Amelia’s Magazine | Tata Naka: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Presentation Review

Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Laura Hickman
Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Laura Hickman.

My last write up for this season features the new collection from the ever wonderful twins behind Tata Naka. This season they eschewed the cool light of the Portico Rooms (no longer used for LFW presentations) to show in the newly created Studio space on the lower levels of Somerset House. Given that this is a dark venue it was a wise decision to shoot with plenty of flash against a simple black backdrop, the girls rearranged on blacked out props, sometimes with parts of their body obscured. Given the complicated set designs of the past few seasons this was probably a relief to put together.

Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory.

This season the girls delved into a wealth of inspiration left behind by Sergei Diaghilev and his iconic Ballet Russes. The bold constructivist shapes that characterised his graphic costumes and set designs were made for these girls to expand on in their inimitable style. The collection was shown in staggered stages so that Tata Naka could shoot their look book, so I only had time to view one part. By a stroke of luck it may well have been my favourite, with geometric designs and lettering placed in great swipes of glorious colour across cream and black grounds on simple calf length strapless flapper dresses, a sleeveless playsuit and a twosie lounge suit with hexagon embellishments. For summer a simple 80s style tank swimsuit looked perfect worn with slicked back hair and heels.

Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Daisy Steele
Tata Naka S/S 2014 by Daisy Steele.

Other parts of the collection (which you can view here) featured dotty net dresses encrusted with giant appliqué stars, jigsaw panels in sugary pastels, and pop art style placement prints on strapless prom dresses. After a mild diversion into new territory last season this felt like Tata Naka returning to their rightful groove: every outfit a beautiful (wearable) piece of art in its own right.

Categories ,Ballet Russes, ,Book Review, ,Daisy Steele, ,Laura Hickman, ,London Fashion Week, ,Presentation, ,S/S 2014, ,Sergei Diaghilev, ,Somerset House, ,Studio, ,Tata Naka

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tata Naka: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Presentation Review

Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander.

Since Tata Naka returned to London Fashion Week it has become customary for Tamara and Natasha Surguladze to create a wonderful set that they photograph live for their upcoming season’s look book: it’s a great concept and always a lot of fun to watch from the sidelines: the whole experience more akin to voyeurism than the traditional catwalk show. This season the Georgian twins were inspired by American High School movies and the multitude of references that underpin these down the decades. So here we had very preppy 50s styles abutting up against the big bouffant hair of the 1980s, a very direct reference to which was found in the graffiti wall that provided the backdrop to one set up, ‘Breakfast Club‘ written in bubble writing above a heart. Sugary coloured tweeds were layered over stripes and trademark graphic prints that merged Mondrian blocks with Pop Art faces, the illustrative elements of which were inspired by iconic scenes from key 80s movies. As we milled around we were served cocktails in milk cartons by ‘dinner ladies’ courtesy of Bompas & Parr.

Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Rebecca French
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Rebecca French.

In the locker room sweethearts covered a simple pencil dress, the detail echoed in a cute cut out back. An A-line skirt was worn with a baseball jacket: other girls wore big quiffs and pastel blocks, both tapered trousers and pencil skirts given sheer mesh slices at the hemlines. Sets were changed with alarming speed and confidence, but the downside of this way of showing is that unless you have an hour or so free you will only manage to see a small portion of the collection. I managed to see two set changes by Chameleon Visual: Jenny Robins took photos of the cheerleaders at the bleachers, and there was also a Prom shoot, where sweethearts emerged yet again as a major theme. The talented Tata Naka twins once more showcased their inventive A/W 2013 collection in wonderfully inimitable style. I have come to expect nothing less.

Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka A/W 2013. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Tata Naka by Jenny Robins
Tata Naka by Jenny Robins
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Jenny Robins.

Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Cissy Hu
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Cissy Hu.

Tata_Naka by_Daniel_Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander
Tata Naka A/W 2013 by Daniel Alexander.

