Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with Patrick Li from Fashion Scout’s ‘One’s to Watch’ A/W13, London Fashion Week

Patrick Li A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman
Sneak Preview of Patrick Li A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman. All other images S/S 2013.

It’s that frantically fabulous point of year again, when Fashion Scout’s coveted Ones to Watch of the season is announced before the highly anticipated London Fashion Week. Among the selected talents is Patrick Li; with an MA from the Royal College of Art and experience working under the likes of Viktor & Rolf and Hussein Chalayan, it is clear that he is a force to be reckoned with. Prior to the show, I had the pleasure of picking Patrick Li’s brain to see what he’s all about and where the ease and fluidity of his designs come from.

Patrick Li by Deborah Moon
Patrick LI by Deborah Moon

Congratulations on being chosen as one of the Ones to Watch this season! How does it feel?
Thank you! It’s feels great to be chosen as once of the Ones to Watch, I am looking forward to presenting A/W 2013.

PATRICK LI SS13
What do you like to think sets you apart from the other designers?
Design, vision and the aesthetic of the brand set PATRICK LI apart from the other designers, I think every designer is unique and has his/her own take on the direction and vision of their brands.

Patrick Li by Natalie Lines
Patrick Li by Natalie Lines

Your designs are so beautifully crisp and seem almost architectural, what has inspired your collection for the Ones to Watch?
For A/W 2013, I was inspired by a V&A exhibition Shadow Catchers, especially the work of Garry-Fabian Miller. The singular lighting objects are so impeccable, yet sensual at the same time. I used the lighting coming through darkness as the initial idea for the collection. I have also looked at architecture and interiors designed by Zaha Hadid. I find the organic bold structures and lines of the buildings very intriguing. I started to develop the collection from there and I have worked with bias seams to achieve softer graphic lines for the body shape this season.

Describe your collection in 5 words.
Graphic, Contrasting, Dimensional, Asymmetrical, Sensual.

PATRICK LI SS13
When designing, what gets your creative juices flowing?
Sunshine! Minimal electro tracks.

Your clothes are to be stocked at Joyce in Hong Kong soon, which is MAJOR. Do you have any trouble balancing creativity with commerce?
It’s exciting to know that my debut collection will be stocked at Joyce. There will also be exhibition event at Joyce with my S/S 2013 collection. I found it hard to balance creativity and commerce at first, because creativity doesn’t really always translate into wearability well. There is compromise to be made along the process; I had to constantly remind myself of the woman that I am designing for.

Patrick Li by Kirsty McGill
Patrick Li by Kirsty McGill

Fashion aside, what are some of your favourite things to do in London?
Going to the Cinema, dining out, visiting museums and galleries.

What’s next for you in the near future?
I am looking forward to starting S/S 2014 straight after Ones to Watch. A solo show next season perhaps.

Patrick Li Illustration by Naomi Samara
Illustration by Naomi Samara

Patrick Li shows as part of Ones to Watch on Saturday 16th February 2013.

Categories ,Deborah Moon, ,Garry Fabian Miller, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Isher Dhiman, ,Joyce, ,Kirsty McGill, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Samara, ,Natalie Lines, ,Ones To Watch, ,Patrick Li, ,Royal College of Art, ,Shadow Catchers, ,Zaha Hadid

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Amelia’s Magazine | Good Fashion Show: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Antonia Parker

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Antonia Parker

Following on the footsteps of other London Fashion Week off-schedule showrooms which focus on ethical fashion, such as Ecoluxe London, The Good Fashion Show was an entirely new, day long event combining a marketplace, talks and an art exhibition during the day with an evening runway show. As someone who is interested in design in relation to sustainability, of course I wanted to check this newcomer out. Unfortunately due to attending other London Fashion Week events earlier in the day, I could only visit the London House, where The Good Fashion Show was taking place in the evening to watch the runway show.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Geo Twins by Erica Sharp

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Geo Twins by Erica Sharp

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Beautiful Ensemble by Zarina Liew

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Beautiful Ensemble by Zarina Liew

Upon arrival I had to pass through a number of stalls placed on the outside corridors which exuded an atmosphere of a craft market or jumble sale – not a very good start. I was also a little disappointed to find the work of brilliant illustrators Erica Sharp and Zarina Liew – whom I first saw in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration – badly curated and placed in a corridor where their beauty was totally drowned out by the style of this building with its town hall feel.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Nina Burri photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Miti Desai photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Unlike other on or off-schedule London Fashion Week events, which are mainly open to press and buyers only, The Good Fashion Show Marketplace could be visited by anyone for a £5 entry fee and similarly the general public could buy a £30 ticket for the evening catwalk show. As this was a paid event the organisers felt they had to provide the audience with some form of extra entertainment in between showcasing the clothes. During an almost two-hour affair we were treated to a combination of live acts which included singing by Omar, body bending by contortionist Nina Burri, story telling about the hindu god Shiva followed by classical Indian dancing by Miti Desai, musical sewing by Brazilian performance artist and designer Lisa Simpson, more live music by band Left at the Robot and a screening of the short film and then it was gone made by fashion photographer Claire Pepper.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by  Deborah Moon

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Deborah Moon

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

During the evening I thought it was a shame, and rather unfortunate for the designers, that the models walked out one after another with the audience having no guidance as to whose designer’s work they were looking at. I had to do quite a bit of research after the show in order to match up some of the designs I had photographed with their designers. Even worse for the promotion of the designers represented, I could not find many captions on the photo galleries published on The Good Fashion Show’s website and Facebook page post show. Fortunately I did manage to find the designer of my favorite outfit of the evening, which was a fun looking and contemporary knitted two piece designed by Jeni Allison.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Another relatively interesting designer on show was Sara Li-Chou Han, who reworks denim and suit pieces from charity shops into more elaborate dresses.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

