of their own. As a result some of those involved are no strangers to wrongful arrest, police brutality and political policing: remember Heathrow, Kingsnorth, G20 and Ratcliffe anyone? These people know what they are doing; naturally the unfair arrests of UK Uncut was filmed and immediately shared, the footage unsurprisingly making the front page of the Guardian.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Some people might wonder what on earth the links between the anti-cuts movement and Climate Camp are, but Climate Camp has always been rooted in a desire to address the social inequalities of capitalism – for example a breakaway group in London is currently looking at ways to campaign around fuel poverty. One of the favourite slogans at the COP15 Climate conference was System Change not Climate Change – we can’t cure the problem with simple quick fix answers, but rather by tackling the whole global neoliberal system. A brutal plan to cut services such as libraries and the NHS will undermine the fabric of a just society, affecting the poor most. Meanwhile the rich are able to avoid huge tax bills at a time when we desperately need to start building a green economy that is not based on endless profit. Clearly these inequalities are something that green activists are keen to tackle.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Climate Camp has also always been a broad mix of liberalism and radicalism, so it’s no surprise that UK Uncut is as well. The very name Green & Black Cross indicates how the group combines the more autonomous anarchist streaks of activism with the skills, infrastructure and ideologies built up within the green movement. It supports grassroots social struggles in the UK and during the March for the Alternative the Green & Black Cross provided Legal Support, Action Medics and Action Kitchens. They even had a basic compost portaloo roaming the streets in a supermarket trolley – but in the event it was never used: it’s hard to get into a kettle once it is formed. They will be independently advising on all arrests during the day at a defendants’ meeting on Saturday 2nd April and were generally out in force to offer biscuits and legal advice as soon as arrestees were released.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Since the arrests UK Uncut activists have had to field a barrage of commentary from the media, which has been ever quick to notice the anarchic element of their protest. Their sit in at Fortnum & Mason was largely peaceful – protestors ate their own sandwiches and listened to performances and speeches – but on Newsnight a spokesperson was asked to denounce all protestor violence. She did a marvellous job of neither condoning nor condemning it: there were people from all backgrounds in Fortnum & Mason. For some it will have been their first experience of direct action (read this shocking report of the arrest of a 15 year old girl) and others were part of the Black Bloc earlier in the day – the two are not mutually exclusive. UK Uncut has an incredibly loose non-hierarchical structure, and to be successful it must somehow find a place for those of all backgrounds.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia GregoryInside Fortnum & Mason. They look super scared don’t they?

Most UK Uncutters recognise that there is more to successful activism than a simplistic black and white damnation of violence, but the more liberal end of the spectrum may well be new to the idea that damage to property is not considered violence by many activists – see here for a definition – so there is going to be a rapid need to redefine and educate as soon as possible. Most of the targets for property damage on Saturday were well thought through – big banks that avoid tax, Topshop, BHS and so on. Who threw paint, and who broke windows? It’s not clear, but the targets were clear enough. Some people, whether you agree with it or not, think it is more effective to inflict damage on a well selected target than to simply march from A-B and then listen to speeches. After all, what did it ever do to stop the Iraq war? Direct action through the ages has proven that targeting property can be highly effective – the Suffragettes were never afraid of inflicting collateral damage. Last year at Climate Camp windows were smashed at the RBS head offices in Edinburgh to demonstrate concern against their continued investment in fossil fuels.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

By Trafalgar Square at night some rogue elements (possibly pissed up) were clearly provoked into throwing glass bottles at police, never something I would recommend however bad police brutality gets (and by all accounts it did get REALLY bad) because I personally don’t believe that violence against people is ever acceptable. But I do believe that the Black Bloc as a considered and thoughtful tactic is something that our movement needs: people who are willing to put their bodies and actions on the front line to stop those who are damaging the fabric of our “democratic” society. Many of them were very young, possibly disaffected veterans of kettling at the student demos last year – others were highly organised groups who came to join the march from across the country. Those involved will undoubtedly have slightly different views as to process and outcome but recent online dialogues prove that diverse parts of the movement are keen to work together. Rather than dismiss Black Bloc actions as the nihilistic work of masked “hooligans” we would do well to consider the underlying reasons why this is seen as an appealing tactic utilised by at least a thousand people last weekend. After all, we’re all in this together… and this is just the beginning of our future.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Further reading:
Why Fortnum & Mason?
Video footage from the UKuncut action
An open letter from the Brighton Solidarity Federation of Anarcho-Syndicalists
People are worth less than property
A night in the cells is nothing to a lifetime imprisoned by cuts
Reasons why the cuts are a bad idea
Dominic Campbell experiences police brutality in Trafalgar Square
Political Dynamite: We should use the word violence with the greatest care.
Leah Borromeo: Protestors can’t disown the “violent minority”.
Why the UKuncut arrests threaten future protests
What is the Black Bloc? Information page.
Laurie Penny – What really happened in Trafalgar Square
My UK Uncut arrest made me a political prisoner
Climate Camp 2010 in Edinburgh – my commentary
Climate Camp 2009 in Copenhagen – my commentary part one, part two and part three.
G20 Climate Camp in the City – my commentary
Ratcliffe: Did PC Mark “Flash” Kennedy ensure my arrest as one of the Ratcliffe 114 ?- my commentary
Climate Camp at Kingsnorth in 2008.
One of the first UK Uncut protests: Sir Philip Green and his Topshop billions get the UK Uncut treatment.
The Third Estate: A message to Critical UK Uncut activists.
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Olivia Rose
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Olivia Rose.

