Amelia’s Magazine | Tate Shots: Jared Schiller’s Dream Job

DSC02965

Jared Schiller with David Byrne

All photographs and videos courtesy of Tate Shots except where otherwise stated.

Back in 2002 whilst still a skint student, cheapest I started what was then my idea of a dream job: ticket seller at Tate Modern and Tate Britain. I got to see great art and even meet the odd artist or two. I remember Gustav Metzger insisting he paid to see Barnett Newman, and Tony Oursler successfully blagging a freebie to the Turner Prize. Bridget Riley even gave us a personal tour of her exhibition. Fast forward five years and I’ve landed a job helping Tate Media launch a new video podcast: TateShots. These days I produce and commission the TateShots series, in which we interview artists about the business of making art, and talk to famous gallery-goers about their favourite art shows. The job has given me the opportunity to nervously meet heroes of mine like Jeff Koons, Laurence Weiner and Martin Creed, as well as artists I’m less familiar with but who become firm favourites.

We’ve made 150 episodes of TateShots so far, and it now comes out weekly. This week we launched a new strand called Sound & Vision. The series took the films’ director, Nicola Probert, and I, all over the country to interview musicians who make art. Billy Childish, Lydia Lunch, Mark E Smith, David Byrne, Jeffrey Lewis and Cosey Fanni Tutti all helped us with our enquiries about where art and music collide.

me-and-JeffJared Schiller with Jeff Koons

Billy’s interview was probably the most memorable. We filmed him in a cramped bedroom he uses as a studio in his mum’s house in Whitstable, surrounded by stacks of paintings. There was hardly enough room for him to paint, let alone for us to film.  Billy’s musical and artistic reputations arguably couldn’t be more different. As a musician he is cited by bands like The White Stripes as an influence – his dedication to lo-fi recording and performance make him the very definition of authentic.  On the other hand, as an outspoken critic of conceptual art, his standing in the art world is a little harder to pin down. Because of this big difference, Nicola had the idea to get Billy to interview himself.  So Artist Billy asked Musician Billy questions (e.g. “Do I have an influence on you?” Answer: “No.”), and explains how he went through a ten year stretch of only painting to the music of John Lee Hooker (almost). The whole experience made me think that it’s only a matter of time before Billy Childish is unmasked as the ultimate conceptual artist…

Going forward I would love to make more videos about pop stars with a taste for art. Before we embarked on this series we had already spoken to Alex James from Blur about Ellsworth Kelly, and John Squire from the Stone Roses about Cy Twombly. Apparently Jay-Z is a massive Richard Prince fan, so perhaps he should be next on my list.

meJared Schiller photograph courtesy of Simon Williams/O Production

What Jared likes:

Places: Moel-y-Gest, a hill near Porthmadog in North Wales

Food: Pizza. My dream is to build a pizza oven in my back garden. It will never happen but I keep hold of the dream..

Drink: An Islay Whisky is the perfect late night tipple.

Website: http://www.tate.org.uk (of course)

Music: Currently the new Four Tet album.

Books:  Currently reading ‘Then We Came to an End’ by Joshua Ferris. I mainly have a weakness for any kind of exhibition catalogue or artist’s monograph.

Film:  I’m looking forward to Chris Morris’s ‘Four Lions’.

Shop: Alter 109 is a really good men’s boutique in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

Categories ,art, ,Billy Childish, ,conceptual, ,contemporary art, ,Cosey Fanni Tutti, ,Cy Twomby, ,david byrne, ,Jeffrey Lewis, ,Lydia Lunch, ,Mark E Smith, ,music, ,musician, ,painting, ,Tate, ,Tate Britain, ,Tate Modern, ,Turner Prize, ,video

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ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, pharmacy with both mediums always being used to express the latest trends. It would then come as no surprise that while fashion has been taking an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, pill which can be seen from clothing brands such as People Tree, that the beauty industry took point and followed. From this new approach, words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, however what do these actually mean, and is there a difference? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??Ethical means being conscious about the recognition of individuals all over the world, and their effort and position it took to get the ingredients which are in the products you’re using. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America.

This standpoint focuses on the conditions and pays those individuals who source ingredients receive, such as, recently there has been questions raised as to the conditions of workers in Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which can be considered an ethical dilemma. Also under the ethical standpoint is the adherence to not test on animals. Most beauty and skincare products do not test on animals; however consumers must always check the packaging, as this is another area of controversy.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

?Natural is another term that often gets confused with what it actually means for beauty products. Brands which use this term are Lush, The Body Shop, Naked Shampoo & Conditioners, Origins and many more. Natural generally means nature and the state in which we are to begin with, (i.e. no makeup or enhancements) however there is also the viewpoint of ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up.

?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

IMAGE ETHICAL BEAUTY 3 JENIFFER
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

http://www.jenillustration.com/

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.

ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, visit both used to express the latest trends. Fashion has taken an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, cheap best epitomised in high profile clothing brands such as People Tree, and of course the beauty industry has followed. Words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, but what do these actually mean, and is there a difference between them? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??

Ethical:
Ethical means being conscious of the efforts and conditions under which products are produced. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America. Recently, for instance, there have been questions raised about the conditions of workers making Katie Price’s branded perfumes, presenting buyers with an ‘ethical dilemma’ once this is known. Most ethical products are not tested on animals, but for this consumers must always check the packaging.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

Natural:
?Natural is another confusing term when applied to beauty products. Brands which use this term include Lush, The Body Shop, Origins and many more. Natural can be applied to the state in which we are without intervention, i.e. no makeup or enhancements. However one may ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up. ?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, approved both used to express the latest trends. Fashion has taken an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, cure best epitomised in high profile clothing brands such as People Tree, prescription and of course the beauty industry has followed. Words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, but what do these actually mean, and is there a difference between them? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??

Ethical:
Ethical means being conscious about the recognition of individuals all over the world, and their effort and position it took to get the ingredients which are in the products you’re using. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America. This standpoint focuses on the conditions and salaries of those individuals who manufacture the products, such as, recently there has been questions raised as to the conditions of workers in Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which can be considered an ethical dilemma. Also under the ethical standpoint is the adherence to not test on animals. Most beauty and skincare products do not test on animals; however consumers must always check the packaging, as this is another area of controversy.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

?Natural is another term that often gets confused with what it actually means for beauty products. Brands which use this term are Lush, The Body Shop, Naked Shampoo & Conditioners, Origins and many more. Natural generally means nature and the state in which we are to begin with, (i.e. no makeup or enhancements) however there is also the viewpoint of ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up.