We also saw some minimal designs, such as this dress by Fashion Compassion.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

I totally support and love shops such as Beyond Retro and Oxfam Fashion, which were shown at The Good Fashion Show, however a lot of the vintage looks could have been styled in a more interesting way.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Some of the menswear looks were a bit of a better hit with me, featuring baggy trousers and gigantic necklaces made out of reused computer game controls by funky customising brand Red Mutha.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In the spirit of resourcefulness a few of the models showed us how an outfit could be turned into a new one, depending on how you wear it.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The show also covered underwear, showcasing brands such as Who Made Your Pants and In Bloom London.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The last few numbers, like Tuncer Tonun’s basket hand bags and potato sack jackets, were a bit more theatrical and the event closed with a rather pretty bubble wrap dress. Unfortunately, as a whole, The Good Fashion Show did not do much to present green fashion as a platform for forward thinking, really good looking fashion design. I thought this was mainly to the way the show was curated and organised, as really brilliant ethical brands such as Emesha, Outsider Fashion, Henrietta Ludgate or From Somewhere were part of it, but still looked unimpressive because of the way they were presented and the context they were put in.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.

Categories ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Harrowing, ,Antonia Parker, ,Beyond Retro, ,Claire Pepper, ,Classical Indian Dance, ,Cobalt Cafe, ,Dana Bocai, ,Deborah Moon, ,Ecoluxe, ,Erica Sharp, ,Ethical Fashion, ,From Somewhere, ,Geiko Louve, ,Good Fashion Show, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,illustration, ,In Bloom London, ,Jeni Allison, ,knitwear, ,Left at The Robot, ,Lisa Simpson, ,London Fashion Week, ,London House, ,Love Amelia, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,menswear, ,Miti Desai, ,Nina Burri, ,Off Schedule, ,Omar, ,Outsider Fashion, ,Oxfam Fashion, ,Red Mutha, ,Sara Li-Chou Han, ,Shiva, ,Sustainable Fashion, ,Tuncer Tonun, ,underwear, ,vintage, ,Who Made Your Pants, ,Zarina Liew

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ji Cheng: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Geiko Louve

Chinese designer Ji Cheng’s first show in London was held at Vauxhall Fashion Scout on Tuesday 21st February, the last day of London Fashion Week’s womenswear. Jumping ahead of the queue I had a chance to examine my front row goody bag – a proper mini version of some of the bags that later appeared on the catwalk designed by Ji Cheng, not a tote! – and to look through the slides projected on the wall at the start of the runway. The slides showed models dressed in Ji Cheng’s designs posing at striking Chinese landscape locations, mixing with traditional Chinese life activities or getting intimate with some sexy Chinese pottery makers in their workshops. Some showed traditional pots at a rough, unfinished stage that made them look more like minimal, contemporary western pottery.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Love Amelia

Indeed Ji Cheng has a passion for Chinese traditional culture, but her collection, according to her ‘combines the essence of classic Chinese art with modern Western techniques and tailoring’ and she wishes to emphasise through her work ‘the combination of Eastern and Western culture’. For example, Chinese inspired elements such as Kimono wrap dresses, short stand-up collars and thick embroidered belts were on show, but so were some minimal skirts, blouses and shirts fit for a nine-to-five job in the office.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah  Moon

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Deborah Moon

The designer from Shanghai named her A/W 2012 collection Zen Awakening and one could easily see that some of the smoothly draped overlapping lines on the garments and the loose way in which they fell over the body were influenced by Zen monks’ robes and cassocks. This influence was further evident in the model who opened and closed the show, with a striking shaved head like that of a Zen monk. In the press release Ji Cheng made an effort to explain the title Zen Awakening using some rather heavy zen philosophical phraseology such as ‘thought is not thinking’ and referring to ‘higher states of unity’, which I rather enjoyed reading in relation to a fashion show.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Somewhat relevant to the above, the colour scheme of the show was presented in groups of colours. It started with a focus on a traditional Chinese vermilion, then it moved on to more earthly, brownish hues, followed by a number of mainly white pieces, then a number of mainly black ones and finishing off with the last two numbers which had an iridescent, silver hue. In that way it was a bit like the clothes were following the developmental stages – represented by the different colour groups – of a soul on its journey towards Zen Awakening. Scattered here and there were flashes of fluorescent green or orange, like little moments of realisation along the way.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The pure vermilion, so characteristic of Chinese culture, did not only make an appearance on the clothes, but also on the models’ faces, whose make up was a very toned down, western version of the reddish make up applied on actors taking part in Peking Opera productions – a theme which has been an inspiration for a previous collection by Ji Cheng.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Ji Cheng A/W 2012 by Dana Bocai

Quite a few of the dresses and blouses featured a very interesting back with cut out panels or huge statement bows. Some of the models carried in their hands really beautifully shaped clutch bags and the shoes had a fabric front, held in place by long ribbons which were tied around the calves in a zigzag fashion. A lot of them left the heel totally exposed, which I thought was not so fit for the modern woman.

