Amelia’s Magazine | Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza

I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, search store and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, information pills and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, pill and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, dosage and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
I could say that Laura J Martin is as ethereal and otherworldly as Bat For Lashes, viagra and I could tell you that her haunting musical tales reminds me of listening to a young Kate Bush, mind and if I really wanted to, I could say that her ability to take a pastoral folk sound and twist an electro beat around it puts me in mind of the great Alison Goldfrapp. Like I said, I could say all of that, but that would be thinking inside the box, and I’m going to take my cue from Laura, who has probably never thought inside the box a day in her life. Instead I am going to say that she reminds me of a hummingbird. Watching her on stage, wielding her flute with the swiftness and precision of a warrior using a samurai sword, you can’t quite believe that something so light and delicate can beats its wings so fast. But she does, and we can only stand in awe.

 

LJMpic2

Described by the people behind The Big Chill (who obviously know what they’re talking about) as “the world’s finest flute wielding, piano playing, mandolin toting singer-songwriter”, Laura goes one step further and offers up this description of her sound and style; “think folkie weirdie beardie (without the beardie) funki (with an ‘i’) mixed in a cauldron with some jazzy slurp + niceness squared = me.” Well put. Now, when I first saw her play, I knew nothing about Laura and I will take this opportunity to shamefully confess that I quickly summed up this adorable pixie in front of me with her flute and her mandolin and thought, “Oh OK, it’s going to be a bit folky.” (Not, I hasten to add, that there is anything wrong with folk.) My point is simply this; if you go see Laura J Martin live, expect the unexpected. Armed with her trusty loopstation, which sits at her feet, she takes the already beautiful sounds that come from her instruments and creates a multi-layered composition of melodies that perfectly compliments her sweet but haunting voice. Catching up with her during a phone chat recently, the Liverpool born, Leeds based singer mused upon the nature of musical genres, and how defining her sound into one style will never give you the full illuminated picture. “My style derives mainly from the instruments that I play, and my main instrument is the flute. So my sound definitely has elements of folk, but I wouldn’t like to be boxed as just that. In the past when I’ve taken party in jam sessions, I’ve played a lot of funk flute. I don’t want people to get the impression that it’s all serious folk” she adds, “I do like to have a beat in my music, in fact, the tracks that I like to perform live the most are the ones with a beat.”

LJMpic1

Over the course of our conversation I discover that validity of this statement. Laura is a jam session veteran; lending her voice and musical ability to performances by hip hop, experimentalism and jazz artists (a much beloved musical style of Laura’s, who rates Herbie Mann as a key influence). Recent collaborations have been with diverse and left-field artists such as the hip hop/turntablist/rock and blues singer Buck 65 (“He’s one of my hero’s”) and kidkanevil. “He’s a hip hop producer and beat maker”, she tells me, “His style is very eclectic. I was involved in his live show for a few years.”

LJMpic3

So how did this petite virtuoso come to possess her musical wizardry? I suggested to Laura that her childhood must have involved imps and faeries and nights spent running across deserted moors. “Not quite!” she laughs, “I did go up in suburban Liverpool after all!”. Still, she reflects, “I was a geek. I used to like climbing trees and exploring. I would find excitement in very small things.” Clearly, this free spirited childhood helped shape the creative and imaginative grown up Laura. Case in point; when she “gets up to mischief” in the name of finding a beat; “I’ve gone into the kitchen and banged pots and pans…. it’s all about getting a stick and banging things and seeing what comes out!” And when I ask about the inspiration for her track Dokidoki, she cites the weather for pointing her towards the melody that she would use. “It was a very sunny day,” she explains, “And I was in a really good mood. I went into the shower and the melody came out!”

Dokidoki performed at The Jazz Cafe

A major creative highlight of Laura’s was a year spent in Japan, where she immersed herself in the music scene, taking part in numerous jam sessions, namely with the group Soil & “Pimp”. Already being fascinated with Asian culture (and a devotee of Kung Fu films, “the melodies are ace!” she laughs) she used her time productively. “I didn’t watch much T.V, it was all about listening to music, practicing music and reading and not being spoon-fed anything.” Her time in Japan was certainly eventful; one night she awoke to discover that her balcony was in flames, in what was later discovered to be an arson attack. Fortunately, no one was hurt, and Laura – as ever – was open to inspiration in the most unexpected of scenarios and took the opportunity to research the history of Japans arson attacks, a journey which led her to the mother of all arsonists (and legends) Yaoya Oshichi. Oshichi, she explains, then went on to become the subject matter of her track ‘Fire Horse’. See? Like I told you, her influences and inspirations are as diverse and eclectic as she is.

Now back on her home turf, Laura plans to keep going full steam ahead with her career. As well as releasing her new track ‘The Hangman Tree’ in early 2010 (check her MySpace for details) she is finishing up her new album and planning her gigs for the months ahead. Lucky Londoners can see her performing this Saturday as part of the You Choose Jamboree night. The venue is undisclosed, but sign up to You Choose Jamborees guest list, and the location will be emailed to you. I can’t wait to see what the New Year has in store for Laura J Martin, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for
titleImages throughout courtesy of both Ester Kneen and James Gardiner, help with a special thanks to Sarah herself for her images

The launch of ‘Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza’ at Poke Design Studios last week was not your average Christmas shopping experience. For a limited period only (1st – 15th December) East London gem, The Biscuit Factory will host Sarah’s Supermarket with a difference.

dress

Sarah Bagner aka Supermarket Sarah “decided to leave the corporate world behind” and set up shop in her home just round the corner from Portabello Market. “I wanted to touch and feel the real world again, make things and really form relationships with people so started doing Portobello Market and assisting top stylists.”

_about

Selling vintage finds alongside pieces from some top new designers, Sarah’s supermarket is a great place for your Christmas shopping. Before the event I had been imagining a trolley dash for vintage bargains that would put Dale’s Supermarket Sweep to shame, instead it was a cool, fun, casual affair. Staff wore supermarket skirts made of plastic bags, designed by Joanna Strickland and neon price banners displayed well known supermarket slogans; “For those who have everything”, “while stocks last!” and of course, “SALE!”

Among the wealth of talented designers exhibiting are:
Victoria Grant
London based milliner with stockists such as Coco de Mer and Harrods.

Marie Molterer
London based print textiles designer.

Future Industries
Product designers reforming chipped milk cartons and plastic lids into new reusable objects.

Pheobe Eason
London based illustrator working in prop design, art direction, shop design, murals and textiles.

Work It! (Loren Platt, Sara El Dabi and Rory McCartney)
Underground club come sellers of classic 90s clothing and memorabilia.

Sasha Kipferling
German designer for Studioilse featured in Wallpaper*, Elle Decoration, Frame and Viewpoint.

Lynne Hatzius
Illustrator, collage artist and printmaker currently experimenting with paper engineering.
Shared her wall with…
Rina Donnersmarck
German illustrator, stage designer and costume maker.

peter1Peter Ibruegger
London based artist, creator of the Surrealist inspired ‘Moustache Mug’. Peter Ibrugger’s mugs were great. They’d make great presents for boyfriends, brothers and dads.

scottwall_finalScott Ramsay Kyle
Hand embroidery with “an obsessive hobbyist feel, with additional Luxe”. Scott Ramsay Kyle’s embroidery work was fabulous. The kind of thing that can really only be appreciated properly when you’re up close and personal with it. The intricate layering of silk threads and beads was beautiful.

mel2Mel Elliott
London based Artist / designer from South Yorkshire. Following her MA IN Communication Art and Design at the RCA she started up her ‘I Love Mel’ brand.

Melwall_final

Mel Elliott’s large scale illustration had added denim pockets holding felt tip pens to encourage visitors to get involved. Her playful products on sale include ‘Colour Me Good’ books inspired by celebrity and fashion magazines and celebrity paper dolls. Mel will also be selling at this months “All I want for Xmas” Fair at the Truman Brewery.

Each designer will be selling at the Supermarket until December 15th. I would thoroughly recommend a visit (appointment only 9.30am-6.30pm) but if you’re unable to make it you can shop online. (I’ve added a Lily Allen paper doll by Mel Elliott to my list to Santa!)

Categories ,Dale Winton, ,Ester Kneen, ,Future Industries, ,Joanna Strickland, ,Lynne Hatzius, ,Marie Molterer, ,Mel Elliott, ,Peter Ibruegger, ,Pheobe Eason, ,Poke Design Studios, ,Portabello Market, ,Rina Donnersmarck, ,Sasha Kipferling, ,Scott Ramsay Kyle, ,Supermarket Sarah’s Christmas Extravaganza, ,Supermarket Sweep, ,The Biscuit Factory, ,Truman Brewery, ,Victoria Grant, ,Work It!