?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, approved with both mediums always being used to express the latest trends. It would then come as no surprise that while fashion has been taking an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, visit this which can be seen from clothing brands such as People Tree, that the beauty industry took point and followed. From this new approach, words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, however what do these actually mean, and is there a difference? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??Ethical means being conscious about the recognition of individuals all over the world, and their effort and position it took to get the ingredients which are in the products you’re using. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America.

This standpoint focuses on the conditions and pays those individuals who source ingredients receive, such as, recently there has been questions raised as to the conditions of workers in Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which can be considered an ethical dilemma. Also under the ethical standpoint is the adherence to not test on animals. Most beauty and skincare products do not test on animals; however consumers must always check the packaging, as this is another area of controversy.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

?Natural is another term that often gets confused with what it actually means for beauty products. Brands which use this term are Lush, The Body Shop, Naked Shampoo & Conditioners, Origins and many more. Natural generally means nature and the state in which we are to begin with, (i.e. no makeup or enhancements) however there is also the viewpoint of ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up.

?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, information pills with both mediums always being used to express the latest trends. It would then come as no surprise that while fashion has been taking an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, price which can be seen from clothing brands such as People Tree, medical that the beauty industry took point and followed. From this new approach, words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, however what do these actually mean, and is there a difference? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??Ethical means being conscious about the recognition of individuals all over the world, and their effort and position it took to get the ingredients which are in the products you’re using. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America.

This standpoint focuses on the conditions and pays those individuals who source ingredients receive, such as, recently there has been questions raised as to the conditions of workers in Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which can be considered an ethical dilemma. Also under the ethical standpoint is the adherence to not test on animals. Most beauty and skincare products do not test on animals; however consumers must always check the packaging, as this is another area of controversy.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

?Natural is another term that often gets confused with what it actually means for beauty products. Brands which use this term are Lush, The Body Shop, Naked Shampoo & Conditioners, Origins and many more. Natural generally means nature and the state in which we are to begin with, (i.e. no makeup or enhancements) however there is also the viewpoint of ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up.

?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

It’s clear the beauty industry is relentlessly changing as fast as the fashion industry, order with both mediums always being used to express the latest trends. It would then come as no surprise that while fashion has been taking an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, which can be seen from clothing brands such as People Tree, that the beauty industry took point and followed. From this new approach, words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become somewhat common when it comes to the latest beauty products, however what do these actually mean, and is there a difference? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??Ethical means being conscious about the recognition of individuals all over the world, and their effort and position it took to get the ingredients which are in the products you’re using. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as FairTrade and The Body Shop sourcing ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America.

This standpoint focuses on the conditions and pays those individuals who source ingredients receive, such as, recently there has been questions raised as to the conditions of workers in Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which can be considered an ethical dilemma. Also under the ethical standpoint is the adherence to not test on animals. Most beauty and skincare products do not test on animals; however consumers must always check the packaging, as this is another area of controversy.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

?Natural is another term that often gets confused with what it actually means for beauty products. Brands which use this term are Lush, The Body Shop, Naked Shampoo & Conditioners, Origins and many more. Natural generally means nature and the state in which we are to begin with, (i.e. no makeup or enhancements) however there is also the viewpoint of ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up.

?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? More viewpoints come into the fray when questions start to get asked on where that sugar was produced. Has it got more ingredients than sugar? Is that honey, 100% honey? There are two issues which have been raised here, and that is the issue of Organic sourced products, which will be discussed, and secondly, that more often than not, products are not 100% natural. The brand ‘Naked’ Shampoo & Conditioner use 97% natural products and Lush, while try to make their products 100% natural, there are still some of their products which are only partially natural; “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Lending the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

??Organic is another term that seems to be related to natural skincare. Organic skincare focuses on the sourcing and products of the ingredients, often meaning that no parabens or synthetic emollients, synthetic humectants, synthetic emulsifiers, synthetic surfactants; synthetic preservatives, artificial dyes, no colourings, flavourings or additives are included. Brands which are focusing on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. As you can see organic skincare is looking more at the ingredients on the back of a product and often overlaps into natural skincare and ingredients because of the adherence to none synthetic additions.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused with these words, and what they mean, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, which kind of products should you be going for? However the decision might be easier than you think. More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, the body shop is a chain which adheres to ethical and fair trade policies, while sourcing natural ingredients in a majority of their products. Also to some degree, using products which are organic, such as the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox foundation and concealer, which boasts 98% organic and natural ingredients, is helping the planet by not using or supporting the use of chemicals which may not be so environmentally friendly, this is on the pretence that a majority of organic ingredients are bio-degradable and do not destroy the planet – which is where the name of this product can be seen to come from.
Links: – Bourjois –
This change of focus could have easily come from the ever increasing pressure of climate change and being friendlier to our environment; nevertheless capitalism could easily have been an influence on this change as well. Especially since there is pressure for using more environmentally-friendly products on consumers, making it more about profit and less about caring for the planet. As consumers, we can easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, as after all, it’s made for us, and the promise of natural ingredients often mesmerises us into thinking it will do better than all the other products we have bought. It may be assumed that this shift in market focus is trying to signal the move away from chemically enhanced products as perhaps that doesn’t sound too appealing anymore.

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

The same goes for ethical sourcing of ingredients; this is a great way for other countries to get fair pay and conditions, and however this can be viewed as a way of the market to ease our conscience of buying more and more products, especially in a time of economic crisis. There has without a doubt been a significant rise in brands specialising and advertising their ethical, natural and organic sourced products, when I only remember when I was younger The Body Shop and their adherence to stop animal testing, therefore there is definitely the question to ask whether this shift in market focus was because of research into natural and organic skincare working for the environment and being less harsh on our bodies, ethical trade programs for those individuals who do pick and harvest the ingredients first, as opposed to a purposeful money making scheme.
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

The beauty industry changes as fast as the fashion industry, website like this constantly updating in line with the latest trends. Fashion has taken an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, best epitomised in high profile clothing brands such as People Tree. Now earth-friendly beauty products are burgeoning too. Words such as Ethical, Natural and Organic have become common when it comes to the latest beauty products, but what do these actually mean, and is there a difference between them? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??