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Ji Cheng AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

This was a pleasant collection with an interesting philosophy behind it, so I hope to see how Ji Cheng’s brand La Vie develops over the following seasons showing in London.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,Chinese, ,Chinese Fashion, ,Chinese Opera, ,Chinese Pottery, ,Clutch Bags, ,Collars, ,Dana Bocai, ,Deborah Moon, ,Eastern, ,Embroidered, ,Fashion Design, ,Fluorescent, ,Freemason’s Hall, ,Geiko Louve, ,Goody Bag, ,Ji Cheng, ,Kerry Jones, ,Kimono, ,La Vie, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Love Amelia, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,monks, ,Peking Opera, ,Shanghai, ,Silk Blouses, ,Silks, ,Slideshow, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Vermilion, ,Western, ,Wrap Dresses, ,Zen, ,Zen Awakening, ,Zigzag

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fred Butler: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Presentation Review

Fred Butler AW 2012 by Mitika Chohan

Fred Butler AW 2012 by Mitika Chohan

I love Fred Butler. She has been one of my favourite accessories and props designers for a few years now and apart from what she makes I also adore the fascinating and playful way in which she dresses as well as the way she expresses herself in interviews, which reveals a really quite special person indeed. I had seen her props pop up here and there in magazines, like in Amelia’s Magazine Issue 7 for which she made a Noah’s Ark shaped paper hat – in fact Amelia Gregory was one of the first to commission props from Fred. But I think a story I saw in i-D’s The Agyness Deyn Issue from May 2008, titled ‘Attitude’, featuring an inflatable rockets bra by Fred among other striking props, was what made me an official fan.

Fred Butler AW 2012 Charli XCX photo by Maria Papadimitriou

While queueing to see Fred’s live presentation of her A/W 2012 collection at The Portico Rooms in Somerset House on the 20th of February I was extra happy because – apart from the obvious reason – my young friend and budding stylist Isabella Sumner of Secret Danger Sister was texting me from backstage. Isabella became Kim Howells’ assistant for this London Fashion Week season after I forwarded to her a post by Kim I saw on Facebook asking for help! Kim has styled numerous Fred Butler presentations, films and lookbooks. Fred’s presentation took the form of a mini catwalk show which repeated itself over and over to a different audience each time. And there was quite a crowd to get through. During the four times in and out from the Portico Rooms – I saw the show twice – there were queues extending all the way to and down the stairs leading to the ground level of Somerset House. In those queues I spotted an array of some of the coolest, cutting edge creatives around, like Piers Atkinson, Bishi, Alùn Davies and Diane Pernet and filmmaker Konstantinos Menelaou from ASVOF, to name a few, all of whom of course love Fred’s original work.

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou 9

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Refreshingly the show opened with pop singer Charli XCX singing her catchy song ‘I’ll Never Know’ live with a band. Fred Butler, who’s twitter feed is full of #thismorningimlisteningto and other music related tweets, has a special relationship with music. She often DJs, she has made props for musicians such as Patrick Wolf, Nicki Minaj, Beth Ditto, La Roux AND Lady Gaga and, according to her, looking at the way musicians were dressed on album covers when she was little has been very inspiring. So it seems entirely natural that this season Fred, enabled by Red Bull Catwalk Studio, collaborated with Charlie XCX on a bespoke soundtrack for the collection. In general I think that the way Fred uses different art forms to enhance and show her work works incredibly well – for example she has made beautiful fashion films of her previous collections with talented young directors such as Zaiba Jabbar and Elisha Smith-Leverock.

Fred Butler AW 2012 by Nicola Ellen

Fred Butler AW 2012 by Nicola Ellen

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler 2012 by Catherine Meadows

Fred Butler 2012 by Catherine Meadows

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Another notable and interesting thing about Fred Butler’s collections is the way she titles them using combined, long and sometimes made up words and phrases that seem to describe an other worldly thing or process in exactly the same intricate and imaginative way her pieces are made. The title of this collection was Tank Top-Ranking, Tong-Tied and Twisted. Her S/S 2012 collection was called Sonic Sinuate Supertemporal Sequestador and a 2011 collection went under the name of Incandescent Meta-morph-incessant.

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler AW 2012 LFW  by Deborah Moon

Fred Butler AW 2012 LFW by Deborah Moon

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Following her S/S 2012 collection which featured more round shapes, frills and quite a bit of fabric, I was personally happy that in this collection Fred returned to origami folding techniques and body props with more clear cut, geometric shapes. This time I thought that the four colour goddesses that stepped out looked impeccable from head to toe. Each model had a monochrome base formed by beautiful knitted undergarments – a collaboration with EDE who specialise in English produced hand knits – and a matching colour wig. Placed on top of that base were a quilted, high collar gilet, origami obi belts, a marshmallow hued harness with twisted tubes, more belts and headbands out of twisted strings and more origami inspired, sculptural body pieces. The outfits were completed by colour matching shoes designed in collaboration with Rosy Nicholas. According to the press release there was a sushi related theme under all of this, especially in relation to the colour palette used. Usually I am very intrigued by the designers’ influences and references – and I have fun making up quite a few of my own when looking at collections – but Fred Butler’s work is for me so striking and fulfilling visually that my mind feels too drunk with pure aesthetic pleasure to care for any explanation in other terms.