Categories ,1980s, ,50s, ,A/W 2013, ,American High School movies, ,Bompas & Parr, ,Breakfast Club, ,Chameleon Visual, ,Cheerleaders, ,Cissy Hu, ,Daniel Alexander, ,Georgian, ,Jenny Robins, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mondrian, ,Movies, ,Pop Art, ,Prom, ,Rebecca French, ,Tamara and Natasha Surguladze, ,Tata Naka

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tata Naka: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Presentation Review

Tata-Naka S/S 2013 by Jamie Wignall
Tata Naka S/S 2013 by Jamie Wignall.

I always look forward to the Tata Naka presentation and this season was no exception: this time the twin sisters had chosen to direct their models posed as if at the end of a diving platform against a skyline of palm trees. It was a clever piece of set design that suited their slightly retro style, all 80s power hair and nipped in waists. When I arrived they were shooting a range of glossy purple dresses on offer for S/S 2013. Centre stage a beautiful hourglass silk dress featured dramatic cut outs around the shoulders and hemline. Floral offerings flanked a bold placement print cutout dress, the ginger hair of a painted girl placed at hip level. For a more casual look the same image was applied to a swimming costume, worn with very high hot pants.

Tata Naka SS 2013 Sept 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2013, photography by Amelia Gregory.

I only stayed at the ‘pool party’ presentation long enough to get a shot of this particular look, but a glance at a set of images on Vogue tells me that this collection was notable for its subtlety – cream and mint separates for daytime and jewel block colours for night providing a commercial counterpoint to the colourful clashing ditsy prints and painted life size faces: eye catching in house prints that the Tata Naka girls are known and loved for. It all worked brilliantly, as always.

Categories ,80s, ,Claire Kearns, ,cutout, ,Jamie Wignall, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Portico Rooms, ,prints, ,S/S 2013, ,Somerset House, ,Tata Naka, ,vogue

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Presentation Review: Tata Naka

Taka Nata S/S 2012 by Alison Day
Taka Nata S/S 2012 by Alison Day.

Turning up to the Tata Naka presentation I had very little idea of what to expect but I had been most intrigued by their invitation, try a dance card with mini pencil attached as if to list dances. I have always loved Tata Naka; their combination of colourful painted print designs and loose fitting but cleverly cut shapes is right up my street.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The presentation was held in the Portico Rooms and as I walked in I felt as though I’d chanced upon a private studio session. Huge lights, photographer, cure stylist. It took me right back to the days when I spent a lot of time loitering around on fashion shoots for magazines such as The Face and I-D. And, it turns out that this was the entire intention. By combining their time in Somerset House with the creation of look book images, Tata Naka had very cleverly made the most of their time and money as well as opening up the creative process for all to see. Absolutely genius.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The shoot had been going for some hours when I arrived, and the team were onto the last look of the day – seven girls clad in fabulously colourful drop waist, oversized and kaftan shaped tropical dresses. For S/S 2012 Tata Naka were inspired by 1950s east coast chic, combined with flowery resort glamour… and these last garments screamed Aloha.

Taka Naka S/S 2012 by Clare Twomey
Taka Naka S/S 2012 by Clare Twomey.

The models stood in formation on chairs against a black background with rose petals scattered across the floor, in an approximation of a famous Pina Bausch dance sequence. The much loved choreographer’s work had inspired the whole shoot, hence the dance card invitations.

Tata Naka Fashion Illustration By Vicky Newman
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Vicky Newman.

Attendees were served fresh lemonade in Tata Naka themed bottles decorated with carnations as we circulated around the shoot. We were able to take our own photos and see the others on a computer screen as the team scrutinised the latest official shots.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Twin sisters Tamara and Natasha Surguladze graduated from Central Saint Martins in 2000, and their label, Tata Naka, celebrated it’s tenth anniversary recently. The brand, which encompasses diffusion lines Stolen Memories and Tata Naka Shrunk for children, is celebrated worldwide yet curiously they have no stockists in the UK. It seems utterly bizarre to me that these talented designers are not more widely feted in the country where they trained and have chosen to make their home. Let’s hope that changes soon.

