Amelia’s Magazine | Operation Bike Bloc: Designing the Resistance Machine!

page -2″ src=”http://www.ameliasmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Shaun-McDowell-Untitled-2.gif” alt=”Shaun-McDowell–Untitled, this web -2″ />Untitled 2 by Shaun Mc Dowell

To examine artists on display in regards to their own sense of what is intangible; what is the unbeknownst? Cecily Brown (one of the five artists displaying), once elucidated of her method; ‘Often, I find it really hard to see what I’m doing when I’m in the thick of things (painting).’ This seemed a resonant befall to take into the exhibition, and one that permeated throughout; the artist’s blindness filtering down to the viewers’ perception.

steve-white-installation-shAll photographs by Stephen White, courtesy of Parasol unit

On entering the chic industrial space of the Parasol Unit, the viewer is introduced to Katy Moran’s installations of small, yet expressively fueled paintings. Ambiguous and ethereal spaces, you are inserted into a void of instability. She is emphatically a cannon for the abstract. Sometimes unsettling, occasionally frustrating (primarily by the evasive titles), but most of all, her paintings are enchanting. Staring into a framed space of colour and shape, for example Daniel, the warped style within the pieces allude to envisions of nothingness that are quite remarkable.

steve white installation shots 054

Shaun McDowell, renowned for his part in the Peckham art squats, uses colour and technique in a vast and expansive means. Glaringly bright and expansively detailed, what initially looks like a lot of fun swiftly augments to a somewhat dark and unnerving visage. Strolling slowly past his paintings, I became ever more hypnotised as the images took on a pseudo stereogram quality. In seeing what wasn’t there, McDowell emulates invisibility by somehow tricking his viewer into complacence, before revealing his true mien.

steve white installation shots 030

Spotted throughout the gallery, Hans Josephsohn’s sculptures have a weird (for want of a better word) presence. Remindful of Easter Island Moai, the veteran sculptor’s cast brass creations have a transcendent quality. Although clearly based upon the human form, they seem to capture their own timeless space with an omnipresent earthliness.

Cecily Brown and Maaike Schoorel probably make for the biggest contrast within the exhibition. Feasibly the crux of the collective display, Brown’s paintings are entirely mesmerising. Sensual and figurative, each image draws the viewer in. A lieu of strokes, the paintings seem to shift with every glance, yielding an ever more desire to look. Saturated with existentialist sensibilities, her works exude human instinct. Counter to this, Maaike Schoorel seems to take a much more apathetic stance. Her bleached canvases denote a controlled and methodical temperament. Her works certainly evoke the invisible, and after forcefully adjusting to her palate, figures and landscapes subtlety emerge.

Katy-Moran,-Salters-Ridge,-Salters Ridge by Katy Moran

Visible Invisible invites the viewer into an uncomfortable world where a desired truth is obsolete. Each artist takes their own stance on how to barrage their audience with a distinctive underlay. Irritating the senses, the exhibition leaves you wanting for something that evades, and, insofar, wanting more.

Visible Invisible: Against the Security of the Real is at the Parasol unit, Foundation for Contemporary Art, 14 Wharf Road, London, N1 7RW from 25.11.09 – 07.02.10. Gallery opens Tuesday to Saturday 10 am to 6 pm. Sunday is 12 to 5 pm. First Thursday of every month, open until 9 pm. Admission if free. Please note that from 6pm on Friday 18 December 2009 until Tuesday 5 January 2010 Parasol unit will be closed for the holidays.
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Last week at the Arnolfini Gallery in Bristol Climate Camp and the Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination joined forces to become Operation Bike Bloc, prescription which will launch the Resistance Machine in Copenhagen on the 16th of December. First however the prototype had to be designed and built. So what on earth materialised when a bunch of volunteers and activists were let loose with a pile of old bikes and welding equipment? I called up JJ, one of the projects facilitators, to find out…

So how did the designing and building of the prototypes go in Bristol last week?

It was brilliant, the idea of the week in Bristol was about creating a collective culture, a lot of social engineering, a lot of the work was getting these people that had never really worked in this formation to build a lot of trust, and work fast and efficiently together, and something that is importantly fun. It was really successful. We then started to set out the design process, through working collectively together we’d already formed a merge of intelligence because the 2 groups that went off to do designs came up with exactly the same 2 ideas, that was really beautiful, it showed that we were really on the same page. There was a wall in the gallery with maybe 100 different designs, so we were looking at those and discussing. Then basically we had this big shipping container outside with this big poster on the side of it. People just welded, learnt to weld, there was a lot of skill sharing.

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What kind of ideas did every one come up with?

Well there are 3 prototypes; the first is ‘The Swarm’, which involves many bikes attached together so that anyone can become a part of the bike bloc. The ideas based on bees swarming, with many bodies communicating together. Then there is ‘Double Double Trouble’ that is 2 tall bikes, basically if you imagine 2 bike frames welded together, it’s got 2 wheels with the bike frames welded on top of each other to make a tall bike about 9/20 ft tall, with a chariot in the middle of those 2 to ride through the streets. That’ll be used for carrying people, things, lots of different uses, for getting up high and so on.The 3rd thing, prototype, ‘The Machine’, won’t actually be released, it’s a secret! That’ll actually be released on the 16th, the day of action in Copenhagen.

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Didn’t you stay on a boat while you were in Bristol?

We stayed on the boat every night, which was fantastic, we all worked collectively, cooking and cleaning together, for us one of the most important things is creating rebel friendships and really enabling people to trust each other and work together well. That is really important, building friendships and relationships really.

The project involves Climate Camp and the Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination collaborating. How do these 2 work together?

Well the Lab is a collection of volunteers and activists that sets this project going and then we collaborated with Climate Camp,  for us it’s a bit like we’re trying to create this spark, with various bits of wood and if that catches then that’s  a project that happens. We’d try and keep the spark going till lots of other bits of wood and materials come in and it catches and the fire starts. It’s about losing control in the sense of starting off an idea and making it open. That’s a key part of what we do. Everyone owns it, which is very different from other ways artists work, quite the opposite.

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And finally how to you think things will pan-out in Copenhagen at Candy Factory? What are your hopes?

We like to create an idea that has its own sort of mythology or power behind it, I think that is beginning to happen already, it seems to have captured peoples imagination, it really is about designing new forms of civil disobedience and making it fun and adventurous, effective and  beautiful, that seems to be happening, we’ve already got about 150 bikes waiting for us in Copenhagen when we get there. We’re going to be based in the Candy Factory, in like a legalized squat. How is it going to go? Well I don’t want to make any predictions, I think it’s unexpected. Our dream is that on the 16th, the day of civil disobedience, the reclaim power day when the Climate Justice Action group which is the wider network we’re working within, the idea is to go and non violently push through… and not escalate to violence but get as near to the UN conference as possible and then to create a peoples summit for climate justice. I think what could happen and I think this would be a historically important moment if it did is that while we do that delegates from the inside would walk out and join to create a new space. It could be amazing. We’re hoping that the bike bloc would enable that to happen as we’re going to be this mobile swarm that’s constantly moving around, like a cavalry from one place to another, engaging and moving off. So hopefully we’ll be able to enable that to happen and also maybe to get people who haven’t done activism or who might feel like it feels safer to be on a bicycle. And also there’s nothing more fun, it’s like being kids, all in your bike gang and that’s what the project is, the title is put the fun between your legs and that’s super important for us that people just love doing it.

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Photography by Amy Scaife

More coming soon on the COP15 summit and the unveiling of ‘The Machine’!

A cool video incase you missed it first time around…

Vrooooom

The Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination
Climate Camp
Climate Justice Action

Categories ,activism, ,bikes, ,Climate Camp, ,Climate Change, ,Climate Justice Action, ,collaboration, ,copenhagen, ,earth, ,Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination

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Amelia’s Magazine | Reclaiming power at Copenhagen!

PA061099

Earlier last week I ventured down to Somerset House to see the eagerly anticipated SHOWstudio: Fashion Revolution exhibition which charts this rise of the iconic website from its creation in 2000. This large-scale retrospective of sorts was bursting to the seams with installations of some of the best videos, and information pills podcasts, sales interviews and most importantly– live projects. Split over two levels, dosage as I entered I was greeted with a room comprised entirely of mirrors that were designed to make each person entering ‘really’ look at their reflection. After a few moments of looking at myself and feeling rather vain and awkward I felt obliged to move on and make way for the hoards of teenagers waiting to pull pranks on each other and the non-suspecting public.

Naomi- image courtesy of Showstudio.com

In the next room I found a giant 3-D sculpture of Naomi Campbell, which was linked to an etch-a-sketch computer where visitors could get involved and draw images which were in turn projected onto Naomi’s imposing frame. Interestingly I discovered after my visit that there were several hidden cameras dotted around the Naomi sculpture to record the best comments made by visitors, so I was very relieved that I had gone alone therefore having no one to talk to.

There were many great fashion moments and highlights peppered throughout this exhibition. I think the best was watching a loop of the project ‘More Beautiful Women’ which pays homage to Andy Warhol’s ‘Thirteen Most Beautiful Women’ screen tests of 1964. It’s based on a simple idea where Nick Knight invited several iconic models from the 1960’s through to the present day and asked them to stand in front of a video camera for two minutes. Models involved were Twiggy, Marie Helvin, Kate Moss, Liberty Ross, Stella Tennant and Gisele to name but a few. The best clip that I saw was that of Stephanie Seymour who looked rather bored throughout and remarked ‘This is the longest two minutes of my life!’ This was sheer brilliance in its subversive undertones both perpetuating and playing upon the underlying opinions most people have of models.