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Amelia’s Magazine | Middlesex University Graduate Fashion Designers 2013: Preview Part Two

Sarah Kathryn Grantham by Rebecca May Higgins
Sarah Kathryn Grantham by Rebecca May Higgins.

You’ve met my first pick of the 2013 graduating Middlesex University fashion and fashion textiles students: now meet the rest.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jiselle Pineda
Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jiselle Pineda 2
A tailored trio of sleek cream dresses and suiting by Jiselle Pineda featured tie detailing, high collars and a cut out back which made clever use of contrasting black fabric.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sukpreet Kaur Jugpal
Wanita Panchal presented a brave menswear collection with a patchwork effect created from contrasting textiles on zippered loose coats, worn over drainpipe trousers and accessorised with pointy Arabian style shoes.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jeyda Yilmaz
Jeyda Yilmaz put a pretty lilac print on a cute flared skater dress with pom-pom heeled shoes.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Jason Patrick Carvalho
Jason Patrick Carvalho presented a sweeping dress with beautiful bold styling: a golden frame and letterbox red gloves.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Sarah Kathryn Grantham
I loved stiff golden frills on ra-ra skirts by Sarah Kathryn Grantham.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Natasha Tandoh
Natasha Tandoh used great accessories to match intriguing prints on peasant inspired garments.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Eva Juhasz
Eva Juhasz mixed outsized mesh and ruffles with fiery print chiffon and woven geometric appliqué.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Kirin Atwal
Kirin Atwal‘s mainly cream collection featured panels of a striped burnt orange and black fabric that was also used in oversized holdall bags in this very professional and well styled collection.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Eliot Moran
Outsize roped knitwear by Eliot Moran was accessorised with hard knitted helmets to present an intriguing silhouette.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Charlotte Stewart
I loved the way that Charlotte Stewart matched neon tartan checks with black fabric and chunky lace up shoes: late 80s style made modern once more.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Charlotte Jones
A delicate rope work motif took centre stage in designs by Charlotte Jones.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Lisa George
Intricate pleating by Lisa George was formed into an amazing rippled all-in-one jumpsuit.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Karolina Formici
An elegant swing trench coat with tie fronted waist by Karolina Formici was worn with brogues and a stunning double rope necklace.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Ange Syret
Ange Syret presented avante grade clashing printed menswear – with tasselled headgear to match fringing on the garments.

Middlesex Fashion Graduate Show 2013-Laurence Wright
Finally, it looked as if a car crash had inspired Laurence Wright to create a clever collection which made light of injuries: wounds reinterpreted as decorative detail and accessorised with bandaged heads.

Laurence Wright by Cathy Hookey
Laurence Wright by Cathy Hookey.

I look forward to seeing what the chosen designers create for the big catwalk show at the Truman Brewery during Graduate Fashion Week in June.

Categories ,Ange Syret, ,Atrium, ,Ba degree show, ,Cathy Hookey, ,Charlotte Jones, ,Charlotte Stewart, ,Eliot Moran, ,Eva Juhasz, ,fashion, ,Fashion Textiles, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Graduate Show, ,Jason Patrick Carvalho, ,Jeyda Yilmaz, ,Jiselle Pineda, ,Karolina Formici, ,Kirin Atwal, ,Laurence Wright, ,Lisa George, ,middlesex university, ,Natasha Tandoh, ,Rebecca Higgins, ,Rebecca May Higgins, ,review, ,Sarah Kathryn Grantham, ,Truman Brewery, ,Wanita Panchal

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Amelia’s Magazine | Kingston University: Graduate Fashion Week 2014 Catwalk Review

GraduateCollection_StefanieTschirky-4
Graduate Collection by Stefanie Tschirky

It was a predictably brilliant outing for Kingston on Monday at this year’s Graduate Fashion Week. Finally the organisers have had some sense and clocked that the Earl’s Court Two venue, home to the event for a number of years, doesn’t do this showcase of the next generation of fashion designers any favours. Relocated at the Truman Brewery, home of numerous other graduate shows, Graduate Fashion Week felt more current, more exciting and a damn sight bloody easier to get to.

Having said that, and as per usual, I hadn’t been particularly organised in the run up to the event and the only ticket I’d managed to get hold of was for Kingston‘s presentation, thanks to some on-it staff who go to the trouble of inviting you rather than waiting for you to email. Drinks and canapés were served across the road in Corbet’s Place, a bar I try to avoid on account of it being at the heart of the misery that is Brick Lane at weekends. I left there precisely one hour later, blind drunk and stuffed full of duck tagine and chicken skewers. Even if the show itself had been terrible, which it definitely wasn’t, I wouldn’t say a bad word about Kingston.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_003LaurenLake

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_006LaurenLake

All photography by Matt Bramford

It was down to Lauren Lake (above) to launch the show, with a fresh approach to outerwear. Pale pink coats with fur trims were teamed with hot pink accessories and it set a heady, exciting tone to the proceedings as the booze started to wear off.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_018MariaBarreto

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_028MariaBarreto

Luckily Maria Barreto (above) was awarded the job of following, doing it in style with a collection of sharp tailored coats and dresses in a more serious, sophisticated palette of blue and black.

Karen Verey 01
Graduate Collection by Karen Verey

Karen Varey was first up representing menswear, with a mixture of sportwear and tailoring. Unique, shiny jackets had embroidered floral details.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_034KarenVerey

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_042KarenVerey

Not dissimilar was Merle Ingram‘s approach to womenswear, making use of futuristic materials, like the plastic jacket with zip detail. Abstract shapes were brought together in pale-coloured separates:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_047MerleIngrama

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_051MerleIngram

Stefanie Tschirky also worked with glossy fabrics, but in a strong palette of black and blue – pencil skirts and wide-leg trousers were teamed with oversized jackets:

GraduateCollection_StefanieTschirky-4
Graduate Collection by Stefanie Tschirky

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_068StefanieTschirky

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_066StefanieTschirky

Jasmine Sellers‘ models were enveloped in soft materials, in beige and salmon:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_094JasmineSellers

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_101JasmineSellers

Tamsin Pick‘s menswear was fresh and unique, with majestic colours, sportswear shapes and towelling details:

collectionlineupflat

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_103TamsinPick

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_115TamsinPick

Abigail Irving-Munro‘s womenswear also used sports elements like varsity jackets and zip hoodies, jazzed up with all sorts of embellishments, like contrasting knits and unfinished strips:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_120AbigailIrvingMunroe

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_127AbigailIrvingMunroe

More menswear came courtesy of Catriona Outram; vibrant sketchy patterns were combined with heavy knitwear, while models wore iPad necklaces:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_166CatrionaOutram

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_177CatrionaOutram

Kanrawee line up
Graduate collection by Kanrawee Vechiboonsom

Kanrawee Vechiboonsom presented a sophisticated collection of striking blue and white separates, one featuring an intricate concertina design:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_194KanraweeVechiboonsom

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_197KanraweeVechiboonsom

Maria Brimelow‘s Scandinivian-inspired collection of elongated coats and cardigans drew loud whoops; I particularly like the knotted orange number:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_272MariaBrimelow

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_263MariaBrimelow

Meanwhile, Susanne Wen‘s truly unique collection featured pleated fabrics stitched together in a haphazard fashion:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_276SusanneWen

My favourite collection of Kingston’s outing was without doubt Hannah Cawley. Voluminous silhouettes featured orange and black prints with silver buckle fastening details. Oversized clutch bags in these rich, loud patterns completed the looks:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_285HannahCawley

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_287HannahCawley

Closing menswear was left in the hands of Isabelle Sallis, showing vibrant green prints and a sinister hooded figure:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_301IsabelleSallis

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_302IsabelleSallis

And finally, Phoebe Kowalska closed this stunning show with an ethereal, Comme des Garçons-esque collection of long dresses with multiple panels.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_331PhoebeKowalska

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_339PhoebeKowalska

Until next year, Kingston!

IMG_0348

Categories ,2014, ,Abigail Irving-Munro, ,BA, ,Catriona Outram, ,catwalk, ,GFW, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Hannah Cawley, ,Isabelle Sallis, ,Jasmine Sellers, ,Kanrawee Vechiboonsom, ,Karen Verey, ,Kingston, ,Lauren Lake, ,Maria Barreto, ,Maria Brimelow, ,Matt Bramford, ,Merle Ingram, ,review, ,Stefanie Tschirky, ,Susanne Wen, ,Tamsin Pick, ,Truman Brewery

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Amelia’s Magazine | Kingston University Graduate Fashion Week 2015: Catwalk Review

Josh Read
I only received one invite to the 2015 edition of Graduate Fashion Week, so I was excited to attend the Kingston University graduate show at the Truman Brewery and get a brief glimpse into the talent that is leaving college this year. The venue was absolutely packed and I did not have a prime photo-taking spot, so I’ll apologise in advance for the quality of my images – Matt Bramford took a far more stunning set last year, which you can see here.