Categories ,Alison Day, ,Aloha, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Choreographer, ,Clare Twomey, ,dance, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Look Book, ,Pina Bausch, ,Portico Rooms, ,Presentation, ,S/S 2012, ,Shoot, ,Somerset House, ,Stolen Memories, ,Tamara and Natasha Surguladze, ,Tata Naka, ,Tata Naka Shrunk, ,Twins, ,Vicky Newman, ,Yelena Bryksenkova

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Presentation Review: Tata Naka

Taka Nata S/S 2012 by Alison Day
Taka Nata S/S 2012 by Alison Day.

Turning up to the Tata Naka presentation I had very little idea of what to expect but I had been most intrigued by their invitation, a dance card with mini pencil attached as if to list dances. I have always loved Tata Naka; their combination of colourful painted print designs and loose fitting but cleverly cut shapes is right up my street.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The presentation was held in the Portico Rooms and as I walked in I felt as though I’d chanced upon a private studio session. Huge lights, photographer, stylist. It took me right back to the days when I spent a lot of time loitering around on fashion shoots for magazines such as The Face and I-D. And, it turns out that this was the entire intention. By combining their time in Somerset House with the creation of look book images, Tata Naka had very cleverly made the most of their time and money as well as opening up the creative process for all to see. Absolutely genius.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Yelena Bryksenkova.

The shoot had been going for some hours when I arrived, and the team were onto the last look of the day – seven girls clad in fabulously colourful drop waist, oversized and kaftan shaped tropical dresses. For S/S 2012 Tata Naka were inspired by 1950s east coast chic, combined with flowery resort glamour… and these last garments screamed Aloha.

Taka Naka S/S 2012 by Clare Twomey
Taka Naka S/S 2012 by Clare Twomey.

The models stood in formation on chairs against a black background with rose petals scattered across the floor, in an approximation of a famous Pina Bausch dance sequence. The much loved choreographer’s work had inspired the whole shoot, hence the dance card invitations.

Tata Naka Fashion Illustration By Vicky Newman
Tata Naka S/S 2012 by Vicky Newman.

Attendees were served fresh lemonade in Tata Naka themed bottles decorated with carnations as we circulated around the shoot. We were able to take our own photos and see the others on a computer screen as the team scrutinised the latest official shots.

Tata Naka SS 2012 LFW review -photo by Amelia Gregory
Tata Naka S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Twin sisters Tamara and Natasha Surguladze graduated from Central Saint Martins in 2000, and their label, Tata Naka, celebrated it’s tenth anniversary recently. The brand, which encompasses diffusion lines Stolen Memories and Tata Naka Shrunk for children, is celebrated worldwide yet curiously they have no stockists in the UK. It seems utterly bizarre to me that these talented designers are not more widely feted in the country where they trained and have chosen to make their home. Let’s hope that changes soon.

Categories ,Alison Day, ,Aloha, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Choreographer, ,Clare Twomey, ,dance, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Look Book, ,Pina Bausch, ,Portico Rooms, ,Presentation, ,S/S 2012, ,Shoot, ,Somerset House, ,Stolen Memories, ,Tamara and Natasha Surguladze, ,Tata Naka, ,Tata Naka Shrunk, ,Twins, ,Vicky Newman, ,Yelena Bryksenkova

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: best of Somerset House & New Gen stands.