'Freedom of Love'- image courtesy of Showstudio.com

Another project that was popular with all visitors was the 2004 collaboration between Brad Pitt and SHOWstudio titled ‘Freedom of Love’. The short film depicted Pitt frantically painting over an enlarged passport sized photograph of himself adding in captions and blurbs, whilst reciting Breton’s sixty line poem of the same name. Whilst I was there this installation drew the biggest crowd and I believe was so popular due to Brad Pitt’s global fame and heartthrob status rather than everyone’s love of the great poet Breton.

'Sheela is a Punk rocker' image courtesy of Showstudio.com

Just when I thought the exhibition was coming to an end I stumbled upon a small section dedicated to Fashion Film, which was comprised of a reel of 16 short films created for SHOWstudio. My favourite was titled ‘Sheena is a Punk Rocker’ which depicted a topless and rather energetic Kate Moss doing a frantic pogo dance which saw her head banging. This was great as I feel it showed much more of her personality than you could possibly gleam from a still image and also had a funny moment near the end where she started ripping the paper background and gets so into it that she suddenly falls to the floor which is the finishing shot.

All fans of SHOWstudio.com would absolutely love this exhibition as it was great to see highlights of the work together in one place, but most importantly it was humbling to see how fashion in general has progressed during this past decade which I feel can partly be credited to Nick Knight and the wealth of contributors who make up the SHOWstudio team. Over the years it has really pushed the boundaries of what is possible and helped guide fashion into the mainstream sphere by applying and manipulating all the modern technologies available to bring it to the masses, whilst looking forward to new and innovative ways to make fashion even more engaging. SHOWstudio: Fashion Revolution is running until 20 December.
COP15 is the next major convening of international governments to reconcile international protocol on climate change.
That’s a lot of long words, visit this what it boils down to is that we are boiling up and the world needs to tackle the issue of climate change head on.

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World leaders and delegates from 189 countries will meet in December in Copenhagen to try and create initiatives and agree on ideas on how we can stop climate change destroying the planet.

COP15 is the fifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Will this one be any different from the past COP’s, for sale which have so far failed to come up with any sound initiatives?

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With corporations still on the offensive, pill putting millions of pounds into trying to discredit the certainty of climate change as well as governments bickering among each other about who needs to make the first and biggest steps, a deal at this point seems unlikely.
Radically reducing the effect of climate change requires radical change and a just transition in countries across the world. With governments scared of losing electorate and backing by the rich corporations making a swift change away from profit based economics and our consumer lifestyle to a sustainable future is never going to be likely.

The struggle to change to sustainable and clean energies shows the tight grip oil corporations have and how as a society we are intent on quick and cheap energy no matter the impact on the environment around us.
With climate change predominately affecting people in the global south, rich western countries are still slow in waking up to the cold hard fact that due to climate change we too will be living in a third world state unless we act now. It is time to gather a mass movement to say it can no longer be business as usual.

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Over the past few years we have also been seeing a range of market based solutions to try and combat climate change, from carbon trading, tar sands and offsetting schemes, these initiatives fail to look at the root causes and are quick fix ideas that have so far failed to have any impact. Some kind of deal at Copenhagen could see a continuation of this. We need to make sure that we no longer look to using false solutions.

A huge movement of groups and individuals are at least going to make this COP one leaders will never forget, joining thousands of activists from around the world people are going to hold a week of protests from farmers actions to a peoples summit in the conference to show that we are no longer willing for governments and corporations to make the decisions and it is time to take the power back. There will be a chance to get involved from any level you are comfortable with, although with cold temperatures and swarms of police expected it is not something for the faint hearted.

Under the banner ‘Social Change not Climate Change,’ Climate Justice Action, a coalition of social groups have been organising like crazy to make it as easy as possible for people to get to Copenhagen and make their voices and presence be known.

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Climate Justice Action will bring together concerned individuals directly affected by climate change from the global south, progressive NGO’s, indigenous peoples as well as you and others from around the UK.
Buses are leaving from Leeds and London at a cut price of 100 pounds return that will give people a chance to get to know others and form an affinity with other protestors. Free accommodation is also being organised as we speak, in social centres and other spaces organised by CJA and networks in Copenhagen.
There are also activities, workshops and events in local neighbourhoods around the country in the next few weeks giving you the chance to get involved and meet up with other people and learn about what you can do and need to bring.

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Copenhagen is seen as one of the last chances to create a huge global movement that will bring about the change we need before it is too late, make sure you are there to join the thousands of others in the biggest and most important protest of the decade.

Categories ,Activists, ,Climate Change, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Cop15, ,copenhagen, ,corporations, ,delegates, ,earth, ,global south, ,indigenous, ,Politicians, ,protest, ,radical, ,social change, ,sustainable, ,Tar Sands, ,transport

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Amelia’s Magazine | COP out CAMP out

Cop-Out-title

Grab your sleeping bag and wrap up warm because this Saturday Climate Camp London will not only be joining the tens of thousands of people gathering in The City for The Wave, these guys are staying put. It is time to draw attention to the false solutions such as carbon trading proposed by the UNFCCC and challenge corporations and political systems that are causing climate change. At a secret location (to be announced via text message) tents will pop-up and a low budget screen will display projected images of all things Climate Camp related, all to demand effective solutions to the climate crisis.

If things continue and the government get their way the next crisis won’t be financial, it’ll be a lot worse. Yesterday in Chicago the Mobilization for Climate Justice targeted Chicago Climate Exchange, the first and largest carbon market in North America. “Climate criminals” such as this are profiting from climate change and cashing in on people’s concern, carbon trading is a diversion from the solutions we really need. As Abigail Singer of the Mobilization for Climate Justice stated; “THE AIR IS NOT FOR SALE!”

Cop_Out
Illustrations by Jermaine Gallacher

So how can you get involved?

Sign up for text message alerts Beep Beep

Get to grips with a pop-up tent Boing

Be in London in the AM ready, willing and able.

And if you’re unsure about carbon trading/cap and trade, how it works and who it benefits heres a little video from the makers of ‘The Story of Stuff’…

“The Story of Cap & Trade is a fast-paced, fact-filled look at the leading climate solution – emissions trading – on the negotiating table at Copenhagen and in other capitals. Host Annie Leonard introduces the energy traders and Wall Street financiers at the heart of this scheme and reveals the “devils in the details” in current cap
and trade proposals: free permits to big polluters, fake offsets and distraction from what’s really required to tackle the climate crisis.”

The Story of Cap & Trade from Story of Stuff Project on Vimeo.

www.storyofcapandtrade.org

Categories ,Activists, ,Carbon Trading, ,Climate Camp, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Copenhagen summit, ,the Wave, ,UNFCCC

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Amelia’s Magazine | COP15: The action starts now

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So, page Lets tackle the name situation. I was on your blog reading the suggestions that fans sent you and my favourites were Rad Stewert and Wasabi Lube…
J: Oh, I don’t like that one at all!

That was my favourite!
J: You can have it! I dunno if you play but whoever suggested that would be stoked to know that there was a band called it I’m sure.

Pyramiddd was the one to go with?
R: Not necessarily, I fucking hate it.
J: Not really, I kinda hate Pyramiddd too.

I got that vibe when I read that blog, there seemed to be a little tension surrounding the issue…
J: The thing that sucked was that we had to pick it so quick. We rushed into it, We were releasing our 7” here and everyone was like “What the fuck is your name, you need to pick a name so we can release this” So we were like – I guess this is it.
R: That was the one that we agreed on more than any other name, out them all.
J: Master Control was close and Trust Fund was close. They were the two runners up.
R: We had some other ones we picked. But, We picked ones and we liked it for a day and the next day we hated it. But there’s no such thing as a good band name. Like Radiohead sucks. That’s a stupid band name.

There was another band called Starfucker, Can they have it, are they worthy?
J: Yeah they can have it, It’s a stupid fucking name!
R: Starfucker is a bad name too.
J: It was a joke! We didn’t think we would be touring the US let alone coming to Europe and Japan if we had any kinda foresight we would have picked a better name a long time ago. Its like getting married, a joke that goes too far… Never again!

green

Another thing I saw on your Myspace was the Las Vegas episodes
J: That was funny, That dude talking bout the cist! I dunno how he saw it, I like bent over to pick up a key and he was like “Aahh cist there”
R: Its not even that big!

Are you guys filming what your doing over here?
J: Yeah we have, We have mainly been filming in the car because that is all we do. It takes hours to get everywhere, but its pretty, the architecture is pretty. Have we filmed anything interesting?
R: I filmed the red light district. That was difficult, your not meant to.
J: He got flipped off.

The Internet told me about the Target commercial, One of your tracks feature on it?
J: Unfortunately, that’s the way it is now- that licensing your songs to commercials is a way to make money. Which is better way of making money than parking cars for me.

Yeah, but its does get a lot of people to hear your music that wouldn’t necessarily hear it…
R: Yeah, I didn’t know that people did this but people will actually find the songs used in commercials and find out who the band is. I didn’t know that was a thing because I don’t have a TV. Target has great music on their commercials.. plus Target has great things at great prices! Make sure you go to target! Today!

Medicine” is your first release over here, Is this a good representation of what is to come with the album, or is it not that far on?
J: It’s not that far on but it seems mostly a little darker than stuff we have so far. The new idea is a 30 minute dance block-all the same tempo and songs that fade into each other. Maybe it will b like that. I dunno about “Medicine”, We didn’t really pick that. Other people were like “This will b a good song” So we were like, “Alright, do what you want.”.
R: Really every song is a single on the album!