There was a wide variety of styles on show, and a good smattering of menswear (I love that it is such a burgeoning field in UK fashion) but as ever I was attracted to the more gregarious and colourful designers, joyfully blending colours and textures.

Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Pippa Harries
Pippa Harries played with the textural contrasts of striped knitwear and sports fabrics.

Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Emma Johnson
Emma Johnson focused on layers of knit and striped patchwork, creating a snuggly yet sophisticated gyspy feel.

Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Grace White
Grace White used ominous knitted snoods to hide faces, worn with heavily draped woollen constructions in a juicy patchwork of colours.

Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Bianca Saunders
Bianca Saunders’ menswear collection showcased metallic quilting and patterned crop pants worn with clashing socks. Humorous whilst still being desirable, her clothing was inspired by the typical interior of a first generation British West Indian home.

Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Josh Read 1
Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Josh Read 3
Kingston Uni fashion 2015-Josh Read 2
But the undoubted star of the show was Josh Read, who I have since discovered has landed a plum role at Dior after winning the LVMH Graduate Prize. His collection was inspired by the elegance of everyday 50s clothing; sharp tailoring paired with sweeping A-line shapes and juicy shades of orange, red and blue. Absolutely gorgeous. His website showcases some beautiful look book images, go take a peek here.

Categories ,2015, ,Bianca Saunders, ,Catwalk review, ,Dior, ,Emma Johnson, ,Grace White, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Kingston University, ,LVMH Graduate Prize, ,Pippa Harries, ,Truman Brewery

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Show Gala Show 2014 Review

Holly Jayne Smith by Sine Skau

Holly Jayne Smith by Sine Skau.

I have been attending Graduate Fashion Week for six years now and every year I wonder how such young designers manage to be so creative. Once again the final 25 collections showcased in last week’s Gala Show were truly outstanding and revealed a wide range of talent to watch. The night began on a poignant note with a moment’s thought for the late Louise Wilson, the formidable Central Saint Martins tutor who was integral in the training of luminaries such as Christopher Kane, Jonathan Saunders and Mary Katrantzou. Here’s hoping that one of these finalists and winners goes on to as much success.

GFW Aimee Dunn by Gareth A Hopkins

Aimee Dunn by Gareth A Hopkins.

GFW Menswear Award: Aimee Dunn – Nottingham Trent University
I know it’s menswear but who doesn’t love stealing their boyfriends clothes? Dunn’s collection of monochrome looks were superbly put together and with Thatcher on the front of a jumper you’re never going to avoid attention. Dunn also picked up the Menswear award at the end of the evening – well deserved.

Grace Weller GFW 2014 Bath Spa Uiversity by Jenny Robins

Grace Weller by Jenny Robins.

Grace Weller by  Julie J Seo

Grace Weller by Julie J.Seo.

George Gold Award winner and GFW Womenswear Award: Grace Weller – Bath Spa University
The embroidery and workmanship that had gone into Grace’s beautiful collection of Erdem-esque floral and sheer dresses was astounding. Not only did Grace pick up the Womenswear Award but she walked away with the £10,000 Gold Award to kick start her label.

Rebecca Rimmer by Vicky Scott
Rebecca Rimmer by Vicky Scott.

Rebecca Rimmer – UCLAN
Brightly coloured clothes painted onto bigger clothes. Sounds ridiculous, works really well on the catwalk, as Rebecca Rimmer proved. Her cartoonish collection was fun and original as well as having a high impact on the audience as it closed the show.

Holly Jayne Smith by Hye Jin Chung_2

Holly Jayne Smith by Hye Jin Chung.

Holly Jayne Smith by Sine Skau

Holly Jayne Smith by Sine Skau.

Holly Jayne Smith – Birmingham City
Foot-high hats and a pop art colour palette ensured this collection caught our attention and made us rethink light blue as a staple. The models also carried co-ordinated bright sports back packs which I loved.

GFW Shan Liao Huang by Gareth A Hopkins

GFW International Winner: Shan Liao Huang by Gareth A Hopkins.

Lauren Lake – Kingston University
Coloured fur made its mark last season and Lauren Lake’s first model strode out in a huge over sized, pink fur-lined shearling coat, so it was always going to be a winner. The silver metallic skirts and block boots, pink PVC and top knots ticked all the boxes, just amazing.

Colleen Leitch – Edinburgh College of Art
80’s glamour is back in Colleen Leitch’s collection of exquisite looks brought together by scattered sequins and dark colours in draping fabrics clinched at the waist for maximum femininity.

HANNAH DONKIN BY JANE YOUNG

Hannah Donkin by Jane Young.

GFW Creative Catwalk Award: Camilla Grimes – Manchester School of Art
Pink fur again, hopefully not real, (trend alert!) but this time alongside a more delicate and feminine ensemble that had hints of Jonathan Saunders about it (never a bad thing). Sheer embroidered shirts and a hooded bomber jacket were just two of the items I want in my wardrobe.

Fashion graduates of 2015, I can’t wait to see what you’ll have in store!

Categories ,2014, ,Aimee Dunn, ,Bath Spa University, ,Birmingham City University, ,Camilla Grimes, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Christopher Kane, ,Colleen Leitch, ,Edinburgh College of Art, ,Gala Show, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Grace Weller, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Hannah Donkin, ,Holly Jayne Smith, ,Hye Jin Chung, ,Jane Young, ,Jenny Robins, ,Jonathan Saunders, ,Julie J Seo, ,Kingston University, ,Lauren Lake, ,Louise Wilson, ,Manchester School of Art, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Nottingham Trent University, ,Rebecca Rimmer, ,review, ,Shan Liao Huang, ,Sine Skau, ,Truman Brewery, ,UCLan, ,Vicky Scott

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Amelia’s Magazine | Junky Styling Junky Air and Ju.St A/W 2011 Catwalk Show Review

Ross Harrison, ed advice Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, see Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, salve when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Screengrabs from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

Finally are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


Ross Harrison, clinic Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

Film Still from Beyond the Brink

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Film Stills from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

To take the provocative question from Beyond the Brink’s website: “Are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


Ross Harrison, stomach Director and Writer of Beyond the Brink, viagra Illustration by Francesca Bourne

Beyond the Brink is young filmmaker’ Ross Harrison’s exploration of the debate on Climate Change. Harrison examines the debate from the angle of a young person being inundated with facts and figures in the lead up to Cop 15, ed when Climate Change was almost inescapably present in the daily news. In Beyond the Brink Ross interviews (to name a few) David Attenbrough, Deepak Rughani, Mark Lynas, Dieter Helm and his Grandparents to find out “What is Climate Change and does it really matter?”

Amelia’s Magazine interviewed Ross about why he decided to make this film, the impact the film has had in schools and what he now thinks needs to be achieved on a personal and governmental level to tackle the impact of Climate Change.

First things first, what inspired you to make a film dealing with the vast and divisive topic that is Climate Change?

Back in 2009, it seemed like an unavoidable issue – what with the media coverage building up to Copenhagen for nearly the whole year and films like The Age of Stupid being released. I also found the subject cropping up more and more in my school work.

What did you feel was missing from the discussion in the media or schools during the lead up to Cop 15 in 2009?

It seemed like a very polarized debate with no middle ground. I was frustrated by hearing the same arguments again and again bouncing between the same groups of people. I didn’t understand why people weren’t cooperating more to work towards a common goal. That hasn’t changed a great deal. Probably and most importantly I wanted to provide a young person’s perspective.

Film Still from Beyond the Brink

How has the film been received since its release? Have you taken it around schools in the UK?

Since I launched the website at the end of last year there has been a lot of positive feedback, which is encouraging. For the week of screenings I posted about 300 DVDs to schools, universities, community groups and individual volunteers. I’ve been along to some screenings myself, but because they’re all over the country it’s mainly teachers and students using the film themselves, which I’ve tried to make as easy as possible by releasing the film for free.

Beyond the Brink Trailer

What -for you- were the most difficult aspects to making this film?

Weighing up the masses of information about climate change – articles, books, blogs, programs, interviews – and trying to filter that down into a documentary that was balanced, accessible and understandable was the first difficulty. The second was trying to think of ways of doing things differently, using different language, presenting the problem in a new way that might make it more inspiring.

Beyond the Brink contains a mixture of talking heads and personal narration, what lead you to construct the film in this way?

The talking heads are in there because I felt that was the best way to convey the experts’ viewpoints. The audience hears what I heard and can draw their own conclusions. I chose to feature myself because it was a very personal project and I wanted to include my slant as a teenager.