Romina Karamanea skirt by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

For the past two seasons the good PRs for Romina Karamanea have ensured that there has been a ridiculously long queue of baying fashionistas gathered outside the venue before they will let anyone inside. And so it was that I found myself being battered around on the steps of the Freemasons’ Hall on Tuesday evening: it was late in the week and it wasn’t really what I wanted to deal with. My ex flatmate, physician a stylist that I used to work for at The Face – we fell out – elbowed her way through with a bit of a hissy fit. I was seriously considering just calling it a day and going right home. But then security announced that it was “too late for stars” meaning that the complex sticker system on invites was about to be ditched, visit this site and the PRs next to me agreed that the most important people were at the front anyway – that would include me! love it when I feel less of a pleb – and it all looked good to go.

Romina Karamanea pants by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

Ushered into one of the gorgeous upper halls I was seated only three chairs down from my nemesis, who of course refused to acknowledge me. Which is just fine, our relationship never recovered after she moved out of my house and refused to pay her outstanding rent. But it did make me smile. Oh happy days. A funny little girl in latex stockings was placed between us and quickly presented me with her card and a badge. I had to spend the whole show trying to take photos around her as she leaned into the catwalk to take hers, but in the grand tradition of fashion week poseurs she sure was good at attracting attention.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina-Karamanea-by-Lisa-Stannard
Romina Karamanea by Lisa Stannard.

For this season Greek born, Central Saint Martins trained Romina looked to abstract expressionism for inspiration, though as her press release cheekily says, basically “the designer had popped to see her artist friend Hermes for a glass of wine.” Three colour stories of white, bluey green and red explored passionate brush strokes and the patterns of natural phenomena and geology. Opposing structures morphed into one garment, voluminous swathes of chiffon colliding with cleanly structured tailoring. It was a big collection that included a smattering of menswear but my favourite pieces were undoubtedly the final ones, glorious rich red undergarments topped with sweeping patterned dresses. Utterly divine.

Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria
Romina Karamanea by Joana Faria.

I wasn’t aware that Romina Karamanea was an advocate of sustainable design until I found a leaflet featuring her work in the basement at Esthetica, where the Centre for Sustainable Fashion had a corner stand showcasing some of the designers they work with. This organisation was set up by the London College of Fashion, with the aim of “challenging and provoking the established fashion system to work towards the goals of promoting human well being and respecting nature’s limits, whilst creating beauty and style.” Fashion designers are invited to attend workshops and one to one mentoring sessions about how to implement sustainable design practices and apparently Romina is one of their ambassadors, which is very exciting news.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina-Karamanea-by-Lisa-Stannard
Romina Karamanea by Lisa Stannard.

But a line in the first paragraph of her blurb immediately made my heart sink just a tiny bit. And not just because of the bad grammar. “Each piece is designed to be loved and kept forever getting better over-time, hopefully like the wearer.” Along with the notion of upcycling (now a far trendier way to say recycling in fashion circles) and making the most of factory waste – both of which I hasten to add are admirable choices when it comes to making fashion – creating clothes to be worn for a long time has become a bit of a get out quick clause for designers. It’s an easy statement to trot out because high fashion is invariably all about luxury and has a price tag to match. Not many people who invest in designer pieces are likely to throw away their purchases every season.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

But let’s just stop and think a bit more here. The reality is that these designers continue to show new collections, and we are inevitably urged to delve deep and create ourselves a new wardrobe each time a new season comes around. I only very rarely buy new clothes myself but I can’t claim to be completely removed from the process because I also get really excited about new creativity on the catwalks. It’s an innate human excitement that you can’t take away, but it’s how we deal with that feeling that counts. Of course I am against throwaway mass produced fashion, but sustainability cannot be achieved merely by saying that people should treasure clothes forever, not whilst producing a new collection twice a year with no deeper links to sustainable practice.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Reading on, I applaud Romina Karamanea‘s efforts. She is careful to fully research her supply chain, reduce fabric waste, utilise low impact digital printing techniques and organic cottons. She’s an edgy designer with a big following who can really affect people’s perception of working in a sustainable way. But it’s interesting that none of this information was on the press release for the catwalk show, or on her website: after all, who wants to be pigeonholed? It says a lot about how we still perceive an ethical imperative in design.

Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Romina Karamanea SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

LFW-Cecilia Mary Robson-Andrea-Peterson
Cecilia Mary Robson by Andrea Peterson.

As well as all the shows there are of course a huge number of static stands to visit during LFW. Generally I manage to whip around them in something of a frenzy, there making mental notes of what to cover over the the ensuing months and accepting business cards but never with the intention of a proper write up on this ‘ere blog. This time though, I determined to do it properly. Because I want to support new designers that I like. Despite the fact that I myself (and this website) is deemed so unworthy of encouragement from the BFC that I made a staggering £19 from a Mercedes sponsored BFC advert over the course of LFW. It would be nice if I myself was to receive some support. Just a little bit. You know, enough to keep this darn blog rolling… because right now it’s in severe danger of death: I need to eat you know.

Somerset House SS2011 Tata Naka shoes
Tata Naka shoes. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

That bit of moaning done and dusted, here’s the low down of the best bits that I saw at Somerset House, both in New Gen and on the main stands. Some of it will have appeared on the catwalk, but if we didn’t make it to the show for whatever reason or didn’t get tickets I’ll cover it here instead. Note to designers: we’d prefer to see your catwalk show wherever possible. I’ll cover jewellery and Esthetica in other blogs.

Somerset House SS2011 Grazia helium dogs
Grazia helium dogs.

Tata Naka
This Georgian sister duo is one of my favourites – I used to style with their clothing a lot, most memorably in a shoot I did in the first ever issue of Amelia’s Magazine. They used to have quite a high profile but that has taken a bit of a nosedive in recent years – probably due to their decision to place more emphasis on creating a solid commercial business. But over the last few seasons they have been slowly creeping back into the centre of the fashion storm and I was very sad to have missed their presentation this year. My own error entirely. This season, like fellow independents Tatty Devine and Drowned in Sound (a very good music website) they were celebrating their 10th anniversary. Whilst perusing the gorgeous printed and embroidered kaftans and playsuits I got thoroughly distracted by a mad buyer who was trying on all the clothes and demanding fabric and colour changes. She was no doubt very important but downright scary: she watched over me whilst I deleted a photo of her (only wanted to get the outfit on someone to be illustrated, honest guv)

tata naka by genie espinosa
Tata Naka by Genie Espinosa.

DavidDavid
Two brothers, one who designs, the other with the business brains *oh why wasn’t I born with a business minded sister? sigh* DavidDavid have been on my radar since I first spotted their unique geometric designs in Mandi Lennard‘s press office many a moon ago. Back then I presumed some feisty young club kid was responsible – but I was clearly wrong: at least one of these designers was seen carrying his kid through the courtyard at Somerset House. Upstarts they ain’t.

Somerset House SS2011 DavidDavid
Somerset House SS2011 DavidDavid

This season’s collection was fetchingly presented against the light beaming through the window… pastel blocks marched against white and grey backgrounds on signature simple tees. But I think what I’d really like most this season is a chair covered in their fabric.

Somerset House SS2011 DavidDavid
DavidDavid.

Felicity Brown
Felicity Brown was discovered in one of the funny little New Gen huts: all froufrou dip dyed cascades of silk ruffled fabric, it reminded me of some much loved 70s dresses that I own. Inspiration was found in the shameless females in paintings of Toulouse-Lautrec. Since graduating from the Royal College of Art Felicity has worked with loads of top designers including Mulberry and Lanvin. Utterly fabulous.

Somerset House SS2011 Felicity Brown
Somerset House SS2011 Felicity Brown
Felicity Brown by Monique Anderson
Felicity Brown by Monique Anderson
Felicity Brown by Monique Anderson.

Mary Katrantzou
I was intrigued by Mary Katrantzou last season but sadly we were not to be recipients of a catwalk ticket – and thus missed the lampshade skirts in action. I nevertheless enjoyed a close up view of her digitally reworked prints of classic 70s glamour photography from Newton and Bourdin.

