Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2010 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

pierre garroudi – lfw – ss11 – sketch crowd – jenny robins
Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Turns out London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike and is thoroughly recommended when hot tailing it between various Bloomsbury venues, doctor as inevitably shows fall within minutes of each other. Actually I throughly recommend traveling around London by bike, one word of warning; once started it becomes increasingly difficult to pour yourself onto the tube. Anyway, I digress from FASHION and within Amelia’s Magazine archive there are posts dedicated to the joys of cycling. In fact why not read Amelia’s interview with Bobbin Bicycles?

But returning to day two of London Fashion Week, in which Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I met super early outside My Beautiful Fashion for Bernard Chandran before hot-peddling it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection in the elegant settings of the Portico Rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden via the trusty bike to collect the YSL manifesto, I easily returned to Somerset House in time for my 1pm appointment with Betty Jackson. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I am strangely intrigued about Betty Jackson.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I was the only one to be so clueless, as the tent was packed to the rafters and as the lights dimmed, and the runway cover was removed, the usual dash to seat the VIP’s caused a mini-pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions or squeezed into any available gap.

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the audience are plunged into darkness, as the first model arrives on the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the chattering murmur of minutes before is replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash.

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer Collections, especially when designers’ tempt you with beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Betty Jackson’s S/S 2011 was beautiful simplicity in her presentation of updated 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which were most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love.”

Illustration by Gemma Randall

Luckily after being lulled into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Betty Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before returning the collection to soft muted browns, delectably realised in the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall.

During shows, one occasionally glances around the room – fashion shows are a great place to watch peoples’ expressions – perhaps to see how the collection is going down or to try and catch a glimpse of the outfits from various angles. In the course of watching a model stalk up to the photographers pit, I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking, it has to be said completely unperturbed) by the door.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were well made in their simplicity and the designer maintained the crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of lengthy cut black garments. Mind you, it appears all designers suffer slightly from an obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it! As showcased in our extremely popular (and excellent) coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford.

Categories ,Betty Jackson, ,BFC, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Edge of Love, ,Flesh, ,Jennifer Saunders, ,Jo Wood, ,Land Girls, ,London Fashion Week, ,Spring Summer, ,SS 11, ,Tracey Emin

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2010 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

pierre garroudi – lfw – ss11 – sketch crowd – jenny robins
Illustration by Lesley Barnes

Turns out London Fashion Week is a breeze by bike and is thoroughly recommended when hot tailing it between various Bloomsbury venues, doctor as inevitably shows fall within minutes of each other. Actually I throughly recommend traveling around London by bike, one word of warning; once started it becomes increasingly difficult to pour yourself onto the tube. Anyway, I digress from FASHION and within Amelia’s Magazine archive there are posts dedicated to the joys of cycling. In fact why not read Amelia’s interview with Bobbin Bicycles?

But returning to day two of London Fashion Week, in which Fashion Editor Matt Bramford and I met super early outside My Beautiful Fashion for Bernard Chandran before hot-peddling it to Craig Lawrence’s beautiful collection in the elegant settings of the Portico Rooms.

After dashing back up to Covent Garden via the trusty bike to collect the YSL manifesto, I easily returned to Somerset House in time for my 1pm appointment with Betty Jackson. For reasons I can’t put my finger on, I am strangely intrigued about Betty Jackson.

Illustration by Lesley Barnes

A long standing figure on the London Fashion Week on schedule, this is a designer name I am familiar with, but whose work I know incredibly little about. It appears I was the only one to be so clueless, as the tent was packed to the rafters and as the lights dimmed, and the runway cover was removed, the usual dash to seat the VIP’s caused a mini-pile up as people jumped into their alloted positions or squeezed into any available gap.

After the door scrum was settled and the late comers quietly ushered in, the audience are plunged into darkness, as the first model arrives on the catwalk. A strange hush descends upon the crowd, the chattering murmur of minutes before is replaced by scribbling pens, tapping on phones and the constant wizz of a camera’s flash.

It is -especially on a cold London September day- easy to forget you are watching Spring Summer Collections, especially when designers’ tempt you with beautifully thick knits and wool infused trousers.

Betty Jackson’s S/S 2011 was beautiful simplicity in her presentation of updated 1940′s land girl outfits, the essence of which were most recently seen on Keira Knightly and Sienna Miller in the Dylan Thomas Biopic “The Edge of Love.”

Illustration by Gemma Randall

Luckily after being lulled into a gentle consideration of how warm those knit would be. Betty Jackson threw a curve ball with the appearance of a swimsuit and blouse adorned with club tropicana prints before returning the collection to soft muted browns, delectably realised in the above jumpsuit illustrated by Gemma Randall.

During shows, one occasionally glances around the room – fashion shows are a great place to watch peoples’ expressions – perhaps to see how the collection is going down or to try and catch a glimpse of the outfits from various angles. In the course of watching a model stalk up to the photographers pit, I noticed a very beautiful Jo Wood standing (looking, it has to be said completely unperturbed) by the door.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

A luxurious collection, the shapes were well made in their simplicity and the designer maintained the crowds attention with the occasional loud print or teeny tiny swimming costumes, interdispersed within sophisticated summer glamour of lengthy cut black garments. Mind you, it appears all designers suffer slightly from an obsession with lots of flesh (mainly leg) and teeny tiny shorts? They LOVE it! As showcased in our extremely popular (and excellent) coverage of Charlie Le Mindu seen here and here by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford.

Categories ,Betty Jackson, ,BFC, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Edge of Love, ,Flesh, ,Jennifer Saunders, ,Jo Wood, ,Land Girls, ,London Fashion Week, ,Spring Summer, ,SS 11, ,Tracey Emin

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 On Schedule Womenswear Preview, Part Two: The Pioneers


Shambala 2010

The costumes have been returned to their dressing up boxes; the mud has dried out and been brushed from the boots; newly-learned dance workshop moves have become vague; reality has crept back into view… The Shambala Festival has packed itself away for another year – and, page my oh my, site what an incredible time it was.

Shambala is a 3-day voyage of discovery. Yes, stomach there’s a programme – and an impressive one at that – featuring acts and activities as diverse as chant-arousing Dizraeli & The Small Gods on the main Shambala stage, the jaw-dropping Cirque de Freq in the Kamikaze tent, min-beast safaris in the Permaculture garden and the Cock Drawing Club in the Random Workshop Tent. But the most magical Shambala experience is a haphazard one, in which the clocks stop and the concept of time is snubbed as punters follow their ears, noses and tapping toes into the most thrilling and unexpected of entertainments.

The Compass House of Lunacy
Noémie Ducimetière creeps out The Compass House of Lunacy

Wandering Word
Poet Rosie Carrick in the Wandering Word yurt

Bewitching bewilderment was the lifeblood of the Compass House of Lunacy, in which the ghosts of French songstresses (Noémie Ducimetière) and high-kicking, be-corseted madams ruled the stage. Just around the corner, the Wandering Word yurt beckoned dazed punters into its cosy folds to have their ears tickled by pirate poets and their imaginations led through eerie worlds summoned by storytelling eccentrics.

Shambala parade

Shambala parade_Picture Frames

Shambala Parade_Gorilla

After Friday’s inaugural explorations and familiarisations, on Saturday Shambala donned its gladrags and revelled in magnificent peculiarities and with newfound friends. For Saturday was the festival’s official fancy dress day (not that that prevented costumes from coming out to play all weekend…), and was topped by the spectacular Shambala parade.

Permaculture Garden

Shambala crazy golf

Didgeridoo
Shambala blows: Getting down with the didgeridoo

Peeping over the debauched brow of Saturday night, Shambala’s Sunday air was thick with drowsiness as the festival rubbed the night before from its eyes, picking up lost wellies, rogue headdress feathers and the first few threads of the real world. It was on Sunday that the Healing Area really came into its own, offering to knead the weariness from revellers’ muscles, revive their vocal chords in the Music & Voice workshops and fix them a jolly good old cup of chai to nestle between their crossed legs as they flanked the crackling camp fire.

Shambala dragon

Site and house

So, there’s a whole year until Shambala returns. Will it be the same? Of course not, and that’s exactly why we’ll love it. Expect the unexpected – and in the meantime keep the Shambala spirit of discovery alive by forgetting your watch every once in a while…


Shambala 2010

The costumes have been returned to their dressing up boxes; the mud has dried out and been brushed from the boots; newly-learned dance workshop moves have become vague; reality has crept back into view… The Shambala Festival has packed itself away for another year – and, medical my oh my, what an incredible time it was.

Shambala is a 3-day voyage of discovery. Yes, there’s a programme – and an impressive one at that – featuring acts and activities as diverse as chant-arousing Dizraeli & The Small Gods on the main Shambala stage, the jaw-dropping Cirque de Freq in the Kamikaze tent, min-beast safaris in the Permaculture garden and the Cock Drawing Club in the Random Workshop Tent. But the most magical Shambala experience is a haphazard one, in which the clocks stop and the concept of time is snubbed as punters follow their ears, noses and tapping toes into the most thrilling and unexpected of entertainments.

The Compass House of Lunacy
Noémie Ducimetière creeps out The Compass House of Lunacy

Wandering Word
Poet Rosie Carrick in the Wandering Word yurt

Bewitching bewilderment was the lifeblood of the Compass House of Lunacy, in which the ghosts of French songstresses (Noémie Ducimetière) and high-kicking, be-corseted madams ruled the stage. Just around the corner, the Wandering Word yurt beckoned dazed punters into its cosy folds to have their ears tickled by pirate poets and their imaginations led through eerie worlds summoned by storytelling eccentrics.

Shambala parade

Shambala parade_Picture Frames

Shambala Parade_Gorilla

After Friday’s inaugural explorations and familiarisations, on Saturday Shambala donned its gladrags and revelled in magnificent peculiarities and with newfound friends. For Saturday was the festival’s official fancy dress day (not that that prevented costumes from coming out to play all weekend…), and was topped by the spectacular Shambala parade.

Permaculture Garden

Shambala crazy golf

Didgeridoo
Shambala blows: Getting down with the didgeridoo

Peeping over the debauched brow of Saturday night, Shambala’s Sunday air was thick with drowsiness as the festival rubbed the night before from its eyes, picking up lost wellies, rogue headdress feathers and the first few threads of the real world. It was on Sunday that the Healing Area really came into its own, offering to knead the weariness from revellers’ muscles, revive their vocal chords in the Music & Voice workshops and fix them a jolly good old cup of chai to nestle between their crossed legs as they flanked the crackling camp fire.