Ethical:
Ethical means being conscious of the efforts and conditions under which products are produced. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as Fair Trade. A good example of an ethical company is The Body Shop, which sources Fair Trade ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America. On the other end of the spectrum questions have been raised about the conditions of workers making Katie Price’s branded perfumes. Most ethical products are not tested on animals, but for this consumers must always check the packaging.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

Natural:
?Natural is another confusing term when applied to beauty products. Brands which use this term include Lush, The Body Shop, Origins and many more. Natural can be applied to the state in which we are without intervention, i.e. no makeup or enhancements. However one may ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up. ?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? Where were the honey and sugar sourced from? Lush aspires to make 100% natural products but they include this disclaimer: “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Which leads to the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

Organic:
Organic skincare means there is no chemicals, colourings, flavourings or additives in the production of ingredients or at the manufacturing stage. Brands which focus on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. Organic skincare naturally overlaps with natural skincare.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused by these words, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, so which kind of products should you go for? The decision might be easier than you think… More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, The Body Shop adheres to both ethical and Fair Trade policies and sources natural ingredients for the majority of their products. But not all organic products are particularly ethical. Take the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox Organic Foundation which boasts 98% natural ingredients and 21% organic ingredients… how is it maunfactured?

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Maybe it’s increasing awareness of how harmful chemicals can be to our skin or the ever increasing pressure to be kind to the environment; but the demand for more environmentally-friendly products has certainly inspired companies to seek profit from organic and natural products in growing numbers. As consumers, we are easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, but it’s important to consider how these products are made as well, so it could be argued that ethical production is by far the most important aspect of any purchase. Ethical production ensures that workers get fair pay and conditions, but there is also the very serious risk of over dependence on the huge markets of the capitalist west: forcing yet another kind of colonialism onto impoverished parts of the world.

In the meantime maybe it’s best to buy from small brands that strive to make things locally from 100% natural and organic ingredients. Coming next…
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

The beauty industry changes as fast as the fashion industry, this constantly updating in line with the latest trends. Fashion has taken an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, more about best epitomised in high profile clothing brands such as People Tree. Now earth-friendly beauty products are burgeoning too. Words such as Ethical, sale Natural and Organic have become common when it comes to the latest beauty products, but what do these actually mean, and is there a difference between them? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??

Ethical:
Ethical means being conscious of the efforts and conditions under which products are produced. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as Fair Trade. A good example of an ethical company is The Body Shop, which sources Fair Trade ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America. On the other end of the spectrum questions have been raised about the conditions of workers making Katie Price’s branded perfumes. Most ethical products are not tested on animals, but for this consumers must always check the packaging.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

Natural:
?Natural is another confusing term when applied to beauty products. Brands which use this term include Lush, The Body Shop, Origins and many more. Natural can be applied to the state in which we are without intervention, i.e. no makeup or enhancements. However one may ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up. ?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? Where were the honey and sugar sourced from? Lush aspires to make 100% natural products but they include this disclaimer: “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Which leads to the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

Organic:
Organic skincare means there is no chemicals, colourings, flavourings or additives in the production of ingredients or at the manufacturing stage. Brands which focus on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. Organic skincare naturally overlaps with natural skincare.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused by these words, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, so which kind of products should you go for? The decision might be easier than you think… More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, The Body Shop adheres to both ethical and Fair Trade policies and sources natural ingredients for the majority of their products. But not all organic products are particularly ethical. Take the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox Organic Foundation which boasts 98% natural ingredients and 21% organic ingredients… how is it maunfactured?

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Maybe it’s increasing awareness of how harmful chemicals can be to our skin or the ever increasing pressure to be kind to the environment; but the demand for more environmentally-friendly products has certainly inspired companies to seek profit from organic and natural products in growing numbers. As consumers, we are easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, but it’s important to consider how these products are made as well, so it could be argued that ethical production is by far the most important aspect of any purchase. Ethical production ensures that workers get fair pay and conditions, but there is also the very serious risk of over dependence on the huge markets of the capitalist west: forcing yet another kind of colonialism onto impoverished parts of the world.

In the meantime maybe it’s best to buy from small brands that strive to make things locally from 100% natural and organic ingredients. Coming next…
ethical beauty by sandra contreras
Illustration by Sandra Contreras

The beauty industry changes as fast as the fashion industry, order constantly updating in line with the latest trends. Fashion has taken an organic and earth friendly approach for some time now, viagra buy best epitomised in high profile clothing brands such as People Tree. Now earth-friendly beauty products are burgeoning too. Words such as Ethical, discount Natural and Organic have become common when it comes to the latest beauty products, but what do these actually mean, and is there a difference between them? If a product is ethical do we somehow think it is natural as well? If something is natural must it also be organic? I’ll now take you through an explanation of these expressions and what they can mean for your skin, and the planet.??

Ethical:
Ethical means being conscious of the efforts and conditions under which products are produced. It is often linked with Community Trade Programs such as Fair Trade. A good example of an ethical company is The Body Shop, which sources Fair Trade ingredients from countries such as Africa and South America. On the other end of the spectrum questions have been raised about the conditions of workers making Katie Price’s branded perfumes, which were withdrawn from the shelves of Superdrug earlier this year. Most ethical products are not tested on animals, but for this consumers must always check the packaging.

Dee-Andrews-Ethical-Beauty
Illustration by Dee Andrews

Natural:
?Natural is another confusing term when applied to beauty products. Brands which use this term include Lush, The Body Shop, Origins and many more. Natural can be applied to the state in which we are without intervention, i.e. no makeup or enhancements. However one may ‘naturally enhancing’ one’s natural features with minimal make up. ?Natural beauty, figuratively speaking, is made from nature, so if you go get some sugar and honey and mix them together for an exfoliating face mask, it would be natural, and the ingredients would be 100% natural. But would they? Where were the honey and sugar sourced from? Lush aspires to make 100% natural products but they include this disclaimer: “we go for lovely natural ingredients and use as few synthetics as possible. In fact, we have an incredible range of natural products with no synthetics at all. Over 70% of our range is totally unpreserved and we will aim to improve on that.” (Lush, 2010) Which leads to the conclusion that up to 30% of lush’s products are not 100% natural, even though the entire range is marketed to consumers as natural skincare.

