Amelia’s Magazine | Prophetik: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Faye West

My fashion week hadn’t got off to the best of starts this season. I skipped day one, and arrived on day two rather worse for wear. I’d been out boozing the night before and hadn’t predicted to feel quite so dreadful the next morning. I managed the Spijkers show, but on my way to see my faces, Teatum Jones, I was spinning out so badly that I just had to return home. Spending the day on the sofa sorted me out, and so I leapt out of bed on a bright, Spring-like morning on Sunday (day three) to catch Prophetik, back after a hiatus last season, to see what Jeff Gardner could offer fashion fans at 10.30am.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

Seating was easy peasy thanks to the glorious gals at Forward PR, and the show began only a few minutes late. This season, Jeff’s charity of choice is the Lawrence Anthony Foundation, committed to protecting endangered rhinos. Well, I certainly didn’t expect to see photographs of rhinos mutilated at such an early hour, but the provocative images hit home the crisis the species face. It costs £30,000 to protect one rhino for a year – a terrifying amount of money – because the only way to keep them alive is by guarding them 24 hours a day. You can read more about the cause here.


All photography by Matt Bramford

So it was on with the show. True to form, a vibrant violinist opened the proceedings, galavanting up and down the catwalk as she played. A live band then accompanied music that blasted from the sound system and the first model appeared.

This collection was called ‘Courtly Love‘, which for a brief moment made me imagine Prophetik‘s staple frocks with Courtney Love-esque make-up. Alas, this wasn’t the case. The theme was more of a reference to Princess Grace, archetypal dandies and an age-old way of dressing reinvented with a surge of modernity. The collection brought Prophetik‘s inimitable style back to the catwalk – romance, drama and sophistication neatly packaged into one collection.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Gilly Rochester

Layers of lace were built up on dresses, blouson sleeves met with tight cuffs, swooping necklines were decorated with ruffled trims and sashes around waists provided flattering silhouettes.

This season saw a shorter hemline on some pieces that came as a bit of a surprise; I’m used to Jeff’s floor-sweeping numbers but cuter frocks cut above the knee made the collection seem more wearable and playful.

Menswear was exemplary as per: this season brought cropped tuxedos with jazzy gold buttons and baggy knits; pillow-shaped sleeves appeared on shirts. I spent more time than was necessary fancying two frock coats, the first with beautiful embroidery that looked like a V&A exhibit, the second made from luxurious velvet with heavy brocade detailing.

I don’t see myself hanging around Bethnal Green in either, but I’ve since fantasised about wearing the latter around the house, pretending I’m from another era.


Prophetik A/W 2012 by Gabriel Ayala

The finale created gasps across the room: a dress, black on bottom, white on top, featured one of Jeff’s grandmother’s original blankets (he must be running out) covered in black feathers – a real red carpet number if ever I saw one; one that will likely have Livia Firth on the phone faster than you can say green carpet. Gasps of another kind came when Whitney Houston’s ‘I Wanna Dance With Somebody’ emerged from the speakers – an unorthadox choice at a Prophetik show, but one that had guests bouncing up and down in their seats.


Finale at Prophetik A/W 2012 by Faye West

While Prophetik isn’t my favourite type of fashion – I prefer the more contemporary, print-based designers – I’m never disappointed, as I’m sure the hopeless romantics won’t be either.

Categories ,A/W 2012, ,AW12, ,catwalk, ,Claire Kearns, ,Courtly Love, ,Dandy, ,fashion, ,Faye West, ,Forward PR, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Jeff Garner, ,Lawrence, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Prophetik, ,review, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Whitney Houston, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

It wasn’t until the Jena.Theo show that I got my first hit of fashion adrenaline this LFW. The design duo Jenny Holmes and Dimitris Theocharidis have created a Spring Summer 2011 collection that combines both the theatrical and the wearable in draped layers of silk and jersey, information pills more about shot through with the Midas Touch. Gold leaf was applied not only to models’ eyelids and nails, but also to wrists, ankles, collarbones and occasionally a breast or belly button that happened to be exposed.

Though this would undoubtedly not go down well in the Muslim world today, culturally the show was a mix of the old Arabian Nights- or Prince of Persia to the computer game generation- meets 19th century British colonialism; models’ heads swathed in oversized turbans or hair backcombed into huge Victorian updos.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The winners of Fashion Fringe 2009 struck a perfect balance between catwalk creativity and clothes with the potential to actually be worn in real life; with a wonderful take on a Victorian hoop skirt to finish the show. This is what I want from an LFW show; something fun and inventive as well as wearable clothes.

I sat with the team behind the new Young British Designers website, which champions the likes of Jena.Theo; keep an eye out on Amelia’s for an interview with them coming soon. Adriana was in fact loyally wearing an outfit by the design duo.

We were in the second row but got bumped forward into the front row when there were a few spaces at the last minute; which meant I managed to get a really good, close up look at the raw painted gold leaf stiletto platform shoes.

It also of course, meant goody bag ahoy!Ironically, for a fashion gift, this included one of the best brownies I’ve ever eaten; in fact many of the stalls in the LFW exhibitions have sweets or cakes on their stands, though you never see anyone eating them. Except me.Which is why you won’t see me bearing my gilded navel in an Aladdin-esque ensemble anytime soon.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

Illustration by Andrea Peterson

It wasn’t until the Jena.Theo show that I got my first hit of fashion adrenaline this LFW. The design duo Jenny Holmes and Dimitris Theocharidis have created a Spring Summer 2011 collection that combines both the theatrical and the wearable in draped layers of silk and jersey, pharm shot through with the Midas Touch. Gold leaf was applied not only to models’ eyelids and nails, but also to wrists, ankles, collarbones and occasionally a breast or belly button that happened to be exposed.

Though this would undoubtedly not go down well in the Muslim world today, culturally the show was a mix of the old Arabian Nights- or Prince of Persia to the computer game generation- meets 19th century British colonialism; models’ heads swathed in oversized turbans or hair backcombed into huge Victorian updos.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The winners of Fashion Fringe 2009 struck a perfect balance between catwalk creativity and clothes with the potential to actually be worn in real life; with a wonderful take on a Victorian hoop skirt to finish the show. This is what I want from an LFW show; something fun and inventive as well as wearable clothes.

I sat with the team behind the new Young British Designers website, which champions the likes of Jena.Theo; keep an eye out on Amelia’s for an interview with them coming soon. Adriana was in fact loyally wearing an outfit by the design duo.

We were in the second row but got bumped forward into the front row when there were a few spaces at the last minute; which meant I managed to get a really good, close up look at the raw painted gold leaf stiletto platform shoes.

It also of course, meant goody bag ahoy!Ironically, for a fashion gift, this included one of the best brownies I’ve ever eaten; in fact many of the stalls in the LFW exhibitions have sweets or cakes on their stands, though you never see anyone eating them. Except me.Which is why you won’t see me bearing my gilded navel in an Aladdin-esque ensemble anytime soon.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Opposite me on the front row the great and the good of sustainable fashion gathered for the opening show at the Freemasons’ Hall: Nicola Woods of Beautiful Soul, ambulance Safia Minney of People Tree, viagra order Joe Oliver of Bash. It could only be Prophetik.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

Last season it was a rock ‘n’ roll band, sickness this time we got pure bluegrass from the Hogslops of Leipers Fork, Tennessee.
Prophetik-by suzie winsor hogslops
The Hogslops by Suzie Winsor.

