Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Party: Tatty Devine


Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, ed stuff everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery, the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.



All photography by Florence Massey

Categories ,Collaborations, ,Covent Garden, ,Cowboy Boots, ,Gilbert and George, ,Horseshoe Necklace, ,jewellery, ,london, ,Monmouth Street, ,Mrs Jones, ,Nametag Necklace, ,rob ryan, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Severed Limb, ,Western

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: studio_805, Agi & Sam and Post Human Wardobe

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, advice dosage I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, what is ed evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.
Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, more about I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, ask evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.
Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, hospital I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, website like this evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, symptoms but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.
Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, clinic I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.

Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, seek I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, treatment evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.

Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, there I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, thumb evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Phillippa Holland
Over on the Phillippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.

Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on, or indeed to give me the impression she even remembers her appearance in Amelia’s Magazine. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.


studio_805, unhealthy illustrated by Alia Gargum

Dashing in between the D-GNAK show and Carolyn Massey, stuff I managed to catch the Fashion Scout presentations at Freemason’s Hall. I was really looking forward to these – I couldn’t wait to see what studio_805 would come up with following sex-trade styling a year ago and bondagey sports-luxe stuff last season, more about and I heard good things about Post Human Wardrobe and Agi & Sam.


studio_805

Set in one of the Freemason’s many haunting rooms, I unfortunately have a huge criticism. Rubbish bloody lighting. Why on Earth would you go to the trouble of putting on such a great presentation (because, besides this major error, they were great presentations) and not consider that people might want to photograph your work? Admittedly, I didn’t have my flash and so was reduced to taking shakey photos, but the lighting really was appalling. Curtains were drawn, few lights were on, and you couldn’t see the infinite detail and craftsmenship that the three labels had administered with any clarity – a huge shame.

Anyway, rant over. Here’s a little run through, from what I could see!

studio_805

Illustration by Alia Gargum

This season, one-man-band Andrew Bannister, aka studio_805, presented a collection of just five pieces, all of which were a treat as always. The five models were raised on boxes, heightening the sense of drama and giving the creations even more oomph. Muscular models who clearly spend their entire existence in gyms were covered in camouflage and tribal paint (who has the time to look that good? I can barely managed a monthly swim).

Camouflage featured heavily, both in print and in physical foliage that was attached to these ensembles. Spiced up with vibrant neon orange (they’d easily find you hiding in the bushes wearing these), each piece utilised pull-straps to form structural shapes. Hoods created a creepy, guerilla attitude, while baggy trousers and capes transformed the Herculean frames of the models. Oh, and the riding cap with decorated antlers was one of my favourite things this week. I won’t be wearing of any of this in the near future (I don’t have the pecs, for starters) but yet again Bannister and studio_805 delivered a progressive, unique and inspiring collection.

Agi & Sam

I loved Agi & Sam‘s twee set up at the back of this room. Evoking images of Spaghetti Westerns and Native America, their installation included a projected background of a desert and a sand covered floor littered with animal bones.

Models stood around nonchalantly in vibrant and exotic fabrics, mostly fitted blazers and tapered trousers. A mix of digital prints and knit, these really stood out and for a moment it was like being whisked back a century. Porkpie hats and side partings completed this whimsical look.

Post Human Wardobe

By the time I’d got to Post Human Wardrobe, I was dripping with sweat and totally bemused by this lighting situation, so I unfortunately didn’t get to have a good rummage through the rails. Gym mats were placed in front of their display, on which fighters were to perform in the outfits. I missed this, unfortunately, but I hear it was very good… The collection, from what I briefly saw, consisted of a neutral and somewhat industrial colour palette used on a range of tailored trousers and sports-luxe jackets, utilising assymetric lines and irregular cuts.

Categories ,Agi & Sam, ,Camouflage, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Muscles, ,Native America, ,Post Human Wardrobe, ,S/S 2011, ,studio_805, ,Western

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Party: Tatty Devine


Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, ed stuff everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery, the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.