Organic:
Organic skincare means there is no chemicals, colourings, flavourings or additives in the production of ingredients or at the manufacturing stage. Brands which focus on organic skincare include Lush, Neal’s Yard, L’Occitane, Organic Surge and Liz Earle. Organic skincare naturally overlaps with natural skincare.

ethical_beauty3_by_jennifercostello
Illustration by Jennifer Costello

?It’s easy to get confused by these words, especially if you’re committed to being earth friendly, so which kind of products should you go for? The decision might be easier than you think… More often than not, ethical products are to some degree, natural and organic, for example, The Body Shop adheres to both ethical and Fair Trade policies and sources natural ingredients for the majority of their products. But not all organic products are particularly ethical. Take the newly released Bourjois Bio-Detox Organic Foundation which boasts 98% natural ingredients and 21% organic ingredients… how is it maunfactured?

ethicalbeauty_aniela murphy
Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Maybe it’s increasing awareness of how harmful chemicals can be to our skin or the ever increasing pressure to be kind to the environment; but the demand for more environmentally-friendly products has certainly inspired companies to seek profit from organic and natural products in growing numbers. As consumers, we are easily be lured into thinking that anything ‘natural’ is good for us and the environment, but it’s important to consider how these products are made as well, so it could be argued that ethical production is by far the most important aspect of any purchase. Ethical production ensures that workers get fair pay and conditions, but there is also the very serious risk of over dependence on the huge markets of the capitalist west: forcing yet another kind of colonialism onto impoverished parts of the world.

In the meantime maybe it’s best to buy from small brands that strive to make things locally from 100% natural and organic ingredients. Coming next…
This is the Kit wriggle out the restless

I’ve always loved France, this harbouring an intention to learn the French lingo for many years. I’m not being frivolous, visit I can assure you. I am able to testify to my desire through my ginger cat, sildenafil whom I named Francois and my half French boy. Oui, j’adore France! Kate Stables wanted to learn French too, so she moved to Paris. Always an observer of life’s idiosyncrasies, she found her vision could stretch even further when she left Bristol’s borough and sat within a caffeinated artery of France. Stables, the singer/musician/protagonist in This Is The Kit, defines the music they create as ‘Screamo/Emo/Flamenco’. Which in a sense it is. A feisty, heart dancing, spirited, emotional flounce. Folky but not in the jingly sense, more soulful and with minimal instruments.

This Is The Kit by Kayleigh Bluck
This Is The Kit by Kayleigh Bluck

Stables is an endearing, dark Rapunzel locked figure. Her voice shoots through you like the first sip of wine after a slog of a day, trapped in an unlit cave. You will find This Is The Kit will gently waft along on a gondolier, tell you it’s all ok, then fighting off the cave bats with their melodies, take you outside to some weeping willow adorned fairy land. She beholds a sound similar to Mary Hampton and Martha Tilston, but more girl next door in pronunciation, realness and the simplicity of lyrics. See: Two Wooden Spoons and Our Socks Forever More. The latter, sang with an acoustic guitar and ukelele, is about wanting to take off your shoes and socks forever more. ‘One of these days’ going to make it back ‘to your mattress’… but ‘I have a thing about sound sufficiency’. It’s a haunting, touching song about decisions, desires and, ‘that someone’. Moon has to be the most splendid of songs about first breath romance. After being lost in the skies, the couple come down, gasping for air and hit by reality. It has only a few lines, but manages an upbeat yet serious undertone feel to it. ‘We had the Moon’ says all it needs to.

This Is The Kit by Kayleigh Bluck
This Is The Kit by Kayleigh Bluck.

It’s nice to be sitting down when you listen to This Is The Kit, with some Pear and Apple cider preferably, or indeed a cafe au lait, if you want to make it French. At many of their relaxed, low key shows (such as Village Halls) you can do this. However, This Is The Kit have also played with big Folk heros like Jeffrey Lewis in their time – so you’ll probably be somewhere bigger, without sitting potential and Maureen and Agnes’ tapestry collections festooning the wooden walls (shame). Multitalented Stables plays guitar, banjo, trumpet and percussion. Often she is joined on stage by her musical friends including Rozi Plain, Jim Barr and Francois and The Atlas Mountains. Tres Bon. Their latest album, Wriggle Out The Restless, on Dreamboat Records, was produced by long term collaborator, Jesse D Vernon, who also often plays on stage as a two piece with Stables.

Continuing to flit across the Channel, This Is The Kit are worth seeing whilst they are this side. They encourage the celebration of the pure and simple things in life. The joy from another person and the beauty right out there. French people will tell you about this: I quote Chamfort, the 18th century French playwright: “Contemplation often makes life miserable. We should act more, think less, and stop watching ourselves live.” Think about this, at a time when most of the world belongs to some form of networking site. Encouraging self evaluation, we discuss our loves, losses, diets and determinations into the abyss. France and This Is The Kit say: look out and to the people we care about.

This Is The Kit released their latest album Wriggle Out the Restless last week on Dreamboat Records. They are also touring at the moment. Catch them in London during mid November, or check out other dates on our listing here.

Categories ,bristol, ,Cider, ,Dreamboat Records, ,folk, ,france, ,Francois and The Atlas Mountains, ,french, ,Jeffrey Lewis, ,Jesse D Vernon, ,Jim Barr, ,Kate Stables, ,Kayleigh Bluck, ,Martha Tilston, ,mary hampton, ,paris, ,Rozi Plain, ,This Is The Kit

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sparky Deathcap – Interview

Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
There’s a big buzz around Erdem, link especially amongst the highly groomed and black attired fash-pack. As I entered Senate House I couldn’t but help noting that I looked somewhat out of place, order clashing floral print leggings and gold hi tops peeking out below my sensible black coat, information pills my hair somewhat wilder than the average attendee. Author Talitha Stevenson has just written a new book, Disappear, which describes the lives of hedge fund managers and their wives, many of whom work in “fashion” and I think this may have been where they hang out.

my legs, erdem
This is a view of my legs at Erdem.

One great thing about fashion week is the opportunity to visit fabulous venues that I would never otherwise get to know. Senate House is an art deco masterpiece, and the Grand Hall offered a dramatic setting for the Erdem show, enhanced by the huge globe lights that shed a bright diffused luminescence.

Senate House, Erdem
Senate House.