Sorry for the “Smash Hits” stylee question, But What your medicine for winter?
R: Most the things that make me feel good, make me feel bad later
J: I have been really homesick on this tour. I just started dating someone I really like so we are gonna take a trip to LA I’m excited about that. I’ll be all warm all my friends will be cold in Portland. I have been eating lots of good food like cantrell mushrooms chopped up with pasta.
R: That’s another great thing bout Portland, You can get so many great vegetables. That’s my winter medicine- I like cooking and baking pies.
J: He is an amazing cook!
R: I like to save my vegetable ends, put them in a big plastic bag in your freezer then boil it and it makes good vegetable broth. Keep all your ends and boil for a few hours = Perfect, amazing vegetable broth.
J: I want ask you how to make granola-he makes really good granola. He is like Mom, he would make us sandwiches when we started on tour.
R: I don’t do it anymore now, I get tired. I’m to busy now. I have a kid. If I make granola while my kid is with me the kid will end up in the granola.

The first thing I thought when I heard “Medicine” was that you guys played a lot of video games in the 90s?
J: Yeah, That’s really true. 007 was my favourite video game from the 90s on N64. Listening to The Fugees album on repeat for hours on end.
R: I was a Nintendo system kid. I never moved beyond that. I played the Sega Genesis once, but that’s it.
J: Genesis was good.

I wasn’t a Sega fan, Nintendo all the way..
Both: Yeah
J: But I think Sega had, Mortal Combat, that was rad.
R: Yeah totally, Sega had Road Rash and Sonic the Hedgehog.
J: Sonic was rad too.

With the video, it’s such a colourful song but black and white, any reason?
J: I think it was easier for Andrew to make-he’s our friend, he is learning the programmes.
R: I think its fitting, I think the video is still very colourful, l like the dancing in black and white, it can bring out the movement. Whether or not that was intentional or not, I think It works really well.

red

I kind of came to my own conclusion that you were really into what Beyoncé does right now?
R: Her video was after ours!
J: That “Single Ladies” video was amazing though!

With the black and white thing and also all the moves being busted out all over the place I assumed she was one of you creative influences?
R: I like her for sure, I have total respect for her she’s queen diva. Neal Medlyn, a comedian/performance artist came to Portland and did “The Beyoncé Experience” and wore a wig and had gay dancers with him and that was one of my favourite shows ever. Yeah, so that was inspiring!

What’s your signature dance move, I know you defiantly got one Ryan from that at the end of the set? (He owned the floor)
J: I don’t go out, I don’t dance. Only on tour.
R: I love when he does though, its awesome!
J: It’s horrible!
R: I don’t dance like on stage when I got out, I tone it down, I cant go out on a dancefloor like BLUGHG, Some things are strictly for performance but for the most part when im around other people I don’t go too crazy I respect peoples space.
J: What that called, grinding though, that’s always nice. That’s how you get laid thts how it happens. You like it?
Love it
R: Yeah, it doesn’t matter you just find someone you like!
J: That’s how it happens!
R: It’s very primal.

yellow

What live acts do you aspire to be as good as?
J: Of Montreal are amazing live! We played with them at Monolith festival, Colorado. They really put a lot of effort into putting on a live show. They have a lot of thought- interesting clothes, people coming out doing crazy shit.
R- I don’t even like Of Montreal that much, but live is amazing for sure. There aren’t that many live shows, I don’t really know, There just aren’t many good live bands…Broadcast they don’t do much, but they have a certain energy while they are playing that draws you in.
J: Deerhunter’s great live, they are one of my favourites.

What should people be prepared for when they see you live?
R: I like it when people don’t know what to expect, when people don’t know who we are. When there’s some mystery about it. I like going to something and not knowing anything about it and then when its really good, it being awesome like makes me feel like I have a secret now.
J: Sometimes you can see Keil’s junk when he is playing drums, like a lot because he wears dresses. Be prepared.
blue

So, abortion Lets tackle the name situation. I was on your blog reading the suggestions that fans sent you and my favourites were Rad Stewert and Wasabi Lube…
J: Oh, I don’t like that one at all!

That was my favourite!
J: You can have it! I dunno if you play but whoever suggested that would be stoked to know that there was a band called it I’m sure.

Pyramiddd was the one to go with?
R: Not necessarily, I fucking hate it.
J: Not really, I kinda hate Pyramiddd too.

I got that vibe when I read that blog, there seemed to be a little tension surrounding the issue…
J: The thing that sucked was that we had to pick it so quick. We rushed into it, We were releasing our 7” here and everyone was like “What the fuck is your name, you need to pick a name so we can release this” So we were like – I guess this is it.
R: That was the one that we agreed on more than any other name, out them all.
J: Master Control was close and Trust Fund was close. They were the two runners up.
R: We had some other ones we picked. But, We picked ones and we liked it for a day and the next day we hated it. But there’s no such thing as a good band name. Like Radiohead sucks. That’s a stupid band name.

There was another band called Starfucker, Can they have it, are they worthy?
J: Yeah they can have it, It’s a stupid fucking name!
R: Starfucker is a bad name too.
J: It was a joke! We didn’t think we would be touring the US let alone coming to Europe and Japan if we had any kinda foresight we would have picked a better name a long time ago. Its like getting married, a joke that goes too far… Never again!

green

Another thing I saw on your Myspace was the Las Vegas episodes
J: That was funny, That dude talking bout the cist! I dunno how he saw it, I like bent over to pick up a key and he was like “Aahh cist there”
R: Its not even that big!

Are you guys filming what your doing over here?
J: Yeah we have, We have mainly been filming in the car because that is all we do. It takes hours to get everywhere, but its pretty, the architecture is pretty. Have we filmed anything interesting?
R: I filmed the red light district. That was difficult, your not meant to.
J: He got flipped off.

The Internet told me about the Target commercial, One of your tracks feature on it?
J: Unfortunately, that’s the way it is now- that licensing your songs to commercials is a way to make money. Which is better way of making money than parking cars for me.

Yeah, but its does get a lot of people to hear your music that wouldn’t necessarily hear it…
R: Yeah, I didn’t know that people did this but people will actually find the songs used in commercials and find out who the band is. I didn’t know that was a thing because I don’t have a TV. Target has great music on their commercials.. plus Target has great things at great prices! Make sure you go to target! Today!

Medicine” is your first release over here, Is this a good representation of what is to come with the album, or is it not that far on?
J: It’s not that far on but it seems mostly a little darker than stuff we have so far. The new idea is a 30 minute dance block-all the same tempo and songs that fade into each other. Maybe it will b like that. I dunno about “Medicine”, We didn’t really pick that. Other people were like “This will b a good song” So we were like, “Alright, do what you want.”.
R: Really every song is a single on the album!

Sorry for the “Smash Hits” stylee question, But What your medicine for winter?
R: Most the things that make me feel good, make me feel bad later
J: I have been really homesick on this tour. I just started dating someone I really like so we are gonna take a trip to LA I’m excited about that. I’ll be all warm all my friends will be cold in Portland. I have been eating lots of good food like cantrell mushrooms chopped up with pasta.
R: That’s another great thing bout Portland, You can get so many great vegetables. That’s my winter medicine- I like cooking and baking pies.
J: He is an amazing cook!
R: I like to save my vegetable ends, put them in a big plastic bag in your freezer then boil it and it makes good vegetable broth. Keep all your ends and boil for a few hours = Perfect, amazing vegetable broth.
J: I want ask you how to make granola-he makes really good granola. He is like Mom, he would make us sandwiches when we started on tour.
R: I don’t do it anymore now, I get tired. I’m to busy now. I have a kid. If I make granola while my kid is with me the kid will end up in the granola.

The first thing I thought when I heard “Medicine” was that you guys played a lot of video games in the 90s?
J: Yeah, That’s really true. 007 was my favourite video game from the 90s on N64. Listening to The Fugees album on repeat for hours on end.
R: I was a Nintendo system kid. I never moved beyond that. I played the Sega Genesis once, but that’s it.
J: Genesis was good.

I wasn’t a Sega fan, Nintendo all the way..
Both: Yeah
J: But I think Sega had, Mortal Combat, that was rad.
R: Yeah totally, Sega had Road Rash and Sonic the Hedgehog.
J: Sonic was rad too.

With the video, it’s such a colourful song but black and white, any reason?
J: I think it was easier for Andrew to make-he’s our friend, he is learning the programmes.
R: I think its fitting, I think the video is still very colourful, l like the dancing in black and white, it can bring out the movement. Whether or not that was intentional or not, I think It works really well.

red

I kind of came to my own conclusion that you were really into what Beyoncé does right now?
R: Her video was after ours!
J: That “Single Ladies” video was amazing though!

With the black and white thing and also all the moves being busted out all over the place I assumed she was one of you creative influences?
R: I like her for sure, I have total respect for her she’s queen diva. Neal Medlyn, a comedian/performance artist came to Portland and did “The Beyoncé Experience” and wore a wig and had gay dancers with him and that was one of my favourite shows ever. Yeah, so that was inspiring!