Shambala dragon

Site and house

So, there’s a whole year until Shambala returns. Will it be the same? Of course not, and that’s exactly why we’ll love it. Expect the unexpected – and in the meantime keep the Shambala spirit of discovery alive by forgetting your watch every once in a while…


London Fashion Week, page photographed by Matt Bramford

As always at London Fashion Week there are the new and innovative designers we are told to watch……but let’s not forget the stalwarts that need no such introduction. They’ve shown at London Fashion Week for seasons (more than some would like to say) but always know how to please the audience, visit this so here’s our pick of the legends…

Betty Jackson

Betty Jackson A/W 2010, website illustrated by Gemma Randall

After seeing the show last year at LFW its clear that Betty Jackson, having nearly 30 years experience in the business, knows how to design for the everyday woman. Showcasing an array of tarnished gold pieces and full dirndl skirts; the materials seem to juxtapose each other as Jackson mixed heavy wool coats and corduroy accessories with the aforementioned “liquid tarnished gold” skirts and blouses. Let’s hope that her SS collection continues to play on the womanly trends that made her pieces flatter the female figure this Autumn Winter.

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell A/W 2010, illustrated by Natsuki Otani

Another dab hand having been on the fashion scene for almost four decades this is a designer with experience dressing both the male and female form. Margaret Howell‘s SS11 collection is a step on from last year but still plays on the “beach stripes and loose fit” ideology of her summer look. Describing the Howell woman as someone who is independent and discerning it’ll be no surprise when Howell creates a contemporary collection that still plays on the quality she is renowned for.

PPQ

PPQ A/W 2010, illustrated by Paolo Caravello

Believe it or not Amy Molyneaux and Percy Parker (aka PPQ) were the inspiration behind us all wearing skinny jeans and the Amy Winehouse/Pete Doherty looks that spawned a decade of copycats. Better know by their fashion pseudonym and with an army of celebrity followers (Rihanna, Alexa Chung and Daisy Lowe amongst many) they’ve been in the business since 1992 and certainly know their stuff. Their A/W 2010 collection featured a cotillion of graphic print and there’s always a very nostalgic feel to their looks; something of the graphic cartoon mixed with Joan Collins in Dynasty. Maybe that’s just me though. Expect big things from their S/S 2011 look; its one for “Sophia Loren in a rush with Peter Sellers in tow.”

Jaeger London

Jaeger A/W 2010, illustrated by Stéphanie Thieullent

Such a grown up retailer like Jaeger that still knows how to impress the younger clientele as well as appealing to their heritage customers. This SS11 collection will be a nod to artistic movements; namely Modernism (confronting condition), Surrealism (juxtaposition of surprise elements) and Minimalism (simplicity in art). With these elements Stuart Stokdale, Design Director, has created “cohesive collection” fused from all of the above and inspired by the cream of London’s art gallery crop.

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland A/W 2010, illustrated by Maria del Carmen Smith

More recently Pringle have been best known for their celebrity collaborations with, well everyone, from Tilda Swinton to David Beckham and even Madonna. Their traditional Scottish production is still a big selling part of the brand but long gone is the traditional twin set. Last year saw a quiet emergence of colour within the summer Resort collection upon a theme of minimalist chic. Let’s see what this summer has to bring.

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Betty Jackson, ,british fashion council, ,David Beckham, ,fashion, ,Gemma Randall, ,Jaeger, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madonna, ,Margaret Howell, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Paolo Caravello, ,ppq, ,Pringle of Scotland, ,S/S 2011, ,Stéphanie Thieullent

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11 as Illustrated by Lisa Stannard
Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Betty Jackson by Lisa Stannard

I’ve always had a personal love of Betty Jackson’s clothes, mind she was one of the first big designers that I got my ticket to see and there’s something that resonates there as an old friend I suppose. Jackson’s collections do always leave me in complete awe too; true they’re not always the most controversial but but that doesn’t mean you can call them boring. And boom out walked the first model to a mix up of Neil Diamond’s “Girl you’ll be a Woman soon” and David Bowie’s “John I’m only Dancing” wearing a fusion of camel (thought it was gone last season well it’s back) and red. Instantly it’s a hit!

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

It definitely was a collection that allowed us to be our most womanly, help full of midi length skirts and dresses in the aforementioned respectable reds (a colour I’ve always loved but never really worn for some strange reason) but Jackson mixed up the ladylikeness of the whole thing by teaming ever look with white tights or thigh high socks. Now that’s certainly not an accessory that all of us can pull off without looking like a doll or a small child but when teamed with a midi leaving just the calves on show (i.e. the thinnest part of the leg) then I think we can all work it. Or try at least.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Moving through the collection though Jackson showed a different side to the look with 90’s-esque grungy striped knits and fleece jackets. Yep I did just say fleece! Do you remember the ones you were made to wear as a small child walking through parks? Well this is nothing like that thank god; in fact this is posh fleeces in long line jackets but still I say wear with caution, information pills it looks good on the catwalk but real life may throw up some slightly different conclusions.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Now there was a neutral element to some pieces too. It wasn’t quite a full camel look but more of a darker shade of pale in the shape of mohair coats and cinched in dresses with waist belts. On the opposite end of the scale was the black lace maxi skirts and chiffon dresses and lace jumpers. Maybe not such a practical choice for every day as Jackson paraded them worn with nothing underneath….I’m sure that would be a no so attractive occasion for cold nipples to do their worst.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

A definite thing to note from Jackson for winter though is that this season is going to be a bright one. Others have shown us variations on mulberry and dusky pinks but there’s no doubt that red is a key look too. Wear it with pride and white tights with platform patent shoes. Slightly reminiscent of childhood dressing but then maybe that’s why it’s such a perfect combination.

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Lisa Stannard

Betty Jackson at London Fashion Week AW11
Photography by Jemma Crow

And of course what would a catwalk show be without it’s celebs; we got ours in the form of none other than T4’s Jameela Jamil who’s quicly becoming part of the fashion A List as Alexa Chung rose to the dizzy heights from the same path. But that girl has the longest legs I have ever seen. Wearing a super cute tangerine mini lantern dress and leopard print heels all I could stare at were her legs. But at least the paparazzi were pleased.

Jameela Jamil at Betty Jackson London Fashion Week AW11
Illustration by Bryony Crane

You can see more of Lisa Stannard’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,AW11, ,Betty Jackson, ,black lace, ,Bryony Crane, ,camel, ,jameela jamil, ,Lisa Stannard, ,London Fashion Week, ,Red, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Betty Jackson S/S 2009 – Betty goes POP!

bettyjackson6

Literally everyone has hailed Betty Jackson’s show as homage to the pretty, view cute and the demure. No, no and no again! I get it, there were lots of ruffles, pastels and accentuated waists.

bettyjackson4

bettyjackson

But these observers have turned a blind eye to her more striking and bold claims about what is hot for Spring/Summer 2010. I think Ms Jackson is spelling out the merits of a cheekiness and fashion that shouldn’t be taken too seriously. Amen!

bettyjackson8

Take for example the pop sock, which was worn as a staple throughout the collection. Not only were they worn at a weirdly raunchy mid-calf, but many also shone out in almost fluorescent shades.

bettyjackonson6

bettyjackson3

A far cry from demure girl-next-door. Equally the space-aged metallic fabrics have been somewhat overlooked. Look at the bra that shines from under a printed puffed-sleeved jacket, or the art deco shape of the wedged shoes.

bettyjackson5

bettyjackson2

bettyjackson7

Rather than radiating classic prettiness, a feeling of casual ditsyness is present, where style is about effortlessness.

A Betty girl is a liberated girl.

bettyjackson9

All photographs by Francesca Weber-Newth

Categories ,Betty Jackson, ,floral, ,London Fashion Week 2009, ,pop, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010 Catwalk Review: Betty Jackson

Real Estate Band

I went down to The Lexington a couple of weeks ago to interview Real Estate before they played a sold out gig in a city they had never played before. During the course of the interview Real Estate and I went on a journey… literally, for sale illness a journey, we started off upstairs, went down stairs, sat in a booth for a while, moved in to a stairwell where the door constantly opened in to my back, but don’t worry, I remained ruthlessly professional in my journalistic pursuit of the truth… sort of.

I met with guitarist/singer Martin Courtney and bassist Alex Bleeker. Martin was really sweet, in a slightly sweaty, nervous kind of way. Alex Bleeker was nice too, but in a more standoffish way, but maybe that’s just the way he talks, I felt like at times he was testing me. The word ‘like’ was used incessantly by both, but in an endearing way which was totally in keeping with their chill-wave-psychedelic-surfer-style music. They gave me 15 minutes of their time to talk Jersey, The Boss, Paul McCartney and the joys of recording in analogue as opposed to digital. Enjoy.

Georgie: How would you define your sound?

Martin Courtney: Um I don’t know its just the sound that like we kind of play we didn’t set out to sound in a specific way, its all kind of like a group process so its kind of like the sound that we make when we play together

G: Was your lo-fi sound a deliberate decision or product of your circumstance at the time of recording?

Alex Bleeker: We decided to record on tape, analogue rather than digital just because we think that sounds better when your dealing with sort of the lower end of the recording process which is all that was available to us, so I guess that was the only sort of aspect of that decision that we consciously made, we feel like lo-fi analogue is better than lo-fi digital.

Martin: If we don’t have the means to record really well then we should probably just embrace the faults that are going to happen.

G: If for the next album if you had the money and time, would you make a more studio base album with a more polished sound?

Martin: I think we would be in to recording in a studio but you can still have it sound more polished and not sound bad.

Bleeker: We would still want it to be homey and warm and unique.

Martin: We would still want it to be recorded on tape for sure.

Real Estate Psyche

G: Have you found now you have become part of a scene?

Bleeker: I don’t know about giving it names, but there is definitely a nice community that we have become part of that’s really supportive.

G: Do you being labelled is important to prevent it becoming lumped in the ‘Indie’ pile?

Martin: Its more of a tool for journalists, and it can’t hurt when your band gets associated with another band people will have heard of, I guess it helps them decide whether or not people want to listen to it. But its kind of weird because there are so many weird genres that people have invented, even over the past year… like Chill Wave or whatever? They are all, like, so kind of silly.

Bleeker: There are a couple of bands that we have been associated with that we look up to and admire, so that can be really flattering.

G: I saw on your Myspace that one of your influences is Bruce Springsteen?

Martin: Yeah well that’s just, like, we can’t help it; me, Bleeker and Matt all grew up in Jersey…

Bleeker: He’s like the musical paramount.

real-estate sky castle

G: You toured with Girls recently, who would you like to tour with next?