As I was seated on the upper balcony I was given a brief nod of acknowledgement by Sara from Relative MO PR, a girl who I’ve known as long as I’ve worked in fashion – from way back when we were both humble interns gossiping about our bosses and getting drunk on free cocktails at bad model parties. She’s much younger than me, but she’s since risen up the ranks and I am no longer considered worthy of a proper chat.

balcony at erdem
a view from the balcony at Erdem
A view from the balcony at Erdem.

As she crouched next to some doyenne of fashion I overheard their conversation: she’s getting married, with a ceilidh in the countryside. I felt like saying: “Ah, but will your ceilidh band be as good as mine?!” But I didn’t – because it is the job of a fashion PR to chat to the most important people and I most definitely am not considered important. A fact of which I am very proud – I like to exist on the fringes of fashion, getting excited by only those things I think are worth being excited about and staying away from all the behind-the-scenes machinations. But I won’t pretend it’s not highly irritating when someone I’ve known for a very long time no longer sees fit to talk to me. Such is the world of fashion my friends.

Sometimes the models at a show are just so ultra skinny you are left wondering how they have the energy to stride down the catwalk, let alone do so in a vivacious manner. Erdem was one such show where I was struck by their absolute thinness, no doubt compounded by the pallid make-up and severe pulled back hairdos. But stride they did, criss-crossing the balcony before making a circuit of the downstairs hall. And I thought, why are all these ladies in black getting so excited about Erdem? It’s a strange fact of fashion that those with the most power, the top buyers and PRs, all look exactly the same – the exact opposite in fact of what fashion implores us to do. Erdem showed delicate geometric prints in muted autumnal tones of mustard yellow, teal and rust. There were high rounded shoulders, shaggy ruffles, lace and high waisted miniskirts to compliment the swinging maxi dresses that swept so wonderfully down the balcony. I swear there was not one tone of black in the whole darn collection.

Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As I left I noticed that all the goodie bags had been left behind – a sure sign that this particular audience was too good for free hair products, even if they looked as though they might actually use such things. On my way out I made my first and only sighting of Diana Pernet, who writes A Shaded View on Fashion blog but is best noted for her ever-present foot high hair-do. I passed Erdem himself doing a meet ‘n’ greet as I turned to go down the staircase, a large queue of sycophants waiting to fawn over the designer. But I wonder, just how many of those in attendance would ever actually wear his clothes, beautiful as they were?

Diane Pernet
Diane Pernet.

Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

There’s a big buzz around Erdem, order especially amongst the highly groomed and black attired fash-pack. As I entered Senate House I couldn’t help noting that I looked somewhat out of place, visit this clashing floral print leggings and gold hi tops peeking out below my sensible black coat, my hair somewhat wilder than the average attendee. Author Talitha Stevenson has just written a new book, Disappear, which describes the lives of hedge fund managers and their wives, many of whom work in “fashion” and I think this may have been where they hang out.

my legs, erdem
This is a view of my legs at Erdem. Lovely angle eh?

One great thing about fashion week is the opportunity to visit fabulous venues that I would never otherwise get to know. Senate House is an art deco masterpiece, and the Grand Hall offered a dramatic setting for the Erdem show, enhanced by the huge globe lights that shed a bright diffused luminescence.

Senate House, Erdem
Senate House.

As I was seated on the upper balcony I was given a brief nod of acknowledgement by Sara from Relative MO PR, a girl who I’ve known as long as I’ve worked in fashion – from way back when we were both humble interns gossiping about our bosses and getting drunk on free cocktails at bad model parties. She’s much younger than me, but she’s since risen up the ranks and I am no longer considered worthy of a proper chat.

balcony at erdem
a view from the balcony at Erdem
A view from the balcony at Erdem.

As she crouched next to some doyenne of fashion I overheard their conversation: she’s getting married, with a ceilidh in the countryside. I felt like saying: “Ah, but will your ceilidh band be as good as mine?!” But I didn’t – because it is the job of a fashion PR to chat to the most important people and I most definitely am not considered important. A fact of which I am very proud – I like to exist on the fringes of fashion, getting excited by only those things I think are worth being excited about and staying away from all the behind-the-scenes machinations. But I won’t pretend it’s not highly irritating when someone I’ve known for a very long time no longer sees fit to talk to me. Such is the world of fashion my friends.

Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

Sometimes the models at a show are just so ultra skinny you are left wondering how they have the energy to stride down the catwalk, let alone do so in a vivacious manner. Erdem was one such show where I was struck by their absolute thinness, no doubt compounded by the pallid make-up and severe pulled back hairdos. But stride they did, criss-crossing the balcony before making a circuit of the downstairs hall. And I thought, why are all these ladies in black getting so excited about Erdem? It’s a strange fact of fashion that those with the most power, the top buyers and PRs, all look exactly the same – the exact opposite in fact of what fashion implores us to do. Erdem showed delicate geometric prints in muted autumnal tones of mustard yellow, teal and rust. There were high rounded shoulders, shaggy ruffles, lace and high waisted miniskirts to compliment the swinging maxi dresses that swept so wonderfully down the balcony. I swear there was not one tone of black in the whole darn collection.

Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As I left I noticed that all the goodie bags had been left behind – a sure sign that this particular audience was too good for free hair products, even if they looked as though they might actually use such things. On my way out I made my first and only sighting of Diana Pernet, who writes A Shaded View on Fashion blog but is best noted for her ever-present foot high hair-do. I then passed Erdem himself doing a meet ‘n’ greet as I turned to go down the staircase, a large queue of sycophants waiting to fawn over the designer. But I wonder, just how many of those in attendance would ever actually wear his clothes, beautiful as they were?

Diane Pernet
Diane Pernet.

Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

There’s a big buzz around Erdem, web especially amongst the highly groomed and black attired fash-pack. As I entered Senate House I couldn’t help noting that I looked somewhat out of place, physician clashing floral print leggings and gold hi tops peeking out below my sensible black coat, seek my hair somewhat wilder than the average attendee. Author Talitha Stevenson has just written a new book, Disappear, which describes the lives of hedge fund managers and their wives, many of whom work in “fashion” and I think this may have been where they hang out.

my legs, erdem
This is a view of my legs at Erdem. Lovely angle eh?

One great thing about fashion week is the opportunity to visit fabulous venues that I would never otherwise get to know. Senate House is an art deco masterpiece, and the Grand Hall offered a dramatic setting for the Erdem show, enhanced by the huge globe lights that shed a bright diffused luminescence.