Somerset House SS2011 Mary Katrantzou
Somerset House SS2011 Mary Katrantzou
LFWSS11 Mary Katrantzou_KitLee
Mary Katrantzou by Kit Lee.

Yang Du
Yang Du was another designer that grabbed my attention last season. She creates huge surrealist sweater dresses in playful designs, and I was particularly taken by the crocodile top. But full marks also have to go for her display, which was really quite special – huge blow up eyeballs, lion finger puppets and masks… and not forgetting the helium dogs (see above for a picture). Oh hang on, they were a freebie from some magazine… still great though.

Somerset House SS2011 Yang Du
Somerset House SS2011 Yang Du
Somerset House SS2011 Yang Du
Somerset House SS2011 Yang Du
Yang Du by Genie Espinosa.
Yang Du by Genie Espinosa.

Klavers Van Engelen
Klavers Van Engelen were spotted in the Eastern Block room. Beautiful relaxed European design from these Dutch designers.

Somerset House SS2011 Klavers Van Engelen
Somerset House SS2011 Klavers Van Engelen
Klavers Van Engelen by Fiona M Chapelle
Klavers Van Engelen by Fiona M Chapelle
Klavers Van Engelen by Fiona M Chapelle.

Cecilia Mary Robson
The Cecilia Mary Robson collection was absolutely adorable and right up my street – watch a movie of these cute brightly coloured patch work dresses and skirts here.

Cecilia Mary Robson by Andrea Peterson
Cecilia Mary Robson by Andrea Peterson
Cecilia Mary Robson by Andrea Peterson.

Bebaroque
I only spotted the fabulous Bebaroque beaded tights as they were packing up to go home, and so didn’t get much of a chance to check out what they were made from and how well they might stand up to some heavy wear. But they sure looked bloody brilliant. Scottish designers Mhairi McNicol and Chloe Patience studied at the Glasgow School of Art before hooking up to start their hosiery business. If you fancy sending me a pair to test drive I’d sure like to give them a go ladies.

LFW SS2011 Bebaroque

Christopher Raeburn
Where to start with Christopher Raeburn? He appears to have made that tricky transition from Esthetica to the loftier climes of New Gen. Which is a good thing. Since we first started to champion his environmentally friendly designs he has expanded his anorak making repertoire – I really loved all the new bright colourways with giant spot prints. But I’m still smarting over the fact that he declined to give me a leftover rabbit, despite my very vocal appreciation of these cleverly designed little buggers and despite the continued support this blog has given him. And having seen lots of other apparently more *emminent* fashionistas carrying said rabbits around tucked smugly under their arms. Hurumph.

Somerset House SS2011 Christopher Raeburn
Somerset House SS2011 Christopher Raeburn
Somerset House SS2011 Christopher Raeburn
LFW SS2011 Menswear Andrew davis
Andrew Davis with his rabbit.

Categories ,Andrea Peterson, ,Bebaroque, ,BFC, ,Cecilia Mary Robson, ,Chloe Patience, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,daviddavid, ,Eastern Block, ,esthetica, ,Felicity Brown, ,Fiona M Chapelle, ,Genie Espinosa, ,Hosiery, ,Kit Lee, ,Klavers Van Engelen, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mandi Lennard, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Mhairi McNicol, ,Monique Anderson, ,New Gen, ,Royal College of Art, ,Somerset House, ,Tata Naka, ,Tatty Devine, ,Yang Du

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2014: Fashion Illustrations from the Catwalk

Burberry A/W 2014 by Emma Farrarons

Burberry A/W 2014 by Emma Farrarons.

Since I was unable to attend many of my favourite designer’s shows this season, and indeed had no help in covering the shows (apart from this post, written by the fabulous Maria Papadimitriou) I thought it would be a nice idea to do an open callout for illustrators to depict their favourite outfit from any of the London Fashion Week shows. Here are the results, in no particular order: I am sure you will agree that they are fabulous. Long live fashion illustration!

