Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ones to Watch (by Amelia)

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, click a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, malady hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, this site described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, approved a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, order hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, information pills described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, link a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, and hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, drug described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, remedy a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, sickness hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, mind a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, store hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by YesGo Illustration
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by YesGo Illustration.

Every season I eagerly anticipate Fashion Scout’s Ones to Watch because it is invariably a wonderful place to discover raw talent before everyone else does. This season we even ran a preview to prompt early onset salivating.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Unfortunately I was late to arrive and had to make do with an abysmal spot at the back, medicine hence my far from fabulous photography. The perils of an action packed opening day to LFW. I do apologise.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June ChanpoomidoleKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June Chanpoomidole
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June Chanpoomidole.

Straight off the starting blocks was Kirsty Ward, hospital who first came to our attention when she created jewellery for boyfriend David Longshaw when he himself showed as part of Ones to Watch a year ago. Last season she created her first collection, buy information pills on view at the static stands at Fashion Scout… and I knew straight away I’d discovered something very special.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Needless to say Kirsty Ward‘s first foray onto the catwalk proper did not disappoint. Working in a range of materials she kept to her sculpted best, whilst also working with new ideas such as the sheer asymmetric flip sided shirt.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

As ever the jewellery was an integral part of her designs, sometimes embedded within the fabric, but always well considered. When I spoke to Kirsty at the stands she talked of her ongoing love with everyday household items: coat hangers and miniature hinges get her in an excitable tizz. But there’s no single clear influence in an innovative collection that will no doubt stand the test of time – one stand out piece was inspired by the shape of a Stormtrooper mask, albeit not through any conscious decision. Amusingly she tried to use as many “sick colours” as possible and was almost disappointed that fashionistas have been referring to her colour palette as “autumnal.” I love Kirsty Ward’s vision and an interview with this talented lady is long overdue….

Anja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Anja Mlakar A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Coming second we were treated to Anja Mlakar‘s collection, which was a confident showing of bouncy tulip skirted dresses in pastels, red and black. Cutaways were a big feature, and I liked the styling with what looked like round padded foam belts, roughly tied at the waist. Definitely an intriguing proposition.

Anja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Anje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Next up was possibly my least favourite, simply because I am not a minimal kind of gal: no offence intended. Tze Goh works in a kind of compacted foam jersey material that can be easily sculpted into shapes which stand proud of the body.

Tze Goh A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryTze Goh A/W 2011 by Sarah Wharton
Tze Goh A/W 2011 by Sarah Wharton.

Capes, hairy and smooth, were the order of the day – in steely greys, deep purples and heathery blues.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Lastly Sara Bro-Jorgensen created an intriguing collection using trompe l’oeil print and intarsia techniques to play with definitions of clothing. One outfit featured the imprint of a tuxedo, accessorised with a bow tie and knitted hood. She replicated her beloved leather jacket in intarsia, (it also features as part of the collection), using an old 1960s knitting machine available only at the Royal College of Art (the bonus of being an alumni).

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

At her exhibition stand she freely admitted that she is not sure how she can reproduce the look commercially. Sometimes, it seems, old technology really is best. My favourite outfit was a trompe l’oeil intarsia cape dress out of which the model’s arms protruded frontways, encased in creamy childlike mittens. I wouldn’t recommend adopting such a stance of an evening on the town but on the catwalk this styling was a lot of fun.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by StellabombellaSara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by StellabombellaSara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Stellabombella
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Stellabombella.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregorySara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregorySara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Read Florence Massey’s review here. You can see more of June Chanpoomidole’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Anja Mlakar, ,Charlotte Hoyle, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Intarsia, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,June Sees, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Kirsty Ward, ,knit, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Mhairi-Stella McEwan, ,Ones To Watch, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sara Bro Jorgensen, ,Sarah Wharton, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Stellabombella, ,Stormtrooper, ,Tze Goh, ,YesGo Illustration

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ones to Watch (by Amelia)

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, click a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, malady hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, this site described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, approved a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, order hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, information pills described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, link a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, and hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, drug described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, remedy a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, sickness hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock
Grow Heathrow by Rebecca Peacock.