All photography by Florence Massey

Categories ,Collaborations, ,Covent Garden, ,Cowboy Boots, ,Gilbert and George, ,Horseshoe Necklace, ,jewellery, ,london, ,Monmouth Street, ,Mrs Jones, ,Nametag Necklace, ,rob ryan, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Severed Limb, ,Western

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ji Cheng: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Geiko Louve

Chinese designer Ji Cheng’s first show in London was held at Vauxhall Fashion Scout on Tuesday 21st February, the last day of London Fashion Week’s womenswear. Jumping ahead of the queue I had a chance to examine my front row goody bag – a proper mini version of some of the bags that later appeared on the catwalk designed by Ji Cheng, not a tote! – and to look through the slides projected on the wall at the start of the runway. The slides showed models dressed in Ji Cheng’s designs posing at striking Chinese landscape locations, mixing with traditional Chinese life activities or getting intimate with some sexy Chinese pottery makers in their workshops. Some showed traditional pots at a rough, unfinished stage that made them look more like minimal, contemporary western pottery.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Love Amelia

Indeed Ji Cheng has a passion for Chinese traditional culture, but her collection, according to her ‘combines the essence of classic Chinese art with modern Western techniques and tailoring’ and she wishes to emphasise through her work ‘the combination of Eastern and Western culture’. For example, Chinese inspired elements such as Kimono wrap dresses, short stand-up collars and thick embroidered belts were on show, but so were some minimal skirts, blouses and shirts fit for a nine-to-five job in the office.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah  Moon

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah Moon

The designer from Shanghai named her A/W 2012 collection Zen Awakening and one could easily see that some of the smoothly draped overlapping lines on the garments and the loose way in which they fell over the body were influenced by Zen monks’ robes and cassocks. This influence was further evident in the model who opened and closed the show, with a striking shaved head like that of a Zen monk. In the press release Ji Cheng made an effort to explain the title Zen Awakening using some rather heavy zen philosophical phraseology such as ‘thought is not thinking’ and referring to ‘higher states of unity’, which I rather enjoyed reading in relation to a fashion show.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Somewhat relevant to the above, the colour scheme of the show was presented in groups of colours. It started with a focus on a traditional Chinese vermilion, then it moved on to more earthly, brownish hues, followed by a number of mainly white pieces, then a number of mainly black ones and finishing off with the last two numbers which had an iridescent, silver hue. In that way it was a bit like the clothes were following the developmental stages – represented by the different colour groups – of a soul on its journey towards Zen Awakening. Scattered here and there were flashes of fluorescent green or orange, like little moments of realisation along the way.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The pure vermilion, so characteristic of Chinese culture, did not only make an appearance on the clothes, but also on the models’ faces, whose make up was a very toned down, western version of the reddish make up applied on actors taking part in Peking Opera productions – a theme which has been an inspiration for a previous collection by Ji Cheng.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Dana Bocai

Quite a few of the dresses and blouses featured a very interesting back with cut out panels or huge statement bows. Some of the models carried in their hands really beautifully shaped clutch bags and the shoes had a fabric front, held in place by long ribbons which were tied around the calves in a zigzag fashion. A lot of them left the heel totally exposed, which I thought was not so fit for the modern woman.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

This was a pleasant collection with an interesting philosophy behind it, so I hope to see how Ji Cheng’s brand La Vie develops over the following seasons showing in London.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,Chinese, ,Chinese Fashion, ,Chinese Opera, ,Chinese Pottery, ,Clutch Bags, ,Collars, ,Dana Bocai, ,Deborah Moon, ,Eastern, ,Embroidered, ,Fashion Design, ,Fluorescent, ,Freemason’s Hall, ,Geiko Louve, ,Goody Bag, ,Ji Cheng, ,Kerry Jones, ,Kimono, ,La Vie, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Love Amelia, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,monks, ,Peking Opera, ,Shanghai, ,Silk Blouses, ,Silks, ,Slideshow, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Vermilion, ,Western, ,Wrap Dresses, ,Zen, ,Zen Awakening, ,Zigzag

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