Was it particularly important to you that the film was released for free and under a creative commons license?

Definitely. My hope is for the film to get the widest audience possible and I think making it freely available should mean more people watch it that otherwise might.


On reflection, since Cop 16 and the overshadowing of Climate Change in the media by the recession and the arrival of the coalition government, what’s next for the climate movement?

Cancun was not surprising – after such a flop at Copenhagen the officials involved were bound to be desperate to publicize some sort of success. Even so COP16 was a small step rather than the deal people had set their hopes on in 2009. I don’t want to rule out the UN process completely, but I think its limited real impact in the 19 years its been running, is a sign progress needs to be made elsewhere. Those involved in the climate movement need to be pressuring the governments of their own countries to lead by example. The discussion needs to move away from talking about climate catastrophe to selling the benefits of a clean energy infrastructure and low-carbon lifestyles. People are far more likely to be driven by an appealing goal than a danger that could affect them at some point in the future.

What did you learn during the making of the film that surprised you with regards to the debate on Climate Change?

A greater proportion of the scientific community than I realized think that humans are largely causing current climate change. A scientific debate about whether we are contributing to climate change doesn’t really exist anymore, it is widely assumed we are.

Have you plans to follow up the film with further interviews?

No, although it’s something I may come back to at a later date, after I’ve finished working on distributing this film I’ll be looking to take on a new project.

How difficult did you find approaching the range of experts -from Sir David Attenborough to Deepak Rughani and Dr Heike Schroeader- that appear in Beyond the Brink?

It was certainly a challenge. Obviously the people I met know a massive amount about the subject, much more than I do, but you still have to research lots to be able to ask good questions. Thankfully all the interviewees were very approachable and generous with their time. Like many things, you get better at interviews with practice and in the end I was really pleased with the responses I had. That’s not to say there weren’t disappointments. Sometimes technical problems meant some of the best answers couldn’t be used.

How did the animations within the film develop and do you feel they were integral to explain a few of the ideas behind the causes of Climate Change?

Concepts like the greenhouse effect are difficult to explain at all, let alone with a strict time limit and so animations seemed like the best option. The problem is they take a long time to create. I’ve still got 100 paper Earths on my shelf that I traced from my computer screen.

Film Stills from Beyond the Brink

What fact or possible event as a cause of Climate Change shocked you the most during the making of this film?

I found that the number of species threatened by potential warming was really startling. One in four land animal and plant species could be threatened with extinction this century.

Which five environmental documentaries would you recommend that everybody sees?

The Age of Stupid, The End of the Line, The Planet Earth series is brilliant and Planet Earth: The Future is a conservation focused companion series. The ‘Jungles’ episode of the recent Human Planet series.

What conclusions have you come to since Beyond the Brink was completed?

Being optimistic is important. Working towards a vision of a better world with a reliable renewable energy supply, full employment, smaller bills, and healthier lifestyles, has got a far greater chance of uniting the population than struggling to avoid a catastrophe. You don’t have to be an environmentalist to want those things. And working together is essential. In whatever situation people are taking action, by joining forces with their neighbours, friends, schoolmates or colleagues, they can make their voice much louder.

What policies would you like to see Governments world wide implement?

I’d like to see serious investment in green technologies, stricter regulation of energy industries, and policies that make it easier for individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Channelling money into developing renewable energy and other green products can create jobs. On the one hand if our current energy system is replaced by a carbon neutral one then individuals will not have to make many changes, on the other, behavioral change is essential because we need to start appreciating almost all the resources we use are finite. One policy I think is especially urgent and needs to be implemented by some south American and Indonesian governments is strong protection of rainforests. The rate of deforestation is mind-blowing and can’t go on.

To take the provocative question from Beyond the Brink’s website: “Are we really causing Climate Change and who cares?

It is very likely we are changing the Earth’s climate by changing the composition of its atmosphere and this is a stance that the vast majority of climate scientists and scientific organizations around the world agree on, as far as I can tell. The implications are serious and everybody could be affected, but importantly the poorest people in the world who are less able to defend themselves against potential hazards are likely to be affected first.

Like many problems, climate change is easy to ignore and only a minority are taking action, even if a much larger number might say they are concerned. The next step must be to encourage changes that people want to see and which reduce our impact at the same time, like demanding cheaper, better public transport, or designing more energy efficient products. What really makes me hopeful, though, is education. I’m hopeful people my age will grow up with different attitudes to those of generations before.

After watching the film, what’s the next step for a viewer who would like to be engaged in the Climate Change debate?

Well, for a start the debate has largely moved from are we really causing climate change, to what’s the best way to minimize the impact we are very likely having. If someone wants more information, there are endless books and websites. The Rough Guide to Climate Change is particularly good. But be wary of blogs – it’s very easy for people to write anything they like and pretend to know more than they do.

In terms of getting involved, the best thing to do is join an existing network, of which there are many. There are so many organizations with basically the same aims I sometimes think if they all joined forces then they could really change things. If you’d call yourself young then check out the UK Youth Climate Coalition, some of whose members feature in the film. Other initiatives like 350 and 10:10 are building the movement, making it exciting and making an impact.


March 26 2011-UK UncutUK Uncut gathers on the South Bank on Saturday 26th March 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Unless you have been living under a rock you will be aware that there was a huge anti-cuts March for the Alternative on Saturday 26th March 2011. In the days since then the press has been dominated with both outrage from the government that “hooligans” should be allowed to roam the streets, viagra 100mg and on the other side, visit this site shock at the way in which once again the police and media have mistreated protestors. As anyone who was following me on Twitter will know I was involved on the UK Uncut action, which involved an occupation of Fortnum & Mason… yet another large corporation culpable of massive tax avoidance: This action led to by far the largest numbers of arrests and charges on the day: a staggering 138 of the 149.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

On my way through London I saw the most enormous amount of creativity, from pound coin shields to a Trojan Horse cunningly installed at the centre of Oxford Circus – and of course plenty of banners bursting with witty one liners: included in this blog post are just a few of the amazing sights from the day. With a march numbering possibly half a million and upwards (something the government has been quick to downplay) there were surely many great ones that I missed – especially the legendary message “I was told there would be biscuits” carried by a small child on someone’s shoulders. I broke away from the march early on to take part in UK Uncut actions on Oxford Street and then at Fortnum & Mason.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Demonised by the press for their behaviour, UK Uncut have been quick to fight back with their version of events: really, the police and media should know better. Both UK Uncut and Green & Black Cross – the support network that provided legal observers and arrestee support – have grown out of Climate Camp networks and ways of organising to take on completely new identities of their own. As a result some of those involved are no strangers to wrongful arrest, police brutality and political policing: remember Heathrow, Kingsnorth, G20 and Ratcliffe anyone? These people know what they are doing; naturally the unfair arrests of UK Uncut was filmed and immediately shared, the footage unsurprisingly making the front page of the Guardian.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Some people might wonder what on earth the links between the anti-cuts movement and Climate Camp are, but Climate Camp has always been rooted in a desire to address the social inequalities of capitalism – for example a breakaway group in London is currently looking at ways to campaign around fuel poverty. One of the favourite slogans at the COP15 Climate conference was System Change not Climate Change – we can’t cure the problem with simple quick fix answers, but rather by tackling the whole global neoliberal system. A brutal plan to cut services such as libraries and the NHS will undermine the fabric of a just society, affecting the poor most. Meanwhile the rich are able to avoid huge tax bills at a time when we desperately need to start building a green economy that is not based on endless profit. Clearly these inequalities are something that green activists are keen to tackle.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Climate Camp has also always been a broad mix of liberalism and radicalism, so it’s no surprise that UK Uncut is as well. The very name Green & Black Cross indicates how the group combines the more autonomous anarchist streaks of activism with the skills, infrastructure and ideologies built up within the green movement. It supports grassroots social struggles in the UK and during the March for the Alternative the Green & Black Cross provided Legal Support, Action Medics and Action Kitchens. They even had a basic compost portaloo roaming the streets in a supermarket trolley – but in the event it was never used: it’s hard to get into a kettle once it is formed. They will be independently advising on all arrests during the day at a defendants’ meeting on Saturday 2nd April and were generally out in force to offer biscuits and legal advice as soon as arrestees were released.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Since the arrests UK Uncut activists have had to field a barrage of commentary from the media, which has been ever quick to notice the anarchic element of their protest. Their sit in at Fortnum & Mason was largely peaceful – protestors ate their own sandwiches and listened to performances and speeches – but on Newsnight a spokesperson was asked to denounce all protestor violence. She did a marvellous job of neither condoning nor condemning it: there were people from all backgrounds in Fortnum & Mason. For some it will have been their first experience of direct action (read this shocking report of the arrest of a 15 year old girl) and others were part of the Black Bloc earlier in the day – the two are not mutually exclusive. UK Uncut has an incredibly loose non-hierarchical structure, and to be successful it must somehow find a place for those of all backgrounds.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia GregoryInside Fortnum & Mason. They look super scared don’t they?