Martin: We’ve been really lucky because we got to tour with Girls and we all really like them, we’re all like really big fans of Woods and we’re touring with them next month, and there are friends too, and there’s a possibility we might tour with Kurt Vile who we’re all really in to as well, we’ve been lucky in that we got to tour with people we all really admire.

Bleeker: We would like to tour with (insert list of inaudible yet cutting edge, avant garde bands)

Martin: Yeah pretty much any band we can all agree on… Paul McCartney?

G: You’re playing Primavera this summer right? Is that going to be your first European festival?

Martin: We are playing the Great Escape festival first

Bleeker: Yeah I’d say we’re really excited to be on the same bill as Pavement, Panda Bear, Pixies, the three P’s

G: How have the English crowds been responding to Real Estate?

Bleeker: Good

Martin: Yeah it’s been really positive; we got contacted by people from the UK really early on, so I feel like there was already a fan base here.

Real Estate Live

G: I read in an interview that you guys like to play house shows? Is this something you still do? Sub question… My friends are having a house party tonight…

Martin: Really? That would be cool. I am not sure on such short notice, if you’d asked us earlier we definitely would have done it. We really like doing them, especially because a lot of the shows we do in the States are like 21 and up so a lot of people don’t get to come otherwise and its really just a lot of fun to play in peoples living rooms.

G: Do you prefer writing/recording or playing live?

Martin: Probably writing/recording it’s more fun, like, recording for all of us is like a hobby that we all have, its part of the song writing process.

Bleeker: I like both, it used to be that I liked performing most of all but I think that’s changed, the recording process can add an entirely new element to the art form itself or it can be an art form in itself you can get a bit more creative and you have more control than necessarily do over a live sound

Martin: playing live is definitely fun but I think writing and recording is more fulfilling, you get a lot more out of it.

G : There are so many amazing bands coming out of the East Coast right now, I was wondering if you could recommend some that we wouldn’t necessarily have heard of over here yet?

Bleeker: Um… Big Trouble, Mountain Man, Andrew Cedarmark

Martin: Yeah Andrew is this kid we grew up with and Big Troubles too they went our high school, they are a couple of years younger than us

G: What was your favourtite album of last year?

Martin: Julian Lynch – ‘Orange you Glad’ or Woods – ‘The Songs of Shame’

Bleeker: I don’t know about favourite albums, but I think Kurt Vile’s album ‘Childish Prodigy’ was met with underwhelming praise.
Real Estate Band

I went down to The Lexington a couple of weeks ago to interview Real Estate before they played a sold out gig in a city they had never played before. During the course of the interview Real Estate and I went on a journey… literally, case a journey, cost we started off upstairs, buy went down stairs, sat in a booth for a while, moved in to a stairwell where the door constantly opened in to my back, but don’t worry, I remained ruthlessly professional in my journalistic pursuit of the truth… sort of.

I met with guitarist/singer Martin Courtney and bassist Alex Bleeker. Martin was really sweet, in a slightly sweaty, nervous kind of way. Alex Bleeker was nice too, but in a more standoffish way, but maybe that’s just the way he talks, I felt like at times he was testing me. The word ‘like’ was used incessantly by both, but in an endearing way which was totally in keeping with their chill-wave-psychedelic-surfer-style music. They gave me 15 minutes of their time to talk Jersey, The Boss, Paul McCartney and the joys of recording in analogue as opposed to digital. Enjoy.

Georgie: How would you define your sound?

Martin Courtney: Um I don’t know its just the sound that like we kind of play we didn’t set out to sound in a specific way, its all kind of like a group process so its kind of like the sound that we make when we play together

G: Was your lo-fi sound a deliberate decision or product of your circumstance at the time of recording?

Alex Bleeker: We decided to record on tape, analogue rather than digital just because we think that sounds better when your dealing with sort of the lower end of the recording process which is all that was available to us, so I guess that was the only sort of aspect of that decision that we consciously made, we feel like lo-fi analogue is better than lo-fi digital.

Martin: If we don’t have the means to record really well then we should probably just embrace the faults that are going to happen.

G: If for the next album if you had the money and time, would you make a more studio base album with a more polished sound?

Martin: I think we would be in to recording in a studio but you can still have it sound more polished and not sound bad.

Bleeker: We would still want it to be homey and warm and unique.

Martin: We would still want it to be recorded on tape for sure.

Real Estate Psyche

G: Have you found now you have become part of a scene?

Bleeker: I don’t know about giving it names, but there is definitely a nice community that we have become part of that’s really supportive.

G: Do you being labelled is important to prevent it becoming lumped in the ‘Indie’ pile?

Martin: Its more of a tool for journalists, and it can’t hurt when your band gets associated with another band people will have heard of, I guess it helps them decide whether or not people want to listen to it. But its kind of weird because there are so many weird genres that people have invented, even over the past year… like Chill Wave or whatever? They are all, like, so kind of silly.

Bleeker: There are a couple of bands that we have been associated with that we look up to and admire, so that can be really flattering.

G: I saw on your Myspace that one of your influences is Bruce Springsteen?

Martin: Yeah well that’s just, like, we can’t help it; me, Bleeker and Matt all grew up in Jersey…

Bleeker: He’s like the musical paramount.

real-estate sky castle

G: You toured with Girls recently, who would you like to tour with next?

Martin: We’ve been really lucky because we got to tour with Girls and we all really like them, we’re all like really big fans of Woods and we’re touring with them next month, and there are friends too, and there’s a possibility we might tour with Kurt Vile who we’re all really in to as well, we’ve been lucky in that we got to tour with people we all really admire.

Bleeker: We would like to tour with (insert list of inaudible yet cutting edge, avant garde bands)

Martin: Yeah pretty much any band we can all agree on… Paul McCartney?

G: You’re playing Primavera this summer right? Is that going to be your first European festival?

Martin: We are playing the Great Escape festival first

Bleeker: Yeah I’d say we’re really excited to be on the same bill as Pavement, Panda Bear, Pixies, the three P’s

G: How have the English crowds been responding to Real Estate?

Bleeker: Good

Martin: Yeah it’s been really positive; we got contacted by people from the UK really early on, so I feel like there was already a fan base here.

Real Estate Live

G: I read in an interview that you guys like to play house shows? Is this something you still do? Sub question… My friends are having a house party tonight…

Martin: Really? That would be cool. I am not sure on such short notice, if you’d asked us earlier we definitely would have done it. We really like doing them, especially because a lot of the shows we do in the States are like 21 and up so a lot of people don’t get to come otherwise and its really just a lot of fun to play in peoples living rooms.

G: Do you prefer writing/recording or playing live?

Martin: Probably writing/recording it’s more fun, like, recording for all of us is like a hobby that we all have, its part of the song writing process.

Bleeker: I like both, it used to be that I liked performing most of all but I think that’s changed, the recording process can add an entirely new element to the art form itself or it can be an art form in itself you can get a bit more creative and you have more control than necessarily do over a live sound

Martin: playing live is definitely fun but I think writing and recording is more fulfilling, you get a lot more out of it.

G : There are so many amazing bands coming out of the East Coast right now, I was wondering if you could recommend some that we wouldn’t necessarily have heard of over here yet?

Bleeker: Um… Big Trouble, Mountain Man, Andrew Cedarmark

Martin: Yeah Andrew is this kid we grew up with and Big Troubles too they went our high school, they are a couple of years younger than us

G: What was your favourtite album of last year?

Martin: Julian Lynch – ‘Orange you Glad’ or Woods – ‘The Songs of Shame’

Bleeker: I don’t know about favourite albums, but I think Kurt Vile’s album ‘Childish Prodigy’ was met with underwhelming praise.
Real Estate Band

I went down to The Lexington a couple of weeks ago to interview Real Estate before they played a sold out gig in a city they had never played before. During the course of the interview Real Estate and I went on a journey… literally, information pills a journey, clinic we started off upstairs, went down stairs, sat in a booth for a while, moved in to a stairwell where the door constantly opened in to my back, but don’t worry, I remained ruthlessly professional in my journalistic pursuit of the truth… sort of.

I met with guitarist/singer Martin Courtney and bassist Alex Bleeker. Martin was really sweet, in a slightly sweaty, nervous kind of way. Alex Bleeker was nice too, but in a more standoffish way, but maybe that’s just the way he talks, I felt like at times he was testing me. The word ‘like’ was used incessantly by both, but in an endearing way which was totally in keeping with their chill-wave-psychedelic-surfer-style music. They gave me 15 minutes of their time to talk Jersey, The Boss, Paul McCartney and the joys of recording in analogue as opposed to digital. Enjoy.

Georgie: How would you define your sound?

Martin Courtney: Um I don’t know its just the sound that like we kind of play we didn’t set out to sound in a specific way, its all kind of like a group process so its kind of like the sound that we make when we play together

G: Was your lo-fi sound a deliberate decision or product of your circumstance at the time of recording?

Alex Bleeker: We decided to record on tape, analogue rather than digital just because we think that sounds better when your dealing with sort of the lower end of the recording process which is all that was available to us, so I guess that was the only sort of aspect of that decision that we consciously made, we feel like lo-fi analogue is better than lo-fi digital.

Martin: If we don’t have the means to record really well then we should probably just embrace the faults that are going to happen.

G: If for the next album if you had the money and time, would you make a more studio base album with a more polished sound?

Martin: I think we would be in to recording in a studio but you can still have it sound more polished and not sound bad.

Bleeker: We would still want it to be homey and warm and unique.

Martin: We would still want it to be recorded on tape for sure.

Real Estate Psyche

G: Have you found now you have become part of a scene?

Bleeker: I don’t know about giving it names, but there is definitely a nice community that we have become part of that’s really supportive.

G: Do you being labelled is important to prevent it becoming lumped in the ‘Indie’ pile?

Martin: Its more of a tool for journalists, and it can’t hurt when your band gets associated with another band people will have heard of, I guess it helps them decide whether or not people want to listen to it. But its kind of weird because there are so many weird genres that people have invented, even over the past year… like Chill Wave or whatever? They are all, like, so kind of silly.

Bleeker: There are a couple of bands that we have been associated with that we look up to and admire, so that can be really flattering.

G: I saw on your Myspace that one of your influences is Bruce Springsteen?

Martin: Yeah well that’s just, like, we can’t help it; me, Bleeker and Matt all grew up in Jersey…

Bleeker: He’s like the musical paramount.

real-estate sky castle

G: You toured with Girls recently, who would you like to tour with next?

Martin: We’ve been really lucky because we got to tour with Girls and we all really like them, we’re all like really big fans of Woods and we’re touring with them next month, and there are friends too, and there’s a possibility we might tour with Kurt Vile who we’re all really in to as well, we’ve been lucky in that we got to tour with people we all really admire.