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Fred Butler AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,A Shaded View on Fashion, ,accessories, ,accessories designer, ,Agyness Deyn, ,Alun Davies, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,ASVOF, ,Beth Ditto, ,Bishi, ,Catherine Meadows, ,Charli XCX, ,Collaborations, ,Deborah Moon, ,Diane Pernet, ,EDE, ,Elisha Smith-Leverock, ,Ella Dror PR, ,Fashion Film, ,Fred Butler, ,i-D, ,Isabella Sumner, ,japanese, ,Kim Howells, ,Kimonos, ,Knits, ,Knotted, ,Konstantinos Menelaou, ,La Roux, ,Lady Gaga, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Mitika Chohan, ,monochrome, ,music, ,Nail Art, ,Nicki Minaj, ,Nicola Haigh, ,Noah’s Ark, ,Obi Belts, ,origami, ,pastels, ,Patrick Wolf, ,piers atkinson, ,Portico Rooms, ,Props, ,Quilting, ,rainbow, ,Red Bull Catwalk Studio, ,Red Bull Music Academy, ,Secret Danger Sister, ,Somerset House, ,Sushi, ,Twisted, ,Zaiba Jabbar

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Amelia’s Magazine | Good Fashion Show: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Antonia Parker

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Antonia Parker

Following on the footsteps of other London Fashion Week off-schedule showrooms which focus on ethical fashion, such as Ecoluxe London, The Good Fashion Show was an entirely new, day long event combining a marketplace, talks and an art exhibition during the day with an evening runway show. As someone who is interested in design in relation to sustainability, of course I wanted to check this newcomer out. Unfortunately due to attending other London Fashion Week events earlier in the day, I could only visit the London House, where The Good Fashion Show was taking place in the evening to watch the runway show.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Geo Twins by Erica Sharp

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Geo Twins by Erica Sharp

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Beautiful Ensemble by Zarina Liew

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Beautiful Ensemble by Zarina Liew

Upon arrival I had to pass through a number of stalls placed on the outside corridors which exuded an atmosphere of a craft market or jumble sale – not a very good start. I was also a little disappointed to find the work of brilliant illustrators Erica Sharp and Zarina Liew – whom I first saw in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration – badly curated and placed in a corridor where their beauty was totally drowned out by the style of this building with its town hall feel.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Nina Burri photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 Miti Desai photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Unlike other on or off-schedule London Fashion Week events, which are mainly open to press and buyers only, The Good Fashion Show Marketplace could be visited by anyone for a £5 entry fee and similarly the general public could buy a £30 ticket for the evening catwalk show. As this was a paid event the organisers felt they had to provide the audience with some form of extra entertainment in between showcasing the clothes. During an almost two-hour affair we were treated to a combination of live acts which included singing by Omar, body bending by contortionist Nina Burri, story telling about the hindu god Shiva followed by classical Indian dancing by Miti Desai, musical sewing by Brazilian performance artist and designer Lisa Simpson, more live music by band Left at the Robot and a screening of the short film and then it was gone made by fashion photographer Claire Pepper.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by  Deborah Moon

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Deborah Moon

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

During the evening I thought it was a shame, and rather unfortunate for the designers, that the models walked out one after another with the audience having no guidance as to whose designer’s work they were looking at. I had to do quite a bit of research after the show in order to match up some of the designs I had photographed with their designers. Even worse for the promotion of the designers represented, I could not find many captions on the photo galleries published on The Good Fashion Show’s website and Facebook page post show. Fortunately I did manage to find the designer of my favorite outfit of the evening, which was a fun looking and contemporary knitted two piece designed by Jeni Allison.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Another relatively interesting designer on show was Sara Li-Chou Han, who reworks denim and suit pieces from charity shops into more elaborate dresses.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

We also saw some minimal designs, such as this dress by Fashion Compassion.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

I totally support and love shops such as Beyond Retro and Oxfam Fashion, which were shown at The Good Fashion Show, however a lot of the vintage looks could have been styled in a more interesting way.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Some of the menswear looks were a bit of a better hit with me, featuring baggy trousers and gigantic necklaces made out of reused computer game controls by funky customising brand Red Mutha.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In the spirit of resourcefulness a few of the models showed us how an outfit could be turned into a new one, depending on how you wear it.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The show also covered underwear, showcasing brands such as Who Made Your Pants and In Bloom London.

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Love Amelia

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Good Fashion Show AW 2012 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

The last few numbers, like Tuncer Tonun’s basket hand bags and potato sack jackets, were a bit more theatrical and the event closed with a rather pretty bubble wrap dress. Unfortunately, as a whole, The Good Fashion Show did not do much to present green fashion as a platform for forward thinking, really good looking fashion design. I thought this was mainly to the way the show was curated and organised, as really brilliant ethical brands such as Emesha, Outsider Fashion, Henrietta Ludgate or From Somewhere were part of it, but still looked unimpressive because of the way they were presented and the context they were put in.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.

Categories ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Antonia Harrowing, ,Antonia Parker, ,Beyond Retro, ,Claire Pepper, ,Classical Indian Dance, ,Cobalt Cafe, ,Dana Bocai, ,Deborah Moon, ,Ecoluxe, ,Erica Sharp, ,Ethical Fashion, ,From Somewhere, ,Geiko Louve, ,Good Fashion Show, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,illustration, ,In Bloom London, ,Jeni Allison, ,knitwear, ,Left at The Robot, ,Lisa Simpson, ,London Fashion Week, ,London House, ,Love Amelia, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,menswear, ,Miti Desai, ,Nina Burri, ,Off Schedule, ,Omar, ,Outsider Fashion, ,Oxfam Fashion, ,Red Mutha, ,Sara Li-Chou Han, ,Shiva, ,Sustainable Fashion, ,Tuncer Tonun, ,underwear, ,vintage, ,Who Made Your Pants, ,Zarina Liew

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Amelia’s Magazine | Charlotte Taylor: London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Preview

Charlotte Taylor Bonsai Wide Leg Trousers by Gilly Rochester

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Wide Leg Trousers by Gilly Rochester

It was last year that a good friend introduced me to the brilliant and uplifting work of Charlotte Taylor. As I leafed through her A/W 2010 look book, advice I was hooked by the individualism – a collection of stand out, repeated prints, but within a tailored and feminine design. It was a unique combination of tweed, navy and printed penguins, which worked through heritage driven shapes such as capes, shift dresses and swinging hemlines.