What’s your signature dance move, I know you defiantly got one Ryan from that at the end of the set? (He owned the floor)
J: I don’t go out, I don’t dance. Only on tour.
R: I love when he does though, its awesome!
J: It’s horrible!
R: I don’t dance like on stage when I got out, I tone it down, I cant go out on a dancefloor like BLUGHG, Some things are strictly for performance but for the most part when im around other people I don’t go too crazy I respect peoples space.
J: What that called, grinding though, that’s always nice. That’s how you get laid thts how it happens. You like it?
Love it
R: Yeah, it doesn’t matter you just find someone you like!
J: That’s how it happens!
R: It’s very primal.

yellow

What live acts do you aspire to be as good as?
J: Of Montreal are amazing live! We played with them at Monolith festival, Colorado. They really put a lot of effort into putting on a live show. They have a lot of thought- interesting clothes, people coming out doing crazy shit.
R- I don’t even like Of Montreal that much, but live is amazing for sure. There aren’t that many live shows, I don’t really know, There just aren’t many good live bands…Broadcast they don’t do much, but they have a certain energy while they are playing that draws you in.
J: Deerhunter’s great live, they are one of my favourites.

What should people be prepared for when they see you live?
R: I like it when people don’t know what to expect, when people don’t know who we are. When there’s some mystery about it. I like going to something and not knowing anything about it and then when its really good, it being awesome like makes me feel like I have a secret now.
J: Sometimes you can see Keil’s junk when he is playing drums, like a lot because he wears dresses. Be prepared.
blue

So, adiposity Lets tackle the name situation. I was on your blog reading the suggestions that fans sent you and my favourites were Rad Stewert and Wasabi Lube…
J: Oh, I don’t like that one at all!

That was my favourite!
J: You can have it! I dunno if you play but whoever suggested that would be stoked to know that there was a band called it I’m sure.

Pyramiddd was the one to go with?
R: Not necessarily, I fucking hate it.
J: Not really, I kinda hate Pyramiddd too.

I got that vibe when I read that blog, there seemed to be a little tension surrounding the issue…
J: The thing that sucked was that we had to pick it so quick. We rushed into it, We were releasing our 7” here and everyone was like “What the fuck is your name, you need to pick a name so we can release this” So we were like – I guess this is it.
R: That was the one that we agreed on more than any other name, out them all.
J: Master Control was close and Trust Fund was close. They were the two runners up.
R: We had some other ones we picked. But, We picked ones and we liked it for a day and the next day we hated it. But there’s no such thing as a good band name. Like Radiohead sucks. That’s a stupid band name.

There is another band called Starfucker, Can they have it, are they worthy?
J: Yeah they can have it, It’s a stupid fucking name!
R: Starfucker is a bad name too.
J: It was a joke! We didn’t think we would be touring the US let alone coming to Europe and Japan if we had any kinda foresight we would have picked a better name a long time ago. Its like getting married, a joke that goes too far… Never again!

green

Another thing I saw on your Myspace was the Las Vegas episodes
J: That was funny, That dude talking bout the cist! I dunno how he saw it, I like bent over to pick up a key and he was like “Aahh cist there”
R: Its not even that big!

Are you guys filming what your doing over here?
J: Yeah we have, We have mainly been filming in the car because that is all we do. It takes hours to get everywhere, but its pretty, the architecture is pretty. Have we filmed anything interesting?
R: I filmed the red light district. That was difficult, your not meant to.
J: He got flipped off.

The Internet told me about the Target commercial, One of your tracks feature on it?
J: Unfortunately, that’s the way it is now- that licensing your songs to commercials is a way to make money. Which is better way of making money than parking cars for me.

Yeah, but its does get a lot of people to hear your music that wouldn’t necessarily hear it…
R: Yeah, I didn’t know that people did this but people will actually find the songs used in commercials and find out who the band is. I didn’t know that was a thing because I don’t have a TV. Target has great music on their commercials.. plus Target has great things at great prices! Make sure you go to target! Today!

Medicine” is your first release over here, Is this a good representation of what is to come with the album, or is it not that far on?
J: It’s not that far on but it seems mostly a little darker than stuff we have so far. The new idea is a 30 minute dance block-all the same tempo and songs that fade into each other. Maybe it will b like that. I dunno about “Medicine”, We didn’t really pick that. Other people were like “This will be a good song” So we were like, “Alright, do what you want.”.
R: Really every song is a single on the album!

Sorry for the “Smash Hits” stylee question, But What your medicine for winter?
R: Most the things that make me feel good, make me feel bad later
J: I have been really homesick on this tour. I just started dating someone I really like so we are gonna take a trip to LA I’m excited about that. I’ll be all warm all my friends will be cold in Portland. I have been eating lots of good food like cantrell mushrooms chopped up with pasta.
R: That’s another great thing bout Portland, You can get so many great vegetables. That’s my winter medicine- I like cooking and baking pies.
J: He is an amazing cook!
R: I like to save my vegetable ends, put them in a big plastic bag in your freezer then boil it and it makes good vegetable broth. Keep all your ends and boil for a few hours = Perfect, amazing vegetable broth.
J: I want ask you how to make granola-he makes really good granola. He is like Mom, he would make us sandwiches when we started on tour.
R: I don’t do it anymore now, I get tired. I’m to busy now. I have a kid. If I make granola while my kid is with me the kid will end up in the granola.

The first thing I thought when I heard “Medicine” was that you guys played a lot of video games in the 90s?
J: Yeah, That’s really true. 007 was my favourite video game from the 90s on N64. Listening to The Fugees album on repeat for hours on end.
R: I was a Nintendo system kid. I never moved beyond that. I played the Sega Genesis once, but that’s it.
J: Genesis was good.

I wasn’t a Sega fan, Nintendo all the way..
Both: Yeah
J: But I think Sega had, Mortal Combat, that was rad.
R: Yeah totally, Sega had Road Rash and Sonic the Hedgehog.
J: Sonic was rad too.

With the video, it’s such a colourful song but black and white, any reason?
J: I think it was easier for Andrew to make-he’s our friend, he is learning the programmes.
R: I think its fitting, I think the video is still very colourful, l like the dancing in black and white, it can bring out the movement. Whether or not that was intentional or not, I think It works really well.

red

I kind of came to my own conclusion that you were really into what Beyoncé does right now?
R: Her video was after ours!
J: That “Single Ladies” video was amazing though!

With the black and white thing and also all the moves being busted out all over the place I assumed she was one of you creative influences?
R: I like her for sure, I have total respect for her she’s queen diva. Neal Medlyn, a comedian/performance artist came to Portland and did “The Beyoncé Experience” and wore a wig and had gay dancers with him and that was one of my favourite shows ever. Yeah, so that was inspiring!

What’s your signature dance move, I know you defiantly got one Ryan from that at the end of the set? (He owned the floor)
J: I don’t go out, I don’t dance. Only on tour.
R: I love when he does though, its awesome!
J: It’s horrible!
R: I don’t dance like on stage when I got out, I tone it down, I cant go out on a dancefloor like BLUGHG, Some things are strictly for performance but for the most part when im around other people I don’t go too crazy I respect peoples space.
J: What that called, grinding though, that’s always nice. That’s how you get laid thts how it happens. You like it?
Love it
R: Yeah, it doesn’t matter you just find someone you like!
J: That’s how it happens!
R: It’s very primal.

yellow

What live acts do you aspire to be as good as?
J: Of Montreal are amazing live! We played with them at Monolith festival, Colorado. They really put a lot of effort into putting on a live show. They have a lot of thought- interesting clothes, people coming out doing crazy shit.
R- I don’t even like Of Montreal that much, but live is amazing for sure. There aren’t that many live shows, I don’t really know, There just aren’t many good live bands…Broadcast they don’t do much, but they have a certain energy while they are playing that draws you in.
J: Deerhunter’s great live, they are one of my favourites.

What should people be prepared for when they see you live?
R: I like it when people don’t know what to expect, when people don’t know who we are. When there’s some mystery about it. I like going to something and not knowing anything about it and then when its really good, it being awesome like makes me feel like I have a secret now.
J: Sometimes you can see Keil’s junk when he is playing drums, like a lot because he wears dresses. Be prepared.

I thought they were nice boys.
If you think they are nice boys,
Follow them on twitter
Add them on myspace
AND BUY THERE TUNE HERE
blue

So, ambulance Lets tackle the name situation. I was on your blog reading the suggestions that fans sent you and my favourites were Rad Stewert and Wasabi Lube…
J: Oh, information pills I don’t like that one at all!

That was my favourite!
J: You can have it! I dunno if you play but whoever suggested that would be stoked to know that there was a band called it I’m sure.

Pyramiddd was the one to go with?
R: Not necessarily, pills I fucking hate it.
J: Not really, I kinda hate Pyramiddd too.

I got that vibe when I read that blog, there seemed to be a little tension surrounding the issue…
J: The thing that sucked was that we had to pick it so quick. We rushed into it, We were releasing our 7” here and everyone was like “What the fuck is your name, you need to pick a name so we can release this” So we were like – I guess this is it.
R: That was the one that we agreed on more than any other name, out them all.
J: Master Control was close and Trust Fund was close. They were the two runners up.
R: We had some other ones we picked. But, We picked ones and we liked it for a day and the next day we hated it. But there’s no such thing as a good band name. Like Radiohead sucks. That’s a stupid band name.

There is another band called Starfucker, Can they have it, are they worthy?
J: Yeah they can have it, It’s a stupid fucking name!
R: Starfucker is a bad name too.
J: It was a joke! We didn’t think we would be touring the US let alone coming to Europe and Japan if we had any kinda foresight we would have picked a better name a long time ago. Its like getting married, a joke that goes too far… Never again!

green

Another thing I saw on your Myspace was the Las Vegas episodes
J: That was funny, That dude talking bout the cist! I dunno how he saw it, I like bent over to pick up a key and he was like “Aahh cist there”
R: Its not even that big!

Are you guys filming what your doing over here?
J: Yeah we have, We have mainly been filming in the car because that is all we do. It takes hours to get everywhere, but its pretty, the architecture is pretty. Have we filmed anything interesting?
R: I filmed the red light district. That was difficult, your not meant to.
J: He got flipped off.