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2014 by Antonia Parker

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2014 by Antonia Parker.

Erdem A/W 2014 by xplusyequals

Erdem A/W 2014 by xplusyequals.

Ashish A/W 2014 by Rebecca May Illustration

Ashish A/W 2014 by Rebecca May Illustration.

Eudon Choi A/W 2014 by Mark Goss

Eudon Choi A/W 2014 by Mark Goss

Eudon Choi A/W 2014 by Mark Goss.

KTZ A/W 2014 by xplusyequals

KTZ A/W 2014 by xplusyequals.

Emilio de la Morena A/W 2014 by Carol Kearns

Emilio de la Morena A/W 2014 by Carol Kearns.

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2014 by Maelle Rajoelisolo

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2014 by Maelle Rajoelisolo

Mary Katrantzou A/W 2014 by Maelle Rajoelisolo.

Daks A/W 2014 by Jenny Robins

Daks A/W 2014 by Jenny Robins.

Sibling A/W 2014 by Calamusyychan

Sibling A/W 2014 by Calamus Ying Ying Chan.

House Of Holland A/W 2014 by Antonia Parker

House Of Holland A/W 2014 by Antonia Parker.

Erdem A/W 2014 by Jane Young

Erdem A/W 2014 by Jane Young.

Burberry A/W 2014 by Mitika Suri

Burberry A/W 2014 by Mitika Suri.

Vivetta A/W 2014 by Briony Jose

Vivetta A/W 2014 by Briony Jose.

Tata Naka A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman

Tata Naka A/W 2014 by Isher Dhiman.

David Koma A/W 2014 by Gaarte

David Koma A/W 2014 by Gaarte.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Ashish, ,Briony Jose, ,Burberry, ,Calamus Ying Ying Chan, ,Carol Kearns, ,daks, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Emma Farrarons, ,Erdem, ,Eudon Choi, ,Gaarte, ,House of Holland, ,Isher Dhiman, ,Jane Young, ,Jenny Robins, ,KTZ, ,Maelle Rajoelisolo, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Mark Goss, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Michael van der Ham, ,Mitika Suri, ,Rebecca May Illustration, ,Sibling, ,Tata Naka, ,xplusyequals

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lako Bukia: The London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Preview Interview

Lako Bukia by Natasha Nicole
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Natasha Nicole Waddon.

In the second of my London Fashion Week previews meet Georgian designer Lako Bukia, and who wowed us with her distinctive style last season. Choxa was inspired by the Georgian National Ballet and featured plenty of military flourishes juxtaposed with feminine flowing chiffon, approved but what can we expect for S/S 2012? Lako Bukia talks about why her homeland is so close to her heart, viagra and why it’s so important to create clothes that suit all women.

Lako Bukia Choxa
Lako Bukia Choxa
You can see more of Choxa on my review blog.

lako-bukia-by-jessica-knight
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Jessica Knight.

You hail from Georgia, which seems to produce a lot of world class designers, for example Tata-Naka. Why do you think that is?
I don’t know, but when I was little I used to hear a lot about Georgians being very talented. Georgia is a really small country but it has a very ancient history so that makes it special. I am happy to hear that you think there so many talented people who are now representing the country abroad.

Lako Bukia by Claire Kearns
Lako Bukia by Claire Kearns.

What do you miss most about your home town?
I miss all the traditions we have that gather together friends and family every day. In London you don’t get a chance to be with your friends every day and it’s harder to get help. In Georgia everyone is ready to be there for you.

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

You are highly educated, with several degrees and other qualifications in fashion design: how have the different places that you’ve studied affected your approach to fashion?
Different colleges and universities have given me different things so from each of them I have learned something special. Attending different colleges helped me to pick up on the most important things and put them together in my mind. In Georgia at the Tbilisi State Academy of Arts I learnt about colours, paintings and fine art, Central Saint Martins was more about developing creative ideas, Istituto Marangoni in Italy was good for learning about business and marketing and finally at LCF there was a good combination of everything and I also learnt good technical skills.