Charlotte Taylor Fishermen Skirt and Blouse by Sam Parr

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Fishermen Skirt and Blouse by Sam Parr

I knew I had to get my hands on a ticket to go and see her next show. Charlotte was presenting her S/S 2011 collection as part of the Vauxhall Fashion Scout’s ‘Ones To Watch’ schedule. A mature transgression was made, but it kept the clear signature established in her first collection. It was quirky, but the English themes of grandma’s and heritage were displaced by a modern feel – bad robots, cut-out panels, younger shapes and a sporty aesthetic. A fresher palette of rust and denim blue sat alongside the yellows and creams from A/W 2010, with the luxurious silks only adding to its appeal.

Impressed and wanting to know more, I asked Charlotte if she would do an interview with me for Amelia’s Magazine. Unfortunately, she had to decline my offer. There were changes in the business, and as it stood, the label was on hold for the immediate future. I was disappointed that this collection would not go into production, and that the label, it appeared, would not continue.

Charlotte Taylor Bee Blouse by Gilly Rochester

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Bee Blouse by Gilly Rochester

So it was with delight that I came across Charlotte’s work again in June this year. Her blog was up and running, and she had produced an A/W 2011 collection. It is a rich splendour of jewel colours and madcap prints, such as ants, elephants, lobsters, and the carried over penguin. The colours clashed, the soft silks were still there, and this time tied up with an exotic feel that was inspired by a trip to Kenya that Charlotte had taken. The label had been stripped back to its signature feature – the prints. Rethought, and redefined, it was great to see the label back and doing business.

Charlotte Taylor Fisherman Shorts by Alejandra Espino

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Fisherman Shorts by Alejandra Espino

From this Friday, Charlotte will be exhibiting her new S/S 2012 collection at London Fashion Week. She let me have a preview of the new range, and answered some of my questions.

Charlotte Taylor is back after a season out. Where have you been, and are you excited to be showing again at London Fashion Week?
Well I didn’t actually take a proper season out… For S/S 2011 we decided not to go forward with production. I felt that the label needed more of an identifiable product and image and that it wasn’t portraying the message that I wanted it to. That’s why I decided to focus on the prints. Hence A/W 2011 was a print and colour frenzie! I decided not to show the collection at fashion week and instead to go around to many of our key retailers and show it in person to the owners and the buyers to get their direct feedback. It was a very useful experience and I also love building relationships with people, emails and telephones are not personable.

I am however really excited about showing at LFW and being back in the buzz of it. Last year I went to look around the BFC space at Somerset House and I had to be escorted around and then out the door. It felt a million miles away!

?What can we expect in the new S/S 2012 collection? What are the influences?
It’s influenced by Japanese Art and Culture, Bee Keeping and Fishing. It’s very colourful and it’s moved on from last season, whilst still retaining a strong Charlotte Taylor look. I would say that it has grown up a fraction, but only a fraction!??

Charlotte Taylor Fisherman Midi Dress by Sam Parr

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Fishermen Midi Dress by Sam Parr

What are the main techniques and materials that you have used in the collection?
Well it’s all print focused again but I’ve used the same prints in different colourways and scales and combined them within the same piece. I have also used Crepe back satin, which has a high shine along side a matt Double Georgette to add further contrast. The silhouettes are simple, elegant and their wearabilty factor is deeply considered. With the bold aspect of the prints, elegant and simple silhouettes are vital.??

You’re going to be launching a collection for Anthropologie USA in October 2011 – can you tell me any more about this?
Yes! We are launching our diffusion line with Anthropologie which will have a slightly lower price point and will be sold in their stores in the States. It’s a fantastic collaboration as we fit perfectly – both print lovers! They are also a fantastic team and I have complete creative control, which is sometimes not the case in such unities.

Charlotte Taylor Bee Jumpsuit by Alejandra Espino

Charlotte Taylor S/S 2012 Bee Jumpsuit by Alejandra Espino

What else does 2012 hold for Charlotte Taylor?
Well – who knows! But we would love to expand our reach abroad….especially Asia as we feel it could work so well out there. I would also love to expand our product range but I won’t get too specific about that just yet! We do a lot of planning for the business but I try not to plan ahead too much design wise. Who knows what ill be doing this time next year?!?!

Thank you to Charlotte for the sneak peak of the new collection. Charlotte Taylor will be presenting her S/S 2012 collection in Somerset House, at the Exhibition for London Fashion Week, September 16th – 20th 2011.

Categories ,Alejandra Espino, ,Charlotte Taylor, ,fashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gilly Rochester, ,London Fashion Week, ,Ones To Watch, ,Sam Parr, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Dans La Vie: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review and Interview

Dans La Vie by Sarah Underwood
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Sarah Underwood

For Dans La Vie’s new A/W 2013 collection Invisible Enemy, Threat Found Japanese designer Rira Sugawara revelled in a mish-mash of fabric textures and the bold yet intricate prints that she has become known for. But this time she eschewed the brightness of previous catwalk shows, choosing instead a sombre theme inspired by cyber attacks: the head of the Mona Lisa appeared in swirling prints, but models sported sinister balaclavas, gothic black lips and giant crosses as they stomped down the catwalk to a suitably dark soundtrack.

Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie by Chloe Douglass
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Chloe Douglass

With an academic background in both print design and art history Dans la Vie takes inspiration from Pop Art and traditional Japanese printing techniques to create collections centred on the concept of ‘Clash Beauty’. A few days before her catwalk show Rira Sugawara answered these questions.

Dans la Vie London Fashion Week AW 2013
Dans la Vie London Fashion Week AW 2013
Dans La Vie by Angela Lamb
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Angela Lamb

Your collections are certainly not for shrinking violets, what are the main characteristics of the women who wear your clothes?
Intellectual, independent and strong woman who have a strong outlook on life I can see wearing my clothes.

Which public figure do you dream of dressing?
When I was growing up Madonna was a huge inspiration to me, so to dress her would be a dream come too. I’d also like to dress Azealia Banks, Jessie J and Rihanna: they would also be great.

Dans la Vie London Fashion Week AW 2013
Dans la Vie London Fashion Week AW 2013
Dans La Vie by Claire Kearns
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Claire Kearns

You’re from Japan but have lived in France and have traveled a lot- which place has influenced you the most?
I find inspiration in every city and every street I visit. Paris brought me fashion intelligence based on the philosophical spirit to be liberated through culture and diversity. In New York I experienced the exciting energy, and in Milan, an abundance of new techniques

What led you to move to France? How easy was it for you to get used to the classic French style compared to typically edgy Japanese fashion?
I moved to France to gain experience in a fashion atelier, I feel it was one of the best moves I ever made as it was after this that I set up Dans La Vie. I think the French style influenced me a lot, it wasn’t hard to get used to at all.

Dans la Vie  London Fashion Week AW 2013
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie by Sarah Underwood
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Sarah Underwood

Would you ever consider taking part in any of the main Fashion Weeks other than London? How about Tokyo, since your collections seem to reflect the city’s renowned street style?
One of the key elements of my collection is ‘Clash Beauty’: pushing the boundaries of conventional beauty. London enables me to push these boundaries, I would consider showing at other Fashion Weeks including Tokyo as the Street Style is like no other. However I want to concentrate on London for the time being.

Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie by Isher Dhiman
Dans La Vie A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman

Which other designers inspire you?
Alexander McQueen was such an inspiring designer: I love the structure of his pieces and the way they were made.

Do you ever incorporate current trends into your collections?
Yes, I try to incorporate current trends into my collections as much as possible, at the moment everywhere you look is print!

Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans la Vie A/W 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Last season you used prints from Jasper Jones’ ‘Target’ painting from the late 60s, and Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Brush Stroke’ and ‘Explosion’. What artwork has inspired or will be included in A/W 2013?
The new collection entitled Invisible Enemy, Threat Found is an altogether darker collection and has older influences such as Italian Renaissance Art, with inspiration being drawn from Botticelli.

Categories ,Alexander McQueen, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Angela Lamb, ,Azealia Banks, ,Botticelli, ,Chloe Douglass, ,Claire Kearns, ,Clash Beauty, ,Cyber Attacks, ,Dans La Vie, ,gothic, ,Invisible Enemy Threat Found, ,Isher Dhiman, ,Italian Renaissance Art, ,japanese, ,Jessie J, ,Madonna, ,Milan, ,Mona Lisa, ,new york, ,paris, ,Pop Art, ,print, ,Rihanna, ,Rira Sugawara, ,Sarah Underwood, ,Street Style

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Amelia’s Magazine | David Koma: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review


David Koma A/W 2013 by Krister Selin

David Koma is a previous NEWGEN winner and continues to attract much attention with his sculptural pieces that push the boundaries of future fashion. It comes as no surprise, then, that Koma is again a worthy recipient of the Fashion Forward award.

These Saturday night shows are always massively oversubscribed, and after an epic cycle from Bow to Somerset House I was in no mood for the bunfight that would no doubt ensue. I managed to get a fairly decent spot on the end of the second row, but a woman stood right in the gap blocking any chance of taking a decent picture. When I asked politely if she planned to spend the duration of the show there, she looked as if I’d asked her if she wouldn’t mind getting her tits out.

There were bodies everywhere. Burly security guards patrolled up and down, barking orders at people with standing tickets to squash in as tightly as possible. As I patiently waited for some show action in the hope there wouldn’t be any nasty accidents, I surveyed the crowd and noticed these three hot blondes (above). Who are they? One of The Saturdays? All of The Saturdays? They garnered lots of media attention as audience photographers clambered over themselves to get a shot, creaming their proverbial drawers in the process.


All photography by Matt Bramford

The invite – my favourite this A/W 2013 season – was a black rectangle with a spot-laminate finish to look like vinyl. I imagined that this a gave clue to Koma‘s inspiration for this particular collection, but had no idea how literally he would take things…


David Koma A/W 2013 by Sylwia Szyszka

While Koma has never strayed away from a futuristic direction, there was definitely a more progressive feel to this collection. Koma‘s angular lines that have become his signature were scarce, this time the beautiful form of 12″ vinyl was replicated across every single garment. Circular leathers encased models around the neck and waist, provided structure for bell-shaped skirts, supplied interest in sexy skintight pieces and formed high-gloss shapes across busts and bottoms. Zips joined garments together, providing even more cyclical shapes.