A hooded girl stood bathed in the glow of the spotlight, gazing demurely into the distance as a series of models took to the grassy turf of the catwalk in a collection of beautiful dip dyed gowns and bloomers made from sustainable fabrics. All were dyed with natural plant and earth based dyes made from the likes of indigo, madder root, marigold and cochineal. The men followed in sweet little waistcoats decorated with antique buttons, ruffled shirts and jaunty neckerchiefs.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

This was a far more coherent collection than last season’s, and I liked it very much this time around. You’ve got to admire Jeff Garner‘s dedication to sustainability – which undoubtedly goes above and beyond the average fashion designer… but I still feel somewhat uncomfortable that this is all we have in terms of a radical rethinking of fashion. Once again we were given copious gifts; a glass bangle made from a bottle by Smart Glass (love their chandeliers!), some products by Burt’s Bees, seeds, hand balm from Pat&Rub (quite happy about all that), and an Envirosax bag “Encourage impulse purchases by placing the bags as close to the register as possible.” Much as I love them my house is going under in a sea of fabric bags right now – how many more do we need before they themselves become a problem?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

We were also given an iphone case made in association with Griffin, admirably made by artisans in Jeff’s native Tennessee, but from “reclaimed leather, taken as byproduct from existing manufacturing processes and upcycled for use in the case.” Really?? And how is a lifestyle that gleefully spans two continents sustainable? Jeff Garner is described as “surfing from his second home in Malibu California, and horse-riding in London’s Hyde Park.”

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

There’s a fine line between trying to create a truly sustainable world and encouraging the consumption of “ecojunk” by creating more products than we actually need. It’s a problem that I struggle with constantly as I try to bridge the worlds of fashion and sustainability. I have so many questions to ask… I really do think that a proper interview is in order soon. Are you up for it Jeff?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Burts Bees, ,Chris Morris, ,Ecofashion, ,Ecojunk, ,Envirosax, ,Jeff Garner, ,Pat&Rub, ,Prophetik, ,Smart Glass, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Tennessee, ,The Hogslops

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Opposite me on the front row the great and the good of sustainable fashion gathered for the opening show at the Freemasons’ Hall: Nicola Woods of Beautiful Soul, Safia Minney of People Tree, Joe Oliver of Bash. It could only be Prophetik.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

Last season it was a rock ‘n’ roll band, this time we got pure bluegrass from the Hogslops of Leipers Fork, Tennessee.
Prophetik-by suzie winsor hogslops
The Hogslops by Suzie Winsor.

A hooded girl stood bathed in the glow of the spotlight, gazing demurely into the distance as a series of models took to the grassy turf of the catwalk in a collection of beautiful dip dyed gowns and bloomers made from sustainable fabrics. All were dyed with natural plant and earth based dyes made from the likes of indigo, madder root, marigold and cochineal. The men followed in sweet little waistcoats decorated with antique buttons, ruffled shirts and jaunty neckerchiefs.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

This was a far more coherent collection than last season’s, and I liked it very much this time around. You’ve got to admire Jeff Garner’s dedication to sustainability – which undoubtedly goes above and beyond the average fashion designer… but I still feel somewhat uncomfortable that this is all we have in terms of a radical rethinking of fashion. Once again we were given copious gifts; a glass bangle made from a bottle by Smart Glass (love their chandeliers!), some products by Burt’s Bees, seeds, hand balm from Pat&Rub (quite happy about all that), and an Envirosax bag “Encourage impulse purchases by placing the bags as close to the register as possible.” Much as I love them my house is going under in a sea of fabric bags right now – how many more do we need before they themselves become a problem?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

We were also given an iphone case made in association with Griffin, admirably made by artisans in Jeff’s native Tennessee, but from “reclaimed leather, taken as byproduct from existing manufacturing processes and upcycled for use in the case.” Really?? And how is a lifestyle that gleefully spans two continents sustainable? Jeff Garner is described as “surfing from his second home in Malibu California, and horse-riding in London’s Hyde Park.”

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

There’s a fine line between trying to create a truly sustainable world and encouraging the consumption of “ecojunk” by creating more products than we actually need. It’s a problem that I struggle with constantly as I try to bridge the worlds of fashion and sustainability. I have so many questions to ask… I really do think that a proper interview is in order soon. Are you up for it Jeff?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory



Categories ,Burts Bees, ,Chris Morris, ,Ecofashion, ,Ecojunk, ,Envirosax, ,Jeff Garner, ,Pat&Rub, ,Prophetik, ,Smart Glass, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Tennessee, ,The Hogslops

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: Fashion Scout


Illustration of Charlotte Taylor by Paolo Caravello

21 fashion shows over five days is no mean feat. The London Fashion Week experience is not complete until you see the sheer amount of work and pure creativity at play during the Fashion Scout shows. The enterprise aims to pluck some of the more obscure yet talented designers out there and provide them with the means and support to build up a sustainable business. We have already seen the back to back Ones to Watch fashion show so here is a little bio for each in addition to Amelia’s write up of the catwalk show.

Parson’s Paris School of Art and Design graduate Georgina Hardinge is already a highly successful designer with a collection for online retail giant Asos under her belt. Her last collection had a very Gaga-esque structured feel to it, page prescription and was picked up by countless magazines and stylists in this summer’s style guides. Erin O’Connor and Little Boots are fans.


Illustration of Georgina Hardinge by Paolo Caravello

A. Hallucination is the brain child of two St Martins graduates – Hwan Sun Park and Chung Chung Lee. Their label was only launched last season and caters for the ‘modern English dandy’ favouring good tailoring and well cut lines, pharmacy modernised with excessive quilting details and added bows to a great effect (if not a little Chanel). The duo use a classic palette in grey, white, beige and black, and their last collection ‘The First Peal’ presented a well crafted and wearable work wardrobe. After taking inspiration from landmarks such as the venue formerly known as The Millenium Dome, their S/S 2011 collection has a lot to beat.

Next up to the block is Amelia’s fave, Charlotte Taylor, also in her second season. With quirky and colourful prints (note she trained under Luella), her S/S 2011 collection is bound to offer a bright and fun style to go with the (hopeful) Indian summer which we missed out on this year. For this collection, her theme is Island Invaders so expect more pokey-fun from the designer in collections to come. Her blog warned not to expect any black and plenty of small orange robots (which are also adorning the VFS cars for the week so look out), silk and bold prints – the sneak preview, a white dress with red and blue stripe detail was lovely, and there’s more where that came from.

The final One to Watch of the week is the lovely, floaty LiLee who, like Georgina has also come under the radar of Asos for a diffusion line. After winning the Highly Commendable award for her London College of Fashion MA graduate show this January, this week Amelia saw how her style has developed since.

Krystof Strozyna was picked up by Vogue in 2007 as one to watch, and after winning the Harrods Design Award for his thesis he has certainly lived up to his potential. Dressing the ‘charismatic and sassy’ woman (he has dressed Cheryl Cole – make of that what you will), his designs utilise graphic lines and perfect fit to create the ultimate pieces. When quizzed on his inspiration for his S/S 11 show, tropical animals and neon lights are listed as key elements in the design process.


Illustration of Prophetik by Paolo Caravello

Prophetik designer Jeff Garner is an eco warrior, a fashion eco warrior. Probably the most well known of the VFS lineup is sustainable fashion brand Prophetik, who have a far more philosophical approach to their collections than contemporaries. Tennessee based, the designer Jeff Garner is firm over the importance of sourcing sustainable fabrics and ethical processes. This year the show entitled ‘Midnight Garden’ focussed on wearable philosophy, and kicked off the VFS shows. Read our review of his show here.