Just over a year ago a group of my friends envisioned a radical new version of the Transition Town model. Activists drawn from groups such as Plane Stupid and Climate Camp decided to squat a rundown old market garden in the village of Sipson that was being used as a dumping ground for car scrap in an area planned for demolition to make way for the third runway at Heathrow. And thus Grow Heathrow was born, mind a great big YES in the face of so many NOs.

We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr
We Won! Grow Heathrow by Sam Parr.

Over the course of the past year they have utterly transformed the area; growing their own food, store hosting bike workshops and ensuring a sustainable community has sprung up that fully involves the locals. What was once an eyesore covered in shattered glass has become an inspiring success story, described by one local as “better than prozac”. In this beautiful short video from You and I Films the misty eyed community get together to reminisce about the past year, describing how what they did was “naughty but extremely worthwhile” and a necessary action to enable the creation of their “own piece of paradise.” As is so often the case, gardening has proved the glue that has brought people together.

Later in March Grow Heathrow will host the Reclaim the Fields European gathering, and then a group of people associated with the project will go on an ambitious 100 day cycle ride to Palestine. P.E.D.A.L. will meet with permaculture projects along the way; sharing ideas and stories for a better world.

Inspiring stuff indeed, but I’ll let this lovely video – made to celebrate Grow Heathrow‘s first birthday – do the talking.

YouTube Preview Image

You can read more about Grow Heathrow in this blog, written just after it was set up in early 2010.
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by YesGo Illustration
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by YesGo Illustration.

Every season I eagerly anticipate Fashion Scout’s Ones to Watch because it is invariably a wonderful place to discover raw talent before everyone else does. This season we even ran a preview to prompt early onset salivating.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Unfortunately I was late to arrive and had to make do with an abysmal spot at the back, medicine hence my far from fabulous photography. The perils of an action packed opening day to LFW. I do apologise.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June ChanpoomidoleKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June Chanpoomidole
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by June Chanpoomidole.

Straight off the starting blocks was Kirsty Ward, hospital who first came to our attention when she created jewellery for boyfriend David Longshaw when he himself showed as part of Ones to Watch a year ago. Last season she created her first collection, buy information pills on view at the static stands at Fashion Scout… and I knew straight away I’d discovered something very special.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Needless to say Kirsty Ward‘s first foray onto the catwalk proper did not disappoint. Working in a range of materials she kept to her sculpted best, whilst also working with new ideas such as the sheer asymmetric flip sided shirt.

Kirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryKirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester
Kirsty Ward A/W 2011 by Gilly Rochester.

As ever the jewellery was an integral part of her designs, sometimes embedded within the fabric, but always well considered. When I spoke to Kirsty at the stands she talked of her ongoing love with everyday household items: coat hangers and miniature hinges get her in an excitable tizz. But there’s no single clear influence in an innovative collection that will no doubt stand the test of time – one stand out piece was inspired by the shape of a Stormtrooper mask, albeit not through any conscious decision. Amusingly she tried to use as many “sick colours” as possible and was almost disappointed that fashionistas have been referring to her colour palette as “autumnal.” I love Kirsty Ward’s vision and an interview with this talented lady is long overdue….

Anja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon
Anja Mlakar A/W 2011 by Karolina Burdon.

Coming second we were treated to Anja Mlakar‘s collection, which was a confident showing of bouncy tulip skirted dresses in pastels, red and black. Cutaways were a big feature, and I liked the styling with what looked like round padded foam belts, roughly tied at the waist. Definitely an intriguing proposition.

Anja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnja Mlakar A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte HoyleAnje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Anje Mlakar A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Next up was possibly my least favourite, simply because I am not a minimal kind of gal: no offence intended. Tze Goh works in a kind of compacted foam jersey material that can be easily sculpted into shapes which stand proud of the body.

Tze Goh A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryTze Goh A/W 2011 by Sarah Wharton
Tze Goh A/W 2011 by Sarah Wharton.

Capes, hairy and smooth, were the order of the day – in steely greys, deep purples and heathery blues.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Charlotte Hoyle.

Lastly Sara Bro-Jorgensen created an intriguing collection using trompe l’oeil print and intarsia techniques to play with definitions of clothing. One outfit featured the imprint of a tuxedo, accessorised with a bow tie and knitted hood. She replicated her beloved leather jacket in intarsia, (it also features as part of the collection), using an old 1960s knitting machine available only at the Royal College of Art (the bonus of being an alumni).