Most UK Uncutters recognise that there is more to successful activism than a simplistic black and white damnation of violence, but the more liberal end of the spectrum may well be new to the idea that damage to property is not considered violence by many activists – see here for a definition – so there is going to be a rapid need to redefine and educate as soon as possible. Most of the targets for property damage on Saturday were well thought through – big banks that avoid tax, Topshop, BHS and so on. Who threw paint, and who broke windows? It’s not clear, but the targets were clear enough. Some people, whether you agree with it or not, think it is more effective to inflict damage on a well selected target than to simply march from A-B and then listen to speeches. After all, what did it ever do to stop the Iraq war? Direct action through the ages has proven that targeting property can be highly effective – the Suffragettes were never afraid of inflicting collateral damage. Last year at Climate Camp windows were smashed at the RBS head offices in Edinburgh to demonstrate concern against their continued investment in fossil fuels.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

By Trafalgar Square at night some rogue elements (possibly pissed up) were clearly provoked into throwing glass bottles at police, never something I would recommend however bad police brutality gets (and by all accounts it did get REALLY bad) because I personally don’t believe that violence against people is ever acceptable. But I do believe that the Black Bloc as a considered and thoughtful tactic is something that our movement needs: people who are willing to put their bodies and actions on the front line to stop those who are damaging the fabric of our “democratic” society. Many of them were very young, possibly disaffected veterans of kettling at the student demos last year – others were highly organised groups who came to join the march from across the country. Those involved will undoubtedly have slightly different views as to process and outcome but recent online dialogues prove that diverse parts of the movement are keen to work together. Rather than dismiss Black Bloc actions as the nihilistic work of masked “hooligans” we would do well to consider the underlying reasons why this is seen as an appealing tactic utilised by at least a thousand people last weekend. After all, we’re all in this together… and this is just the beginning of our future.

March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory
March 26 2011-UK Uncut. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Further reading:
Why Fortnum & Mason?
Video footage from the UKuncut action
An open letter from the Brighton Solidarity Federation of Anarcho-Syndicalists
People are worth less than property
A night in the cells is nothing to a lifetime imprisoned by cuts
Reasons why the cuts are a bad idea
Dominic Campbell experiences police brutality in Trafalgar Square
Political Dynamite: We should use the word violence with the greatest care.
Leah Borromeo: Protestors can’t disown the “violent minority”.
Why the UKuncut arrests threaten future protests
What is the Black Bloc? Information page.
Laurie Penny – What really happened in Trafalgar Square
My UK Uncut arrest made me a political prisoner
Climate Camp 2010 in Edinburgh – my commentary
Climate Camp 2009 in Copenhagen – my commentary part one, part two and part three.
G20 Climate Camp in the City – my commentary
Ratcliffe: Did PC Mark “Flash” Kennedy ensure my arrest as one of the Ratcliffe 114 ?- my commentary
Climate Camp at Kingsnorth in 2008.
One of the first UK Uncut protests: Sir Philip Green and his Topshop billions get the UK Uncut treatment.
The Third Estate: A message to Critical UK Uncut activists.
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Olivia Rose
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Olivia Rose.

This was apparently the first catwalk show that Junky Styling have staged in two years, cheapest and I’m rather ashamed to say the first that I have ever been to. On this outing I reckon it was well worth the wait. Junky Styling feature in ACOFI and were one of my favourite labels at the recent Find Your Feet ethical fashion show, putting on a strong showing with a gorgeous pink layered maxi dress.

Junky Styling air hostesses
Junky Styling air hostesses.

Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke.

Coming over a month after the official end of London Fashion Week this was more than a catwalk show. Guests were greeted by faux air hostesses and after checking in passed by a ‘Luggage Bar’ constructed from old suitcases. At the far end of the Old Truman Brewery warehouse location there was a free bar laid on by Courvoisier, enamelled tie pins jauntily placed on the rim of a citrusy punch. Despite my lack of a front row invite I managed to duck into an empty seat just as the catwalk lights started flashing as if a jet was about to race down the runway.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Abi Heyneke.

Junky Air was purportedly inspired by airports, planes and the such like. Ladies sported beautifully tailored outfits, elegant up dos and fake red lips that made at least one model look more than a little masculine (the only dodgy bit of styling in an otherwise faultless experience). Gents trundled down the catwalk in patchwork jumpers, excitable shirts and shorts, and engineer-ish baggy boiler suits.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryvJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Madi
Junky Styling A/W 2011 by Madi.

But really, this was a Junky style clash on full force, a multitude of ideas thrown together in a dashing devil-may-care way: several collections shown at once, including Ju.St. There were some beautiful all in one striped jumpsuits, some extremely clever ruched suiting and always the clever tailoring. Yes it was way to long and could have done with a major edit, yes the lips scared the hell out of me, the celebrity model passed right over my head (though a quick google reveals her to be Amanda Cazalet, once famous for snogging Madonna in Justify My Love, now staging a comeback) but generally this was a major hit. Junky Styling may eschew everything about the legitimate fashion world, from London Fashion Week dates to general trends – apart from the all important big skirted dress – but hell, this was inspiring. See how imaginative upcycled clothing can be? Yes, it really can.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory
Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 – all photography by Amelia Gregory.

For a pair of mates who started out creating clothes to go clubbing in Annika Sanders and Kerry Seager have done bloody well. They may still be showing far from the fashion crowd, but make no mistake, Junky Styling have arrived, all engines firing.

Junky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia GregoryJunky Styling Junky Air A/W 2011 Photography by Amelia Gregory

Read part of the interview with Junky Styling in ACOFI, or buy Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration online.

Categories ,Abi Heyneke, ,ACOFI, ,Airplanes, ,Airports, ,Amanda Cazalet, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Annika Sanders, ,catwalk show, ,Celebrity Model, ,Courvoisier, ,Enamelled tie pins, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Find Your Feet, ,Free drink, ,Ju.St, ,Jumpsuits, ,Junky Air, ,Junky Styling, ,Justify My Love, ,Kerry Seager, ,London Fashion Week, ,Luggage Bar, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Madonna, ,menswear, ,Olivia Rose, ,Punch, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Oxfam taking action with a city of tents and Jamie Hewlett of Gorillaz lending a hand

If you walked over the Millennium Bridge today you might happen upon a small city of tents, cost cure this is in fact not a new city of borrowers or a miniature tourist town as a few people were in under the impression, price but a new campaign by Oxfam to get people involved with the fight against climate change.

OX1

Oxfam have teamed up with a German artist Herman Josef Hack who has meticulously produced hundreds of tents that aim to highlight some of the 26 million people forced from their homes around the world. Human impact and wars have misplaced millions and now the evil of climate change is creating droughts and flooding around the world that is forcing huge numbers of people into temporary accommodation.

OX2

The installation pushes the message home with the backdrop of St Paul’s and the Millennium Bridge creating a contrast with the tents that millions worldwide are forced to live in. It was all a bit lost on the rush hour commuters as they kept their heads down, sidestepping all the shelters that blocked their way. As the day progresses, however, people are showing a real interest, stopping to chat and having a look around. As it is on the path of the tourist walk and with the half term break it looks like it will attract plenty of people, which makes it a shame that it is only a temporary exhibition.

OX3

The event, however, is being replicated today in four other cities – Dublin, Berlin, Madrid and Brussels – hoping to get hundreds of people to sign up on their website and send messages to governments. The aim is to put pressure on the European heads of state that will meet tomorrow in Brussels to decide what they can take to the table at the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit in December.

OX4

Oxfam have another exhibition, Under Water Colours, being held at the Truman Brewery at the Dray Walk Gallery, which I popped into today. The free exhibition focuses on the human cost of climate change in Bangladesh and features nine watercolours by Jamie Hewlett, the artist who produces the artwork for the GORILLAZ.

OX5

He took a trip to the country with Oxfam and documented what the devastation facing the communities that he saw to produce some amazing watercolour images. It will be on until Saturday (31st) so make sure you get down. You can also buy some of the limited edition prints if you’re feeling a bit flush.

OX6

Oxfam are also urging people to attend ‘The Wave’, one of the UK’s biggest ever demonstrations in support of action on climate change, held by Stop Climate Chaos Coalition on 5th December. At this event thousands of people will flow through the streets of London to put pressure on the government to kick start a green economy and safeguard the world’s poorest communities around the world. It’s going to be an empowering day so make sure you put it in your diary.