Categories ,Charlotte Taylor, ,fashion, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,live, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Ones To Watch, ,Paolo Caravello, ,Prophetik, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,VFS, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Helen)

Jena Theo Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, seek rx Illustration by Matilde Sazio

I was ushered in through the door by a geezer of a Londoner chap, sick straight through to a high heeled officious lady, then again to the very highest heels clinking their way to the front row to show me my seat. There were bags on my seat. Bags filled with goodies. Splendid. The lady next to me was bouncing her baby on her knee, as said baby was knawing on a pain au chocolat. “Nice earmuffs” I said to the tiny fashionista, pointing towards her penguin earmuffs on her head. “To protect her from the sound. It can get very loud. But she does love it here. Loves the shows.” How much do I want a chilled out, cute baby like her. Also, cool mother! I know mothers who wouldn’t take their child to Tescos for fear of its screaming the flourescently lit shed down. I looked around properly, and saw straight backed women before me. Unsmiling, with notepads on their laps and twitter at their fingertips. No one was without a smart phone. Comfortingly others were holding cameras possibly at the same level as mine, not everyone had the enormous lensed beasts. This made me feel infinitely better about my black device with sand trapped in the lens from every holiday in the last three years and glitter from an explosion of glitter at a festival last year. It makes me slightly sad to see it sprinkle on my lap when I take the lens cap off. Nostalgic particles… To the left, I felt like I was getting an immense tan however from the mad, bright white, highly lit, flashing, mini bulb, sensation. It was just INTENSE; magic eye, transfixing, blinding… The lady next to me shielded the left hand side of her face for a bit. We briefly discussed the perils of giant screens of mini light bulbs. SUCH a drag. Then it all went dark and we were treated to intro music as the anticipation was allowed to be built. Dum, dum, dum….dum… dum. EXCITED. Most of the opposite front row remained attached to the twit or without expression.

Karina Yarv
Jena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Karina Yarv

The darkness remained for a while, and I felt my heart start to beat harder. You know when as a child (/adult), at a theme park, you have just queued to get onto a ride that begins in the dark? You’re kind of scared but excited, not really sure how it will turn out? Yes, that. That was what it felt like. I was half expecting for the floor to drop and to experience a heart in my mouth sensation, as gravity stole my nerves. Child next door was heckling, all ready for the experience to begin. She’s not worried her mother assures me, as a seasoned show-goer why would she be? Well, indeed. This does not compare to my 80s Sussex upbringing. I spent being three and four devoted to my pink bomber jacket and all in one waterproof jumpsuit number. Was it the 80s? Was it me? Is there any hope? I apoligise, enough pondering! The show began.

Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_006 Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_007Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_008Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_004Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_003
Photography by Matt Bramford

I was pleased to see that what was being presented was completely wearable. Definitely in London. Perhaps less so in Bristol – it was slightly ‘too’ urban for the West Country. However, if I had a choice (and el cash), some of those pieces would be getting worn in Falfael King and that secret bar we’ve been meaning to go to for a while… at least supper club. Or – ah see, I kind of want to move to London again. Don’t get the wrong impression of Briz, I beg you. Anyway digressing again- the show was very charcoal, black and cream orientated. The models all had black stripes across their eyes and otherwise bare faces. This made them look like mysterious, moody superheros. I liked it, as it really set of the simple coloured, pieces; the models all expressionless (course), their masks and the movement of the light or dark pieces worked together perfectly. It felt like we were on the sea, with norwegian heroines. Swishing slowly about, their heels never falter, their gaze exact, the path has been set and the grey skies are dappled with stars, as the storm takes hold. These strong warriors will take us with their capes flowing behind them, their hair dancing in the wind.

Jena.Theo Valkyrie by Matilde SazioJena.Theo LFW A/W 2011, Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite piece was one with an almost bustling at the back, flowing down to the ground, in one swipe. The front was a mini, the back was the drama, the fantasy. I would love to wear this one standing at the front of a ship. Not a ferry, a ship. The collection; Valkyrie, refers to a band of celestial female figures who decide to die in the field of battle. So 300, in a sense, but with women. Strong, ethereal women.

Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_002Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_001 Jena.Theo_LFW_MattBramford_005
Photography by Matt Bramford

Jena.Theo have managged to combine the mythology with the urban reality. Fantasy has been embraced, with opulence in mind, the designs are sumptuous, yet strong. Fit for women going into battle with the ice of Scandinavia and the luxuriousness of a cashmere bustle behind them. And why not mix up the hemlines, paint black across our eyes and march like amazonian creations girls. We are women. Watch us gracefully, cooly and quietly move, like we believe we are mighty. We are. For designs that were indeed simple, they were deserving of their sparkling lights.
Gemma Milly-Prophetik-A-W11
Prophetik LFW A/W 20011 Collection illustration by Gemma Milly

A long queue waited for me outside of Freemason’s Hall. Initially I considered sauntering in through the door I first came across, pill but after peering in I discovered that in fact there was only a Vauxhall car in there and a couple of security men. Instead there was the aforementioned queue, pill just round the corner. I spotted Akeela, Katie and Sarah of Scribble fame in the line and promptly hit them all with my enormous goodie bag from Jena.Theo. As I was excitable, my accompanying movements were erratic and thus the thwacking continued until I decided to destroy the bag and had a look at the contents. Delicious. The standing and nattering continued before our coloured stickers were called forwards. I thanked Amelia power as we were marched straight in and positioned in the second row. Ooo a mini orchestra to the left.

Prophetik_Abby_Wright_LFW
Prophetik LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Abby Wright

Chat for ages it seems before it all goes dark. Then a blonde bobbed lady came out and started ‘haaaa’ing. More high pitched than Enya, but similarly Lord Of The Rings magical. WHAT to expect. Well, in truth I had an idea, the press sheet announced that this was ‘Artist Wonderment’. This can only mean we are entering the fantasy land of the designer. Happily, as I read on, it would appear that Prophetik have been inspired by all the magic of the past. And I DO so love a good period drama. I quote: ‘The season exudes the freedom from the pretense of being what we would become, fleeing from egotism into the wonderment of an artist.’ Prophetik are very fond of liberty and protection of our world, through being all-sustainable. Tennessee’s Jeff Garner, who designs the fashion lifestyle brand, wants to bring an awareness of the repercussions of the clothing business, to everyone they can reach.

Gemma_Milly-Prophetik2-A-W11
Prophetik LFW A/W 20011 Collection illustration by Gemma Milly

Then violin lady, Analiza Ching came out, short skirted, her hair flicking around. Violinsts always look pretty cool I think, especially when they are jumping around, confidently using the strings to produce feisty sounds. After more hair and body kinetic energy, Miss Violinst went and joined the Benjamin Ellin orchestra. Then the models started streaming out in their Louis XV inspired outfits. With long dresses, corseted and delicate detailing. The colours were soft and the fabric consisted of ripped silks, organic velour, as well as 100 year old southern quilts, courtesy of Jeff Garner’s great grandmother, Lola. Interestingly cactus silk was also introduced, made from the agave plant. The pieces looked heavy and purposeful as they swept past. Similar to the dresses you find in fashion museums, a bit starchy and very thick. However, Prophetik‘s collection, as opposed to the historic pieces, had a woodland feel to them, connecting them to the earthy message and principles of the designer.

Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_198Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_188Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_142Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_131Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_104Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_098Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_078Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_068Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_044Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_040Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_024
Prophetik LFW A/W 2011 Collection, photography by Matt Bramford

“He’s grease lightning isn’t he?” The ladies behind me complained, as they were unable to get a shot of the red-headed male model on the catwalk. With his long hair slicked back, quilted buttoned up jackets and three quarter length trousers, I wished he would next come out mounted on a horse. Perhaps with one of the angel lady beings, riding side saddle and looking into the middle distance – because that’s where the magic is, clearly. The men all looked serious and officious in their luxurious outfits. Like Prince’s, they wore the natural colours with a regal air about them. I can certainly imagine some of my Hereford friends cracking out these jackets round the fire this Autumn. Residing in woods, yurts and buses, they whole heartedly are ‘woodland creatures’. Much like these, pretty imps and fairies. The Prince, the carpenter and the folk singer, sit within the trees, stars sparkling and dragonflies dancing.

