Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week Interview: Nottingham Trent’s Phoebe Thirlwall

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Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, story receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Categories ,catwalk, ,Dazed & Confused, ,De Montford, ,fabric, ,Fashion Bloggers, ,Fashion degree, ,Flesh, ,GH Hurt and Sons, ,Graduate Fashion Week 2010, ,Hong Kong, ,Kate Shillingford, ,knitwear, ,Lucy Wood, ,Mark Fast, ,Missoni, ,Nottingham Trent University, ,Pheobe Thirlwall, ,Rankin, ,Shanghai, ,Skin, ,Spin Expo, ,Susie Bubble, ,Technique, ,usa, ,Work experience

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week Interview: Nottingham Trent’s Phoebe Thirlwall

hold

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, story receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Categories ,catwalk, ,Dazed & Confused, ,De Montford, ,fabric, ,Fashion Bloggers, ,Fashion degree, ,Flesh, ,GH Hurt and Sons, ,Graduate Fashion Week 2010, ,Hong Kong, ,Kate Shillingford, ,knitwear, ,Lucy Wood, ,Mark Fast, ,Missoni, ,Nottingham Trent University, ,Pheobe Thirlwall, ,Rankin, ,Shanghai, ,Skin, ,Spin Expo, ,Susie Bubble, ,Technique, ,usa, ,Work experience

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ji Cheng: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Geiko Louve

Chinese designer Ji Cheng’s first show in London was held at Vauxhall Fashion Scout on Tuesday 21st February, the last day of London Fashion Week’s womenswear. Jumping ahead of the queue I had a chance to examine my front row goody bag – a proper mini version of some of the bags that later appeared on the catwalk designed by Ji Cheng, not a tote! – and to look through the slides projected on the wall at the start of the runway. The slides showed models dressed in Ji Cheng’s designs posing at striking Chinese landscape locations, mixing with traditional Chinese life activities or getting intimate with some sexy Chinese pottery makers in their workshops. Some showed traditional pots at a rough, unfinished stage that made them look more like minimal, contemporary western pottery.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Love Amelia

Indeed Ji Cheng has a passion for Chinese traditional culture, but her collection, according to her ‘combines the essence of classic Chinese art with modern Western techniques and tailoring’ and she wishes to emphasise through her work ‘the combination of Eastern and Western culture’. For example, Chinese inspired elements such as Kimono wrap dresses, short stand-up collars and thick embroidered belts were on show, but so were some minimal skirts, blouses and shirts fit for a nine-to-five job in the office.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah  Moon

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah Moon

The designer from Shanghai named her A/W 2012 collection Zen Awakening and one could easily see that some of the smoothly draped overlapping lines on the garments and the loose way in which they fell over the body were influenced by Zen monks’ robes and cassocks. This influence was further evident in the model who opened and closed the show, with a striking shaved head like that of a Zen monk. In the press release Ji Cheng made an effort to explain the title Zen Awakening using some rather heavy zen philosophical phraseology such as ‘thought is not thinking’ and referring to ‘higher states of unity’, which I rather enjoyed reading in relation to a fashion show.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Somewhat relevant to the above, the colour scheme of the show was presented in groups of colours. It started with a focus on a traditional Chinese vermilion, then it moved on to more earthly, brownish hues, followed by a number of mainly white pieces, then a number of mainly black ones and finishing off with the last two numbers which had an iridescent, silver hue. In that way it was a bit like the clothes were following the developmental stages – represented by the different colour groups – of a soul on its journey towards Zen Awakening. Scattered here and there were flashes of fluorescent green or orange, like little moments of realisation along the way.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The pure vermilion, so characteristic of Chinese culture, did not only make an appearance on the clothes, but also on the models’ faces, whose make up was a very toned down, western version of the reddish make up applied on actors taking part in Peking Opera productions – a theme which has been an inspiration for a previous collection by Ji Cheng.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Dana Bocai

Quite a few of the dresses and blouses featured a very interesting back with cut out panels or huge statement bows. Some of the models carried in their hands really beautifully shaped clutch bags and the shoes had a fabric front, held in place by long ribbons which were tied around the calves in a zigzag fashion. A lot of them left the heel totally exposed, which I thought was not so fit for the modern woman.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