OX9

Categories ,art, ,Bangladesh, ,campaign, ,Climate Change, ,Gorillaz, ,Herman Josef Hack, ,installation, ,Jamie Hewlett, ,london, ,Millennium Bridge, ,miniature, ,oxfam, ,oxfam campaign, ,shelter, ,St Pauls, ,tents, ,the Wave, ,Truman Brewery, ,water colours

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Amelia’s Magazine | Shea Alchemy: Natural Handmade Skincare

Joe Worricker by Karina Yarv
Joe Worricker by Karina Yarv.

Joe Worricker was indeed wearing stars on his face, generic as declared on twitter twenty minutes before I arrived at his gig. I could hear Joe’s idiosyncratic voice even as I raced into this industry thick showcase at new venue XOYO, buy located just behind the main Old Street thoroughfare. He was also wearing the same clothes that he sports in his Finger-Waggers video (digital download out this week, sales though as Joe was only too happy to admit, easily downloadable somewhere online for free.)

Joe Worricker-XOYO-Photo by Amelia Gregory
Joe Worricker at XOYO. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Joe Worricker by Sarah Ushurhe
Joe Worricker by Sarah Ushurhe.

A whole 45 minutes later I was still somewhat struggling to describe Joe, who sings with a session-type band that wouldn’t look out of place on the X Factor – but then this is the lad who auditioned for that very show… and was turned down. “I think they were scared of my voice” he told me in our earlier interview. And he does indeed have an almighty set of curiously old-fashioned lungs, somewhat at odds with his outwardly trendy demeanour.

Joe Worricker by Fay Morrow
Joe Worricker by Fay Morrow.

He swung through a set which included some slow tempo tales of weddings and fairytales, before returning to his trademark upbeat tracks. “We’ve got two fun ones now, don’t worry,” he told his many friends in the audience, including what I can only presume was his granny sat pride of place in the front row, and another relative who was doing his best impression of the funky chicken.

Joe Worricker at XOYO. All photography by Amelia Gregory.
Joe Worriker by Sarah Ushurhe
Joe Worricker by Sarah Ushurhe.

Joe Worricker is an intriguing proposition for Rough Trade. He’s poppy – he fronts a band without an instrument – dance-y, and a whole lot of soulful. Who knows where he fits into the current market place, but that distinctive voice paired with some jaunty tunes could well make him the next big thing. One thing’s for sure, anyone who puts their granny in the front row at their debut gig gets my vote. And bless, being the polite lad he is, he even thanked me on twitter.

Joe Worricker XOXO granny

Go check him out. And read my interview with him here.
Joe Worricker was indeed wearing stars on his face, about it as declared on twitter twenty minutes before I arrived at his gig. I could her Joe’s idiosyncratic voice even as I raced into this industry thick showcase at new venue XOYO, viagra 100mg located just behind the main Old Street thoroughfare. He was also wearing the same clothes that he sports in his Finger-Waggers video (digital download out this week, though as Joe was only too happy to admit, easily downloadable somewhere online for free.)

A whole 45 minutes later I was still somewhat struggling to describe Joe, who sings with a session-type band that wouldn’t look out of place on the X Factor – but then this is the lad who auditioned for that very show… and was turned down. “I think they were scared of my voice” he told me in our earlier interview. And he does indeed have an almighty set of curiously old-fashioned lungs, somewhat at odds with his outwardly trendy demeanour.

He swung through a set which included some slow tempo tales of weddings and fairytales, before returning to his trademark upbeat tracks. “We’ve got two fun ones now, don’t worry,” he told his many friends in the audience, including what I can only presume was his granny sat pride of place in the front row, and another relative who was doing his best impression of the funky chicken.

Joe Worricker is an intriguing proposition for Rough Trade. He’s poppy – he fronts a band without an instrument – dance-y, and a whole lot of soulful. I’m not entirely sure where he fits into the current market place, but that distinctive voice paired with some jaunty tunes could well make him the next big thing. One thing’s for sure, anyone who puts their granny in the front row at their debut gig gets my vote. Go check him out.

Being the polite lad he is, he even thanked me for coming on twitter.

Joe Worricker was indeed wearing stars on his face, this site as declared on twitter twenty minutes before I arrived at his gig. I could her Joe’s idiosyncratic voice even as I raced into this industry thick showcase at new venue XOYO, recipe located just behind the main Old Street thoroughfare. He was also wearing the same clothes that he sports in his Finger-Waggers video (digital download out this week, though as Joe was only too happy to admit, easily downloadable somewhere online for free.)

A whole 45 minutes later I was still somewhat struggling to describe Joe, who sings with a session-type band that wouldn’t look out of place on the X Factor – but then this is the lad who auditioned for that very show… and was turned down. “I think they were scared of my voice” he told me in our earlier interview. And he does indeed have an almighty set of curiously old-fashioned lungs, somewhat at odds with his outwardly trendy demeanour.

He swung through a set which included some slow tempo tales of weddings and fairytales, before returning to his trademark upbeat tracks. “We’ve got two fun ones now, don’t worry,” he told his many friends in the audience, including what I can only presume was his granny sat pride of place in the front row, and another relative who was doing his best impression of the funky chicken.

Joe Worricker is an intriguing proposition for Rough Trade. He’s poppy – he fronts a band without an instrument – dance-y, and a whole lot of soulful. I’m not entirely sure where he fits into the current market place, but that distinctive voice paired with some jaunty tunes could well make him the next big thing. One thing’s for sure, anyone who puts their granny in the front row at their debut gig gets my vote. And bless, being the polite lad he is he even thanked me on twitter.

Go check him out. And read my interview with him here.
Joe Worricker was indeed wearing stars on his face, story as declared on twitter twenty minutes before I arrived at his gig. I could her Joe’s idiosyncratic voice even as I raced into this industry thick showcase at new venue XOYO, story located just behind the main Old Street thoroughfare. He was also wearing the same clothes that he sports in his Finger-Waggers video (digital download out this week, buy information pills though as Joe was only too happy to admit, easily downloadable somewhere online for free.)

A whole 45 minutes later I was still somewhat struggling to describe Joe, who sings with a session-type band that wouldn’t look out of place on the X Factor – but then this is the lad who auditioned for that very show… and was turned down. “I think they were scared of my voice” he told me in our earlier interview. And he does indeed have an almighty set of curiously old-fashioned lungs, somewhat at odds with his outwardly trendy demeanour.

He swung through a set which included some slow tempo tales of weddings and fairytales, before returning to his trademark upbeat tracks. “We’ve got two fun ones now, don’t worry,” he told his many friends in the audience, including what I can only presume was his granny sat pride of place in the front row, and another relative who was doing his best impression of the funky chicken.

Joe Worricker is an intriguing proposition for Rough Trade. He’s poppy – he fronts a band without an instrument – dance-y, and a whole lot of soulful. I’m not entirely sure where he fits into the current market place, but that distinctive voice paired with some jaunty tunes could well make him the next big thing. One thing’s for sure, anyone who puts their granny in the front row at their debut gig gets my vote. And bless, being the polite lad he is he even thanked me on twitter.

Go check him out. And read my interview with him here.
Shea Alchemy by Cat Palairet
Shea Alchemy by Cat Palairet.

I am a big fan of cottage industries – after all, cialis 40mg I am one myself. In the first of an ongoing series that will profile ethical skincare and makeup brands, let me introduce you to Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford. Having discovered her creams some years ago (at a market) I can indeed testify that they are very yummy… Here she talks about how she set up her business and why it is possible to avoid spending a fortune on good quality natural skincare.

Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford by Charlotte Hoyle
Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford by Charlotte Hoyle.

What did you do before you set up Shea Alchemy?
I was marketing manager at Random House publishers. Absolutely nothing to do with skincare. After having my kids I wanted to be around at home more so I went freelance from home as a graphic designer and copywriter. This all sounds totally unrelated but has actually helped me set up the business as I haven’t had to pay designers or marketing people which would have cost a fortune and I did know about running a business.

Shea Alchemy pots

What prompted you to set up shop? Where did you learn how to make skincare products and where would you recommend that budding skin magicians go to train?
I went to stay with a friend in the States when I was a freelance designer and met a woman who was really into natural skincare who told me all about all the rubbish that is in so many commercial skin creams. I was pretty horrified and bought some ‘natural’ creams made by a company called Arbonne. I loved them but they were INCREDIBLY expensive. When they ran out I looked at the ingredients list and, being a practical kind of person, (and miserly), I thought I’m sure I could make this myself and save myself £100’s. So, I bought a natural beauty recipe book from Amazon and with Claire, my daughter, I set off to Neal’s Yard and spent a fortune on natural ingredients (far more than £100 in the end) and came home and had fun in the kitchen. We squashed beetroot through sieves, blocked the sink with melted beeswax and made all kinds of weird and wonderful concoctions. That was just the beginning but I got hooked on it. I did loads of reading, experimenting and talking to various chemists and toxicologists. I researched ingredient properties and finally, once I had decided I wanted to sell my creams, rather than just giving them to friends and family as I had been – I went on a course run by Aromantic in Fulham to find out how to make sure they didn’t curdle or go off and to learn about the legal side of things.