The Internet told me about the Target commercial, One of your tracks feature on it?
J: Unfortunately, that’s the way it is now- that licensing your songs to commercials is a way to make money. Which is better way of making money than parking cars for me.

Yeah, but its does get a lot of people to hear your music that wouldn’t necessarily hear it…
R: Yeah, I didn’t know that people did this but people will actually find the songs used in commercials and find out who the band is. I didn’t know that was a thing because I don’t have a TV. Target has great music on their commercials.. plus Target has great things at great prices! Make sure you go to target! Today!

Medicine” is your first release over here, Is this a good representation of what is to come with the album, or is it not that far on?
J: It’s not that far on but it seems mostly a little darker than stuff we have so far. The new idea is a 30 minute dance block-all the same tempo and songs that fade into each other. Maybe it will b like that. I dunno about “Medicine”, We didn’t really pick that. Other people were like “This will be a good song” So we were like, “Alright, do what you want.”.
R: Really every song is a single on the album!

Sorry for the “Smash Hits” stylee question, But What your medicine for winter?
R: Most the things that make me feel good, make me feel bad later
J: I have been really homesick on this tour. I just started dating someone I really like so we are gonna take a trip to LA I’m excited about that. I’ll be all warm all my friends will be cold in Portland. I have been eating lots of good food like cantrell mushrooms chopped up with pasta.
R: That’s another great thing bout Portland, You can get so many great vegetables. That’s my winter medicine- I like cooking and baking pies.
J: He is an amazing cook!
R: I like to save my vegetable ends, put them in a big plastic bag in your freezer then boil it and it makes good vegetable broth. Keep all your ends and boil for a few hours = Perfect, amazing vegetable broth.
J: I want ask you how to make granola-he makes really good granola. He is like Mom, he would make us sandwiches when we started on tour.
R: I don’t do it anymore now, I get tired. I’m to busy now. I have a kid. If I make granola while my kid is with me the kid will end up in the granola.

The first thing I thought when I heard “Medicine” was that you guys played a lot of video games in the 90s?
J: Yeah, That’s really true. 007 was my favourite video game from the 90s on N64. Listening to The Fugees album on repeat for hours on end.
R: I was a Nintendo system kid. I never moved beyond that. I played the Sega Genesis once, but that’s it.
J: Genesis was good.

I wasn’t a Sega fan, Nintendo all the way..
Both: Yeah
J: But I think Sega had, Mortal Combat, that was rad.
R: Yeah totally, Sega had Road Rash and Sonic the Hedgehog.
J: Sonic was rad too.

With the video, it’s such a colourful song but black and white, any reason?
J: I think it was easier for Andrew to make-he’s our friend, he is learning the programmes.
R: I think its fitting, I think the video is still very colourful, l like the dancing in black and white, it can bring out the movement. Whether or not that was intentional or not, I think It works really well.

red

I kind of came to my own conclusion that you were really into what Beyoncé does right now?
R: Her video was after ours!
J: That “Single Ladies” video was amazing though!

With the black and white thing and also all the moves being busted out all over the place I assumed she was one of you creative influences?
R: I like her for sure, I have total respect for her she’s queen diva. Neal Medlyn, a comedian/performance artist came to Portland and did “The Beyoncé Experience” and wore a wig and had gay dancers with him and that was one of my favourite shows ever. Yeah, so that was inspiring!

What’s your signature dance move, I know you defiantly got one Ryan from that at the end of the set? (He owned the floor)
J: I don’t go out, I don’t dance. Only on tour.
R: I love when he does though, its awesome!
J: It’s horrible!
R: I don’t dance like on stage when I got out, I tone it down, I cant go out on a dancefloor like BLUGHG, Some things are strictly for performance but for the most part when im around other people I don’t go too crazy I respect peoples space.
J: What that called, grinding though, that’s always nice. That’s how you get laid thts how it happens. You like it?
Love it
R: Yeah, it doesn’t matter you just find someone you like!
J: That’s how it happens!
R: It’s very primal.

yellow

What live acts do you aspire to be as good as?
J: Of Montreal are amazing live! We played with them at Monolith festival, Colorado. They really put a lot of effort into putting on a live show. They have a lot of thought- interesting clothes, people coming out doing crazy shit.
R- I don’t even like Of Montreal that much, but live is amazing for sure. There aren’t that many live shows, I don’t really know, There just aren’t many good live bands…Broadcast they don’t do much, but they have a certain energy while they are playing that draws you in.
J: Deerhunter’s great live, they are one of my favourites.

What should people be prepared for when they see you live?
R: I like it when people don’t know what to expect, when people don’t know who we are. When there’s some mystery about it. I like going to something and not knowing anything about it and then when its really good, it being awesome like makes me feel like I have a secret now.
J: Sometimes you can see Keil’s junk when he is playing drums, like a lot because he wears dresses. Be prepared.

I thought they were nice boys.
If you think they are nice boys,
Follow them on twitter
Add them on myspace
AND BUY THERE TUNE HERE
Loads of actions and demonstrations will be taking place this week and next in Copenhagen to protest against COP15 and to demand real effective solutions to the climate crisis…

climateaction
Image courtesy of Climate Justice Action

Wednesday 9th December: A large meeting will be held to spread the word on the upcoming actions and demonstrations this week in Copenhagen.
19:00 – 21:00 Ragnhildgade 1.

Friday 11th December: Don’t Buy the Lie. A day of anti-corporate action, cialis 40mg because there is no such thing as green capitalism! 14:00.

Click here for more information

Saturday 12th December: Global Day of Action. Synchronised international demonstrations to call on world leaders to take urgent action on climate change.
To help build for these demonstrations go to www.globalclimatecampaign.org

Saturday 12th December: Flood for Climate Justice! A ‘flood’ organised by Friends of the Earth, in which people will flood through the streets of Copenhagen with their demands for climate justice.

Click here for more information and to find out how to get involved

Sunday 13th December: Hit the production! A day encouraging groups to take action on our economic system, in Copenhagen and abroad. On Saturday morning a group will shut down Copenhagen Harbor with a mass blockade.

Click here for more information

borders
Image courtesy of Climate Justice Action

Monday 14th December: No Border Day of Action. March to the Ministry of Defense from Radhuspladsen at 11am.

Click here for more information

agriculture
Image courtesy of Climate Justice Action

Tuesday 15th December: Resistance is ripe! Agriculture Action Day. The current food production system is responsible for over 32% of greenhouse gas emissions whilst farmers lose their land and livelihood, agri-businesses make millions. A day of action demanding an end to the false business solutions of the UNFCCC, No offsets from agriculture, a transition from the world’s capitalist economy toward a people-centered economy where peasants agriculture and local foods play a large role, an end to food waste and over-consumption, support for peasants access to land, support for small scale farming, sustainable agriculture and healthy food for all.

Click here for more information

Wednesday 16th – 18th December: Reclaim Power! Push for Climate Justice! A confrontational mass action of non-violent civil disobedience. In opposition to the false solutions being discussed at the climate summit, the Peoples Assembly will highlight alternatives that provide real just solutions. The Assembly will begin at 12 noon in the main entrance to the Bella Centre inside the UN area.

Climate Justice Action

Categories ,activism, ,Anti-corporate, ,civil disobedience, ,Climate Change, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Cop15, ,copenhagen

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Amelia’s Magazine | Earth Listings: 9th – 15th November

Another week of plenty of chances to listen, treatment learn, cialis 40mg get involved or take action around the country.

Copenhagen info evening
Tuesday 10th November 2009

el1

The prospects for the negotiations are not looking great, buy more about but the good news is the movement for climate justice is going strong, and you can still be part of largest ever climate mobilisation in Copenhagen this December!

Climate Justice Action Network, have been working hard to make it easier for people to attend the summit, with transport, free accommodation and food all being arranged.
Come to the event to discuss why we think its important to come to Copenhagen in December, and get all questions on logistics answered, what we are trying to achieve in Copenhagen.

Time: 19.30hrs – 21:00
Venue: School of Oriental and African Studies, Room G50, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG

Embrace Woodlands! – Glade Creation
Wednesday 11th November 2009

el2

Join a group of people making their very own glade in Dulwich Upper Wood in order to help increase the biodiversity in the urban woodland. Get involved, get stuck in and help to improve the environment in the area. Everyone is welcome, tools will available and food will be put on

Time: 10:30am to 3:30pm
Venue: Dulwich Upper Wood, Farquhar Rd, London, SE19 1SS, United Kingdom
Website: http://embraceenvironment.wordpress.com/

NATO Not Welcome in Edinburgh
Thursday 12th November to 17th November

The NATO Parliamentary Assembly meets in Edinburgh this week. There is a welcoming Committee providing convergence space from the 12th and support to activists. There is a call for a mass demo on 13th to hold militarist profiteers to account. Nato members currently account for 70% of the world’s military spending.
Website: http://natowc.noflag.org.uk

Tar Sands UK Tour
Friday 13th November 2009

el3
Tar Sands Action in London earlier this year

Indigenous people in Canada are fighting ‘the most destructive project on earth’ – the extraction of oil from Tar Sands. Hear their stories first hand and get involved in the new UK campaign to halt one of the world’s fastest growing causes of climate crisis.
Featuring, from the Indigenous Environmental Network in Canada: Eriel Tchekwie-Deranger Melina Laboucan-Massimo Heather Milton-Lightening

Time: 7-9pm
Venue: Bristol Arnolfini, C words Festival
Website: http://www.arnolfini.org.uk/whatson/events/details/546

Living in communities
Friday 13th November 2009

A course run since 1994 by Redfield Community in association with Diggers and Dreamers. It focuses the social issues involved in collective living, communes, squats, collectives or cooperatives. Looking at work, relationships, disagreements, play and also the organisational side of how communities were founded, and the financial and legal structures they use.

