Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010: Streetstyle: Womenswear

NB: At Amelia’s Magazine, cheap we do not promote real fur of any kind. We hope all of these looks use only faux fur, remedy but there are still some people who think it’s acceptable. It’s the 21st century, and it really isn’t. Please don’t wear fur.

IMG_0338

IMG_0333

IMG_0337

IMG_0330

IMG_0323

IMG_0324

IMG_0319

IMG_0312

IMG_0314

IMG_0291

IMG_0306

IMG_0290

IMG_0289

IMG_0283

IMG_0286

IMG_0281

IMG_0275

IMG_0276

IMG_0266

IMG_0252

IMG_0253

IMG_0056

IMG_0034

IMG_0042

IMG_0032

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Bows, ,Faux Fur, ,Legs, ,London Fashion Week, ,Street Style, ,Tartan

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010: Streetstyle: Menswear

Streetstyle1

Streetstyle2

Streetstyle3

Streetstyle4

Streetstyle5

Streetstyle6

Streetstyle7

Streetstyle8

Streetstyle9

Streetstyle9a

Streetstyle9b

Streetstyle9c

Streetstyle9d

Streetstyle9e

Streetstyle9f

Streetstyle9g

Streetstyle9i

Streetstyle9h

Photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Street Style

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010: Streetstyle: Menswear

Streetstyle1

Streetstyle2

Streetstyle3

Streetstyle4

Streetstyle5

Streetstyle6

Streetstyle7

Streetstyle8

Streetstyle9

Streetstyle9a

Streetstyle9b

Streetstyle9c

Streetstyle9d

Streetstyle9e

Streetstyle9f

Streetstyle9g

Streetstyle9i

Streetstyle9h

Photography by Matt Bramford



Categories ,A/W 2010, ,London Fashion Week, ,menswear, ,Street Style

Similar Posts:

Bookmark this:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn

Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 in Łódź: Street Style

Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
It was harder to shoot Street Style at this Fashion Week Poland than at last, due in part to the cold weather which kept us huddling indoors but also because of the ever increasing bump that I now have to drag around with me everywhere. Both connived to prevent me from hunting down as many extravagant dressers. But here’s an idea of what Street Style Polish Style (and a bit of front row international fashion) looks like in late 2011.

Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland people SS 2012-Street Style
Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 Street Style. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,80s, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Jemima Daisy, ,Lodz, ,Malgosia Kralkowska, ,Marcellous, ,Phaedra, ,S/S 2012, ,Street Style, ,Systeme D

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Ice Cool

Recently discussing with a fellow fashion blogger the growing interest in the Scandinavian fashion world, information pills treatment she quipped that it was very easy for Scandinavians to be fashionable; after all, link each and every one of them seem to be all long legs and white blonde hair. Her remark seemed to suggest that perhaps the Scandinavians have no street style genius or imaginative flair when it comes to dressing. Indeed, sale the stereotype of beautiful dumb models hailing from the North of Europe is far from rare – but there’s something going on over there that’s worth a bit of investigating.

Taking just one look at street style websites Lookbook or the Face Hunter confronts us with the fresh new faces of Scandinavian fashion. The majority of the most ‘hyped’ looks on Lookbook come from sassy, fashionable (and often very young) North Europeans, hailing from Stockholm, Helsinki and beyond. Indeed, for a clear picture of Swedish success on Lookbook, just look at “Shelley M, 18 year old art student and blogger from Sweden,” with her knack of combining little girl cuteness (headbands and bows) with serious sex appeal (short black skirts and lace) topped off with crazy heels and splashes of kitsch accessories straight out of Tatty Devine.

And she’s not a lone phenomenon. Sporting brave and bold urban prints in vivid colours, these bright young things from Scandinavian meccas of style exude a perfect blend of 90s skate culture with CluelessCher Horowitz, with her high school polished, blonde doll-faced perfection. See Amelia’s Magazine’s recent articles on Daniel Palillo and CTRL for examples of this kind of styling, something that appears to be truly specific to the Scandinavians. The 90s, it seems, are the nostalgic wardrobe reference du jour here, embodying past positivity and youth in a pre-doom and gloom world of the new millennium.

Ever since the Swedish Institute’s exhibition – ‘Swedish Fashion: Exploring a New Identity’ – launched at London’s Fashion and Textile Museum this February, Scandinavian fashion has seen a markedly rising profile in the fashion world. Celebrating a new wave of Swedish design talent, the exhibition questioned the static view that fashion blooms only in the eponymous fashion capitals of Paris, London, New York and Milan. In fact, this collection instead raised the debate over whether globally, we neglect fashion from all four corners of the globe at the cost of fresher and more interesting approaches to design, simply because they have traditionally been ignored by the industry.