Senate House, Erdem
Senate House.

As I was seated on the upper balcony I was given a brief nod of acknowledgement by Sara from Relative MO PR, a girl who I’ve known as long as I’ve worked in fashion – from way back when we were both humble interns gossiping about our bosses and getting drunk on free cocktails at bad model parties. She’s much younger than me, but she’s since risen up the ranks and I am no longer considered worthy of a proper chat.

balcony at erdem
a view from the balcony at Erdem
A view from the balcony at Erdem.

As she crouched next to some doyenne of fashion I overheard their conversation: she’s getting married, with a ceilidh in the countryside. I felt like saying: “Ah, but will your ceilidh band be as good as mine?!” But I didn’t – because it is the job of a fashion PR to chat to the most important people and I most definitely am not considered important. A fact of which I am very proud – I like to exist on the fringes of fashion, getting excited by only those things I think are worth being excited about and staying away from all the behind-the-scenes machinations. But I won’t pretend it’s not highly irritating when someone I’ve known for a very long time no longer sees fit to talk to me. Such is the world of fashion my friends.

Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix
Erdem by Rachel de Ste. Croix.

Sometimes the models at a show are just so ultra skinny you are left wondering how they have the energy to stride down the catwalk, let alone do so in a vivacious manner. Erdem was one such show where I was struck by their absolute thinness, no doubt compounded by the pallid make-up and severe pulled back hairdos. But stride they did, criss-crossing the balcony before making a circuit of the downstairs hall. And I thought, why are all these ladies in black getting so excited about Erdem? It’s a strange fact of fashion that those with the most power, the top buyers and PRs, all look exactly the same – the exact opposite in fact of what fashion implores us to do. Erdem showed delicate geometric prints in muted autumnal tones of mustard yellow, teal and rust. There were high rounded shoulders, shaggy ruffles, lace and high waisted miniskirts to compliment the swinging maxi dresses that swept so wonderfully down the balcony. I swear there was not one tone of black in the whole darn collection.

Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem Photography by Amelia gregory
Erdem. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Erdem. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As I left I noticed that all the goodie bags had been left behind – a sure sign that this particular audience was too good for free hair products, even if they looked as though they might actually use such things. On my way out I made my first and only sighting of Diana Pernet, who writes A Shaded View on Fashion blog but is best noted for her ever-present foot high hair-do. I then passed Erdem himself doing a meet ‘n’ greet as I turned to go down the staircase, a large queue of sycophants waiting to fawn over the designer. But I wonder, just how many of those in attendance would ever actually wear his clothes, beautiful as they were?

Diane Pernet
Diane Pernet.

Sparky Deathcap is a twenty-something musician and artist from Cheshire, sale whose wry tales of love and loss are in turns hilarious and heartwrenching. You may have caught him recently supporting the likes of Los Campesinos! and Hot Club de Paris.

On songs like “Berlin Syndrome”, ampoule guitars and handclaps loop and whirl around lyrics like, page “Since then you just make cameos when I’m asleep/you’re the William Shatner of this elite genre of women that I have loved and lost,” creating a lo-fi landscape one that is simultaneously bleak and full of warmth. At times the songs are reminiscent of early Smog, when Bill Callahan wrote songs like he had a sense of humour and sometimes felt a bit awkward. As well as the recent Tear Jerky EP (available here) he maintains a brilliant cartoon blog at his website.

It’s a busy year for Sparky, off on a European tour as we speak, but I managed to send a few emails back and forth about comic books, rock operas and the Wonder Years.

So, you’re on tour with Los Campesinos! right now, how’s that going?

It has been really fun, it’s an absolute privilege to tour with my friends Los Campesinos! and the supports, Islet and Swanton Bombs, are two outrageously good bands. It was my birthday the other day coinciding with our Aberdeen date and the crowd sang happy birthday to me which was a really touching moment.

Sparky Deathcap presumably isn’t your real name – is it a sort of onstage personal that allows you to unleash your inner diva, like Beyonce Knowles’ Sasha Fierce?

I originally chose it something like 5 years ago when I started doing the one man and a guitar thing live because I felt like it would be easier to play if I could invent a persona. Now, however, there isn’t really a great separation between Sparky Deathcap and me, except for when I remember some of the crap, depressing gigs I used to do and I think about younger Sparky as this sort of beleaguered little brother or something and how excited he’d be by the exciting things I’m getting to do at the moment. Crikey, my mind is like Fellini directing The Wonder Years. Edited by Lassie.

When you play live you have drawings projected behind you, do you think you might ever make a whole comic book, is that something you’d be interested in?

Oh I have grand, grand plans for comic books. I’m working on a little comics booklet for my album and an illustrated valentines rock opera for next year. I’m also trying to resurrect my weekly comic strip for my new blog. The trouble is that comics are incredibly labour intensive. Chris Ware pointed out once that unlike writing a novel, comics don’t allow any sort of natural flow to occur as every page has to be planned out as a whole and so the panels within in it are predestined. I’d love to create a big Clowesian comic book one day, but for now I have to concentrate upon producing small, gimmicky things to “build my profile”… urggggghhhh, the modern world… adulthood…

You mentioned your rock opera there, what does that involve?

That was something I wrote for a ukulele festival in Manchester last year on Valentine’s Day. I was wrongly under the impression that we had to perform the whole thing on ukulele and didn’t really have any ukulele songs so I set about writing a sort of musical/rock opera about an organ transplant van driver finding love whilst snowbound in a rural town. I drew some illustrations for my old overhead projector as well. I hope to turn it into a special edition record and book for next year’s Valentine’s Day.

Musically, who would you call your biggest influences? You get compared to Jeffrey Lewis a lot, right? But that seems like a pretty easy comparison for anyone who sings and draws…

I have an awful lot of respect, naturally, for Jeffrey Lewis, and he has obviously influenced some aspects of my live show, even if it is in trying to steer away from his territory as much as I possibly can. I suppose the bands I have revered the most over the years are The Beach Boys, Pavement, Smog, Silver Jews, Magnetic Fields and Why?, but increasingly I’m becoming very interested in Steve Reich and Bill Evans. In terms of my artwork I’m very heavily influenced by Archer Prewitt, Daniel Clowes, Chris Ware, Adrian Tomine and Marcel Dzama. Archer Prewitt is another artist/musician; he plays in the The Sea And Cake and under his own name whilst also drawing the incomparable Sof’ Boy comics.