Venue: Lili, Bucks
E-mail: taryn@lowimpact.org?
Website: www.lowimpact.org

Signs of Revolt
Saturday 14th – 22nd November 2009

el4

Signs of Revolt is an exhibition that weaves together the story of the past decades social movements, drawing out the influences and connections between and across the movements against Capitalism, War and Climate Change. Using archive material and documentary photography and video from movement photographers and filmmakers. It reveals the story of how we got from Seattle to Copenhagen.
Interspersed in this narrative are works by artist and designer activists and collectives, produced during, within and for the movements.

Venue: Shop 14 Truman Brewery, London
Website: http://signsofrevolt.net/

Categories ,action, ,Bristol Arnolfini, ,C words Festival, ,canada, ,climate, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Communities, ,copenhagen, ,earth, ,edinburgh, ,Embrace Woodlands, ,environment, ,exhibition, ,glade, ,Indigenous Environmental Network, ,listings, ,militarist, ,NATO, ,Signs of Revolt, ,Tar Sands, ,The Truman Brewery

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | A Crude Awakening shuts down Coryton Oil Refinery


Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent

“Ari Up: John Lydon’s step-daughter dies.” The Telegraph’s headline was horribly reductive. Ari Up, information pills try who died on Wednesday at the tragically young age of 48, treatment was the punk legend’s step-daughter but that was just a small and tangential detail in a fascinating life and career. With The Slits and later with the New Age Steppers and solo in several guises, medical Ari Up was a musical icon in her own right, not a bit player on the fringes of the John Lydon circus.   


Illustration by Gemma Milly

The granddaughter of the owner of Der Spiegel and daughter of Nora Foster who was at the centre of the London music scene for years (befriending Hendrix and dating Chris Spedding before finally marrying Johnny Rotten), Ari Up was born from privilege and chaos in equal measure.  

Nora’s tendency to invite poor punk musicians to bunk down at their house put Ari at the heart of the scene and got her guitar tuition from Joe Strummer. She was 14 when she formed The Slits with Strummer’s former-flatmate Palmolive. Her fascination with reggae gave the band a dubby feel that was in sharp contrast to the guitar thrashing of many other punk outfits.  


Illustration by Aniela Murphy


Illustration by Abi Daker

The Slits debut album Cut, with its memorable image of the band naked but for grass skirts and a liberal coating of mud, featured a cleaner sound than their live performances. While the band’s cover of I Heard It Through The Grapevine is still an indie disco staple, the record is studded with gems particularly the amateurish piano and bouncing bass of Typical Girls.  


Illustration by Faye West

The Splits broke up in 1981 and Ari moved with her husband and twins to Indonesia and Belize before heading for Jamaica, an appropriate location given her an enduring love of reggae and dub. She performed and recorded with Lee Scratch Perry and released a solo album, Dread More Dan Dead, in 2005.  
In 2006, The Slits reformed to some critical acclaim, releasing the Return of The Giant Slits EP which was followed by a new full length record, Trapped Animals, in October last year.The Slits final work together, a video for the Trapped Animals track Lazy Slam, was released yesterday in accordance with Ari’s final wishes.  


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

A whirling dervish of dreadlocks and energy even when The Slits returned in their middle-aged incarnation, it’s with sad inevitability that Ari Up will be pegged as John Lydon’s step-daughter first and a musician in her own right second. But more thoughtful souls will remember her as one of punk’s most distinctive voices whose work with The Slits confounded and confronted the heavy-handed misogyny of much mainstream punk – The Stranglers, I’m looking at you.  
The death of Ari up has deprived music of one of its most original and unpredictable voices. It’s a truly sad day.


Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent

“Ari Up: John Lydon’s step-daughter dies.” The Telegraph’s headline was horribly reductive. Ari Up, link who died on Wednesday at the tragically young age of 48, information pills was the punk legend’s step-daughter but that was just a small and tangential detail in a fascinating life and career. With The Slits and later with the New Age Steppers and solo in several guises, Ari Up was a musical icon in her own right, not a bit player on the fringes of the John Lydon circus.   


Illustration by Gemma Milly

The granddaughter of the owner of Der Spiegel and daughter of Nora Foster who was at the centre of the London music scene for years (befriending Hendrix and dating Chris Spedding before finally marrying Johnny Rotten), Ari Up was born from privilege and chaos in equal measure.  

Nora’s tendency to invite poor punk musicians to bunk down at their house put Ari at the heart of the scene and got her guitar tuition from Joe Strummer. She was 14 when she formed The Slits with Strummer’s former-flatmate Palmolive. Her fascination with reggae gave the band a dubby feel that was in sharp contrast to the guitar thrashing of many other punk outfits.  


Illustration by Aniela Murphy


Illustration by Abi Daker

The Slits debut album Cut, with its memorable image of the band naked but for grass skirts and a liberal coating of mud, featured a cleaner sound than their live performances. While the band’s cover of I Heard It Through The Grapevine is still an indie disco staple, the record is studded with gems particularly the amateurish piano and bouncing bass of Typical Girls.  


Illustration by Faye West

The Splits broke up in 1981 and Ari moved with her husband and twins to Indonesia and Belize before heading for Jamaica, an appropriate location given her an enduring love of reggae and dub. She performed and recorded with Lee Scratch Perry and released a solo album, Dread More Dan Dead, in 2005.  
In 2006, The Slits reformed to some critical acclaim, releasing the Return of The Giant Slits EP which was followed by a new full length record, Trapped Animals, in October last year.The Slits final work together, a video for the Trapped Animals track Lazy Slam, was released yesterday in accordance with Ari’s final wishes.  


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

A whirling dervish of dreadlocks and energy even when The Slits returned in their middle-aged incarnation, it’s with sad inevitability that Ari Up will be pegged as John Lydon’s step-daughter first and a musician in her own right second. But more thoughtful souls will remember her as one of punk’s most distinctive voices whose work with The Slits confounded and confronted the heavy-handed misogyny of much mainstream punk – The Stranglers, I’m looking at you.  
The death of Ari up has deprived music of one of its most original and unpredictable voices. It’s a truly sad day.


Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent

“Ari Up: John Lydon’s step-daughter dies.” The Telegraph’s headline was horribly reductive. Ari Up, who died on Wednesday at the tragically young age of 48, medicine was the punk legend’s step-daughter but that was just a small and tangential detail in a fascinating life and career. With The Slits and later with the New Age Steppers and solo in several guises, more about Ari Up was a musical icon in her own right, not a bit player on the fringes of the John Lydon circus.   


Illustration by Gemma Milly

The granddaughter of the owner of Der Spiegel and daughter of Nora Foster who was at the centre of the London music scene for years (befriending Hendrix and dating Chris Spedding before finally marrying Johnny Rotten), Ari Up was born from privilege and chaos in equal measure.  

Nora’s tendency to invite poor punk musicians to bunk down at their house put Ari at the heart of the scene and got her guitar tuition from Joe Strummer. She was 14 when she formed The Slits with Strummer’s former-flatmate Palmolive. Her fascination with reggae gave the band a dubby feel that was in sharp contrast to the guitar thrashing of many other punk outfits.  


Illustration by Aniela Murphy


Illustration by Abi Daker

The Slits debut album Cut, with its memorable image of the band naked but for grass skirts and a liberal coating of mud, featured a cleaner sound than their live performances. While the band’s cover of I Heard It Through The Grapevine is still an indie disco staple, the record is studded with gems particularly the amateurish piano and bouncing bass of Typical Girls.  


Illustration by Faye West

The Splits broke up in 1981 and Ari moved with her husband and twins to Indonesia and Belize before heading for Jamaica, an appropriate location given her an enduring love of reggae and dub. She performed and recorded with Lee Scratch Perry and released a solo album, Dread More Dan Dead, in 2005.  
In 2006, The Slits reformed to some critical acclaim, releasing the Return of The Giant Slits EP which was followed by a new full length record, Trapped Animals, in October last year.The Slits final work together, a video for the Trapped Animals track Lazy Slam, was released yesterday in accordance with Ari’s final wishes.  


Illustration by Gemma Sheldrake

A whirling dervish of dreadlocks and energy even when The Slits returned in their middle-aged incarnation, it’s with sad inevitability that Ari Up will be pegged as John Lydon’s step-daughter first and a musician in her own right second. But more thoughtful souls will remember her as one of punk’s most distinctive voices whose work with The Slits confounded and confronted the heavy-handed misogyny of much mainstream punk – The Stranglers, I’m looking at you.  
The death of Ari up has deprived music of one of its most original and unpredictable voices. It’s a truly sad day.

Crude Awakening photo by Amelia Gregory
Gathering at Waterloo Station. Photo by Amelia Gregory.

It’s the day of the Crude Awakening. I walk into Waterloo station on Saturday morning and spot a few familiar faces. We wander around trying to look nonchalant, more about giving each other secret smiles. Some people manage to look more discreet and ‘normal’ than others; standing in a group to one side of me is a fabulous gaggle of drag queen laundry ladies, treat all answering to the name of Dot. (A few weeks ago police turned up at a few activists’ houses and were spotted searching them for clothes that matched those worn by people at the Climate Swoop at Ratcliffe on Soar coal fired power station last year. The Space Hijackers‘ Laundry ladies were on hand to give people “an instant restyling that the police fashion hounds were not able to keep up with”.) Suddenly, a little after 10am we give up on the nonchalance and things start to happen. A large collection of ‘oil’ spattered white jackets appear as if from nowhere, legal observers handed out ‘bust cards’ with useful numbers and info about your legal rights, and people started passing around little blue and yellow flags.