There were a few dresses that I fell in love with. This included the midi length halter dress with boots – most of the outfits were worn with flat boots – I imagine for easy action in the woods. They complimented the dresses, stopping the over pretty factor. All hair was slicked to the ears and then waved, faces pale and natural. I also loved the female tailcoats, tight to the waist then full to the thigh and featuring turned up cuffs, curling at the top. All with embroidered edges and in deep, or pastel colours. Then the floor length, corseted, strapless, rich purple dress, complete with a train was divine. As was a stunning mossy green and cream empire line dress. It was a modern, eco Austen esque, Regency beauty; so graceful. The strapless and halterneck dresses were lighter than the embroidered pieces, many of which billowed in layers to the floor, and were more reminiscent of the Tudor 16th century period.

Helen Martin Prophetik
THE Prophetik DRESS. Photo by Helen Martin

I must say, the absolutely MOST fantastic dress of them ALL was a white ostrich feather creation. I want to get married and wear this ostrich BEAUTY. Like the white, angelic creation from the sky, she swept in and the whole audience gasped. I’d like to think she was saved by birds after being orphaned through the enemy’s shots. Then nurtured by the birds before she emerged, into the woods. And the woodland creatures danced in merriment, for she had been saved, and she was beautiful. Red-headed man will hopefully slow his canter to a trot, then dismount, his nonchalent stare becoming a transfixed (gruff) stare. He loved her already.

Gemma Milly and Abby Wright have their illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,ACOFI, ,Akeela, ,Amelia, ,Analiza Ching, ,Benjamin Ellin, ,eco, ,folk, ,Gemma Millie, ,Helen Martin, ,Katie Antoniou, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Lola, ,Louis XV, ,marriage, ,Matt Bramford, ,Orchestra, ,planet, ,prince, ,Princess, ,Prophetik, ,Sarah Scribbles, ,sustainable, ,Tennessee, ,vauxhall, ,Violin, ,woodland creatures

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Helen)

Gemma Milly-Prophetik-A-W11
Prophetik LFW A/W 20011 Collection illustration by Gemma Milly

A long queue waited for me outside of Freemason’s Hall. Initially I considered sauntering in through the door I first came across, but after peering in I discovered that in fact there was only a Vauxhall car in there and a couple of security men. Instead there was the aforementioned queue, just round the corner. I spotted Akeela, Katie and Sarah of Scribble fame in the line and promptly hit them all with my enormous goodie bag from Jena.Theo. As I was excitable, my accompanying movements were erratic and thus the thwacking continued until I decided to destroy the bag and had a look at the contents. Delicious. The standing and nattering continued before our coloured stickers were called forwards. I thanked Amelia power as we were marched straight in and positioned in the second row. Ooo a mini orchestra to the left.

Prophetik_Abby_Wright_LFW
Prophetik LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Abby Wright

Chat for ages it seems before it all goes dark. Then a blonde bobbed lady came out and started ‘haaaa’ing. More high pitched than Enya, but similarly Lord Of The Rings magical. WHAT to expect. Well, in truth I had an idea, the press sheet announced that this was ‘Artist Wonderment’. This can only mean we are entering the fantasy land of the designer. Happily, as I read on, it would appear that Prophetik have been inspired by all the magic of the past. And I DO so love a good period drama. I quote: ‘The season exudes the freedom from the pretense of being what we would become, fleeing from egotism into the wonderment of an artist.’ Prophetik are very fond of liberty and protection of our world, through being all-sustainable. Tennessee’s Jeff Garner, who designs the fashion lifestyle brand, wants to bring an awareness of the repercussions of the clothing business, to everyone they can reach.

Gemma_Milly-Prophetik2-A-W11
Prophetik LFW A/W 20011 Collection illustration by Gemma Milly

Then violin lady, Analiza Ching came out, short skirted, her hair flicking around. Violinsts always look pretty cool I think, especially when they are jumping around, confidently using the strings to produce feisty sounds. After more hair and body kinetic energy, Miss Violinst went and joined the Benjamin Ellin orchestra. Then the models started streaming out in their Louis XV inspired outfits. With long dresses, corseted and delicate detailing. The colours were soft and the fabric consisted of ripped silks, organic velour, as well as 100 year old southern quilts, courtesy of Jeff Garner’s great grandmother, Lola. Interestingly cactus silk was also introduced, made from the agave plant. The pieces looked heavy and purposeful as they swept past. Similar to the dresses you find in fashion museums, a bit starchy and very thick. However, Prophetik’s collection, as opposed to the historic pieces, had a woodland feel to them, connecting them to the earthy message and principles of the designer.

Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_198Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_188Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_142Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_131Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_104Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_098Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_078Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_068Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_044Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_040Prophetik_LFW_MattBramford_024
Prophetik LFW A/W 2011 Collection, photography by Matt Bramford

“He’s grease lightning isn’t he?” The ladies behind me complained, as they were unable to get a shot of the red-headed male model on the catwalk. With his long hair slicked back, quilted buttoned up jackets and three quarter length trousers, I wished he would next come out mounted on a horse. Perhaps with one of the angel lady beings, riding side saddle and looking into the middle distance – because that’s where the magic is, clearly. The men all looked serious and officious in their luxurious outfits. Like Prince’s, they wore the natural colours with a regal air about them. I can certainly imagine some of my Hereford friends cracking out these jackets round the fire this Autumn. Residing in woods, yurts and buses, they whole heartedly are ‘woodland creatures’. Much like these, pretty imps and fairies. The Prince, the carpenter and the folk singer, sit within the trees, stars sparkling and dragonflies dancing.

There were a few dresses that I fell in love with. This included the midi length halter dress with boots – most of the outfits were worn with flat boots – I imagine for easy action in the woods. They complimented the dresses, stopping the over pretty factor. All hair was slicked to the ears and then waved, faces pale and natural. I also loved the female tailcoats, tight to the waist then full to the thigh and featuring turned up cuffs, curling at the top. All with embroidered edges and in deep, or pastel colours. Then the floor length, corseted, strapless, rich purple dress, complete with a train was divine. As was a stunning mossy green and cream empire line dress. It was a modern, eco Austen esque, Regency beauty; so graceful. The strapless and halterneck dresses were lighter than the embroidered pieces, many of which billowed in layers to the floor, and were more reminiscent of the Tudor 16th century period.

Helen Martin Prophetik
THE Prophetik DRESS. Photo by Helen Martin

I must say, the absolutely MOST fantastic dress of them ALL was a white ostrich feather creation. I want to get married and wear this ostrich BEAUTY. Like the white, angelic creation from the sky, she swept in and the whole audience gasped. I’d like to think she was saved by birds after being orphaned through the enemy’s shots. Then nurtured by the birds before she emerged, into the woods. And the woodland creatures danced in merriment, for she had been saved, and she was beautiful. Red-headed man will hopefully slow his canter to a trot, then dismount, his nonchalent stare becoming a transfixed (gruff) stare. He loved her already.