Shea Alchemy by Alison Day
Shea Alchemy by Alison Day.

Why Shea Butter? Do you ever feel tempted to throw another substitute product in the mix?
On that first Neal’s Yard trip in 2003 we bought some shea butter just because it was in one of the recipes I fancied making. I really liked its texture and the feel of it on my skin. When I read about its properties I decided to make it the theme of my creams. Shea butter is fantastically good for the skin and has been used for centuries in Africa as a natural skin moisturiser. It helps heal scars, offers natural sun protection, soothes eczema and a whole range of dry skin conditions and is also used as a hair conditioner. We mix it with other ingredients though as in its basic unrefined form it is hard and wax like and needs warming before use.

How do you source your shea butter? What led you to Ghana?
We get our fairtrade, unrefined shea butter via a child rights organisation in Ghana called Afrikids and it is made in a woman’s fairtrade cooperative. Ghana is the main place for Shea butter and as a friend of mine had some Ghanaian contacts it seemed the natural place to head for.

SheaAlchemyBottleIllustration_by_JessGu
Illustration by Jess Gurr.

What other products do you add to the shea butter and where do you find these?
We use organic oils such as olive, apricot kernel, thistle and avocado, aloe vera, horse chestnut extract and cocoa butter. We use spring water which we get from my cousin’s farm in Northants where they have a natural spring. They bottle and sell their water and I am sure this is why our creams are so good for sensitive skins because our water is SOOOO pure. We use an emulsifier – cetyl alcohol, which comes from coconut oil – to blend the fats and the water together. We scent the creams with organic essential oils. All our ingredients are sourced from different companies.

Can you explain a bit of the process behind the making your products?
It’s a cross between cooking and chemistry! Lots of heating, cooling, whisking and stirring. Heating has to be very precise and timing is crucial. In the early days we had loads of disasters with curdled messes in saucepans but now we have it down to a fine art. The cooks in the company are Prue (my sister), Emma (my oldest friend) and me. Emma has a science background and that helps a lot.

Shea Alchemy by Karina Yarv
Shea Alchemy market stall by Karina Yarv.

Why is selling in markets so important to you, and which markets do you sell in?
Selling at markets is great because it really keeps you in touch with the people who buy our stuff and what they want. We love the feedback and because we are a tiny company we can actually act on it. If people say they love the smell of geranium for example – we go and get organic essential oil of geranium and add it to stuff. If people show interest in hemp oil for example or blackcurrant seed or blackseed oil etc (as they have done) we can add it to products. We do have to get every recipe toxicology tested though before selling it so its not totally ad hoc. We sell at Broadway Market in London Fields every Saturday and Brick Lane Upmarket in the Truman Brewery on Sundays. We also do one off markets in York (we are there loads over Christmas), Suffolk, Brighton etc. Our website is regularly updated with our plans for the next month and every Friday we confirm our venues via twitter. I chose Broadway and Brick Lane as regular markets because they are GREAT venues and I love being there! Lots of people, lots of great stalls and really friendly stall holders. If I am going to spend my weekends working I want to make sure I am going to enjoy myself.

How do you work between Crouch End and York?
I am based in Crouch End and make stuff in my kitchen and sell at markets in London. Emma makes it in her kitchen in York,  services most of the web orders and sells at York markets. My sister, Prue, makes creams in her kitchen in Northants and brings batches of cream up to me on a weekly basis.

SheaAlchemy by Reena Makwana
Illustration by Reena Makwana.

What are your new products?
Our new products are Cyclists’ Sore Bits Cream and Cyclists All Weather Face protection because we have had loads of cyclists asking for specialist creams – particularly on Broadway market. We also do a blusher and tinted moisturiser because it is simple to just add mineral tints to our existing creams. We don’t have plans to extend the make up range but these two products fit comfortably with the rest of our products.

All your products come in distinctive little tins and pots – why have you decided to package them in this way and what inspired the distinctive bright design?
I just liked the idea of tins because they are really practical, unsquashable and have a kind of basic honesty about them – no fake bottoms here. I did some basic market research before becoming a Ltd company and the results of the survey I did showed that people wanted something a bit different that would stand out from the endless white boxes. I design all our packaging myself and I love bright colours. I looked at lots of Ghanaian batiks for inspiration and the borders of all our tins are based on a batik I liked.

Shea Alchemy Stall by Charlotte Hoyle
Shea Alchemy Stall by Charlotte Hoyle.

Why are gift boxes such a good idea for a small brand like yours?
I think people like to buy presents that are packaged in some way so it made sense to put combinations of creams together. I have to admit I love little bags, boxes, tissue and ribbon so it gave me a great excuse to go and spend loads of money at the packaging factory!

What are your dreams for the future of your brand?
Oh wow … Well, I think we want to stay small. This company is a lifestyle for us rather than an ambition to make mega bucks. We like messing around in the kitchen and making lovely products. If we were to go into shops and get big, our recipes would have to be made in a factory, we would need a distribution network and a production line and who wants to spend their days dealing with all that hassle and the stress of borrowing large amounts of money? If we just sell online and at markets the other great thing is we can keep our prices very competitive because our overheads are massively reduced.  We do want to make a bit more money than we do at the moment though … I think online sales are the way to go. So check out our website www.sheaalchemy.co.uk and start doing your christmas shopping!

Categories ,Afrikids, ,Alison Day, ,aloe vera, ,apricot kernel, ,Arbonne, ,Aromantic, ,Avocado, ,Brick Lane, ,Broadway Market, ,Cat Palairet, ,Charlotte Hoyle, ,Chemistry, ,Cocoa Butter, ,course, ,Crouch End, ,cycling, ,fairtrade, ,ghana, ,horse chestnut extract, ,Jess Gurr, ,Karina Yarv, ,Kitchen, ,Market Stalls, ,Neal’s Yard, ,Olive Oil, ,organic, ,Random House, ,Reena Makwana, ,Sally, ,Sally Mumford, ,Shea Alchemy, ,Shea Butter, ,Skincare, ,Sunday Upmarket, ,Thistle, ,Truman Brewery, ,York

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Amelia’s Magazine | Shea Alchemy: Natural Handmade Skincare

Shea Alchemy by Cat Palairet
Shea Alchemy by Cat Palairet.

I am a big fan of cottage industries – after all, I am one myself. In the first of an ongoing series that will profile ethical skincare and makeup brands, let me introduce you to Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford. Having discovered her creams some years ago (at a market) I can indeed testify that they are very yummy… Here she talks about how she set up her business and why it is possible to avoid spending a fortune on good quality natural skincare.

Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford by Charlotte Hoyle
Shea Alchemy founder Sally Mumford by Charlotte Hoyle.

What did you do before you set up Shea Alchemy?
I was marketing manager at Random House publishers. Absolutely nothing to do with skincare. After having my kids I wanted to be around at home more so I went freelance from home as a graphic designer and copywriter. This all sounds totally unrelated but has actually helped me set up the business as I haven’t had to pay designers or marketing people which would have cost a fortune and I did know about running a business.

Shea Alchemy pots

What prompted you to set up shop? Where did you learn how to make skincare products and where would you recommend that budding skin magicians go to train?
I went to stay with a friend in the States when I was a freelance designer and met a woman who was really into natural skincare who told me all about all the rubbish that is in so many commercial skin creams. I was pretty horrified and bought some ‘natural’ creams made by a company called Arbonne. I loved them but they were INCREDIBLY expensive. When they ran out I looked at the ingredients list and, being a practical kind of person, (and miserly), I thought I’m sure I could make this myself and save myself £100’s. So, I bought a natural beauty recipe book from Amazon and with Claire, my daughter, I set off to Neal’s Yard and spent a fortune on natural ingredients (far more than £100 in the end) and came home and had fun in the kitchen. We squashed beetroot through sieves, blocked the sink with melted beeswax and made all kinds of weird and wonderful concoctions. That was just the beginning but I got hooked on it. I did loads of reading, experimenting and talking to various chemists and toxicologists. I researched ingredient properties and finally, once I had decided I wanted to sell my creams, rather than just giving them to friends and family as I had been – I went on a course run by Aromantic in Fulham to find out how to make sure they didn’t curdle or go off and to learn about the legal side of things.