Beep beep. All around me I can see people reaching for their mobiles. Before the weekend we had all signed up for a text messaging service that would be sending out updates throughout the day.

text message crude awakening

We set off in a stream of people down the escalators into the tube. I can imagine it might be a bit of a shock for Saturday shoppers to suddenly come across hundreds of oddly dressed people! On the tube I get chatting to this ace older woman who wants to know all about us and is full of questions, thanks, and words of encouragement.

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
On the train. Photo by sinisterpictures.

Our train is mysteriously delayed so we all pile out at the next stop and start walking through the streets of London. Apparently people overhear some cops running through the list of possible targets, trying to work out where we are going. Safe to say, they don’t work it out in time.

Crude Awakening photo by Amelia Gregory
Crude Awakening photo by Amelia Gregory
Police accompany activists as they reach Fenchurch Street. Photo by Amelia Gregory

When we get to Fenchurch Street station the shout goes out to head for Platform 4. We get onto the waiting train with still no idea where we are going. As the train heads out of the station an A4 flyer which is being passed around the train is thrust into my hand. We’re on route to Coryton, the UK’s busiest oil refinery (responsible for 22% of the UK’s forecourt demand)!

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Photo by sinisterpictures.

Hell yeah! I’d guessed that we were maybe going to target an oil company head office but we are actually going to go and put ourselves literally in the path of the flow of oil. Peak oil may be fast approaching but not fast enough that what’s left won’t royally screw up the climate if we burn it. Business, governments and other vested interests have shown time and time again that they don’t want to do anything about it. That means it’s down to us, together.

Kristian Buus crude awakening hedge
Photo by Kristian Buus.

The train is a hive of activity. People discuss the target as they go through the goody bags that have been handed out. Everyone tries on a carabiner wrist straps (a crucial part of arm tube lock-ons that we use to blockade spaces, and which make it easier for us to be removed from somewhere we have ‘locked on’ to).

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Photo by sinisterpictures.

Even while we are on the train 12 women blockade the only entrance to Coryton refinery by attaching themselves to the underside of vehicles but they won’t be able to hold the road for long without us. The three different themed blocs (Dirty Money bloc, Building bloc and Body bloc) hasten to join them.

Kristian Buus Crude Awakening police
Kristian Buus Crude Awakening dance
Photos by Kristian Buus.

Stanford-le-Hope is outside of the Oyster card zone so none of us have a valid ticket once we pass Grays. In what is to become a theme for the day there are too many of us working together for any obstacle to be insurmountable. We simply walk through the barriers out of the station and make our way to the refinery in our three different blocs, stopping briefly to pick up some kit stashed under a hedge on the way.

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Photo by sinisterpictures.

Basically all the seriously under prepared police can do is follow us and watch us do precisely what we want. They have a go at seizing one of the tripods from my bloc and I heard rumours of attempted arrests (and prompt de-arrests) on the other blocs.

Kristian Buus crude awakening locals
Locals join the protest. Photo by Kristian Buus.

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Photo by sinisterpictures.

Travelling cross country we make it to our target location on the Coryton Oil Refinery entrance road, just up from the Shell Haven turning (two oil targets in one, woop woop!). There is a truly beautiful moment as, count ‘em, 12 tripods go up in moments and the road is ours. Now, you may not know this already but the ‘traditional’ metal tripods you see on protests are a bit of a pain-they’re blimmin’ heavy and take 4 or 5 people to erect. Bamboo tripods, as trialled in this video released before the action, can be carried, erected and climbed by just one person in a pinch.

Crude Awakening day of the dead stilt Jody Boehnert
Crude Awakening day of the dead stilt Jody Boehnert
Day of the Dead stilt bloc, photos by Jody Boehnert.

Through the day our blockade gradually grows as we are joined by other blocs, including the beautiful ‘Day of the Dead’ stilt walkers. We grow so strong that the police, after marching at the barricade in a little phalanx, are quickly forced to retreat and let us get on with it. But we do lift a small section of the blockade briefly though in order to let the workers out at the end of their shift. As we’ve said many times before, we have no quarrel with the ordinary workers of polluting industries; we’re on the same side.

Kristian Buus Crude Awakening scene
Photo by Kristian Buus.

Locals tell us that oil tankers normally drive up and down this stretch of road every few minutes so all the time we are there we are preventing thousands of gallons of dirty oil from reaching the capital – 375,000 gallons in total. What’s even better is the fact that this isn’t just us taking action. Crude Awakening is part of a global week of action called for by the Climate Justice Action Network (CJA). We are just one of many protests taking place on the same day by people from 22 different countries… from the Philippines to Argentina.

Kristian Buus Crude Awakening tripods
Photo by Kristian Buus.

Crude Awakening sinisterpictures
Photo by sinisterpictures.

It truly is an amazing day. 500 of us working together to stop the flow of oil with no one able to stop us. Oh, and the police have to hold the train station barriers open to let us on to the train home – the cherry on the cake of an empowering day.

YouTube Preview Image
Film by You and I Films.

Categories ,Blocs, ,Climate Camp, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Climate Justice Action Network, ,Climate Swoop, ,Coryton Oil Refinery, ,Crude Awakening, ,Direct Action, ,Jody Boehnert, ,Kristian Buus, ,Peak Oil, ,police, ,Shell Haven, ,sinisterpictures, ,Space Hijackers, ,Stanford-le-Hope, ,Tripods, ,You and I Films

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Amelia’s Magazine | Climate Camp goes to COP15 in Copenhagen December 2009, Part 3

ed Helvetica, medications sans-serif; font-size: 12px;”>Copenhagen-COP15-16122009-Dec-09-300Reclaim Power Climate Justice Action at Cop15

On Wednesday the 16th of December the Reclaim Power! demo was due to hit the streets surrounding the Bella Centre (where the Cop15 was being held). The highlight of the Climate Justice Action calendar, it was towards this that the majority of British activists who had travelled as part of Climate Camp were working over the preceding days and with this in mind we retired to bed in a slightly wary frame of mind the night before. I’ve been the subject of a midnight raid before, and let me tell you, it’s pretty discombobulating to be woken by someone screaming in your ear “POLIIIIIIIIICE” as you scramble to take stock of the situation whilst pulling together some decent happy-to-be-arrested-in clothing (I was one of the 114 people arrested in the Iona School in Nottingham last April). This time I wasn’t so worried as we’d seen nothing of the police out at Voldparken, but when I awoke before daybreak and wandered bleary eyed betwixt bed and portaloo in my sexy checked pyjamas I was greeted by some friendly coppers at the exit, who had been sent to search everyone as they left the building. “Where are you going today?” “Oh, you know, just off to hang out in Copenhagen for a bit.” At 6am. There were plenty of ways we could have escaped without being checked if we’d wanted to, but it seems that coppers everywhere are, well, just a bit thick really.

Copenhagen-COP15-16122009-Dec-09-261Being searched before leaving Voldparken school on December 16th

It was a long cold ride into Copenhagen with my Bike Bloc affinity group (a trusted collective of people who have agreed to stick together and look after one another through an action), and from there onwards to the island where the Bella Centre is located. Unfortunately part of our group had decided to go on ahead without us and whilst we were waiting for them on a corner in a vaguely interest-arousing manner we were stopped and searched. This was not exactly unexpected, but one of our members had rather stupidly brought a map with him that had segments drawn onto it around the Centre, and for this he was detained immediately – a short day for him, straight to the holding cells.

Copenhagen-COP15-16122009-Dec-09-278Being searched on the way to the Bella Centre

Copenhagen-COP15-16122009-Dec-09-280Definitely not a suspicious map officer, definitely not.

The rest of us quickly cycled onwards and were soon turning in circuits around the residential backstreets near the Bella Centre, at first trying to evade the many many police vans patrolling the streets (a Netto supermarket proved a good venue to hide in at one point, the bemused staff unsure how to react), but eventually just giving ourselves up to the patrols – thereby delaying the police and hopefully preventing them from harassing other activists, particularly those in the Green Bloc who would be using more direct means to scale the fences of the centre. (So the theory went, we later learned they were all arrested long before they got anywhere near the perimeter.) One *lovely* officer even offered to kiss me, as you can hear in my audiocast here.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009032Cycling towards the Bella Centre.

Just as the police decided that they had had enough of our tactics the Blue March drew up to the main gates and suddenly the Bike Bloc was there to get ahead of them and blockade the road, giving them space to breath on one side.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009057Blockading the road.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009124Holding the space around the sound system.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009296I find it’s always a nice touch to wear a fancy hat to a demonstration.

It’s quite hard to provide an overall analysis of what happened next as there was so much going on at once and even though I did my usual mad dashing about the place, of course I couldn’t cover it all. As the marchers formed a blockade (video here) and attempted to breach the gates we continued to hold the space on one side. I witnessed a man climb on top of a police van, only to be beaten with a baton then hauled down, and I repeatedly saw people being pulled from the crowd with reddened faces, weeping from the pepper spray that was being squirted with abandon at peaceful protestors on the front line.

Copenhagen-COP15-16122009-Dec-09-308Pepper spray sure looks like it hurts!

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009204The Santa Block do their thang. In fancy dress no less.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009133A ‘hub’ – the way that Bike Bloc affinity groups gathered to discuss plans.