Lako Bukia Flower Skirt by Sam Parr
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Sam Parr.

You make clothes to flatter every woman, how do you ensure that is the case?
Construction and fabric are the most important thing. Different cuts must be used with different fabrics or you risk ruining everything. Every time I design something I have a particular fabric in mind and I will travel all over until I have found it because if I use something else it could change everything. I use lots of silk and chiffon fabrics, because with these it is possible to create very flattering styles and this is important to the Lako Bukia aesthetic.

Lako Bukia by Natasha Nicole Waddon
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Natasha Nicole Waddon.

The new collection is inspired by Asian trees and flowers. Where did you turn to for your inspiration for S/S 2012, and why were you attracted to them?
I have always been attracted to Asian culture: my favourite writer is Japanese and the designers that I adored from childhood are Japanese too, so it was one of the things I really wanted to work on. Luckily I traveled to China and Hong Kong this March and was amazed at the architecture and beautiful gardens full of pretty flowers and trees.

Lako Bukia print design
You have introduced print for the first time this season, why did you decide to do this and what has the learning curve been like?
Every season I try to do something new, so it is always a learning process. I love exploring new things and I am not afraid of the challenge. I think if a designer wants to grow and learn more, then they should do something new or more difficult every season. I have always been fond of fine art and I used to paint a lot, so I wanted to make use of this in my clothes. So I decided to draw and print on the fabric.

Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Lako Bukia S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

Why are you so interested in contrast? You favour quite a dramatic colour palette – is this a reflection of your personality?
I can be very depressed and I often see more of the negative in life than the positive, but my friends and family would never believe this because I don’t show this side to them. I guess that is why my colour palette is more dramatic: because of my personality. If you are not strong in this industry (and in life in general) then you will not survive, so I need to be strong, and my experiences have made me stronger.

Lako Bukia Shoes by Sam Parr
Lako Bukia Shoes by Sam Parr.

It’s important to you to appeal to a wide market, offering commercial pieces amongst showpieces – how do you balance your offerings so that they are attractive on all levels, and what kind of commercial pieces have you introduced this season?
If you look at my collections from the beginning then you will see that they have changed a lot. At the start I thought fashion was all about being creative and making art. My first collection Mushroom was completely unwearable, with hand made fabrics and very big sleeves. Step by step I have learned that being a designer is not just making something very extraordinary but it is also about doing business and making something new, different and wearable. I always try to have a few showpieces for press amongst more commercial garments but this season almost everything will appeal to buyers: printed fabric chiffon shirts, dresses, trousers, small shorts and corsets.

Lako Bukia Mushroom
Lako Bukia’s graduate collection Mushroom.

What can we expect from Lako Bukia in the coming years? 
I will always try to be more creative and make more interesting clothes. I never want to lose my style as I try to climb to the top. My aim is to redefine the way the world sees femininity and sexuality. Due to a decade long pressure from the fashion world and show business representatives, femininity and sexuality are now widely perceived as being equal to wearing tight and revealing clothes. The women of the world have forgotten that there is something more exciting in the mystery of garments that do not stress ones body shape.

Lako Bukia takes to the catwalk on Saturday 17th September 2011 as part of Fashion Scout.

Categories ,Asian, ,Central Saint Martins, ,CHOXA, ,Claire Kearns, ,Dramatic, ,Fashion Scout, ,Femininity, ,Flowers, ,georgia, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Istituto Marangoni, ,japanese, ,Jessica Knight, ,lako bukia, ,London College of Fashion, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mushroom, ,Natasha Nicole Waddon, ,preview, ,print, ,S/S 2012, ,Sam Parr, ,sexuality, ,Silk, ,Tata Naka, ,Tbilisi State Academy of Arts, ,trees

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