Gemma Milly and Abby Wright have their illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,ACOFI, ,Akeela, ,Amelia, ,Analiza Ching, ,Benjamin Ellin, ,eco, ,folk, ,Gemma Millie, ,Helen Martin, ,Katie Antoniou, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Lola, ,Louis XV, ,marriage, ,Matt Bramford, ,Orchestra, ,planet, ,prince, ,Princess, ,Prophetik, ,Sarah Scribbles, ,sustainable, ,Tennessee, ,vauxhall, ,Violin, ,woodland creatures

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Katie)

ORLA_KYELI_by_Joana_Faria_2

Orla Kiely LFW A/W Collection, search stuff illustration by Joana Faria

Initially I got stuck in the lift with a delivery man, information pills and then a very tanned lady. Apparently you are not supposed to use the lift at London Fashion Week. I don’t normally use the lift (thighs), pharmacy but to be honest, I was unsure as to how to get to the Portico Rooms, where Orla Kiely was showing her short films, and there was an arrow towards the lift. Anyway, tanned lady assisted me in getting in and consequently missed her lift and was forced to take the stairs. She was lovely. I entered the little room to find three sheds, twig trees, pretty stools, lots of stuffed birds (real?) and strange bird/nature music, wafting.

Orla_Kiely_by_Matilde_Sazio

Orla Kiely LFW A/W 2011, illusration by Matilde Sazio

I wish I could say that I wafted around the room, and I tried to put be exhibition faced, but I had to move around people, twigs in my hair and face and then birds – just there. *SQUAWK* Perhaps now would be the time to say I am scared of birds.

orla_kiely_by_avril_kelly

Orla Kiely LFW A/W 2011, illustration by Avril Kelly

A dyed, dark haired boy with a strong side parting came up to me, straight backed and carrying a tray of champagne. Luckily for him the tray had little grooves so the stems came out the bottom to avoid spillage. Sadly for me, I couldn’t see how to access le bubbly. “How do I… ah, thanks”. I clutched my champagne at its stem. Although I saw most people holding their glasses around the fatter bit. I was told this was wrong to do by a man at a ‘ra’ party when I was 15. I also thought this was wrong/bad etiquette/heats liquid with hand warmth? But it does look better, holding champs at the fatter bit…rearrange hand. I smiled at a lady who had a few people round her and was smiling in my direction. She saw me though, and it vanished. Denied! I later heard her say she was the Editor of a Homes magazine and she got her photo taken amongst the twig trees. My time at BBC Homes and Antiques, as an intern, came rushing back to me.

Orla_Kiely_Bag_by_Matilde_Sazio

Orla Kiely LFW A/W 2011, illusration by Matilde Sazio

I meandered about. LOVED the girls in Orla Kiely outfits, plastered to the walls. Although Orla Kiely heavily reminds me of women in Clifton (affluent part of Bristol), and Bath, sauntering about, I think her designs look excellent on younger women. With 60s influences, and pretty detailing, they’re perfect and easy to wear creations, that are FAR from some of preconceived ideas. Most of the aforementioned women only ever really wear the bags, to be fair. And to see the full outfits, with the pretty shoes, natural colours and high hemlines, I was in lust with Orla! Less the birds.

ORLA_KYELI_by_Joana_Faria_1

Orla Kiely LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Joana Faria

I had a little chat with the champagne boy, as I had no chance of speaking to Ms Editor, she wouldn’t appreciate one of my own designed business cards (they’re amazing). He said the films had been on rotation since 7am, which is fiiiine, but the soundtrack (i.e. birds), was a tad repetitive. We discussed our day. He asked if I was in ‘the business’. I replied: “Mmmm, writer.” I felt bad for not asking him if he was in the business, but as I sat on an Orla bench, decided that he was a poet who had escaped Burnley.

Orla_kiely_2_by_avril_kelly

Orla Kiely LFW A/W 2011, illustration by Avril Kelly

I saw that the films were being shown in the sheds. I considered leaning on the side of the shed, as no one seemed to be sitting inside them. But instead decided to sit inside, on a stool, in the shed. It felt like one of those watch places you find on walks. Then: ARG!! A MASSIVE stuffed OWL was looking straight at me. Out the shed.

ORLA_KYELI_by_Joana_Faria_3

Orla Kiely LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Joana Faria

The video was purposefully flickery and sweet, with the models in greens and creams, wandering about their vintage filled houses. I won’t lie; I wanted the house/clothes dearly. They looked so contented, slightly robotic, but perfect.

Orla_Kiely_A-W_2011LFW_A-W_2011-Orla_Kiely-4LFW_A-W_2011-Orla_Kiely-2LFW_A-W_2011-Orla_Kiely-3LFW_A-W_2011-Orla_KielyLFW_A-W_2011-Orla_Kiely-1
Orla Kiely LFW A/W 2011, photography by Amelia Gregory

It seems that lighter, floatier fabrics took hold for Orla Kiely’s S/S 2011 collection, as Orla said: For ready-to-wear, there is silk organza mesh partywear; sheer fabrics have played a large part in the collection. Some prints also have abstract references to apples and pears. Within bags and accessories, I have designed leather backpacks and my debut sunglasses range.” But, heavier fabrics have returned for A/W, with beautiful, thick coats, short, wool dresses and A Line skirts, knitted skirt suits and 70s influenced belted loose jersey dresses and bell sleeves. All worn with black socks and ankle strapped shoes. Thick knit long cardigans or 60s trenches also feature, whilst the make up is subtle, allowing the deep teals, greens and light browns to take the focus. And of course promoting the simple, pretty, easy to wear, natural style of Orla Kiely.

I was transfixed by the video for a little while – the music was quite liable to do this – and then, although tempted to sit and drink more champagne on a pretty stool, I wandered off out the correct door.

Joana Faria’s Illustrations can also be found in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, available here.

Illustrations by Ankolie.

Even the invitation to this show had me excited; detail of a vintage toile print on a fabric corset lined with vintage style brass buttons and the byline ‘inspired by the court of Louis XV when art became frivolous’ grabbed my attention. Because all of this is frivolous, visit web isn’t it? We’re in the middle of a recession and yet here we are, still feeding are obsession with fashion and art because it has become such an integral part of our lives. Combining fashion and music is a big part of my job as a stylist to musicians, so opening the show with Analize Ching on the violin was a big hit with me, followed by wonderful orchestral music that evoked the atmosphere of a French royal court.

I’d been a little underwhelmed by a lot of very drab Autumn/Winter collections, where hues vary only from black,to greys, some cream and back to black. The colours Prophetik used are all natural, with plum shades blended from madder root, rumex, logwood and indigo, and burgundy mixed from madder root, curled dock and gallnut. Adding yet more splashes of colour and prints were the quilted pieces, handed down from Jeff’s grandmother Lola from Tennesse. Hemp, cactus silk and ostrich feathers provided stunning texture and shape to the pieces. Accessories label ‘Dotted Loop’ provided reworked vintage accessories and even the shoes were made from vegetable-tanned leather.

It’s rare that I can get at all excited by menswear, but the pieces in this collection spoke to the avid period-drama fan inside me. Military inspired jackets and riding boots? Phwoar. Yes please. Jeff himself appeared at the end showing how the look can be worked, though I’m sure he could probably get a way with wearing pretty much anything and still look like he just finished writing poetry/surfing/horse-riding; all listed as his hobbies. Only someone this comfortable with his masculinity could design coats for men made out of pastel pink quilts.

Corsets, tailored jackets and voluminous skirts; Jeff is very good at designing clothes for real women’s bodies. He recently dressed the lovely Livia Firth for the 2011 Golden Globes, and I can only imagine that his celebrity following will continue to increase. The final dress, ‘Mrs Moulton’ features ostrich feathers that shed naturally twice a year (from the ostrich, not the dress-that would be a high maintenance frock indeed) hand sewn on white silk and organza – I can totally picture this as a celebrity wedding dress. Watch this space.