Shea Alchemy by Alison Day
Shea Alchemy by Alison Day.

Why Shea Butter? Do you ever feel tempted to throw another substitute product in the mix?
On that first Neal’s Yard trip in 2003 we bought some shea butter just because it was in one of the recipes I fancied making. I really liked its texture and the feel of it on my skin. When I read about its properties I decided to make it the theme of my creams. Shea butter is fantastically good for the skin and has been used for centuries in Africa as a natural skin moisturiser. It helps heal scars, offers natural sun protection, soothes eczema and a whole range of dry skin conditions and is also used as a hair conditioner. We mix it with other ingredients though as in its basic unrefined form it is hard and wax like and needs warming before use.

How do you source your shea butter? What led you to Ghana?
We get our fairtrade, unrefined shea butter via a child rights organisation in Ghana called Afrikids and it is made in a woman’s fairtrade cooperative. Ghana is the main place for Shea butter and as a friend of mine had some Ghanaian contacts it seemed the natural place to head for.

SheaAlchemyBottleIllustration_by_JessGu
Illustration by Jess Gurr.

What other products do you add to the shea butter and where do you find these?
We use organic oils such as olive, apricot kernel, thistle and avocado, aloe vera, horse chestnut extract and cocoa butter. We use spring water which we get from my cousin’s farm in Northants where they have a natural spring. They bottle and sell their water and I am sure this is why our creams are so good for sensitive skins because our water is SOOOO pure. We use an emulsifier – cetyl alcohol, which comes from coconut oil – to blend the fats and the water together. We scent the creams with organic essential oils. All our ingredients are sourced from different companies.

Can you explain a bit of the process behind the making your products?
It’s a cross between cooking and chemistry! Lots of heating, cooling, whisking and stirring. Heating has to be very precise and timing is crucial. In the early days we had loads of disasters with curdled messes in saucepans but now we have it down to a fine art. The cooks in the company are Prue (my sister), Emma (my oldest friend) and me. Emma has a science background and that helps a lot.

Shea Alchemy by Karina Yarv
Shea Alchemy market stall by Karina Yarv.

Why is selling in markets so important to you, and which markets do you sell in?
Selling at markets is great because it really keeps you in touch with the people who buy our stuff and what they want. We love the feedback and because we are a tiny company we can actually act on it. If people say they love the smell of geranium for example – we go and get organic essential oil of geranium and add it to stuff. If people show interest in hemp oil for example or blackcurrant seed or blackseed oil etc (as they have done) we can add it to products. We do have to get every recipe toxicology tested though before selling it so its not totally ad hoc. We sell at Broadway Market in London Fields every Saturday and Brick Lane Upmarket in the Truman Brewery on Sundays. We also do one off markets in York (we are there loads over Christmas), Suffolk, Brighton etc. Our website is regularly updated with our plans for the next month and every Friday we confirm our venues via twitter. I chose Broadway and Brick Lane as regular markets because they are GREAT venues and I love being there! Lots of people, lots of great stalls and really friendly stall holders. If I am going to spend my weekends working I want to make sure I am going to enjoy myself.

How do you work between Crouch End and York?
I am based in Crouch End and make stuff in my kitchen and sell at markets in London. Emma makes it in her kitchen in York,  services most of the web orders and sells at York markets. My sister, Prue, makes creams in her kitchen in Northants and brings batches of cream up to me on a weekly basis.

SheaAlchemy by Reena Makwana
Illustration by Reena Makwana.

What are your new products?
Our new products are Cyclists’ Sore Bits Cream and Cyclists All Weather Face protection because we have had loads of cyclists asking for specialist creams – particularly on Broadway market. We also do a blusher and tinted moisturiser because it is simple to just add mineral tints to our existing creams. We don’t have plans to extend the make up range but these two products fit comfortably with the rest of our products.

All your products come in distinctive little tins and pots – why have you decided to package them in this way and what inspired the distinctive bright design?
I just liked the idea of tins because they are really practical, unsquashable and have a kind of basic honesty about them – no fake bottoms here. I did some basic market research before becoming a Ltd company and the results of the survey I did showed that people wanted something a bit different that would stand out from the endless white boxes. I design all our packaging myself and I love bright colours. I looked at lots of Ghanaian batiks for inspiration and the borders of all our tins are based on a batik I liked.

Shea Alchemy Stall by Charlotte Hoyle
Shea Alchemy Stall by Charlotte Hoyle.

Why are gift boxes such a good idea for a small brand like yours?
I think people like to buy presents that are packaged in some way so it made sense to put combinations of creams together. I have to admit I love little bags, boxes, tissue and ribbon so it gave me a great excuse to go and spend loads of money at the packaging factory!

What are your dreams for the future of your brand?
Oh wow … Well, I think we want to stay small. This company is a lifestyle for us rather than an ambition to make mega bucks. We like messing around in the kitchen and making lovely products. If we were to go into shops and get big, our recipes would have to be made in a factory, we would need a distribution network and a production line and who wants to spend their days dealing with all that hassle and the stress of borrowing large amounts of money? If we just sell online and at markets the other great thing is we can keep our prices very competitive because our overheads are massively reduced.  We do want to make a bit more money than we do at the moment though … I think online sales are the way to go. So check out our website www.sheaalchemy.co.uk and start doing your christmas shopping!

Categories ,Afrikids, ,Alison Day, ,aloe vera, ,apricot kernel, ,Arbonne, ,Aromantic, ,Avocado, ,Brick Lane, ,Broadway Market, ,Cat Palairet, ,Charlotte Hoyle, ,Chemistry, ,Cocoa Butter, ,course, ,Crouch End, ,cycling, ,fairtrade, ,ghana, ,horse chestnut extract, ,Jess Gurr, ,Karina Yarv, ,Kitchen, ,Market Stalls, ,Neal’s Yard, ,Olive Oil, ,organic, ,Random House, ,Reena Makwana, ,Sally, ,Sally Mumford, ,Shea Alchemy, ,Shea Butter, ,Skincare, ,Sunday Upmarket, ,Thistle, ,Truman Brewery, ,York

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2011 Review: Best Furniture Design

Tent London 2012 review -anthony hartley
Furniture by Anthony Hartley.

This year I once again visited Tent London hot on the heels of London Fashion Week. At the end of September the creme de la creme of the product design world held court at the Truman Brewery, look and I’m here to bring you the best of the bunch. First up my favourite bits of furniture design.

Tent London 2012 review -anthony hartley
Beautiful and very unique furniture from Anthony Hartley; waves of colour splashed across drawers and curved around walls in long shelving units.

Tent London 2012 review -jan plechac
Czech designer Jan Plechac showcased versions of his favourite chair designs in wire.

Tent London 2012 review -senufo
The A & Z Design furniture stand was attracting people with a very cute dog. I liked their senUFO side table the most. It would be very cool in a kid’s bedroom.

Tent London 2012 review -squint
Furniture makers Squint were showcasing a collaboration with the London Transport Museum – using classic hardwearing Moquette fabrics (familiar from the tube) within their trademark patchwork upholstery designs.

Tent London 2012 review -nobody and co
What a brilliant idea for a chair cum bookcase from Italian company Nobody&Co. Obviously inspired by the same problems I have: an overwhelming number of books with no home.

Tent London 2012 review -ercol
What a hit: bold 50s influenced textile designs on simple modernist furniture from the well established brand Ercol.

Tent London 2012 review -nobody and co
Tent London 2012 review alex garnett
Oversized household objects become kitsch furniture thanks to Goldsmiths trained Alex Garnett.

Tent London 2012 review -shell thomas
Tetronimoes by Shell Thomas were created by invitation from JJAM Curators’ Collective – what an ace idea for a kids’ playroom. Visitors were encouraged to use the velcro strips to rearrange the cushions and create new shapes of furniture.

Tent London 2012 review -rex chair
My new favourite new chair comes from the Rex range, straight out of Slovenia. So comfortable, I want this rocker now.

Tent London 2012 review -spellner milner
Alison of Speller Milner design is a RCA graduate who makes elegant furniture topped with pretty graphic decoration.

Categories ,2011, ,50s, ,A & Z Design, ,Alex Garnett, ,Alison, ,Anthony Hartley, ,Chair, ,Czech, ,design, ,designer, ,Ercol, ,Furniture, ,goldsmiths, ,Jan Plechac, ,JJAM Curators Collective, ,London Design Festival, ,London Transport Museum, ,Moquette, ,Nobody&Co, ,Oversized, ,Pillhead, ,review, ,Rex, ,Rocking Chair, ,senUFO, ,Shell Thomas, ,Slovenia, ,Speller Milner, ,squint, ,Tent London, ,Tetronimoes, ,textiles, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upholstery

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