So, after this tour, what’s next for Sparky Deathcap?

Next up: more touring with Los Camp. I’m trying to perfect my world-weary, “oh, touring is such a drag,” but in truth it’s the most fun I’ve ever had. We have European and US tours to come which will be really amazing. In between I’m working hard on writing and recording my album, which is really very exciting.

Categories ,cartoon, ,cartoons, ,comics, ,interview, ,islet, ,Jeffrey Lewis, ,Los Campesinos, ,Singer Songwriter, ,sparky deathcap, ,swanton bombs, ,tearjerky

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Amelia’s Magazine | Festival Preview: Standon Calling


Illustration by Donna McKenzie

Regular readers of Amelia’s Magazine will know that we covered the Maison Martin Margiela 20 exhibition last March, visit when it showed in fashion capital Antwerp.

But, price since it’s moved to our very own fashion capital, we thought we’d have another look, and get some of our wonderful illustrators involved!

Somerset House is quickly becoming a fashion hot spot, with the rehoming of London Fashion Week and the recent SHOWstudio sessions. It’s clear why, too – it’s bloody beautiful.

This is the third outing for the Maison Martin Margiela exhibition, after seasons in Antwerp and Munich, so actually it’s the label’s 22nd anniversary this year, but who cares? I’ll use any excuse to have a poke around a fashion archive.


Illustration by Louise McLennan

The exhibition, set in Somerset House’s lower galleries and you’d be forgiven for believing, if this building wasn’t centuries old, that the space had been purpose-built for this nostalgic trip down Margiela memory lane.

All but a couple of the rooms are white-washed in typical Margiela fashion, and while the exhibition allows us to explore the history of this conceptual and inspirational label, it still give nothing away about the elusive man himself.


Illustration by Amy Martino

Instead of being a chronological or nostalgic display, the aim of this exhbition is to explore the key themes of Maison Martin Margiela, including the inspiration behind each collection and the techniques used.

So it is the quirks that have made this brand truly unique that are given most attention. We begin with a look at the anniversary catwalk show, amongst a lot of polystyrene models, whilst mooching along a row of rather battered Tabi shoes.


Illustration by Donna McKenzie

The bulk of the exhibition explores varying collections and what made them stand out alongside so many other fashion designers of the time. Flat-pack clothing, XXXL oversized pieces, painted garments, narrow tailoring, the trench coat, and the re-visioning of old garments. We also see the evolution of Margiela’s elusivity – first it was a slash of paint across a model’s face, then a blindfold, and then the infamous sunglasses (which I was so tempted to lift I had to walk around with my hands in my pockets. Damn I wish I’d bought them – what a collector’s item).


Illustration by Farzeen Jabbar

One room is devoted to archive footage, film and photographs from across the collections – the room is dark and has white lounge chairs for you to kick back and revel in some of the most iconic fashion images of the last two decades.


Illustration by Zarina Liew

Whether you like fashion or not, I’m entirely convinced that you will love this exhibition – it breaks the boundaries of typical gallery design and it is incredibly inspirational – Go See It!

You can read a full review of the Antwerp exhibition (which was exactly the same exhibition, I promise) here.

For the all important details, visit our listings section.

Most bands have a limited shelf life, medicine especially the ones who are hyped. Although a review like: “The first band in a decade to lay serious claim to The Stone Roses throne” (The Guardian) can put you in good stead while you’re starting out, it can also set you en route Destination Doomsville, burdening you with a reputation you simply can’t live up to.

British indie rock band Delays have so far managed to defy the odds. They have gone from strength to strength, following the release of their debut album ‘Faded Seaside Glamour’ in 2004. Six years on, the four-piece are set to release their forth record, ‘Star Tiger, Star Ariel’ produced by Duncan Lewis.

In a tiny room in the basement of music venue Water Rats in King’s Cross – decorated with blue and white fairy lights, a few old shelves and an enormous brightly coloured abstract painting – I join spiritual front man Greg Gilbert (GG) and down-to-earth drummer Rowly (R) before they take to the stage at their sold out London gig, to talk about their latest album, town criers and livin’ it up at Glastonbury over lime-flavoured Doritos

How would you describe your new album in three words?
GG: Rustic, organic and psychedelic
R: I don’t like organic, it sounds a bit vegetably
GG: OK then; rustic, psychedelic and melancholic
R: Yeah, that sounds better – I second that emotion
GG: Or we could say “Our. Best. Album” – three words – succinct and to the point

What has inspired your latest album?
GG: Our last album had a lot of orchestral arrangements and there was a real urge between the four of us to strip the sound back and become a four-piece band again. With that in mind we started to go for long drives at night along the New Forest, making music to soundtrack the journey. We built the record from the ground up and it was just a case of being inspired by the environment opposed to any concerns about writing a single. We banned the words ‘single’ and ‘commercial’ from the studio.
R: We used to do it all the time; we would say: “I think this one’s a single”, which makes you approach making music differently. We spent a lot of time in Southampton, reacquainting ourselves with the city and each other again, which does come through on the record. The result is a much more personal and honest sound.

How have you found the audience’s response to your new material so far?
GG: We’ve found that people who wouldn’t have liked our previous stuff have been positive about the new album. They’re responding to the fact that it’s a more personal record – they’re getting from it more from us as individuals then a commodity. So far, the people who have heard our record think it’s the best one.
R: The new tracks are going down just as well as our old stuff. It’s a great feeling when the roar for a new song is as enthusiastic as for an old song, like ‘Long Time Coming’.

How do you think your sound has evolved over the years?

GG: The first album sounds like a beach, the second album sounds like a club, the third album sounds like a festival and this album sounds like the forest, with the roots growing underneath the city at night making the buildings shake whilst you’re asleep. The first album is quite delicate because we recorded that before we toured so there was a certain amount of discovery. For the second album we worked with Graham Sutton who is genius producer; he brought a real club edge to the record which had a raw but beautiful precision about it.
R: We wrote the third album with the approach that it would be amazing at a festival; it’s big and bombastic and sounds like you’re playing it to 100,000 people rather then making a record for headphones.
GG: This album’s much more abstract; you can hear this on a beach in Scandinavia at two in the morning with mist flowing in the morning. We were trying to create a record which maintained a mood and an atmosphere which carries you into different surroundings. I think the best records take you to different worlds and that’s what we tried to emulate.
R: It’s not necessarily one genre of music. There’s a certain atmosphere which you can’t quite put your finger on, but it works for late night drives with aerial views over the city.