I’ll leave you with Jeff’s take on Renaissance Art. I think it’s very interesting considering our current pre-occupation with all things vintage:

‘Renaissance art is not a rebirth as one implies, but freedom from the past. Unconcerned with what has been said or done, living in the present with an immediate relation to all things…achievement does not birth beauty but raw effort confessing its own failures and in the confession is the beauty of Art.’


All photography by Katie Antoniou.

Categories ,Ankolie, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Jeff Garner, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2011, ,Louis XV, ,Prophetik, ,renaissance

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Matt)


Illustration by Antonia Parker

The On|Off venue this year isn’t the best, medicine sale I have to say. Located at Mercer Street Studios, medicine it’s absolutely tiny, information pills roasting hot and there are fewer seats than usual. Having been awarded an invitation with an orange sticker on, mind, I was ushered to the front and glamourously made my way inside. I don’t know if I’m just getting on a bit, but there seems to be a helluva lot of people at fashion week this season. For this, the Jena.Theo show, the room was full to bursting (I’m not sure what the HSE would have to say about some of the goings on in these pokey venues) but this design duo thoroughly deserve the mass attention they are getting.

‘Hilary’s here! Hilary’s here!’ began the whispers, and a gap on the front row, directly across the aisle from me, was created. At fashion week it could only be one Hilary they were so frantically trying to seat – our Hilary Alexander, who looked gorgeous in a feather-trimmed top. As the show was about to start, a tiny photographer with a lens the length of my arm positioned himself on the floor, right in my shot, between me and Hils. I was livid. I asked him politely to move the hell out of my way (another trend this season…) but he failed to take any notice. Sigh.

Look, here he is:

Despite moaning about the venue being tiny, I do adore the addition of an enormous screen at the back of the catwalk, which made for stark and interesting photographs and emphasised the pieces – a wondrous addition here with Jena.Theo’s exaggerated silhouettes.

On with the show, and extremely tall models emerged wearing all sorts of sculptural shapes. I really like Jena.Theo’s aesthetic – it’s contemporary (futuristic, even) but also wearable for the fashion-forward woman. The models really stood out in-front of the blinding LED screen; curved silhouettes had a Japanese influence with enormous sleeves and garments that gave out at the waist.

There was a definite unfinished aesthetic at play – ma, maybe, like the great Japanese couturiers. Hems were raw and luxurious silks were layered on top of each other. There wasn’t much in the way of colour – a splash of denim for an over-sized cape was a welcome break from this pretty much all black collection, but I guess that’s Jena.Theo’s style.


Illustration by Antonia Parker

I especially enjoyed the additions of leather, particularly on one patchwork piece that I’ve since deemed my fave. Black stripes across models faces added a sinister twist, but flattering shapes that emphasised curves and bare flesh allowed this collection to remain sexy and sophisticated. Capes were like sexed-up graduation gowns, while a huge padded jacket would sit happily in a Yohji Yamamoto exhibition.

A fantastic outing for this twosome, I can’t wait to see what direction they take all this in. I’m now off to drink the Chambord from the goody bag and smother myself in Elemis for ladies (I’m actually not, I’m off to another show, I just wanted to give them a plug).

Also got slightly distracted by what Dame Hilary might have been scribbling, so took a few cheeky shots of her notebook…


Illustration by Yelena Bryksenkova

The first time I saw Prophetik, buy information pills I just didn’t get it. It was Jeff Garner’s debut show, medications and I had come straight from some kind of Hannah-Marshall-if-it-aint-leather-and-black-it-aint-going-in show, pharm and I just couldn’t handle Prophetik’s pretty aesthetic. I’m pleased to say I’ve since changed my mind, and after researching Jeff’s label and reading about him in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, I couldn’t wait to see what he’d come up with this season – romantically titled ‘Artistic Wonderment’.

It was so lovely to see our ACOFI pals from Forward PR on the way in looking all professional (the last time I saw them, Laura was throwing shapes behind the bar and Nick was dancing with the wall). I was seated next to the owner of a boutique whose name I cannot remember, but who had an adorable baby on her lap who, at eight months, is apparently already into fashion. I think they gage the little one’s reaction on whether she cries or smiles (I do the same myself) and I’m happy to announce that said baby smiled with glee through the entire show – encouraged by the beautiful sounds of Benjamin Ellin‘s orchestra.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates

The room at Fashion Scout was packed, due in part I guess to the attention Jeff received for designing Livia Firth’s stunning Golden Globe gown as part of her ‘Green Carpet Challenge’. The beautiful Peace Silk floor-length dress evoked romance and elegance, two characteristics that have become Prophetik’s signature.

This season, Jeff’s been inspired by the court of Louis XV, when art became frivolous and dressing became romantic. An enormous collection featured gorgeous ripped silks and organic velours, as well as 100 year old quilts, transformed into men’s blazers and worked into dresses, handed down by Jeff’s own great grandmother Lola from Tennessee.

Acclaimed violinist Analiza Ching set the show in motion, frantically playing as she strutted up the catwalk to join the rest of the orchestra. Traditional dress shapes were transformed with said patchwork elements, low cut at the front and some models bearing flesh while other long-sleeved corseted numbers were influenced by Elizabethan dress. Pale models with metres of hair appeared one after the other in a earth-based colour palette of oatmeal, violet and burgundy, and the women bunched their dresses up at the front as they walked in that maiden-like way.


Illustration by Yelena Bryksenkova

The show-stopper at the end was an incredible all-white number (I can see potential brides fawning over this one) with hand-sewn ostrich feathers abundantly attached onto white organza layers. My other faves were a sweeping number in pinstripe heavy fabric, with a corseted top and a frou frou trim; a cropped corset with military elements, blouson sleeves and stiff Baroque cuffs, teamed with a bunched hemp skirt; and the men’s patchwork jacket (apparently made from Jeff’s own bedspread as a child) finished with gold jewellery and a pocket watch.


Illustration by Madi Illustrates

LOVED the shoes, darlings: a collaboration with LA sustainable shoe label CYDWOQ; gorgeous vegetable-tanned leather pointy numbers.

Jeff’s aesthetic sits side by side with his sustainable ethos – it’s earthy, romantic and never boring. I’m not entirely sure that I’ll be wearing a floor-length patchwork jacket with gold buttons come Autumn, but much gratitude to hunky Jeff for bringing a bit of fantasy and fairy tale to this week of shows.

All photography by Matt Bramford

See more of Yelena Bryksenkova’s illustrations is Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,ACOFI, ,Analiza Chang, ,Artistic Wonderment, ,baroque, ,Benjamin Ellin, ,CYDWOQ, ,Forward PR, ,frou frou, ,Golden Globes, ,Green Carpet Challenge, ,Jeff Garner, ,lfw, ,Livia Firth, ,London Fashion Week, ,Louis XV, ,Orchestra, ,Prophetik, ,Tennessee, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Michael Van Der Ham (by Amelia)

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I cannot tell a lie, order sickness having tried in vain for several seasons to get tickets, doctor I was super excited to finally be in attendance at a Mark Fast show. Knitwear was my first love. I spent much of teens knitting 80s tastic jumpers and despite opting to specialise in printed textile design at university I eventually started a knitwear label at the same time as Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately it didn’t last because it soon became apparent that the magazine was going to dominate my time and energy, so now big bags of ethically dyed rare breed wool sit languishing in my parents attic.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow.

Knitwear has been overlooked by high fashion for a long time, but in recent times there have been encouraging signs of its resurgence – with designers such as Mark Fast, Cooperative Designs and Alice Palmer leading the way. Mark has become well known for sexy figure hugging pieces with dramatic details that he creates using specialised techniques.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

This season he worked predominantly in merino wool in tones of oatmeal, beige, shades of orange and black to create ribbed and ridged bodycon numbers fit for the most glamourous cocktail party. He also worked in leather with Canadian retailer Danier to create complementary pieces that included sexy corseted tops, wide legged trousers and buttersoft crop jackets, worn with sheer fabric and swishing straps. High necks followed a familiar trend for A/W 2011, as did the use of deep orange. One particular standout piece was a massive round shouldered ridged cardigan that called to mind a similar piece by fellow design supremo Georgia Hardinge.