Bleeker: We would like to tour with (insert list of inaudible yet cutting edge, avant garde bands)

Martin: Yeah pretty much any band we can all agree on… Paul McCartney?

G: You’re playing Primavera this summer right? Is that going to be your first European festival?

Martin: We are playing the Great Escape festival first

Bleeker: Yeah I’d say we’re really excited to be on the same bill as Pavement, Panda Bear, Pixies, the three P’s

G: How have the English crowds been responding to Real Estate?

Bleeker: Good

Martin: Yeah it’s been really positive; we got contacted by people from the UK really early on, so I feel like there was already a fan base here.

Real Estate Live

G: I read in an interview that you guys like to play house shows? Is this something you still do? Sub question… My friends are having a house party tonight…

Martin: Really? That would be cool. I am not sure on such short notice, if you’d asked us earlier we definitely would have done it. We really like doing them, especially because a lot of the shows we do in the States are like 21 and up so a lot of people don’t get to come otherwise and its really just a lot of fun to play in peoples living rooms.

G: Do you prefer writing/recording or playing live?

Martin: Probably writing/recording it’s more fun, like, recording for all of us is like a hobby that we all have, its part of the song writing process.

Bleeker: I like both, it used to be that I liked performing most of all but I think that’s changed, the recording process can add an entirely new element to the art form itself or it can be an art form in itself you can get a bit more creative and you have more control than necessarily do over a live sound

Martin: playing live is definitely fun but I think writing and recording is more fulfilling, you get a lot more out of it.

G : There are so many amazing bands coming out of the East Coast right now, I was wondering if you could recommend some that we wouldn’t necessarily have heard of over here yet?

Bleeker: Um… Big Trouble, Mountain Man, Andrew Cedarmark

Martin: Yeah Andrew is this kid we grew up with and Big Troubles too they went our high school, they are a couple of years younger than us

G: What was your favourtite album of last year?

Martin: Julian Lynch – ‘Orange you Glad’ or Woods – ‘The Songs of Shame’

Bleeker: I don’t know about favourite albums, but I think Kurt Vile’s album ‘Childish Prodigy’ was met with underwhelming praise.
Real Estate Band

I went down to The Lexington a couple of weeks ago to interview Real Estate before they played a sold out gig in a city they had never played before. During the course of the interview Real Estate and I went on a journey… literally, sale a journey, case we started off upstairs, dosage went down stairs, sat in a booth for a while, moved in to a stairwell where the door constantly opened in to my back, but don’t worry, I remained ruthlessly professional in my journalistic pursuit of the truth… sort of.

I met with guitarist/singer Martin Courtney and bassist Alex Bleeker. Martin was really sweet, in a slightly sweaty, nervous kind of way. Alex Bleeker was nice too, but in a more standoffish way, but maybe that’s just the way he talks, I felt like at times he was testing me. The word ‘like’ was used incessantly by both, but in an endearing way which was totally in keeping with their chill-wave-psychedelic-surfer-style music. They gave me 15 minutes of their time to talk Jersey, The Boss, Paul McCartney and the joys of recording in analogue as opposed to digital. Enjoy.

Georgie: How would you define your sound?

Martin Courtney: Um I don’t know its just the sound that like we kind of play we didn’t set out to sound in a specific way, its all kind of like a group process so its kind of like the sound that we make when we play together

G: Was your lo-fi sound a deliberate decision or product of your circumstance at the time of recording?

Alex Bleeker: We decided to record on tape, analogue rather than digital just because we think that sounds better when your dealing with sort of the lower end of the recording process which is all that was available to us, so I guess that was the only sort of aspect of that decision that we consciously made, we feel like lo-fi analogue is better than lo-fi digital.

Martin: If we don’t have the means to record really well then we should probably just embrace the faults that are going to happen.

G: If for the next album if you had the money and time, would you make a more studio base album with a more polished sound?

Martin: I think we would be in to recording in a studio but you can still have it sound more polished and not sound bad.

Bleeker: We would still want it to be homey and warm and unique.

Martin: We would still want it to be recorded on tape for sure.

Real Estate Psyche

G: Have you found now you have become part of a scene?

Bleeker: I don’t know about giving it names, but there is definitely a nice community that we have become part of that’s really supportive.

G: Do you being labelled is important to prevent it becoming lumped in the ‘Indie’ pile?

Martin: Its more of a tool for journalists, and it can’t hurt when your band gets associated with another band people will have heard of, I guess it helps them decide whether or not people want to listen to it. But its kind of weird because there are so many weird genres that people have invented, even over the past year… like Chill Wave or whatever? They are all, like, so kind of silly.

Bleeker: There are a couple of bands that we have been associated with that we look up to and admire, so that can be really flattering.

G: I saw on your Myspace that one of your influences is Bruce Springsteen?

Martin: Yeah well that’s just, like, we can’t help it; me, Bleeker and Matt all grew up in Jersey…

Bleeker: He’s like the musical paramount.

real-estate sky castle

G: You toured with Girls recently, who would you like to tour with next?

Martin: We’ve been really lucky because we got to tour with Girls and we all really like them, we’re all like really big fans of Woods and we’re touring with them next month, and there are friends too, and there’s a possibility we might tour with Kurt Vile who we’re all really in to as well, we’ve been lucky in that we got to tour with people we all really admire.

Bleeker: We would like to tour with (insert list of inaudible yet cutting edge, avant garde bands)

Martin: Yeah pretty much any band we can all agree on… Paul McCartney?

G: You’re playing Primavera this summer right? Is that going to be your first European festival?

Martin: We are playing the Great Escape festival first

Bleeker: Yeah I’d say we’re really excited to be on the same bill as Pavement, Panda Bear, Pixies, the three P’s

G: How have the English crowds been responding to Real Estate?

Bleeker: Good

Martin: Yeah it’s been really positive; we got contacted by people from the UK really early on, so I feel like there was already a fan base here.

Real Estate Live

G: I read in an interview that you guys like to play house shows? Is this something you still do? Sub question… My friends are having a house party tonight…

Martin: Really? That would be cool. I am not sure on such short notice, if you’d asked us earlier we definitely would have done it. We really like doing them, especially because a lot of the shows we do in the States are like 21 and up so a lot of people don’t get to come otherwise and its really just a lot of fun to play in peoples living rooms.

G: Do you prefer writing/recording or playing live?

Martin: Probably writing/recording it’s more fun, like, recording for all of us is like a hobby that we all have, its part of the song writing process.

Bleeker: I like both, it used to be that I liked performing most of all but I think that’s changed, the recording process can add an entirely new element to the art form itself or it can be an art form in itself you can get a bit more creative and you have more control than necessarily do over a live sound

Martin: playing live is definitely fun but I think writing and recording is more fulfilling, you get a lot more out of it.

G : There are so many amazing bands coming out of the East Coast right now, I was wondering if you could recommend some that we wouldn’t necessarily have heard of over here yet?

Bleeker: Um… Big Trouble, Mountain Man, Andrew Cedarmark

Martin: Yeah Andrew is this kid we grew up with and Big Troubles too they went our high school, they are a couple of years younger than us

G: What was your favourtite album of last year?

Martin: Julian Lynch – ‘Orange you Glad’ or Woods – ‘The Songs of Shame’

Bleeker: I don’t know about favourite albums, but I think Kurt Vile’s album ‘Childish Prodigy’ was met with underwhelming praise.
BettyJacksonAW10_SarojPatelIllustration beautifully created by Saroj Patel.

Despite my best efforts to ignore my alarm yesterday morning (much to my boyfriend’s annoyance), side effects I still managed to make the 9am showcase of Betty Jackson’s AW10 collection. Having risen much earlier than I would normally care to on a Sunday (with the days of enforced church visits long behind me), find I had a spring in my step and a positive outlook on the day – at least until it started lashing with rain.

P2212597Photography courtesy of Rachael Oku

Luckily Betty didn’t disappoint and put on a cracking show, totally worth any early morning wake-up call. I would even go as far as to say this was my favourite show of the season so far, where each and every garment was a vision of beauty, winking at me and trying to tempt and seduce me to part with my hard earned cash (or should I say Job Seekers Allowance?!)

P2212628

JSA was certainly the last thing on Betty’s mind, for her AW10 collection models were dripping with expensive looking tan leather embellishments and accessories, luxurious furs and heavy brocades – so beautiful and opulent that they wouldn’t be out of place as soft furnishings in a posh stately home. Balancing amazingly well on vertiginous heels, the models sashayed down the catwalk in quick succession with Betty hitting us again and again – and again – with strong look after look, producing the most relevant, feminine and flirty collection I’ve seen so far.

P2212600

As a designer who unsurprisingly has a huge following, Betty stayed true to her trademark design aesthetic producing a collection of ultra-chic pieces that are perfect for all occasions, possessing the versatility that can carry them from day to night, also looking perfect for trans seasonal wear. With the colour brown featuring heavily in each look, the collection had a great autumnal feel with light mackintoshes, cropped trousers and dresses a plenty. As a lover of textiles and textures alike I had many favourite pieces, from the military influenced sleeveless blouse and matching mini skirt combo to the gorgeous belted leopard print furs, overcoats and trousers. I also loved Betty’s use of cord, one of my favourite and most luxurious fabrics, partnering it with gold lame tops and overcoats.

P2212599

Chunky knitwear also made a welcome return to the catwalk with Betty creating her own spin on the traditional Argyle jumper, instead using what appeared to be a python print. With this fashion forward thinking; Betty proved exactly why she is one of Britain’s most loved women’s wear designers at the forefront of her game.

P2212638

Categories ,AW10 collection, ,Betty Jackson, ,Erin O’Connor, ,Hillary Alexander, ,Job Seekers Allowance, ,lfw, ,Saroj Patel, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Listings 16-22 November

 

 

 ghost forest

Angela Palmer’s Ghost Forest

Mediumly-interesting fact: Nelson’s Column stands at 169 feet. The relevance of this morsel? Angela Palmer’s new installation of rainforest tree stumps in Trafalgar Square, purchase pharmacy which would once have stood as tall as the Column but now are rather lower to the ground, unhealthy buy more about more roots than trunks. Palmer’s work is intended to highlight the destruction of the rainforest. Much better than the 4th plinth people. That didn’t quite work did it?

 braun record player dieter rams

Dieter Rams @ The Design Museum

The Design Museum is excellent because it gets down to business: if you can’t sit on it or reasonably hang it on the wall, use it to build bridges or fill a teacup, you won’t find it there. This ethos of substance as well as style echoes the title of the current Dieter Rams exhibition, “Less and More”. He was Head of Design at Braun and every time you see something ergonomic and pleasing to look at on an appliance, like an iPhone for instance, you can see his influence. His ten design principles:

Good design is innovative.
Good design makes a product useful.
Good design is aesthetic.
Good design makes a product understandable.
Good design is unobtrusive.
Good design is honest.
Good design is long-lasting.
Good design is thorough down to the last detail.
Good design is environmentally friendly.
Good design is as little design as possible.

polar-bears-climate-change

C Words: carbon, climate, capital, culture @ Arnolfini Gallery in Bristol

How can I persuade you polar bears are relevant to this event?  Well, polar bears reflect our confused feelings about climate change: yes, they’re cute but they’d also happily rip off your head and eat your brain. Only through constructive debate can we resolve our feelings.