At our end there was far less aggression from the police, who seemed fairly bemused by our tactics, especially the ‘Santa Block‘ who cycled in circles chanting “ho ho ho”. Here’s an especially good video of me wobbling along on my bike as I try to tour between the two, nearly crashing into someone in the process. Between this a group of Climate Camp activists launched what looked like a large inflatable lilo over their heads towards the Bella Centre perimeter and indeed there was soon a ‘lilo bridge‘ angled across the moat into the scrubland surrounding the Bella Centre. Unfortunately this highly inventive approach to getting inside was destined to be thwarted by circumstances, as those who reached the other side were promptly arrested by a squad of riot cops.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009319Climate Campers made a lilo bridge to get into the Bella Centre. So inventive!

There was poetry, dancing in the street and even a call for the cops to give an activist a hug (amusing audioblog here) – all as we waited (since we couldn’t get in ourselves) to hear whether the delegates inside the Cop15 would be able to march out and join us for the planned People’s Assembly. It looked increasingly unlikely that they would be able to do so: we were later to find out the extreme lengths to which the police went to prevent them from leaving the Bella Centre – for shocking footage of the bassist in my band Green Kite Midnight being beaten with a baton see this Guardian video. At about 7 minutes in Tim can clearly be seen mouthing the words “peaceful protest” as he is whacked. He has had his fractured arm in a cast since then.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009381People’s Assembly outside the Bella Centre.

Instead activists from all over the world sat in circles on the cold road, discussing in groups of a dozen or so, how real life grassroots solutions could be applied to the crises that we face. For video footage of this see here. But the light was failing and all too soon it was over and the decision made to march back into central Copenhagen. By this point I was seriously cold and had a very wet foot due to running around in the scrubland and stepping into an icy cold bog. As the sky turned into a beautiful orange haze over the Bella Centre the Bike Bloc attempted to decide on a course of action, but a lack of clarity about how or what we should do led to a random diversion for some back onto the scrubland where we were immediately met by police on horseback. I decided to call it a day and together with Dave headed back towards the Klimaforum in search of a hot cup of tea and a radiator on which to dry my socks and shoes.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009413Final Bike Bloc hub to decide our next move… home.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009435Everyone should have a red bobble hat.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009452And orange fabric tied around their ankles. A must for every direct action.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009479The one fancy bike I saw: a Tall Bike ridden by a clown.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-16122009516Homeward bound.

The following day a few Climate Campers decided that we should not leave Copenhagen without holding some kind of camp (since that’s what we’ve become so well known for), so in the evening about 50 of us rocked up to Hopenhagen, where we popped open a few tents (video here) and stood around chanting and thinking, ho hum, what shall we do next? Having been autonomously organised it wasn’t exactly the most considered of actions, but it was an interesting experiment in seeing how the police would react to a completely impromptu non-violent occupation. They started off on quite an aggressive footing, with one snatching a tent and ineffectually putting it into the bin, from whence it was speedily retrieved.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009641Setting up camp in Hopenhagen.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009621Oi! Give me that tent. No. It’s mine.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009794

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009673

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009677A particularly articulate young man gives an interview.

The brainchild of the action declared his ambition to stay put through the entire night (before popping open a can of beer) – not a desire shared by the majority present, what with the sub zero temperatures and lack of planning. However first there was some fun to be had in disrupting a television programme being broadcast from inside one of the alien green boxes – where a smarmy looking presenter caked in make up with slicked back hair (a man, I might add) steadfastly ignored the Caution: Greenwash banner being held up behind his head. I wasn’t sure what exactly this action was meant to achieve but was assured that this particular TV channel had been misrepresenting activists in its coverage, and that since they were talking about the Cop15 it was an ideal place to get our message across. By this point the cops had relaxed and we got into some entertaining conversations with them about the efficacy of our actions.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009745Greenwash on the television at Hopenhagen. He’s looking straight at me isn’t he?

Suddenly Tim was at my shoulder, one-handedly suggesting that we do a ceilidh, since Green Kite Midnight has always held ceilidhs at Climate Camp actions. But, there was only the two of us out of a band of six, no instruments and no amplification. Not a problem. Tim whipped out his harmonica, and laughing, I managed to call several dances, yelling from atop a concrete pillar holding aloft the giant Hopenhagen balloon above our heads. You can see footage here, but be warned, I’m loud – filming whilst calling being an up close and personal affair.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009776Green Kite Midnight performs their first international gig.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009778Erm, I’m not sure how we deal with this. Errr.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009788Swing your pardner! Ceilidh dancing in Hopenhagen with Climate Camp.

Copenhagen-COP15-17122009-Dec-09-453It’s like an alien ball isn’t it?

It was then back to an amusing last evening at the Voldparken School, what with an impromptu music video shot in one of the disused laboratories and a full on rave held in one of the air-locked antechambers far into the night, where I espied our ambitious young activist in the wee hours. The police gave him a lift all the way back to the school, keen to see both him and his tents dispatched safely back to the far reaches of the suburbs!

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-18122009807The crew for the Voldparken music video.

Copenhagen-COP15-18122009-Dec-09-503Playing the piano at Voldparken school.

Copenhagen-COP15-18122009-Dec-09-478A map shows the best skips in the area for food runs.

Copenhagen-COP15-18122009-Dec-09-507Your friendly reception staff! Only joking, we don’t do staff.

One of the final things I did in Copenhagen was to visit their most famous landmark; the mermaid, of course. It was beyond bitingly cold, and as I admired her temporary cohorts, some frozen penguins, I considered the probability of losing both my fingers and my toes to frostbite. Visitors from all over the world clearly saw this spot as the most emblematic place to stage a protest and during the short time we were there they came in their dozens with placards held aloft, cameras at the ready. Behind the Little Mermaid another special Cop15 sculpture reared out of the grey waves, a grotesquely oversized woman sat astride the shoulders of a skinny little man – the ‘Survival of the Fattest’ by Jens Galschiot and Lars Calmar.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009593The Little Mermaid with Survival of the Fattest and penguin friends.

Copenhagen-COP15-Dec-09-17122009578Korean delegates protesting in front of the mermaid.

After cleaning up our accommodation (surreal audiocast of me peeling up the masking tape used to mark the fire lanes in our room here) as best we could the coach ride home from Copenhagen was, how shall I put it… interesting. Even though I decided early on (as we sat delayed, due to snow, in a traffic jam into Calais) to practice the art of zen, I, along with everyone else, was starting to lose the will to live by the time we had sat in a car park in Dover for several hours whilst our increasingly irate drivers tried to figure out where their relief drivers were to ferry us the last hour home to London, eventually both completely losing their rag and threatening to kill their employers.

Copenhagen-COP15-18122009-Dec-09-524Trying to sort out Climate Camp coaches home in the hallway.

Copenhagen-COP15-19122009-Dec-09-624Snowball fights whilst we wait to catch the ferry home.

Copenhagen-COP15-19122009-Dec-09-530White Cliffs of Dover by floodlight.

Copenhagen-COP15-19122009-Dec-09-534White Cliffs of Dover by night. OH GOD WE HAVEN’T MOVED IN HOURS.

Since I got home there has been plenty of editorial commentary on what happened inside the Cop15 summit and what exactly our actions did or didn’t achieve. From my point of view (and maybe I should keep this to myself), I didn’t ever for one moment think that we would actually get into the Bella Centre – it was immensely well fortified and we didn’t have the strength in numbers or ability to get inside – so I wasn’t exactly surprised when we didn’t. As a whole it was quite hard to take part in the Climate Justice Action pre-planning meetings because of the distance between activist venues, which I think resulted in many people thinking that others would be more organised than themselves and lead the way. The Bike Bloc felt a bit disparate – we lost half our affinity group, split up and regrouped several times – taking our lead from the people around us rather than from the pre-planned messages that I was expecting to be sent out via text. It was a shame that Double Trouble (confiscated earlier in the week by the police looking for our fictional “machine of resistance”) and the Sound Swarm never made it to the gates, (at least not to my knowledge). As usual we were underprepared to make fast decisions, which led to a confused ending to the Bike Bloc during the final march away from the Bella Centre. On the plus side the Bike Bloc was massively effective in blockading the street and confusing the police, and was a beautifully mobile way to take part in the action – I think it will lead to further creative direct action on bikes in the future.

Copenhagen-COP15-18122009-Dec-09-519Thankyou in snow at the Voldparken School and to all the activists who worked so hard to make sure our stay was enjoyable.

On a wider scope, although many people were seriously disappointed that we were unable to get into the Bella Centre to hold the People’s Assembly as promised, I feel that our very presence served to highlight the inequality of the whole Cop15 process, which has only now begun to filter down to those disappointed NGOs who were so certain they could use the current ways of meeting to facilitate meaningful change. Because I never for one moment believed that any good decisions could come out of the Cop15 I felt more than vindicated by the dismal outcome, but for many of the NGOs who were excluded from the Bella Centre it must have been a wake up call and one can only hope they have been radicalised. We were there to show that there is a strong global grassroots movement ready to challenge the accepted status quo, and those relationships cultivated on the front line will be crucial in taking creative action in 2010. System Change Not Climate Change now feels firmly on the agenda. I feel as though this is just the beginning…

Read Part 1 of my trip to Copenhagen here: wherein I describe our journey over by coach.

Read Part 2 of my trip to Copenhagen here: wherein I attend lots of actions and fix up my bike.

Categories ,activism, ,bike bloc, ,Climate Camp, ,Climate Justice Action, ,Cop15, ,copenhagen, ,Direct Action, ,Hopenhagen, ,People’s Assembly, ,Reclaim Power!, ,Voldparken School

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