Dresses and coats with plush shoulder bolsters worked especially well, as did the plump trim on a mini dress worn with a giant fluffy hat and platforms. Also of note was a swirling maxi skirted number with covered arms that only left the shoulders sexily bare. Boots were knee high and sexily louche and accessories included big bangles and spiky neckpieces.

The show ended on a showpiece backless leather hooded coat, trailing a huge train behind like a sweeping Hollywood baddie. Once more Mark Fast chose normal sized women to model his collection with the use of several “plus size” models. These lush beauties only served to emphasise the extreme skinniness of the few extremely bony girls included in the show. And the joy of it? These dresses arguably worked way better on the girls that looked more like real women.

This is one happy bunny to have at last seen a Mark Fast show.
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I cannot tell a lie, pharmacy having tried in vain for several seasons to get tickets, here I was super excited to finally be in attendance at a Mark Fast show. Knitwear was my first love. I spent much of teens knitting 80s tastic jumpers and despite opting to specialise in printed textile design at university I eventually started a knitwear label at the same time as Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately it didn’t last because it soon became apparent that the magazine was going to dominate my time and energy, sildenafil so now big bags of ethically dyed rare breed wool sit languishing in my parents attic.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow.

Knitwear has been overlooked by high fashion for a long time, but in recent times there have been encouraging signs of its resurgence – with designers such as Mark Fast, Cooperative Designs and Alice Palmer leading the way. Mark has become well known for sexy figure hugging pieces with dramatic details that he creates using specialised techniques.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

This season he worked predominantly in merino wool in tones of oatmeal, beige, shades of orange and black to create ribbed and ridged bodycon numbers fit for the most glamourous cocktail party. He also worked in leather with Canadian retailer Danier to create complementary pieces that included sexy corseted tops, wide legged trousers and buttersoft crop jackets, worn with sheer fabric and swishing straps. High necks followed a familiar trend for A/W 2011, as did the use of deep orange. One particular standout piece was a massive round shouldered ridged cardigan that called to mind a similar piece by fellow design supremo Georgia Hardinge.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Dresses and coats with plush shoulder bolsters worked especially well, as did the plump trim on a mini dress worn with a giant fluffy hat and platforms. Also of note was a swirling maxi skirted number with covered arms that only left the shoulders sexily bare. Boots were knee high and sexily louche and accessories included big bangles and spiky neckpieces.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The show ended on a showpiece backless leather hooded coat, trailing a huge train behind like a sweeping Hollywood baddie. Once more Mark Fast chose normal sized women to model his collection with the use of several “plus size” models. These lush beauties only served to emphasise the extreme skinniness of the few extremely bony girls included in the show. And the joy of it? These dresses arguably worked way better on the girls that looked more like real women.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

This is one happy bunny to have at last seen a Mark Fast show.
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I cannot tell a lie, rx having tried in vain for several seasons to get tickets, case I was super excited to finally be in attendance at a Mark Fast show. Knitwear was my first love. I spent much of teens knitting 80s tastic jumpers and despite opting to specialise in printed textile design at university I eventually started a knitwear label at the same time as Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately it didn’t last because it soon became apparent that the magazine was going to dominate my time and energy, more about so now big bags of ethically dyed rare breed wool sit languishing in my parents attic.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow.

Knitwear has been overlooked by high fashion for a long time, but in recent times there have been encouraging signs of its resurgence – with designers such as Mark Fast, Cooperative Designs and Alice Palmer leading the way. Mark has become well known for sexy figure hugging pieces with dramatic details that he creates using specialised techniques.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

This season he worked predominantly in merino wool in tones of oatmeal, beige, shades of orange and black to create ribbed and ridged bodycon numbers fit for the most glamourous cocktail party. He also worked in leather with Canadian retailer Danier to create complementary pieces that included sexy corseted tops, wide legged trousers and buttersoft crop jackets, worn with sheer fabric and swishing straps. High necks followed a familiar trend for A/W 2011, as did the use of deep orange. One particular standout piece was a massive round shouldered ridged cardigan that called to mind a similar piece by fellow design innovator Georgia Hardinge.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Dresses and coats with plush shoulder bolsters worked especially well, as did the plump trim on a mini dress worn with a giant fluffy hat and platforms. Also of note was a swirling maxi skirted number with covered arms that only left the shoulders sexily bare. Boots were knee high and louche; accessories included big bangles and spiky neckpieces.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The show ended on a showpiece backless leather hooded coat, trailing a huge train behind like a sweeping Hollywood baddie. Once more Mark Fast chose normal sized women to model his collection with the use of several “plus size” models. These lush beauties only served to emphasise the extreme skinniness of the few extremely bony girls included in the show. And the joy of it? These dresses arguably worked way better on the girls that looked more like real women.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

This is one happy bunny to have at last seen a Mark Fast show.
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I cannot tell a lie, prescription having tried in vain for several seasons to get tickets, remedy I was super excited to finally be in attendance at a Mark Fast show. Knitwear was my first love: I spent much of teens knitting 80s tastic jumpers and despite opting to specialise in printed textile design at university I eventually started a knitwear label at the same time as Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately it became apparent that the magazine was going to dominate my time and energy, stomach so now my big bags of ethically dyed rare breed wool sit languishing in my parents attic.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow.

Knitwear has been overlooked by high fashion for a long time, but in recent years there have been encouraging signs of its resurgence – with designers such as Mark Fast, Cooperative Designs and Alice Palmer leading the way. Mark has become well known for sexy figure hugging pieces with dramatic details that he creates using specialised techniques.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Loving the fairy light look!

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

This season he worked predominantly in merino wool in oatmeal, beige, shades of orange and black to create ribbed and ridged bodycon numbers fit for the most glamourous cocktail party. He also worked in leather with Canadian retailer Danier to create complementary pieces that included sexy corseted tops, wide legged trousers and buttersoft crop jackets, worn with sheer fabric and swishing straps. High necks followed a familiar trend for A/W 2011, as did the use of deep orange. One particular standout piece was a massive round shouldered ridged cardigan that called to mind a similar piece by fellow design innovator Georgia Hardinge.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Dresses and coats with plush shoulder bolsters worked especially well, as did the plump trim on a mini dress worn with a giant fluffy hat and platforms. Also of note was a swirling maxi skirted number with covered arms that only left the shoulders sexily bare. Boots were knee high and louche; accessories included big bangles and spiky neckpieces.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The show ended on a showpiece backless leather hooded coat, trailing a huge train behind like a sweeping Hollywood baddie. Once more Mark Fast chose normal sized women to model his collection with the use of several “plus size” models. These lush beauties only served to emphasise the extreme skinniness of the few extremely bony girls included in the show. And the joy of it? These dresses arguably worked way better on the models of more normal size.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

This is one happy bunny to have at last seen a Mark Fast show.
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I cannot tell a lie, more about having tried in vain for several seasons to get tickets, no rx I was super excited to finally be in attendance at a Mark Fast show. Knitwear was my first love: I spent much of teens knitting 80s tastic jumpers and despite opting to specialise in printed textile design at university I eventually started a knitwear label at the same time as Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately it became apparent that the magazine was going to dominate my time and energy, so now my big bags of ethically dyed rare breed wool sit languishing in my parents attic.

Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Michaela Meadow.