This was apparently the first catwalk show that Junky Styling have staged in two years, cheapest and I’m rather ashamed to say the first that I have ever been to. On this outing I reckon it was well worth the wait. Junky Styling feature in ACOFI and were one of my favourite labels at the recent Find Your Feet ethical fashion show, putting on a strong showing with a gorgeous pink layered maxi dress.

Junky Styling air hostesses
Junky Styling air hostesses.

Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke.

Coming over a month after the official end of London Fashion Week this was more than a catwalk show. Guests were greeted by faux air hostesses and after checking in passed by a ‘Luggage Bar’ constructed from old suitcases. At the far end of the Old Truman Brewery warehouse location there was a free bar laid on by Courvoisier, enamelled tie pins jauntily placed on the rim of a citrusy punch. Despite my lack of a front row invite I managed to duck into an empty seat just as the catwalk lights started flashing as if a jet was about to race down the runway.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke.

Junky Air was purportedly inspired by airports, planes and the such like. Ladies sported beautifully tailored outfits, elegant up dos and fake red lips that made at least one model look more than a little masculine (the only dodgy bit of styling in an otherwise faultless experience). Gents trundled down the catwalk in patchwork jumpers, excitable shirts and shorts, and engineer-ish baggy boiler suits.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryvJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Madi
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Madi.

But really, this was a Junky style clash on full force, a multitude of ideas thrown together in a dashing devil-may-care way: several collections shown at once, including Ju.St. There were some beautiful all in one striped jumpsuits, some extremely clever ruched suiting and always the clever tailoring. Yes it was way to long and could have done with a major edit, yes the lips scared the hell out of me, the celebrity model passed right over my head (though a quick google reveals her to be Amanda Cazalet, once famous for snogging Madonna in Justify My Love, now staging a comeback) but generally this was a major hit. Junky Styling may eschew everything about the legitimate fashion world, from London Fashion Week dates to general trends – apart from the all important big skirted dress – but hell, this was inspiring. See how imaginative upcycled clothing can be? Yes, it really can.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 – all photography by Amelia Gregory.

For a pair of mates who started out creating clothes to go clubbing in Annika Sanders and Kerry Seager have done bloody well. They may still be showing far from the fashion crowd, but make no mistake, Junky Styling have arrived, all engines firing.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory

Read part of the interview with Junky Styling in ACOFI, or buy Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration online.

Categories ,Abi Heyneke, ,ACOFI, ,Airplanes, ,Airports, ,Amanda Cazalet, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Annika Sanders, ,catwalk show, ,Celebrity Model, ,Courvoisier, ,Enamelled tie pins, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Find Your Feet, ,Free drink, ,Ju.St, ,Jumpsuits, ,Junky Air, ,Junky Styling, ,Justify My Love, ,Kerry Seager, ,London Fashion Week, ,Luggage Bar, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Madonna, ,menswear, ,Olivia Rose, ,Punch, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Charlotte Simpson: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS13 by Deborah Moon
Charlotte Simpson S/S 2013 by Deborah Moon.

For sleek understated summer glamour look no further than Ones to Watch designer Charlotte Simpson (a graduate of the London College of Fashion), who produced a beautiful minimalist collection fit for the finest of lunching ladies.

Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Fusing a colour palette that included lemon yellow, pale mint green, duck egg blue, copper and buttermilk, the models stepped out in fluid garments that included key shapes: wide flowing trousers, relaxed double breast detailing and once again those layers and flaps. Tactile satin and the finest of beading ensured a touch of glamour, at it’s best on a gorgeous copper column. It’s a shame the low v-necks would suit only the slimmest of women: no boobs here.

Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Charlotte Simpson SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Charlotte Simpson S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Charlotte Simpson, ,Deborah Moon, ,London College of Fashion, ,Ones To Watch

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