David Koma A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman

Juxtaposing fabrics were married together – another Koma signature – with high-gloss leathers mixed with rich wools and cottons. Laser-cut leather, flock print, organza and quilting were all fused together in harmony.


David Koma A/W 2013 by Krister Selin

Koma‘s relationship with the colour black isn’t in any danger, with the opening looks relying entirely on fashion’s favourite colour. This season, though, welcome blasts of nude, bright red (my favourite pieces), teal and deep blue allowed for a linear colour palette that worked effortlessly almost to the point of unnoticeable. Models were styled with simple centre partings, long, thin ponytails and vertiginous heels, in collaboration once again with Alain Quilici.


David Koma A/W 2013 by Sylwia Szyszka

It takes a talented designer to take such ephemeral inspiration and produce a cohesive and exciting collection without verging on pantomime. David Koma is the nuts.

Categories ,12″, ,A/W 2013, ,A/W’13, ,british fashion council, ,catwalk, ,David Koma, ,fashion, ,Fashion-forward, ,Krister Selin, ,Laura Hickman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Newgen, ,review, ,Somerset House, ,Sylwia Szyszka, ,Vinyl

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Amelia’s Magazine | Alexandra Groover: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Presentation Review

Alexandra Groover AW 2012 by Dana Bocai

Alexandra Groover A/W 2012 by Dana Bocai

On the evening of Friday 17th February at London Fashion Week, I went to St Giles In The Fields Church in Holborn to watch Alexandra Groover’s A/W 2012 collection presented through a short film called DEATH. Since I attended Show Studio’s exhibition Fashion Revolution at Somerset House in 2009 I have developed a keen interest in fashion films and the way in which more and more fashion designers choose to show their work via this medium. DEATH was the final instalment in Groover’s trilogy of short films, following two previous ones titled BIRTH and LIFE.

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung altar view

Unfortunately as I walked into the dark church to take my seat I was informed I could not take photos, which did make sense as I am sure the choice of venue played some part in the atmosphere Alexandra Groover wished to create around the viewing of her film. There is a sense of reverence in most of us, I think, when we enter a religious building – whether we are religious or not – and getting properly into that respectful state was appropriate for an audience about to watch characters exiting this world.

Alexander Groover AW 2012 by Lizzie Mary Cullen

Alexander Groover A/W 2012 by Lizzie Mary Cullen

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung Inesa and Barrington De La Roche

In the short film DEATH the two protagonists were artists and married couple Inesa Vaiciute De La Roche and Barrington De La Roche of Dark Theatre, who are both very striking in themselves and as a duo, their age difference creating a beautiful contrast. Indeed the looks of Barrington De La Roche – something close to Sir Christopher Lee in The Lord of The Rings, with long grey hair and dark, strong eyes, but without the long beard – was one of the most fascinating things I took away with me from the evening. The fact that this otherworldly being was walking around and chatting whilst serving wine during the film screenings was also quite entertaining.

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung

Alexandra Groover AW 2012 by  Deborah Moon

Alexandra Groover A/W 2012 by Deborah Moon

The video was a ritual, taking place also in a church, during which a man and a woman were slowly led towards the altar in a dream-like state surrounded by what looked like illuminated blue petals on the floor and then reddish fairy lights on their bodies. These glowing flower forms reminded me of the quote by Edvard Munch at the opening page of the booklet for this season’s presentation which read ‘from my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity’. As the characters reached the altar, death figures searched them up and down and then assisted them into an embrace and a kiss. At the culmination of the film there was a large figure placed against the window behind the altar extending its two arms like wings. Wing-like extensions of fabric were also wrapped around the man and the woman about to die, as if to unite them forever.

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung

Alexandra Groover AW 2012 by Geiko Louve

Alexandra Groover A/W 2012 by Geiko Louve

The first image that emerged in my mind when I saw Alexandra Groover’s A/W 2012 collection was that of Death in Ingmar Bergman’s film The Seventh Seal. Her signature all-black hoods and winged drawstring garments worn with jersey ponchos, surcoat tops, tutelary skirts and black leggings definitely have something medieval about them – especially when seen in an ecclesiastical context.

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung

Alexandra Groover AW12 by Paul Phung shoes

For the shoes in the collection Alexandra Groover collaborated for the third time with London footwear designer Benjamin John Hall, the soundtrack was created by musician Dave.i.d and the film was directed by Gabriel Gettman.

Photography by Paul Phung.

Categories ,Alexandra Groover, ,Altar, ,Barrington De La Roche, ,Benjamin John Hall, ,Birth, ,Church, ,Dana Bocai, ,Dark Theatre, ,Dave.i.d, ,Death, ,Deborah Moon, ,Edvard Munch, ,Fashion Film, ,Fashion films, ,footwear, ,Geiko Louve, ,Holborn, ,Inesa De La Roche, ,Ingmar Bergman, ,Life, ,Lizzie Mary Cullen, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,medieval, ,Paul Phung, ,Show Studio, ,Sir Christopher Lee, ,Somerset House, ,Sort Film, ,St.Giles-In-The-Fields, ,The Lord of the Rings, ,The Seventh Seal, ,Trilogy

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Amelia’s Magazine | Review: London College of Communication Green Week, 6th-10th February 2012

LCC Green Week 'Urban Farming Installation' by Deborah Moon

Urban Farming Installation by second year Interaction & Moving Image students as part of LCC Green Week illustrated by Deborah Moon

Within an atmosphere of playfulness and improvisation the London College of Communication organised a Green Week between the 6th and 10th of February – part of the nation wide People and Planet Green Week. It was packed with workshops, pop-up installations, film screenings and talks aiming to encourage students to share ideas for improving sustainability in their creative practice and at home. Under the motivational general title ‘You Can Make a Difference‘ the week explored the themes of ‘found’, ‘upcycle’, ‘change’, ‘waste’ and ‘activism’. Every day of the week the upper galleries of the college hosted both student led initiatives and the work of invited creatives.