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

At her exhibition stand she freely admitted that she is not sure how she can reproduce the look commercially. Sometimes, it seems, old technology really is best. My favourite outfit was a trompe l’oeil intarsia cape dress out of which the model’s arms protruded frontways, encased in creamy childlike mittens. I wouldn’t recommend adopting such a stance of an evening on the town but on the catwalk this styling was a lot of fun.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by StellabombellaSara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by StellabombellaSara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Stellabombella
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011 by Stellabombella.

Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregorySara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregorySara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Sara Bro-Jorgensen A/W 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Read Florence Massey’s review here. You can see more of June Chanpoomidole’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Anja Mlakar, ,Charlotte Hoyle, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Intarsia, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,June Sees, ,Karolina Burdon, ,Kirsty Ward, ,knit, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Mhairi-Stella McEwan, ,Ones To Watch, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sara Bro Jorgensen, ,Sarah Wharton, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Stellabombella, ,Stormtrooper, ,Tze Goh, ,YesGo Illustration

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Spring is in the air: Music to go travelling by

Bodyamr A/W 2011 by Maria del Carmen-Smith
Bodyamr A/W 2011 by Maria del Carmen-Smith.

For the Bodyamr show the upstairs hall of Freemasons Hall had been laid out in a strange network of criss-crossing aisles, cure approved variably lit with spotlights from all directions. I was on the end of a row just across from Amber Rose, viagra 60mg sick though I hasten to add that I had to be told who she was as I am not that up on celebrities who have no discernible career: model/actress whatever – you get the picture.

Amber Rose at Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Amber Rose at Bodyamr A/W 2011.

Louise Redknapp at Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Louise Redknapp with a fan at Bodyamr A/W 2011.

I will concede that she pulled off a gunmetal S/S 2011 Bodyamr dress with considerable panache – hers is a curvaceous physique to envy. Also in attendance was Louise Redknapp, that famous fashion guru.

Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Bodyamr A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Somewhat inexplicably the show started with the prolonged sounds of revolution, and throughout the show lighting altered drastically between interrogation bright and near darkness – changes which definitely kept me on my photographic toes as I constantly swung around in my seat and adjusted my camera settings. My cousin-in-law-to-be is a fashion designer who works for Bodyamr and so I know that this was not an attempt to ensure that bloggers took only shit photos, and in fact the results were a pleasant surprise: the models bathed in a warm ethereal glow that gives a very different feel to most of my catwalk photos.

Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker
Bodyamr A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

Bodycon tailoring is at the centre of all Bodyamr collections; sleekly fitting fabrics encasing leggy models, draped flatteringly over shoulders and featuring well placed cutaway designs. Tightness was offset with flowing chiffons split thigh-high, all picked out in a highly desirable selection of plum and jade green colours. An occasional fez made an appearance, emphasising the languid opulence of flowing fabrics. Shoulders were fluffed out with woolly capes, heels were gold spiked – a collaboration with Gianmarco Lorenzi. Where collars existed they were high and bejewelled. Caramel, golden yellow and the ubiquitous bright red provided highlights.

Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011 by Maria del Carmen-SmithBodyamr A/W 2011 by Maria del Carmen-Smith
Bodyamr A/W 2011 by Maria del Carmen-Smith.

The show ended on a stunning lilac gown with a golden woven bodice and Amber Rose stood to kiss Bodyamr designer Amir Ali as he came loping down the catwalk for his photo call.

Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It’s not surprising that a Bodyamr show attracts so many celebrities. His is a very superior brand of glamour, designed to unashamedly wow the red carpet crowd. And wow it did.

Bodyamr A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

You can see more illustrations by Antonia Parker in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Annie: Chewing gum (bonus track), salve illustrated by Mhairi-stella McEwan

Spring officially starts the first day you can run to the corner shop without a jacket, ed and that was a couple of weeks ago now. Soon it will be summer – the prime season for hitting the road, whether it’s for city breaks, festivals or far-away backpacking. So we’ve put together eight songs (and a bonus track) for getting on the road – each interpreted by an illustrator. The first half of the list is fitting of a road trip, for singing loud out of open windows, but it also works as a soundtrack for the Gatwick Express, as is more often the case for me. While the destinations make it worthwhile, the travelling itself can be a chore – meaning the second half has some more meditative tracks. These are for turbulent airplanes, or when you’ve been driving too long – they also work for hungover mornings on freezing buses or delayed flights with no end in sight. (If all else fails, try AC/DC.)