What’s your proudest achievement to date?
GG: To me it’s the fact that we’re about to release our fourth album and our songs are still playing on the radio. Very few bands get to make four albums so that makes me feel very proud. We’ve been around since 2004 and we’ve managed to sustain and grow our fan base in a way that has been pure because there is no hype now around what we do.

What’s the best gig you’ve ever played?
R: I’ve been going to Glastonbury for years so to play there was amazing. I was really ill on the day and I came so close to calling the others to say I couldn’t do it, but by the time it came to going on stage I’d never felt so healthy in all my life – Glastonbury has that effect, it wakes you up. There was another time when we played in Mexico City; we were headlining on one of the nights at a festival called ‘Manifest’ and we had no idea how big it was going to be. There were 6,000 people crammed into a wrestling/bullfighting arena all chanting ‘Delays, Delays!”. We were slightly in shock for the first couple of numbers.

Did you have any ridiculous demands on your rider in the early days that you don’t feel embarrassed about fessing up to now?
R: I don’t think our rider has changed much since the start; just the same stuff: vodka, beer, water bottles. In the beginning we did have one thing that we thought would be great to collect, which was to have a picture of the local mayor from every town where we played. The only one we got in the end was from Gloucester where they gave us a picture of the town crier which they also got signed – that was ace!

Now that you have played with your long-term idols the Manic Street Preachers, who would you most like to support?
GG: I always come back to Prince. I’m also pretty obsessed with Scott Walker at the moment – he’s the musician I most admire. I’m not sure how we’d go down with his audience but he’s awesome.
R: It’s still The (Rolling) Stones for me. Apparently we did get an offer to support them in Vienna about three years ago but we were already booked in for a festival in Wales on the same day.
GG: Keith Richards is pretty much top of the tree when it comes to rock and roll. Hopefully the opportunity will come up again…

Delays release their fourth album ‘Star Tiger, Star Ariel on 21st June 2010 on Lookout Mountain Records, preceded by the debut track ‘Unsung’ on 14th June.


Now this one has us rubbing our hands together in excitement. It’s not just the music that is getting us hot under the collar – although the line up is pretty electrifying. Standon Calling has a well earned reputation for having its finger on the new music pulse, prostate and this years festival is no exception. It’s also because of the care and attention to detail that Standon has put into their event, pharm once again highlighting the difference between the sprawling, stuff amorphous and messy mega-festivals and their small -but perfectly formed boutique counterparts.


Danish collective Efterklang will be playing at Standon Calling


As will Telepathe, who we discovered last year. Read our coverage of them here.

Known for being keen champions of upcoming talent, Standon has put artists on the stage at times in their career when they still needed people to take a chance on them; case in point, Florence and the Machine, Friendly Fires and Mumford & Sons have all played at Standon a good year before they orbited into the festival stratosphere. So stay close to the stages this year, to see the cutting edge and critically acclaimed artists that everyone will be talking about in the next few months. Joining Metronomy, British Sea Power, Steve Mason, Jeffrey Lewis, Alice Russell and The Magic Numbers will be Danish collective Efterklang (who we will be interviewing shortly), Southend art-rockers These New Puritans, upbeat electro-popsters Casiokids, a DJ set by Tom Ravenscroft, one of Brooklyn’s finest exports, Telepathe, and a band who we will support until the end of time, Lulu And The Lampshades, (the lead singer is an ex-Amelia’s Magazine staffer). Of course, this list is but a drop in the ocean of the final line-up, check Standon’s website for all the details.


Look out for Casiokids, playing at Standon 2010

As we mentioned earlier, a lot of love, time and energy has gone into planning Standon and making sure that it not only meets, but improves upon the check list that a seasoned festival goer might have. Living up to their boutique credentials, the thoughtful folk understand that you can love music and still want to maintain basic hygienic standards, so they have laid on extra (and ‘top class’, no less) showers and toilets for the campers, and for those who are bringing water-wings – always be safe, kids – Standon are in the unique position of having a swimming pool at their disposal to offer up. But here’s what I like best about the Standon experience, and I could probably write a festival preview on this basis alone; the Standon ‘fairies’ leave a revitalising drink outside each guests tent in the morning. Seeing that my drink of choice at a festival is Vodka and Berocca, I can’t think of anything more thoughtful, necessary or appropriate for a three day festival. Note to other festivals, take your cue from Standon!


Pack your cossie for a dip in Standon’s pool

Standon Calling is held from 6th – 8th August, in Standon, Hertfordshire, around 40 miles outside of London. There are several options for tickets; a full adult weekend ticket costs £95 (a Sunday day pass is also available). Check the website for details on tickets and various options for camping, including tipis and yurts.

Standon Calling is also running a competition that will appeal to a huge section of our readers.They are inviting designers, artists and illustrators to design a t-shirt, with the winning entry being turned into festival merchandise. The competition will be judged by a panel of creatives and illustrators. Here’s a bit more information from the people behind Standon:

This year’s theme is ‘Murder on the Standon Express’ so think murder, mystery, mayhem and madness. A panel of established arts professionals will judge the designs, with the winner receiving two VIP festival packages including boutique camping, as well as seeing their T-shirt printed. The winning artist will also be featured on the festival website. This isn’t a money-making exercise, so any proceeds will be donated to charity.

How to enter
-Please email your design to design@standoncalling.com before the 21st June 2010 as a moderately high j-peg (at least 1500-pixels wide). Although please note that the final artwork will need to be supplied as either a colour separated PSD file or a vector/bitmap based Illustrator file.
-Your design should contain a maximum of three colours.
-Your design should not contain any copyrighted material.
-Please don’t include any fancy pants printing techniques, such as glow in dark, fuzzy felt or marmite.

Categories ,British Sea Power, ,casiokids, ,festival preview, ,Florence and The Machine, ,Friendly Fires, ,Illustrator Brief, ,Indie, ,Jeffrey Lewis, ,Mumford and Sons, ,Standon Calling, ,telepathe, ,The Magic Numbers, ,Tom Ravenscroft

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