Knitwear has been overlooked by high fashion for a long time, but in recent years there have been encouraging signs of its resurgence – with designers such as Mark Fast, Cooperative Designs and Alice Palmer leading the way. Mark has become well known for sexy figure hugging pieces with dramatic details that he creates using specialised techniques.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Loving the fairy light look!

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Mark Fast A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

This season he worked predominantly in merino wool in oatmeal, beige, shades of orange and black to create ribbed and ridged bodycon numbers fit for the most glamourous cocktail party. He also worked in leather with Canadian retailer Danier to create complementary pieces that included sexy corseted tops, wide legged trousers and buttersoft crop jackets, worn with sheer fabric and swishing straps. High necks followed a familiar trend for A/W 2011, as did the use of deep orange. One particular standout piece was a massive round shouldered ridged cardigan that called to mind a similar piece by fellow design innovator Georgia Hardinge.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Dresses and coats with plush shoulder bolsters worked especially well, as did the plump trim on a mini dress worn with a giant fluffy hat and platforms. Also of note was a swirling maxi skirted number with covered arms that only left the shoulders sexily bare. Boots were knee high and louche; accessories included big bangles and spiky neckpieces.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The show ended on a showpiece backless leather hooded coat, trailing a huge train behind like a sweeping Hollywood baddie. Once more Mark Fast chose normal sized women to model his collection with the use of several “plus size” models. These lush beauties only served to emphasise the extreme skinniness of the few extremely bony girls included in the show. And the joy of it? These dresses arguably worked way better on the models of more normal size.

Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Mark Fast A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

This is one happy bunny to have at last seen a Mark Fast show.
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd.

Michael Van Der Ham was held at the New Gen space in Billingsgate, visit this site and in the queue I bumped into *name drop alert* Courtney of Forward PR, rx Jeff Garner of Prophetik, Louisa of Cent Magazine and Jessica of Vogue. Usually I just slink in and out of shows as fast as possible, so it was nice to have a friendly little crew to hang out with as we made the most of free food laid on courtesy of Topshop… glasses of champagne, or juice… and creamy butternut squash risotto served in dinky little pots: quite possibly the best risotto I have ever tasted.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

This was only Michael Van Der Ham‘s second stand alone show, and as we were ushered in to our seats I was left wondering why the hell it had been so hard to get tickets for New Gen shows… the Billingsgate venue is huge, and the PR girls had to hurry standing tickets into seats as the lights went down. It was not exactly busy for either of the shows that I attended here, so it’s a shame that allocation of tickets was so tight.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie HarnettMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett.

Michael Van Der Ham has made his name from a unique cut and paste approach to fashion. Last season he mashed up all sorts of clashing fabrics to create something universally lauded but perhaps not wholly wearable. This season he appeared to address the commerciality question, so first out onto the catwalk came a series of eminently desirable velvet outfits in a range of jewel brights. Each one featured his signature asymmetric draped tailoring, but rendered all in one shade: delicious rose, fuchsia, lime, turquoise and orange.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi.

From then on in we were in more familiar territory: assorted fabric panels and intarsia knitwear inspired by vintage floral paisleys in 70s style shades of purple and orange, complete with accents of lurex. Heavily tasseled trousers were fun for editorial but of questionable taste for the buying public; far more successful were the wide legged high waisted trousers worn with panelled wool crop jackets.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril KellyMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

But for me the standouts were unquestionably the range of sumptuous velvet dresses. Want. One. Experimenting with more wearable concepts suits Michael Van Der Ham well.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

You can read Jemma Crow’s review of this show here and see more of Katie Harnett’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Assymetrical, ,Avril Kelly, ,Billingsgate, ,Cent Magazine, ,Champagne, ,Courtney Blackman, ,Forward PR, ,Intarsia, ,Jeff Garner, ,Jemma Crow, ,Jenny Lloyd, ,Jessica Bumpus, ,Katie Harnett, ,Louisa Lau, ,Lurex, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Michael van der Ham, ,New Gen, ,Old Billingsgate, ,Prophetik, ,Risotto, ,topshop, ,vogue

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik (by Amelia)

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

I will confess now. I may have gone over the top. Yes, nurse physician this blog is positively popping at the seams with illustrations. And it’s the FOURTH, clinic yes the FOURTH one to hit our website. But really it’s no surprise that Prophetik is such a big draw for both writers and illustrators, prostate peddling as he does an uber romantic view of the world that is steeped in a deep love for the natural environment.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson.

For his A/W 2011 Artist Wonderment collection designer Jeff Garner once again referenced times past, this time the “frivolous snobbery” of the court of Louix XV, an epoch that for him epitomises the falsity of impulsive consumption. Having interviewed Jeff Garner for my book, Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration I know how important it is for him to live a fully accountable life, and it seems to me that the title of this collection refers to the purity of artistic vision which he himself attempts to put into practice in everything he does.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly RochesterProphetik A/W 2011 by Gilly RochesterProphetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

The show opened in typical Jeff style, with live vocals followed by a madly thrashing classical violinist, who strutted down the catwalk as if her life depended on it.

Analiza Ching by Amelia Gregory
Violinist Analiza Ching by Gabriel 'Gaarte' Ayala
Violinist Analiza Ching by Gabriel ‘Gaarte’ Ayala.

But it was the finer detailing which really stood out as the models swept past me. His ball gowns and corseted dresses were awash with gorgeously constructed patchwork, twirly brocade, gilded buttons and ruffles. At a time when trains, tails, hooped and boned structures of every description have been big across all runways, his is an aesthetic which makes total sense right now.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Danielle Shepherd.

For me the absolute stand outs were a couple of stupendous quilted jackets… and by quilted I really do actually mean made out of antique quilts, one of which belonged on his childhood bed that he must surely have baulked at destructing – just a tiny bit. But as his stylist Rebekah Roy pointed out to me later on, it makes absolute sense to refashion a quilt in this way – a quilt that in the very first place was made from fabric remnants.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson.

This approach of continuous upcycling is certainly innovative, and epitomises what I love most about Jeff: his dedication to sustainable practice. All his fabrics are painstakingly hand dyed with a magical potion of herbs in a process that takes many weeks to accomplish – this season’s special plum colour was obtained by mixing up a unique blend of madder root, sorrel, logwood and indigo.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Karina Yarv
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Karina Yarv.

The love he puts into every single part of his work is evident in the outcome, and of anyone on the ethical fashion scene I really feel that Prophetik is pushing the way forward by putting on a ambitious catwalk show that ensures excitement amongst mainstream fashionistas. Prophetik opened Fashion Scout for the third season running and the Freemasons Hall was packed to the rafters, including famous front row attendees in the form of Hilary Alexander and Livia Firth, erstwhile wife of Colin and celebrity advocate of ethical fashion. At the end Jeff took a demure bow dressed in a cream silky ruffled top and powder blue peddle pushers, sporting his trademark swept back ponytail: if there’s one major advocate for dressing this way it’s the ever dapper Jeff Garner himself.

Prophetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen JabbarProphetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen Jabbar
Prophetik A/W 2011 by Farzeen Jabbar.

I can only hope that Jeff’s dedication to the ethical cause will rub off on other members of the fashion industry. Soon.

You can read Matt Bramford’s review here, Helen Martin’s review here and Katie Antoniou’s review here.

Prophetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryProphetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can read more about Jeff Garner‘s design philosophy in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Analiza Ching, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Artist Wonderment, ,Danielle Shepherd, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Farzeen Jabbar, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gaarte, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Jeff Garner, ,Karina Yarv, ,Livia Firth, ,Louix XV, ,Prophetik, ,Quilt, ,Rebekah Roy, ,Upcycling, ,Violinist

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