As this piece is a virtual illustrator-palooza, music videos have been omitted to curb the length, but click on the song names for the full YouTube experience. So without further ado – here’s the Amelia’s Magazine Spring 2011 Vagabond Soundtrack!

Illustration by Wanni

Squeeze: Tempted
This is the song Winona Ryder and Janeane Garofaldo sing in the car in ‘Reality Bites’ – a film about being young and not knowing what to do with your life (I may have worn out a video tape once upon a time). The song is about packing up your essential belongings and taking off: ‘I said to my reflection, let’s get out of this place’ … yes let’s do that.

Illustration by Claire Sells

Madonna: Express yourself
Ah early Madonna – the badass years. I’ve been listening to her again lately since the rise of Lady Gaga (who I do appreciate). Madonna doesn’t have a particularly amazing voice but oh my does she want it bad. You can hear it in this song, and in ‘Vogue’ and ‘Material girl’ too – and when she sings not to go for second best … well Madonna we would never, not when you say it like THAT.

Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rolling Stones: Brown Sugar
You can’t sing along to a Rolling Stones track but that’s not the point – you just shuffle your shoulders and shout along at the chorus. There are several ‘better’ Stones tracks but I think this is my favourite one (okay so it’s tie a with ‘Gimme shelter’). Mick’s practically shimmying out through the speakers with the energy of it.

Illustration by Sarah Matthews

Creedence Clearwater Revival: Fortunate son
I love Creedence, The Dude (The Big Lebowski, you know) loves Creedence, and my dad loves Creedence, judging from the pile of records from his hippie days. Either way, the beardy fellas of CCR remain underrated. ‘Fortunate son’ is one of their more ‘Summer of Love’-sounding tracks, coupled with anti-war lyrics that makes me want to wear dip-dyed clothes with flowers in my hair.

Illustration by Laura Godfrey

Jimi Hendrix: Highway chile
He’s quite poetic, Jimi Hendrix, and there’s something almost happy-go-lucky about ‘Highway chile’. It’s an ode to life on the road – I like this one when I’m travelling above the clouds and can do nothing but sit idle as the plane hurls forward. ‘Woodoo child’ is probably the better track, but it’s too much for when you are forced to sit still.

Illustration by Sanna Dyker

America: A horse with no name
This song is for jetlagged stopovers in boring airports with bad food, when you’re so tired your body aches but you can’t sleep. America and its simple logic will soothe you: ‘The heat was hot and the ground was dry but the air was full of sound.’

Illustration by YesGo!

Death Cab for Cutie: Soul meets body
Listening to the wonderfully named Death Cab for Cutie when travelling alone is almost like having someone talking to you – because all their lyrics are excellent. Not everyone listens to the lyrics of music, but with Death Cab it’s practically a crime not to: ‘Cause in my head there’s a Greyhound station / where I send my thoughts to far-off destinations / so they may have a chance of finding a place / where they’re far more suited than here.’ … paints a picture, doesn’t it.

Illustration by Romain Lambert-Louis

Björk: Immature
This little ditty from saga-queen Björk only contains one line of lyric (it loops, but yes really), and it’s an excellent one. It’s a wall of sound, this song, without any of the scratchiness of the rest of the album (the wonderful ‘Homogenic’). It brings to mind dark Scandinavian forests, the smell of pine and blowing bubbles.

Categories ,A horse with no name, ,AC/DC, ,America, ,Annie, ,bjork, ,Brown sugar, ,Chewing gum, ,claire sells, ,Creedence Clearwater Revival, ,death cab for cutie, ,Express yourself, ,Fortunate son, ,Highway chile, ,Immature, ,Jessica Furseth, ,Jimi Hendrix, ,Karina Yarv, ,Laura Godfrey, ,Madonna, ,Mhairi-Stella McEwan, ,Mick Jagger, ,music, ,Reality Bites, ,Rolling Stones, ,Romain Lambert-Louis, ,Sanna Dyker, ,Sarah Matthews, ,Soul meets body, ,spring, ,summer, ,Summer of Love, ,The Big Lebowski, ,travelling, ,Wanni, ,YesGo!