C Words is a two-month build-up to Copenhagen, using a multitude of free events, installations and discussions to generate interest and action on the topics of carbon emissions, our changing climate, capitalist structures and the culture wars. More about active engagement than simply mulling over points, PLATFORM, a group of artist-activists, aims to question how culture will grow up in the context of a low-carbon future.

bob and roberta smith

Bob & Robert Smith @ Beaconsfield

Bob and Roberta Smith, who is actually one person, will be showing their/his works to celebrate and commiserate the end of their/his residency at the roomy “Factory Outlet” space at Beaconsfield in Vauxhall. Smith is known for painting signs and there are references to the previous usage of the space, as a “ragged school” for poor little boys and girls to learn to read, in the use of text.

 cornelia parker

Passing Thoughts and Making Plans @ Jerwood Space

This exhibition at the Jerwood Space takes the tack that seeing the process behind an artwork is interesting in itself. This isn’t always the case – looking at the sketches for a work do sometimes make you grateful for the myriad choices the artist had to make to get it to the end result but it can also be a bit boring. This exhibition focuses (ha!) on artists who use photography as part of their process and escapes boredom by including interesting artists such as Cornelia Parker and Rachel Whiteread, whose work you can imagine hinges on perfect recollection of spaces. I am persuaded about this exhibition, but I will never be persuaded about “alternative versions” of songs at the end of special edition albums.
EJF

Image courtesy of Environmental Justice Foundation

ENVIRONMNENTAL JUSTICE FOUNDATION POP-UP STORE
13-27 NOVEMBER (MON-SAT: 10-7PM, viagra 100mg SUN: 12-6PM)
WHITE GOLD, 1ST FLOOR, KINGLY COURT, W1
FREE ENTRY
Over the coming fortnight the Environmental Justice Foundation charity will be setting up shop in the heart of London’s Carnaby Street to help raise awareness of forced child labour and environmental abuses in cotton production. The EJF pop-up store will be selling a limited edition range of T-shirts designed in collaboration with fashion heavyweights such as Luella, Giles Deacon, Zandra Rhodes, John Rocha, Betty Jackson, Christian Lacroix, Allegra Hicks, Katharine Hamnett, Jenny Packham, Alice Temperley, Richard Nicoll and Ciel. EJF will also be stocking 100 shopper bags designed by Eley Kishimoto which will retail at the bargain price of £10 or come free when you spend over £50 in store. As they sold out like hot potatoes at LFW last month make sure you get there while stock lasts.

ASSEMBLY THRIFT STORE OPENING
19 NOVEMBER
THE WATERMAN’S BUILDING, ASSEMBLY PASSAGE, E1
FREE ENTRY
This week sees the lovely chaps behind the East End Thrift Store open a new shop called Assembly just off Brick Lane. As an expansion of the existing space in Whitechapel, Assembly aims to bring together the most eclectic and unique vintage finds in clothing, accessories, jewellery, quilts, fabrics and even rare books. Situated within a disused factory the shop space has been created to resemble a New York loft which will also be used to host exhibitions and installations and installations by young contemporary artists.

1110-Paul-Smith-banner-1Image courtesy of Paul Smith

PAUL SMITH SAMPLE SALE
19-21 NOVEMBER (THURS/FRI: 9-7PM, SAT: 10-5PM)
PRINCES HOUSE, 37 KINGSWAY, WC2
FREE ENTRY
World renowned for his offbeat and unique designs British fashion legend Sir Paul Smith is holding a three day sample sale later this week. Look out for his trademark striped suits and floral dresses at heavily discounted prices.

article_7

Image courtesy of the Victoria & Albert Museum

CELEBRATE OUR FASCINATION WITH HAIR
FRIDAY 20TH NOVEMBER (6:30-10PM)
V&A MUSEUM: SACKLER CENTRE, CROMWELL ROAD, SW7
FREE ENTRY
If you’re looking to change your image or simply want a new hairdo for the festive season than treat yourself to a makeover courtesy of London College of Fashion students. Head down to the V&A to take part in a fashion illustration workshop and watch an A-list make up demonstration led by LCF’s partner institution the Hong Kong Design Institute. For those who are less keen on having a student get to grips with your locks you can always experiment and try new hairstyles digitally.

sourcing_marketplace5

Image courtesy of Ethical Fashion Forum

GLOBAL SOURCING MARKETPLACE
20-21 NOVEMBER (FRI: 10-7PM, SAT: 10:30-5PM)
CHELSEA COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN, 16 JOHN ISLIP STREET, SW1
£20 FOR UNLIMITED ACCESS OVER BOTH DAYS
Later this week the Ethical Fashion Forum will be hosting a two-day ethical sourcing marketplace which will bring together an array of brands, retailers, manufacturers and cooperatives working to high ethical standards. This yearly event aims to create opportunities for suppliers with the overall goal being to reduce the environmental impact of the industry, support fair and equitable trade, and reduce poverty. The event gives industry professionals and consumers an opportunity to network with suppliers and gain information about ways to get involved through a series of seminars and talks.

DESIGNER SALES UK SAMPLE SALE
20-22 NOVEMBER (FRI: 11-9PM, SAT: 11-8PM, SUN: 11-5:30PM)
85 BRICKLANE, E1
£2 ENTRY, £1 CONCESSIONS
Brainchild of Elaine Foster-Gandey, the DSUK website was founded 20 years ago and is the first in its kind to sell samples and stock directly from the biggest fashion houses to customers at seriously discounted prices. Currently gearing up for their fourth sample sale of the year later this week, expect to find great value womenswear, menswear, kidswear and accessories. With over 100 different labels to choose from during this three day shopping extravaganza you’re sure to find a bargain.

Categories ,Alice Temperley, ,Allegra Hicks, ,Assembly, ,Betty Jackson, ,Christian Lacroix, ,ciel, ,Designer Sales UK, ,East End Thrift Store, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Environmental Justice Foundation, ,Ethical Fashion Forum, ,Giles Deacon, ,Global Sourcing Marketplace, ,Hong Kong Design Institute, ,Jenny Packham, ,John Rocha, ,Katharine Hamnett, ,Kingly Court, ,London College of Fashion, ,Luella, ,Paul Smith, ,Richard Nicoll, ,va, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Listings 23-29 November

Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, visit web involving 11, diagnosis 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability. It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column.

Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth. The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, page involving 11,000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, approved involving 11, salve 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, information pills involving 11, stuff 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, click Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.

Last week was Community Week in Leeds, information pills meaning all week Leeds University Union hosted various events on their campus aimed at students and ways in which we can make a positive difference in our local community.

Kicking off rather appropriately with ‘Talking Rubbish’ on Monday, prescription wheelie bins were hot on the agenda due to the bin strike in Leeds which has amazingly reached its 12th week now because of rows over unfair pay. The vast amount of recyclable waste which had not been collected since the beginning of September when the strike began was finally shifted this week, unhealthy and residents can expect letters from Leeds City Council informing them of the changes to be made in their area.

james

Image courtesy of James Maxfield

On Wednesday it was ‘Safe in the knowledge’, a day aimed at teaching ways we can prevent burglary in the LS6 area. For example did you know that, according to the union’s ‘Knowledge’ campaign, in 2008 almost 52% of student homes burgled were due to open doors or windows? So first step: Shut your windows, lock your doors! It is pretty easy to pop out or even just upstairs and forget to lock the front door. Most of the burglary stories I’ve heard happened to people who were in the house at the time, for instance last year someone wandered into my friend’s house in the middle of the day, pinched their underwear and left a ‘surprise’ in the middle of the carpet. The Knowledge website offers practical advice on preventing burglary and making your student home a more secure place.

 Reszie_Knowledge_1

Images courtesy of Leeds University Union

Thursday was concerned with volunteering. The Union runs a great volunteering service which supports students who want to give a little back locally and abroad. For instance why not become a Carbon Ambassador? Sounds pretty impressive and you receive FREE training in energy efficiency practices, and what’s more you can then share your new skills by giving talks in your area and teach others ways they can cut carbon emissions.

unionbuilding

Image courtesy of Leeds University Union

The week finished off on Friday with Representation, which gave you the chance to chat about anything community related that may be worrying you, such as poor street lighting, recycling, suspicious take-aways, anything. Community Week may be over but Leeds students can still get down to the Union at any time. Go meet the student representatives and find out how you can get involved in local campaigns and make your neighbourhood just a little bit lovelier.

PLAS1

Following their super successful appearance at Barfly last week I made my way to a west London location to meet the plastiscine girls. On the way I’m trying desperately to remember my French from school to impress them. On a trip to Paris with my friend Ruth, malady there was no way we would have got by without my “C” grade, I’m sure I can think of something amazingly French to say. I arrive and briefly they are all there, hugs and an ipod charger are exchanged and then drummer Ana and bass player Louise are whisked off back to Paris. I’m sure they are going to have to get used to this whisking about business. So, I was on a very bizarrely patterned couch (see photo above) with lead singer Katty and guitarist Marine. I thought I’d open with my French skills…

Bonjour
K: Bonjour

Cava?
K: Cava merci, Vous parlez francais?

Non, that’s my limit
K: That’s good enough!

(Really?! That’s all that I could have come up with?! I should have revised more.)

You guys played Barfly last night, how do you find London crowds?
K: We really enjoyed the crowd yesterday because it was very busy, so we were really happy! We had a lot of friends in the crowd so they were dancing and jumping! It’s always good to have people reacting when you say something. In Paris people are so quiet, just at the back with their arms crossed and watching. They are interested but they just don’t move. So it’s good to be here and have the crowd reacting.

There seemed to be a lot of French folks in the audience, That must have been nice?K:
K: Yeah, I was really surprised! When I asked, “Who is French tonight?” there were quite a lot of people shouting!

barfly

So, How did your story begin?
K: Marine and I met in high school when we were 15 or 16. We started the band because we watched lots of bands like The Strokes and The White Stripes. We loved them, they had so much energy onstage, they were young and we thought we want to do the same thing. So we started the band and a few months after we were already doing some gigs in bars in Paris. We actually learnt our instruments on stage because we just wanted to play! We didn’t care if we could play, all we wanted was to play and get on stage and get into it!