This was a pleasant collection with an interesting philosophy behind it, so I hope to see how Ji Cheng’s brand La Vie develops over the following seasons showing in London.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,Chinese, ,Chinese Fashion, ,Chinese Opera, ,Chinese Pottery, ,Clutch Bags, ,Collars, ,Dana Bocai, ,Deborah Moon, ,Eastern, ,Embroidered, ,Fashion Design, ,Fluorescent, ,Freemason’s Hall, ,Geiko Louve, ,Goody Bag, ,Ji Cheng, ,Kerry Jones, ,Kimono, ,La Vie, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Love Amelia, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,monks, ,Peking Opera, ,Shanghai, ,Silk Blouses, ,Silks, ,Slideshow, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Vermilion, ,Western, ,Wrap Dresses, ,Zen, ,Zen Awakening, ,Zigzag

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Amelia’s Magazine | A Review of ILLUMinations at the Arsenale, Venice Biennale 2011: part one

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review
During my recent trip to Venice I had the opportunity to visit the Venice Biennale. Even better, information pills as guests of the primary partner Swatch, erectile we had our own private tour around two major parts of the extensive exhibition. Here’s what I liked at the amazing old army dockyard, otherwise known as the Arsenale. ILLUMinations at the Arsenale was curated by Bice Curiger.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-song dong
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-song dong
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-song dong
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-song dong
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-song dong
Song Dong‘s massive Parapavilion installation greets visitors on entry to the Arsenale exhibition – part old Chinese Hutong, part wardrobe maze: a reference to the cupboards kept on streets in many old areas. An impressive piece to encounter straight away… and I particularly liked looking at all the details of the individual wardrobes, wondering what their previous lives were.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-456
Roman Ondak‘s eery artwork Time Capsule (2011) is focused on a replica of the rescue capsule that was used to evacuate the Chilean miners last year. Viewers approach it in darkness, only realising what it is when they are pressed up close to its narrow confines.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Mai-Thu Perret
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Mai-Thu Perret
Mai-Thu Perret‘s glossy sculpture wears a replica of Elsa Schiaparelli‘s famous Skeleton Dress. Behind it a neon pyramid glows in sputtering layers.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Andro Wekua
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Andro Wekua
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Andro Wekua
Andro Wekua of Georgia now works in Switzerland after he was forced into exile with the outbreak of war. Pink Wave Hunter is the odd title he gives a piece that is built on his recollections of important buildings from the city of his birth.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Rashid Johnson
Rashid Johnson examines the culture of the black diaspora in America. A zebra rug is laid on top of a woollen carpet. Artefacts particular to his upbringing, such as a book on childcare by Bill Crosby, are laid out on shattered mirrored wall mounts. Beautiful and affecting.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Birdhead
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Birdhead
Birdhead are a Shanghai collective who collect imagery that captures the lives of the modern Chinese.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Franz West
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-500
Franz West has relocated his kitchen to the gallery for his Parapavilion, complete with artwork from his walls – thereby creating a show within a show. And yes, a photograph proves that his walls are indeed painted in this crazy cross-hatched manner.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Dayanita Singh
Dayanita Singh‘s evocative collection of black and white photographs highlights the many many files sitting on shelves across India, which will soon vanish as the use of computers and hard drives become ever more prevalent.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Elad Lassry
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Elad Lassry
Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Elad Lassry
Elad Lassry shows a video montage of catsuited dancers alongside colourful images of vintage ladies in big hats and pop art-esque mushrooms. No idea what it all means but it was fun.

Venice Biennale 2011 Swatch review-Haroon Mirza
Haroon Mirza has created an eery installation – visitors enter a darkened box with walls covered in sound soaking points of foam. The combination of sound and blinking neon creates a discombobulating effect that leaves everybody giggling.

Next up: more from the ILLUMinations exhibition in part two.

Categories ,54th, ,Andro Wekua, ,Arsenale, ,Bice Curiger, ,Bill Crosby, ,Birdhead, ,Chinese, ,Dayanita Singh, ,Elad Lassry, ,Elsa Schiaparelli, ,Franz West, ,georgia, ,Haroon Mirza, ,Hutong, ,ILLUMinations, ,Mai-Thu Perret, ,Parapavilion, ,Pink Wave Hunter, ,Rashid Johnson, ,Roman Ondak, ,Shanghai, ,Skeleton Dress, ,Song Dong, ,Swatch, ,Switzerland, ,Time Capsule (2011), ,Venice Biennale

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