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lulu and the Lampshades: Cold Water EP review

Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

At the entrance there stood a horned model, shop purchase arms crossed and lycra-ed legs askance. Face masked. Model or mannequin? It wasn’t immediately obvious. In a season of slick presentations the one given by Maria Francesca Pepe – a true Amazonian beauty herself – really stood out for its professionalism. But it made me uncomfortable.

Maria Francesca Pepe, <a target=store drug LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.” title=”Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.” width=”480″ height=”615″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37268″ />Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011
Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Red lighting shifted, pulsating over models that looked younger than legal. Young and nervous. One was laid prostrate on a plinth across the entrance to the next room, two more further back, and then in the far room what I can only describe as a child sat perched in front of a series of mannequins, none of which I could see in the gloaming. This girl had the face of an imp, a feeling encouraged by her amazing resin and carbon steel curved and studded hat – a bastardised version of something a gnome might wear. Beneath her flowing robes I suddenly realised why she was so uncomfortable. The bum and back of her tights were also encrusted with spikes. Is this a good idea? Should I be calling out the NSPCC?

Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMaria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

But what of the jewellery and accessories on display? I must confess that it took me awhile to look in at the details, such was the overwhelming effect of towering horned creatures. I had a brief opportunity to ask Maria who she would most like to wear her showpiece headpieces, which are heavily encrusted with hexagonal Swarovski crystals in the style of Medieval helmets. The answer was of course Lady Gaga. But the real point of all this girly S&M drama? Why of course: it was to sell a diffusion line. MFP accessories are available online at ASOS.

Maria Francesca Pepe A-W 2011-ringsMaria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

Each child model sported expertly manicured hands, dangling ‘amulets’ dripping from her tiny fingers. The Fortuna collection features everyday jewellery made in workhorse metals such as brass and accessorised with crystals and pearls. And always those ever present studs.

Maria Francesca Pepe is also available at Wolf & Badger. You can read Helen Martin’s review here.

Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

At the entrance there stood a horned model, advice arms crossed and lycra-ed legs askance. Face masked. Model or mannequin? It wasn’t immediately obvious. In a season of slick presentations the one given by Maria Francesca Pepe – a true Amazonian beauty herself – really stood out for its professionalism. But it made me uncomfortable.

Maria Francesca Pepe, <a target=sildenafil LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.” title=”Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.” width=”480″ height=”615″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37268″ />Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011
Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Red lighting shifted, pulsating over models that looked younger than legal. Young and nervous. One was laid prostrate on a plinth across the entrance to the next room, two more further back, and then in the far room what I can only describe as a child sat perched in front of a series of mannequins, none of which I could see in the gloaming. This girl had the face of an imp, a feeling encouraged by her amazing resin and carbon steel curved and studded hat – a bastardised version of something a gnome might wear. Beneath her flowing robes I suddenly realised why she was so uncomfortable. The bum and back of her tights were also encrusted with spikes. Is this a good idea? Should I be calling out the NSPCC?

Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMaria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

But what of the jewellery and accessories on display? I must confess that it took me awhile to look in at the details, such was the overwhelming effect of towering horned creatures. I had a brief opportunity to ask Maria who she would most like to wear her showpiece headpieces, which are heavily encrusted with hexagonal Swarovski crystals in the style of Medieval helmets. The answer was of course Lady Gaga. But the real point of all this girly S&M drama? Why of course: it was to sell a diffusion line. MFP accessories are available online at ASOS.

Maria Francesca Pepe A-W 2011-ringsMaria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

Each child model sported expertly manicured hands, dangling ‘amulets’ dripping from her tiny fingers. The Fortuna collection features everyday jewellery made in workhorse metals such as brass and accessorised with crystals and pearls. And always those ever present studs.

Maria Francesca Pepe is also available at Wolf & Badger. You can read Helen Martin’s review here.

Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

At the entrance there stood a horned model, advice arms crossed and lycra-ed legs askance. Face masked. Model or mannequin? It wasn’t immediately obvious. In a season of slick presentations the one given by Maria Francesca Pepe – a true Amazonian beauty herself – really stood out for its professionalism. But it made me uncomfortable.

Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011
Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Red lighting shifted, pulsating over models that looked younger than legal. Young and nervous. One was laid prostrate on a plinth across the entrance to the next room, two more further back, and then in the far room what I can only describe as a child sat perched in front of a series of mannequins, none of which I could see in the gloaming. This girl had the face of an imp, a feeling encouraged by her amazing resin and carbon steel curved and studded hat – a bastardised version of something a gnome might wear. Beneath her flowing robes I suddenly realised why she was so uncomfortable. The bum and back of her tights were also encrusted with spikes. Is this a good idea? Should I be calling out the NSPCC?

Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMaria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

But what of the jewellery and accessories on display? I must confess that it took me awhile to look in at the details, such was the overwhelming effect of towering horned creatures. I had a brief opportunity to ask Maria who she would most like to wear her showpiece headpieces, which are heavily encrusted with hexagonal Swarovski crystals in the style of Medieval helmets. The answer was of course Lady Gaga. But the real point of all this girly S&M drama? Why of course: it was to sell a diffusion line. MFP accessories are available online at ASOS.

Maria Francesca Pepe A-W 2011-ringsMaria Francesca Pepe, LFW A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique
Maria Francesca Pepe by Karla Pérez Manrique.

Each child model sported expertly manicured hands, dangling ‘amulets’ dripping from her tiny fingers. The Fortuna collection features everyday jewellery made in workhorse metals such as brass and accessorised with crystals and pearls. And always those ever present studs.

Maria Francesca Pepe is also available at Wolf & Badger. You can read Helen Martin’s review here.

Alex Noble by Alia Gargum
Alex Noble Soft Death by Alia Gargum.

Alex Noble creates cross disciplinary creative projects under the umbrella name of Alex Noble studio and is represented by the uber cool Ella Dror PR. He’s worked for super stylist (and now creative director of Mugler) Nicola Formichetti on projects for Lady Gaga, approved and on photo shoots for Ellen Von Unworth and Mario Testino amongst many others. For two years he helped create props for the windows in Selfridges… the list of his creative collaborations goes on and on.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

But for his Soft Death collection Alex Noble has decided to embrace the couture market with an anatomically themed first collection. Presented in the crypt of St Martin in the Fields, this was an ambitious installation of mannequins, live models and music courtesy of Hannah Holland.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Surrounded by industrial rubber piping that emulated intestines, beautiful light-as-lace pale yellow concoctions encrusted with beading swung from simple stands. A strange alien-esque mould of a rib cape lay on green netted surgical bedding, its crystallised spine glinting like a rare treasure.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

At the far end of the room three uncomfortable looking models displayed the designs on pedestals – presumably they had been there for awhile. One sported an appliqued skeleton suit which would make the most fabulous Halloween outfit, another had vein like patterns creeping across her body. But it was the bandaged ball gown that made the most impression on me – the model swaddled with tightly crossed strips of silken fabric that extended across her head and over one eye. The model was so pissed off with her lot that she could barely contain her annoyance, even while I took a photo.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It’s obvious why Alex Noble is so beloved of exhibitionistic pop stars like Gaga, but the delicate frailty of his gorgeous couture gowns could just as easily attract rich patrons of a less outrageous nature. But the rarefied world of couture is not an easy world to crack, so I will be intrigued to see what Alex Noble does next.

Alex Noble by Alia Gargum
Alex Noble Soft Death by Alia Gargum.

Alex Noble creates cross disciplinary creative projects under the umbrella name of Alex Noble studio and is represented by the uber cool Ella Dror PR. He’s worked for super stylist (and now creative director of Mugler) Nicola Formichetti on projects for Lady Gaga, information pills and on photo shoots for Ellen Von Unworth and Mario Testino amongst many others. For two years he helped create props for the windows in Selfridges… the list of his creative collaborations goes on and on.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

But for his Soft Death collection Alex Noble has decided to embrace the couture market with an anatomically themed first collection. Presented in the crypt of St Martin in the Fields, tadalafil this was an ambitious installation of mannequins, live models and music courtesy of Hannah Holland.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Surrounded by industrial rubber piping that emulated intestines, beautiful light-as-lace pale yellow concoctions encrusted with beading swung from simple stands. A strange alien-esque mould of a rib cape lay on green netted surgical bedding, its crystallised spine glinting like a rare treasure.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

At the far end of the room three uncomfortable looking models displayed the designs on pedestals – presumably they had been there for awhile. One sported an appliqued skeleton suit which would make the most fabulous Halloween outfit, another had vein like patterns creeping across her body. But it was the bandaged ball gown that made the most impression on me – the model swaddled with tightly crossed strips of silken fabric that extended across her head and over one eye. The model was so pissed off with her lot that she could barely contain her annoyance, even while I took a photo.

Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Alex Noble Soft Death A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

It’s obvious why Alex Noble is so beloved of exhibitionistic pop stars like Gaga, but the delicate frailty of his gorgeous couture gowns could just as easily attract rich patrons of a less outrageous nature. But the rarefied world of couture is not an easy world to crack, so I will be intrigued to see what Alex Noble does next. Watch the video of his presentation here:

Illustration by Romain Lambert-Louis

It’s good thing it’s starting to feel like spring outside, cialis 40mg as listening to Lulu and the Lampshades in the dead of winter strikes me as being something akin to torture. This is music that makes me want to ride my bicycle along gravel roads, there slurping down iced lollies and squinting as the sunshine pokes through my eyelashes.

There is a lot of sweetness to Lulu and the Lampshades – starting with the playfulness of the name itself, down to the music which is a bucketful of sunshine. At least that was my first impression, before I listened to the new ‘Cold Water’ EP. The only thing I’d heard of the London-based foursome before was ‘Feet to the sky’, a cheery little number with an even cheerier video, but for a release with just four tracks, ‘Cold Water’ does an impressive job of delivering diversity.

Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite thing about Lulu and the Lampshades is probably main singer (and former Amelia’s Magazine art editor) Luisa Gerstein’s voice – a rich, chocolatey sound which makes you think of bigger songs and swoonier music productions. But the stripped back style of the Lulu songs do an excellent job of accompanying Luisa. The overall effect is something akin to listening to your favourite act playing at a musical, just a few feet away and it feels like they‘re playing just for you.

It certainly sounds like the Lulus having fun though, skipping along (or at least that’s what it sounds like) on the title track ’Cold Water’. Although the lyrics tell a more complex story: ’I hate to be wrapped in cotton although I think it’s better for me / Yes I see there’s trouble but it’s proven to me I’m better off this way’ … I’m not sure if the music and lyrics are mismatched, or if Luisa is simply the happiest when causing a bit of trouble?

Illustration by Mhairi-stella McEwan

Illustration by Sarah Matthews

The video to ‘Cups’, or ‘You’re gonna miss me’, has had over half a million YouTube hits, as Luisa and Heloise banging those plastic beakers into the kitchen table really needs to be seen. ‘Cups’ started out as a routine Louisa learnt at percussion class, combined with new verses and a chorus from a traditional folk song. The result is a lovely little ’all together now’ call-and-response song, but it’s that cup action that has us all going Whoa Lulu! Have a look:

‘I’ll keep my demons underground if it keeps you smiling’, Luisa sings as ‘Demons’ start. Although the flute and glockenspiel keeps things light, the darker undertones are definitely there now, both in terms of lyrics and tone. ‘Cause you’ve punctured me / I’ve ruptured at the seams and though its strange for me / I’ll do my best to keep the rest from falling out’ … But there is something fairytale-like about it too, like the stories about witches and evil creatures that we like because it gives us a chill down our backs.

‘Moccasin Mile’ mixes vocal harmonies, ukulele and some nifty drumstick action as the tempos change. ‘If you can’t be good then please be careful,’ Luisa sings … But then the flute comes in again at the chorus, as Lulu regulars Luisa, Heloise, Jemma and Dan were joined by flutist Isobel to add some extra ‘dance around the maypole’ feeling. And that’s it – four tracks are done and Lulu and the Lampshades have certainly managed to whet our appetites for a full-length album. As well as a dip in a lake that’s still a little too cold, before skipping on home with sunburnt cheeks.

Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Illustration by Sarah Matthews

‘Cold Water’ by Lulu and the Lampshades is out now on Moshi Moshi. Have a look at our listing for the current gig schedule, plus see the YouTube channel for more music videos.

Categories ,Cold Water, ,ep, ,folk, ,Luisa Gerstein, ,Lulu and the Lampshades, ,Matilde Sazio, ,Mhairi-Stella McEwan, ,Moshi Moshi, ,music, ,Romain Lambert-Louis, ,Sarah Matthews

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