So, you began by doing covers?
K: When we started we did a few covers, but we were very interested in doing our own songs. We did some covers from The Strokes and other bands for a while then we started doing our own songs, thats what really interested us more rather than covers.

A lot of your influences are English so do you guys find it more natural to write in English?
Both: Defiantly
K: Because all the songs we listen to are in English it is very natural to write in English, but sometimes we do write in French. We get direction from people saying we should say things this way because it’s a better way to say it in English. But yes, its natural because the music we like is English and American, we were never really into French bands

I read that French radio stations have restrictions on what they play (a percentage of French radio has to be French songs)
K: Yeah, so its quite difficult for us to be on the radio in France because we may be French but we sing in English. We are not in the same category as big international bands like the Arctic Monkeys, But then we don’t sing in French so we don’t fit into that category either, so its quite difficult to be on the radio.

PLAS2

You worked on your album with top producer Butch Walker what was this like?
M: We went to Malibu to record the album and it was amazing, it was really beautiful and we were in the this big house all together and in the morning we would go to record together or go swimming. Everyday we got to work together! It was interesting because it was the first time we were working with someone American. When we are French we don’t know if we would get along or have the right words to express, so we had a really long talk with him and he said what he likes and we said what we like. Butch is really passionate about music.

He’s worked with a wide range of people from Katy Perry to Weezer and now you guys

K: Yeah, he has done a lot of very big pop stars and he also works with acts because he really likes them, he’s done a lot of indie bands like Hot Hot Heat.
M: He was very honest, he said I do some stuff for money I do some stuff for passion and you are a passion for me.
K: He told us that from the first time he saw us playing on stage at Coachella he fell in love with us.

PlasB

So what acts are you into right now?
M: Lots of stuff, lots of English acts, I love the Jamie T album, I think it’s amazing. I like Metronomy, Katty loves Florence and the Machine. Also I love Eagles of Death Metal, we went to see them in Paris. We like lots of old and new stuff.

“Bitch” was on “Gossip Girl”, this must have been a massive deal for you?
K: I think we didn’t really realize when we did it! It was such a big thing to do! When we saw it on the internet were like “that’s weird!”. We watch the programme, we know the characters and the story so when we arrived we wanted to know what was happening! We were playing on stage at a ball so we couldn’t hear what the actors were saying! It was nice because all the actors came to us to say “hello” and Leighton Meester who plays Blake came up with our album and she wanted us to sign it!

How did this come about because it’s as if the song was written for “Gossip Girl”?
M: No, its on the album so they heard it on the album it was picked out because it worked really well. We recorded it back in February.

You have a great relationship with Nylon can you tell us a little more about this?
K: Marvin Scott Jarrett ,the editor in chief at Nylon, he is so passionate about music and he always puts a lot of bands in the magazine. I think he wanted to launch a label and so he did it with Nylon, Nylon records. We are the first band signed because he really liked us and I think he thought we were a good image for the magazine. He knew of us because in Paris fashion week we were on the cover of a magazine, from this he got in touch with our label, at the time which was Virgin, us we came to NYC to play at a party for the magazine. Then when we came back again he had the idea for the label and wanted to sign us.

So you spend a lot of time here and in NYC, would you ever relocate?
K: We would love to live in New York! We all love it there! I think people are amazing with us there! Sometimes here when people see four girls on stage in a rock band it is weird for them, like there is something fake, something wrong with it, but in NYC they are just like “That’s cool, its just four girls rocking” and they don’t care.

M: Also, I think that in NYC everybody is doing something interesting. We were only there for a few months we already made such good friends and there’s so much going on and so much different music. I think it would be good for the band living in NYC for a bit for inspiration.

K: You walk in the street and you just feel good there, I don’t know what it is. Its such a big city but you still feel safe.

PlasC

I follow u guys on twitter and I noticed you had a meeting with Topshop today, You guys are obviously into your fashion, Who are your style icons?

K: Yeah we got it all myspace/facebook/twitter there a blog that marines writes on.
M: Yeah we like fashion because we are girls. I love david bowie from the ziggy stardust period
K: I love Debbie Harry, she’s got it all the music the style, she’s amazing

The same thing could be said about these girls, they have the style, they have the music, they also seem to have it all. I glance and notice the smudge of a stamp on my hand from the entry last night, this reminds me that I have not even bothered to wash for our meeting today never mind attempting to dress nicely. I don’t think there is much point in trying around these girls though. They are naturally chic (I think it’s a French thing) with a playful grunge twist. I’m in love with them for the fact that they just decided to pick up interments to be onstage; from viewing them at The Barfly they all seem to be perfectly at home this platform. These beauties armed with the energy and attitude they bring to their performances, their catchy rock/pop tracks and their effortless style is a winning combination for these pop/grunge goddesses to begin a French revolution.
 

header_cottonImage courtesy of Environmental Justice Foundation.

ENVIRONMNENTAL JUSTICE FOUNDATION POP-UP STORE
13-27 NOVEMBER (MON-SAT: 10-7PM, sick SUN: 12-6PM)
WHITE GOLD, recipe 1ST FLOOR, dosage KINGLY COURT, W1
FREE ENTRY
Over the coming fortnight the Environmental Justice Foundation charity will be setting up shop in the heart of London’s Carnaby Street to help raise awareness of forced child labour and environmental abuses in cotton production. The EJF pop-up store will be selling a limited edition range of T-shirts designed in collaboration with fashion heavyweights such as Luella, Giles Deacon, Betty Jackson, Christian Lacroix, Alice Temperley, Richard Nicoll and Ciel. EJF will also be stocking 100 shopper bags designed by Eley Kishimoto which will retail at the bargain price of £10 or come free when you spend over £50 in store. As they sold out like hot potatoes at LFW last month make sure you get there while stock lasts.

rokit neon green cropImage courtesy of Rokit Vintage Clothing.

ROKIT ROCKING CHRISTMAS
26 NOVEMBER (6-9PM)
ROKIT, 42 SHELTON STREET, COVENT GARDEN, WC2
FREE ENTRY
If you’re looking to get into the festive spirit this week then head down to Covent Garden for this glamorous in-store event where in-house stylists will be on hand to help you choose something unique and original for all those impending Christmas parties! With drinks, cakes and live rockabilly rock’n’roll with Ronnie King and the Hustlers what more could you ask for? With an added incentive of 15% discount on offer you’d be made not to pop in for a mince pie.

otb_logo_bannerImage courtesy of the Old Truman Brewery.

ALL I WANT FOR XMAS
26 NOVEMBER – 20 DECEMBER (THURS: 5-9PM, FRI: 12-6PM, SAT/SUN: 10-6PM)
T1 SPACE, F BLOCK, OLD TRUMAN BREWERY, 15 HANBURY STREET, E1
FREE ENTRY
Launching this Thursday the Old Truman Brewery has come up with the perfect antidote to pre-Christmas blues with a one-stop shopping event that aims to inject the fun back into the much dreaded Christmas shop. Featuring a wide variety of exclusive goods on sale from independent retailers in the form of gift markets, exhibitions, designer sales, independent shops and even a pop-up emporium you’re sure to find something for everyone. With the brightest creative talent from the worlds of design, art, fashion and home ware it’s time to start checking off your Christmas list and see who’s been naughty and who’s been nice!

ada zanditon sample saleImage courtesy of Ada Zandinton.

ADA ZANDITON SAMPLE SALE
26-27 NOVEMBER (THURS: 6:30-9:30PM, FRI: 11-7PM)
DIGITARIA, 60 BERWICK STREET, SOHO, W1
FREE ENTRY
A firm favourite among the British ethical designers, Ada Zanditon is to host her first sample sale later this week. Hosted by Ada herself in conjunction with Notion magazine there will be exclusive music videos from Bishi and a fashion supplement giveaway. If you’d like to get your hands on pieces from Ada’s AW09 range at heavily discounted prices (up to 70%) make sure you put this date in your diary, just don’t forget to RSVP.

twist baby twistImage courtesy of Fashion & Textile Museum.

TWIST BABY TWIST
27-28 NOVEMBER (7:30-10:30PM)
FASHION & TEXTILE MUSEUM, 83 BERMONDSEY STREET, SE1
£15 (INCLUDING FOALE & TUFFIN EXHIBITION ENTRY AND SHOW)
This weekend the Fashion & Textile Museum will be hosting two evenings of swinging sixties entertainment to celebrate their current exhibition Foale and Tuffin: Made in England. Celebrating everything great about this iconic decade in British culture there will be a host of live music and dancing from the likes of Remi Nicole, Theoretical Girl, The Equations and BeBe & Paulo on Friday and Eliza Doolittle, The Bang Bang Club and Henry Johnson on Saturday. If that wasn’t enough you’ll also find film displays, fashion shows, 1960s themed make-overs, DJs, a mysterious David Bailey photo booth plus many more activities to keep you entertained.

OXFAM_MAKE_DO_AND_MENDImage courtesy of Oxfam.

OXFAM MAKE DO AND MEND FASHION SHOW
28 NOVEMBER (FROM 2PM WITH CATWALK SHOW AT 6:30PM)
ST. MARY’S CHURCH, WYNDHAM PLACE, MARYLEBONE, W1
£5 ENTRY
This one-off “Make Do and Mend” event takes its name from the WW2 propaganda campaigns when clothing rationing was introduced. In current times where every penny counts Oxfam are encouraging consumers to step away from the “throwaway” fashion and embrace the quality and individual style their stores have to offer. To bring home this message Oxfam are hosting a very special event which will see a host of market stalls sell everything from accessories to wedding dresses, as well as an exhibition on the history of 2nd hand fashion, a swap shop and a special customisation corner. If all of this wasn’t enough to whet your appetite there will also be food and drink on offer, live music and DJs and the piece de resistance; a special Oxfam fashion show.

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Alice Temperley, ,All I want for Xmas, ,BeBe & Paulo, ,Betty Jackson, ,Bishi, ,Christian Lacroix, ,ciel, ,David Bailey, ,Digitaria, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Eliza Doolittle, ,Environmental Justice Foundation, ,Fashion & Textile Museum, ,Foale and Tuffin, ,Giles Deacon, ,Henry Johnson, ,Kingly Court, ,Luella, ,Make Do and Mend, ,Notion, ,Old Truman Brewery, ,oxfam, ,Remi Nicole, ,Richard Nicoll, ,Rokit, ,Ronnie King and the Hustlers, ,The Bang Bang Club, ,The Equations, ,Theoretical Girl, ,Twist Baby Twist

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Listings 23-29 November – Part 23

Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, visit web involving 11, diagnosis 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability. It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column.

Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth. The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, page involving 11,000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, approved involving 11, salve 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay, no matter what Obama says.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.
Ghost Forest in Trafalgar Square is a well-timed art-installation taking place ahead of the UN conference on Climate Change from December 7 to 18, information pills involving 11, stuff 000 delegates from 192 countries. Ten tree stumps selected from seven indigenous species all with delightful exotic names are represented – Denya, click Dahuma, Danta, Hyedua, Mahogany, Wawa and three varieties of Celtis – and have been placed at the feet of the National gallery, right at the very centre of Western Industrialization. They are all with a rich and varied ecology and all with equally diverse uses by man; the Celtis Adolfi-Friderici is evergreen, but many of its leaves do fall during the dry season. It grows up to 100 feet tall and is of abundant forest availability.

Ghost forest 2

It is hard not to be moved by the contrasting sight of those stumps laid to rest on white concrete blocks close to the 196 feet-tall Nelson’s Column. Londoners know Trafalgar Square as a rather uninspiring and barren site inhabited by a swarm of pigeons and tourists. The place is now invaded with what appears to be sculptures for posh interiors. Or is it a vast graveyard of searing beauty? The Celtis is used for interior joinery, plywood, and furniture components back in its country of origin, Ghana. In Europe, it is mostly used in the coffin industry. At Trafalgar Square, it all looks like an odd burial site. Now Ghana’s trees have the good fortune of benefiting from the Voluntary Partnership Agreement. Artist Angela Palmer says: “Having lost 90% of its primary rainforest over the past 50 years, Ghana now exercises strict regulations in sustainable and responsible forestry. Last year it became the first country in Africa to enter the VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement) with the European Union in an effort to outlaw illegal logging.”

Ghost forest 1

Celtis and its friends do not end their epic journey in London; having traveled all the way from the tropics, they will travel to Copenhagen to remind UN employees that the removal of the world’s ‘lungs’ through continued deforestation needs to be dealt with without delay.

Ghost forest 3

Angela Palmer is an artist with convictions: “Many thinkers maintain that all art is political; politics touches all aspects of our lives. Life is about politics. And art is about communication, often transmitting unpalatable truths.” Breathing In, currently at the Welcome museum from the 20th of October to the 22nd of November 2009, is another one of Palmer’s projects currently in the capital. In April 2007 Palmer travelled to Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, home to the most polluted air on Earth, and then to Cape Grim on the northwest tip of Tasmania where there’s the purest air and water on Earth.

Ghost forest 4

The exhibition is a straightforward display of the results of her journey to capture the physical properties of climate change. The evidence is undeniable- the previously white outfits worn for a day now blackened by the unhealthy Linfen air, the dark face cleanser pads and air pump filters…the facts are brutal. There is an uneasy juxtaposition between the pristine green luscious Tasmanian rainforest and the cloudy, polluted, dusty and overpopulated Chinese streets. Angela Palmer’s art is good medicine for anyone still wondering what all the fuss is about Climate Change. You leave the building wanting to help a worthy cause.

Last week was Community Week in Leeds, information pills meaning all week Leeds University Union hosted various events on their campus aimed at students and ways in which we can make a positive difference in our local community.

Kicking off rather appropriately with ‘Talking Rubbish’ on Monday, prescription wheelie bins were hot on the agenda due to the bin strike in Leeds which has amazingly reached its 12th week now because of rows over unfair pay. The vast amount of recyclable waste which had not been collected since the beginning of September when the strike began was finally shifted this week, unhealthy and residents can expect letters from Leeds City Council informing them of the changes to be made in their area.

james

Image courtesy of James Maxfield

On Wednesday it was ‘Safe in the knowledge’, a day aimed at teaching ways we can prevent burglary in the LS6 area. For example did you know that, according to the union’s ‘Knowledge’ campaign, in 2008 almost 52% of student homes burgled were due to open doors or windows? So first step: Shut your windows, lock your doors! It is pretty easy to pop out or even just upstairs and forget to lock the front door. Most of the burglary stories I’ve heard happened to people who were in the house at the time, for instance last year someone wandered into my friend’s house in the middle of the day, pinched their underwear and left a ‘surprise’ in the middle of the carpet. The Knowledge website offers practical advice on preventing burglary and making your student home a more secure place.

 Reszie_Knowledge_1

Images courtesy of Leeds University Union

Thursday was concerned with volunteering. The Union runs a great volunteering service which supports students who want to give a little back locally and abroad. For instance why not become a Carbon Ambassador? Sounds pretty impressive and you receive FREE training in energy efficiency practices, and what’s more you can then share your new skills by giving talks in your area and teach others ways they can cut carbon emissions.

unionbuilding

Image courtesy of Leeds University Union

The week finished off on Friday with Representation, which gave you the chance to chat about anything community related that may be worrying you, such as poor street lighting, recycling, suspicious take-aways, anything. Community Week may be over but Leeds students can still get down to the Union at any time. Go meet the student representatives and find out how you can get involved in local campaigns and make your neighbourhood just a little bit lovelier.

PLAS1

Following their super successful appearance at Barfly last week I made my way to a west London location to meet the plastiscine girls. On the way I’m trying desperately to remember my French from school to impress them. On a trip to Paris with my friend Ruth, malady there was no way we would have got by without my “C” grade, I’m sure I can think of something amazingly French to say. I arrive and briefly they are all there, hugs and an ipod charger are exchanged and then drummer Ana and bass player Louise are whisked off back to Paris. I’m sure they are going to have to get used to this whisking about business. So, I was on a very bizarrely patterned couch (see photo above) with lead singer Katty and guitarist Marine. I thought I’d open with my French skills…

Bonjour
K: Bonjour

Cava?
K: Cava merci, Vous parlez francais?

Non, that’s my limit
K: That’s good enough!

(Really?! That’s all that I could have come up with?! I should have revised more.)

You guys played Barfly last night, how do you find London crowds?
K: We really enjoyed the crowd yesterday because it was very busy, so we were really happy! We had a lot of friends in the crowd so they were dancing and jumping! It’s always good to have people reacting when you say something. In Paris people are so quiet, just at the back with their arms crossed and watching. They are interested but they just don’t move. So it’s good to be here and have the crowd reacting.

There seemed to be a lot of French folks in the audience, That must have been nice?K:
K: Yeah, I was really surprised! When I asked, “Who is French tonight?” there were quite a lot of people shouting!

barfly

So, How did your story begin?
K: Marine and I met in high school when we were 15 or 16. We started the band because we watched lots of bands like The Strokes and The White Stripes. We loved them, they had so much energy onstage, they were young and we thought we want to do the same thing. So we started the band and a few months after we were already doing some gigs in bars in Paris. We actually learnt our instruments on stage because we just wanted to play! We didn’t care if we could play, all we wanted was to play and get on stage and get into it!

So, you began by doing covers?
K: When we started we did a few covers, but we were very interested in doing our own songs. We did some covers from The Strokes and other bands for a while then we started doing our own songs, thats what really interested us more rather than covers.

A lot of your influences are English so do you guys find it more natural to write in English?
Both: Defiantly
K: Because all the songs we listen to are in English it is very natural to write in English, but sometimes we do write in French. We get direction from people saying we should say things this way because it’s a better way to say it in English. But yes, its natural because the music we like is English and American, we were never really into French bands

I read that French radio stations have restrictions on what they play (a percentage of French radio has to be French songs)
K: Yeah, so its quite difficult for us to be on the radio in France because we may be French but we sing in English. We are not in the same category as big international bands like the Arctic Monkeys, But then we don’t sing in French so we don’t fit into that category either, so its quite difficult to be on the radio.

PLAS2

You worked on your album with top producer Butch Walker what was this like?
M: We went to Malibu to record the album and it was amazing, it was really beautiful and we were in the this big house all together and in the morning we would go to record together or go swimming. Everyday we got to work together! It was interesting because it was the first time we were working with someone American. When we are French we don’t know if we would get along or have the right words to express, so we had a really long talk with him and he said what he likes and we said what we like. Butch is really passionate about music.

He’s worked with a wide range of people from Katy Perry to Weezer and now you guys

K: Yeah, he has done a lot of very big pop stars and he also works with acts because he really likes them, he’s done a lot of indie bands like Hot Hot Heat.
M: He was very honest, he said I do some stuff for money I do some stuff for passion and you are a passion for me.
K: He told us that from the first time he saw us playing on stage at Coachella he fell in love with us.

PlasB

So what acts are you into right now?
M: Lots of stuff, lots of English acts, I love the Jamie T album, I think it’s amazing. I like Metronomy, Katty loves Florence and the Machine. Also I love Eagles of Death Metal, we went to see them in Paris. We like lots of old and new stuff.

“Bitch” was on “Gossip Girl”, this must have been a massive deal for you?
K: I think we didn’t really realize when we did it! It was such a big thing to do! When we saw it on the internet were like “that’s weird!”. We watch the programme, we know the characters and the story so when we arrived we wanted to know what was happening! We were playing on stage at a ball so we couldn’t hear what the actors were saying! It was nice because all the actors came to us to say “hello” and Leighton Meester who plays Blake came up with our album and she wanted us to sign it!

How did this come about because it’s as if the song was written for “Gossip Girl”?
M: No, its on the album so they heard it on the album it was picked out because it worked really well. We recorded it back in February.

You have a great relationship with Nylon can you tell us a little more about this?
K: Marvin Scott Jarrett ,the editor in chief at Nylon, he is so passionate about music and he always puts a lot of bands in the magazine. I think he wanted to launch a label and so he did it with Nylon, Nylon records. We are the first band signed because he really liked us and I think he thought we were a good image for the magazine. He knew of us because in Paris fashion week we were on the cover of a magazine, from this he got in touch with our label, at the time which was Virgin, us we came to NYC to play at a party for the magazine. Then when we came back again he had the idea for the label and wanted to sign us.

So you spend a lot of time here and in NYC, would you ever relocate?
K: We would love to live in New York! We all love it there! I think people are amazing with us there! Sometimes here when people see four girls on stage in a rock band it is weird for them, like there is something fake, something wrong with it, but in NYC they are just like “That’s cool, its just four girls rocking” and they don’t care.

M: Also, I think that in NYC everybody is doing something interesting. We were only there for a few months we already made such good friends and there’s so much going on and so much different music. I think it would be good for the band living in NYC for a bit for inspiration.

K: You walk in the street and you just feel good there, I don’t know what it is. Its such a big city but you still feel safe.