LCC Green Week Sarah Bagner from Supermarket Sarah with plastic bags quilt photo by Maria Papadimitriou

As the designer of Plastic Seconds – a jewellery line that uses recycled plastic and other found materials – I was invited by Sarah Bagner from Supermarket Sarah to make a wall on the first day of the event and talk to the students about the usage of ‘rubbish’ we do not often think to use anew in design… Sarah, even though still jet-lagged from a trip to Tokyo photographing local ‘walls’ for her upcoming book, played a major part in the event making installations and collaborating with the students throughout. On the third day of the week she teamed up with Tiziana Callari and created a quilt made out of discarded plastic bags – seen above.

Supermarket Sarah for London College of Communication Green Week by Jo Ley

Supermarket Sarah for London College of Communication’s Green Week by Jo Ley

Plastic Seconds wall installation at LCC green week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Plastic Seconds display

LCC Green Week Skip Sisters

Sarah Bagner had also invited the super fun Skip SistersJulia Burnett, Edori Fertig, Liz Honeybone, Pia Randall-Goddard and Helen Turner who search the skips of South London for raw materilas and then turn them into sculptural objects, clocks, jewellery and textiles. Apart from the installation above the Skip Sisters also rummaged through the college’s printing studios for discarded paper which they transformed into beads for jewellery making.

LCC Green Week Veja Shoes photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Veja was another sustainable brand Sarah Bagner had invited to the event.

LCC Green Week Face Shields by Jody Boehnert at EcoLabs

Some of the most striking – and possibly emotionally charged – objects on show were these ‘Face Shields‘ from Climate Camp 2007, designed by Jody Boehnert at EcoLabs, which were used as part of a mass action at Heathrow against the proposed third runway.

'Face Shields' Time2Act Climate Camp 2007 Green Week LCC by Lizzy Holbrook

Face Shields by Lizzy Holbrook

Wooden Objects by Gregor Garber LCC Green Weekphoto by Maria Papadimitriou

I was quite taken by these really well made and well presented reclaimed wood toy kits made by the college’s 3D technician Gregor Garber, who salvages good quality wood from shelving or broken easels. He thinks it a shame that maquettes by interior design students can look rather samey because of the standard materials they use, so during his workshops he encourages students to use all sorts of more interesting and varied looking reclaimed materials – as in the examples below.

reclaimed wood interior design models by Gregor Garber LCC green week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

LCC Green Week pop-up bicycle powered cinema by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs

LCC Green Week pop-up bicycle powered cinema by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs

The collective Magnificent Revolution brought into the college their bicycle powered cinema!

London College of Communication Takeaway LCC Green Week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

During my visit on the last day of the events I was happy to see LCC students’ Azra Bhagat and Laura Carless ‘Green Takeaway’ stall where they displayed tons of reclaimed takeaway coffee cups – along with these ceramic mugs and glasses – which they had turned into tiny city flower pots by adding seeds.

LCC Green Week Furniture Upcycling 1 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Also on the last day unused and ignored furniture from around the college was given pretty make-overs by the students and the resulting pieces will be auctioned on the Supermarket Sarah website!

Book Swishing at LCC Green Week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Throughout the week there was a book swishing point, accompannied by this lovely hanging books display, where students could bring a book in and take one away.

LCC Green Week 'my apple is jetlagged' wall painting photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In terms of more student led events this wall painting highlighting the issue of food miles was created by a team of them as the week unfolded.

Other highlights were Garudio Studiage creating a ‘Lucky Skip’ interactive installation where all those unattractive Christmas presents could be put to good use or passed on to someone else, and Food for Good, an initiative by three graphic and media design students who pick up left over food from restaurants, bakeries and supermarkets and trasnport it to charities. Finally there was a lot of extra cycling related activity in the middlele of the week, which I unfortunately missed, including letterpress artist, poet and cyclist Dennis Gould exhibiting his work as featured in Boneshaker Magazine and talking about his love of cycling.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.
Skip Sisters photo by London College of Communication.

Categories ,activism, ,bicycle powered cinema, ,books, ,Charities, ,cinema, ,Climate Activism, ,Climate Camp, ,Deborah Moon, ,ecolabs, ,Film Screening, ,Food for Good, ,Food Miles, ,Found, ,Furniture, ,Garudio Studiage, ,Green Week, ,Gregor Garber, ,Heathrow Airport, ,Heathrow third runway, ,installation, ,Interior Design, ,Jet-Lagged, ,jewellery, ,Jo Ley, ,Jody Boehnert, ,LCC, ,Leftovers, ,Lizzy Holbrook, ,London College of Communication, ,Magnificent Revolution, ,Maquettes, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,painting, ,people and planet, ,People and Planet Week, ,plastic bags, ,Plastic Seconds, ,recycling, ,Sarah Bagner, ,Skip Siters, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Supermarket Sarah, ,Swishing, ,talks, ,Tiziana Callari, ,Toys, ,Upcycling, ,Urban Farming, ,Veja, ,Walls, ,Waste, ,wood, ,workshops

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