PlasC

I follow u guys on twitter and I noticed you had a meeting with Topshop today, You guys are obviously into your fashion, Who are your style icons?

K: Yeah we got it all myspace/facebook/twitter there a blog that marines writes on.
M: Yeah we like fashion because we are girls. I love david bowie from the ziggy stardust period
K: I love Debbie Harry, she’s got it all the music the style, she’s amazing

The same thing could be said about these girls, they have the style, they have the music, they also seem to have it all. I glance and notice the smudge of a stamp on my hand from the entry last night, this reminds me that I have not even bothered to wash for our meeting today never mind attempting to dress nicely. I don’t think there is much point in trying around these girls though. They are naturally chic (I think it’s a French thing) with a playful grunge twist. I’m in love with them for the fact that they just decided to pick up interments to be onstage; from viewing them at The Barfly they all seem to be perfectly at home this platform. These beauties armed with the energy and attitude they bring to their performances, their catchy rock/pop tracks and their effortless style is a winning combination for these pop/grunge goddesses to begin a French revolution.
 

header_cottonImage courtesy of Environmental Justice Foundation.

ENVIRONMNENTAL JUSTICE FOUNDATION POP-UP STORE
13-27 NOVEMBER (MON-SAT: 10-7PM, sick SUN: 12-6PM)
WHITE GOLD, recipe 1ST FLOOR, dosage KINGLY COURT, W1
FREE ENTRY
Over the coming fortnight the Environmental Justice Foundation charity will be setting up shop in the heart of London’s Carnaby Street to help raise awareness of forced child labour and environmental abuses in cotton production. The EJF pop-up store will be selling a limited edition range of T-shirts designed in collaboration with fashion heavyweights such as Luella, Giles Deacon, Betty Jackson, Christian Lacroix, Alice Temperley, Richard Nicoll and Ciel. EJF will also be stocking 100 shopper bags designed by Eley Kishimoto which will retail at the bargain price of £10 or come free when you spend over £50 in store. As they sold out like hot potatoes at LFW last month make sure you get there while stock lasts.

rokit neon green cropImage courtesy of Rokit Vintage Clothing.

ROKIT ROCKING CHRISTMAS
26 NOVEMBER (6-9PM)
ROKIT, 42 SHELTON STREET, COVENT GARDEN, WC2
FREE ENTRY
If you’re looking to get into the festive spirit this week then head down to Covent Garden for this glamorous in-store event where in-house stylists will be on hand to help you choose something unique and original for all those impending Christmas parties! With drinks, cakes and live rockabilly rock’n’roll with Ronnie King and the Hustlers what more could you ask for? With an added incentive of 15% discount on offer you’d be made not to pop in for a mince pie.

otb_logo_bannerImage courtesy of the Old Truman Brewery.

ALL I WANT FOR XMAS
26 NOVEMBER – 20 DECEMBER (THURS: 5-9PM, FRI: 12-6PM, SAT/SUN: 10-6PM)
T1 SPACE, F BLOCK, OLD TRUMAN BREWERY, 15 HANBURY STREET, E1
FREE ENTRY
Launching this Thursday the Old Truman Brewery has come up with the perfect antidote to pre-Christmas blues with a one-stop shopping event that aims to inject the fun back into the much dreaded Christmas shop. Featuring a wide variety of exclusive goods on sale from independent retailers in the form of gift markets, exhibitions, designer sales, independent shops and even a pop-up emporium you’re sure to find something for everyone. With the brightest creative talent from the worlds of design, art, fashion and home ware it’s time to start checking off your Christmas list and see who’s been naughty and who’s been nice!

ada zanditon sample saleImage courtesy of Ada Zandinton.

ADA ZANDITON SAMPLE SALE
26-27 NOVEMBER (THURS: 6:30-9:30PM, FRI: 11-7PM)
DIGITARIA, 60 BERWICK STREET, SOHO, W1
FREE ENTRY
A firm favourite among the British ethical designers, Ada Zanditon is to host her first sample sale later this week. Hosted by Ada herself in conjunction with Notion magazine there will be exclusive music videos from Bishi and a fashion supplement giveaway. If you’d like to get your hands on pieces from Ada’s AW09 range at heavily discounted prices (up to 70%) make sure you put this date in your diary, just don’t forget to RSVP.

twist baby twistImage courtesy of Fashion & Textile Museum.

TWIST BABY TWIST
27-28 NOVEMBER (7:30-10:30PM)
FASHION & TEXTILE MUSEUM, 83 BERMONDSEY STREET, SE1
£15 (INCLUDING FOALE & TUFFIN EXHIBITION ENTRY AND SHOW)
This weekend the Fashion & Textile Museum will be hosting two evenings of swinging sixties entertainment to celebrate their current exhibition Foale and Tuffin: Made in England. Celebrating everything great about this iconic decade in British culture there will be a host of live music and dancing from the likes of Remi Nicole, Theoretical Girl, The Equations and BeBe & Paulo on Friday and Eliza Doolittle, The Bang Bang Club and Henry Johnson on Saturday. If that wasn’t enough you’ll also find film displays, fashion shows, 1960s themed make-overs, DJs, a mysterious David Bailey photo booth plus many more activities to keep you entertained.

OXFAM_MAKE_DO_AND_MENDImage courtesy of Oxfam.

OXFAM MAKE DO AND MEND FASHION SHOW
28 NOVEMBER (FROM 2PM WITH CATWALK SHOW AT 6:30PM)
ST. MARY’S CHURCH, WYNDHAM PLACE, MARYLEBONE, W1
£5 ENTRY
This one-off “Make Do and Mend” event takes its name from the WW2 propaganda campaigns when clothing rationing was introduced. In current times where every penny counts Oxfam are encouraging consumers to step away from the “throwaway” fashion and embrace the quality and individual style their stores have to offer. To bring home this message Oxfam are hosting a very special event which will see a host of market stalls sell everything from accessories to wedding dresses, as well as an exhibition on the history of 2nd hand fashion, a swap shop and a special customisation corner. If all of this wasn’t enough to whet your appetite there will also be food and drink on offer, live music and DJs and the piece de resistance; a special Oxfam fashion show.

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Alice Temperley, ,All I want for Xmas, ,BeBe & Paulo, ,Betty Jackson, ,Bishi, ,Christian Lacroix, ,ciel, ,David Bailey, ,Digitaria, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Eliza Doolittle, ,Environmental Justice Foundation, ,Fashion & Textile Museum, ,Foale and Tuffin, ,Giles Deacon, ,Henry Johnson, ,Kingly Court, ,Luella, ,Make Do and Mend, ,Notion, ,Old Truman Brewery, ,oxfam, ,Remi Nicole, ,Richard Nicoll, ,Rokit, ,Ronnie King and the Hustlers, ,The Bang Bang Club, ,The Equations, ,Theoretical Girl, ,Twist Baby Twist

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Editor’s Christmas Gift Guide

2London Undercover
If you’re looking for a quirky present this Christmas why not opt for an umbrella with a twist? London undercover is a new brand which specialises in quintessentially British umbrellas. With designs ranging from Full English breakfast and Café tablecloth, page Fish & Chips wrapped in newspaper, unconventional Union Jacks, Hounds Tooth and Plaid designs there is something for everyone. Prices start at £40.

EJF_luellaEthical Justice Foundation
Giles Deacon, Zandra Rhodes, Allegra Hicks, John Rocha, Luella, Christian Lacroix, Betty Jackson and Katharine Hamnett have all designed exclusive prints for a collection of t-shirts in aid of The Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) produced on organic and fairly traded cotton and printed with organic certified inks. This great capsule collection of T-shirts are designed to help raise awareness and funds for EJF’s Cotton Campaign to end child labour and the use of dangerous pesticides in cotton production while promoting the benefits of organic, fairly traded fashion. Prices start at £30.

xmaslife72Mr P.S
If you’re looking to pick up something festive for the Christmas table in the coming weeks why not opt for this Cranberry themed 100% cotton tea towel, also available in Lime. Priced at £8.50.

mini-case-4-35373Paul Smith
As one of the UK’s forefront fashion designers it comes as no surprise that Sir Paul Smith has teamed up with computer software giants Apple to create a range of limited edition accessories just in time for Christmas. Pick up one of these Mac book 15” Mini Cooper sleeves bearing Sir Paul’s signature multistripe. Several products are available offered in a choice of sizes, fabrics and prints. Case pictured priced at £89.

JTA02-AW09-1

Equa
If you’re on the hunt for a more meaningful gift to give this festive season why not opt for the Just Trade 5 a Day Brooch, a quirky vegetable brooch, handmade from organic Peruvian cotton. All brooches are hand made by the Zoe Project which provides training and fairly paid work for women living in some of the poorest shanty towns in Lima, Peru. Designs also available are corn-on-the-cob, beetroot, peas-in-a-pod, red pepper, cauliflower and broccoli. Priced at £9.

pleatedskirtcover

DIY Couture
DIYcouture is a fantastic website which publishes books that allow people to make personally tailored clothing without couture price-tags, and affordable clothing that has not been made using sweatshop labour. Each book teaches the reader to make one piece of clothing from the DIYcouture collection. The books are an evolution of and a step away from traditional sewing patterns. They use colourful computer designed diagrams and photography to guide novice sewers through the making process. Priced at £9.

file_2_6Matt and Nat
It’s not often that I write about the same brand twice in one week however, so impressed were we with their wares it felt right to include them in the gift guide too. After all which eco contentious fashion savvy woman wouldn’t want one of these on her arm? Pick up this vegan ‘Chi’ leather wallet with grey lining, tone on tone stitching, antique brass and copper hardware, and embossed MATT & NAT logo on front. Priced at £50.

pants2p-f-big

Pants to poverty
Pants to Poverty is a new kind of underwear on a mission to rid the world of bad pants! These organic, safe sex pants are made from 97% organic and fair-trade cotton and 3% lycra and even come with a fairly traded French Letter condom made from natural latex – impressed yet? With £1 per pair of pants sold going to the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa (TAC), the money raised will support essential work empowering people to access lifesaving treatment in some of the worst affected regions in the world. Priced at £11.99.

All images courtesy of the brands written about, all there is left to say is Merry Christmas x

Categories ,Allegra Hicks, ,Apple, ,Betty Jackson, ,Christian Lacroix, ,DIY Couture, ,Equa, ,Giles Deacon, ,John Rocha, ,Katharine Hamnett, ,London Undercover, ,Luella, ,Matt and Nat, ,Mini Cooper, ,Mr P.S, ,Pants to Poverty, ,Paul Smith, ,Treatment Action Campaign, ,Zandra Rhodes

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