Ann-Sofie Back must be considered one of the most influential and successful of these designers, with her place at London Fashion Week and her capsule collection for Topshop, not to mention her collaboration with that uber-successful Swedish brand, Cheap Monday. As seen at her s/s 09 collection, Back is unafraid to incorporate social comment into her shows, holding celebrity obsession with plastic surgery up to ridicule with her bandaged and felt-tipped models.

Back.JPG

But then, there are also the clothes. Back’s most recent collection sported ripped and distressed pieces supposedly representing ‘Ann-Sofie Back goes to Hell’. Striking the balance can be near-impossible, yet she really knows how to shock whilst also providing wearable fashion pieces.

And Back’s not the only one causing a stir. Joining her from the recent exhibition for particular note are Sandra Backlund, Helena Horstedt and Martin Bergström, who showcased similarly effortless Scandinavian cool.

Backlund.jpg

If you saw our feature on Backlund’s knitwear in recent weeks, you’ll know that it is really something special; with oversize knotting and draping, with the designs exude wooly coziness whilst remaining edgy and thoroughly modern. Alongside Backlund stands Horstedt whose work focuses on intricacy of shape in order to create highly fascinating designs that swirl and envelope the body with draping and fringing detail, all in solid black.

Horstedt.jpg

Indeed, for both designers, it seems that the human body is paramount to their designs, with Backlund quoted as saying the it is her chief inspiration. Finally we have Bergström, who once again predominantly centres on futuristic shapes enveloping the body with volume, but in a more vivid aquamarine colour palette.

Bergstrom.jpg

It seems then, that the Finns and the Swedes are well and truly indulging in some kind of sartorial breakthrough at the moment. Whatever it is that’s doing it, there is undoubtedly something linking these North European designers spurring them into a fashion frenzy. Hopefully, the fashion world will take notice, and we will be joining the likes of Shelley M in her fashion credentials all too soon.

Categories ,90s, ,Body-con, ,Scandinavian Fashion, ,Skatewear, ,Street Style

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Dans La Vie: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Jenny Robins
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Jenny Robins.

And so for London Fashion Week S/S 2013, which I am covering in a reduced capacity this season due to Snarfle demands: he will intermittently be joining me at the shows and no doubt vocalising his opinions. Our first show of Friday was Dans La Vie by Rira Sugawara at Fashion Scout, and I was pleased to find that Snarfle was perky and very interested in his first front row experience, particularly the flashing lights of the photographers at the end of the catwalk.

Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Gareth A Hopkins
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Gareth A Hopkins.

Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Jenny Robins
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Jenny Robins
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Jenny Robins.

For her Moving Print Bodies collection the Japanese designer used her signature plasticised printed fabrics to create a range of dramatic silhouettes in unusual colour combinations of mossy greens, pastel blues, mustard, blood red and teal. Gingham and python happily co-existed with gigantic bows and pictorial prints inspired by traditional Japanese gods. Waists were a big feature, cinched in with wide belts and exaggerated with tulip skirts and widened shoulders. The theme went somewhat haywire with the appearance of printed mesh catsuits that had panels across crotch and thighs in the style of Pam Hogg.

Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Fantastical make up was inspired by the patterns of the fabric…. blackened eyes topped with chequerboard foreheads or square blocks smeared across cheek and chins. For the finale Sugawara sent out my favourite look: a searing azure blue swing skirted dress with bodice frills spiked over the face in great fans like the frilled neck of a lizard.

Dans La Vie SS 2013 September 2012-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Deborah Moon
Dans La Vie S/S 2013 by Deborah Moon.

Dans La Vie has a very strong signature look but this season if felt a bit as if Sugawara was trying to shoehorn in as many of the prevailing trends as possible. The result? Individual pieces worked well but the collection as a whole came across as a bit of a style mish mash. Still, Snarfle gave it the thumbs up, so who am I to judge? Watch the catwalk show here:

Categories ,Dans La Vie, ,Deborah Moon, ,Fashion Scout, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,London Fashion Week, ,Moving Print Bodies, ,Pam Hogg, ,Rira Sugawara, ,S/S 2013, ,Snarfle

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland A/W 2011 in Łódź: Street Style at Expo

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style. All photography Amelia Gregory.

Finding the most interesting people to take photos of at any fashion week is always a lot of fun, adiposity especially in a new and interesting place where I’m not competing with a thousand street style photographers. Here, website like this then, are the most fabulously dressed people at Fashion Week Poland, part one: the stand outs in the crowd at the Expo arena where the more mainstream Designers’ Avenue catwalk shows were held. As you can see colour blocking is as massive in ?ód? as it is elsewhere in the world right now, but the Polish also like to go to town with a slightly zany vintage touch, quite often referencing the 80s. Love it.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
You’ve got to love the crown!

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
This girl was magnificently turned out every time I saw her. So admire the dedication.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Her own dye job. I asked.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
This boy had made his amazing neck piece out of plastic pricing tags.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Pink Voyager in the picture (that’s the cuddly pink toy)

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
I don’t know who this woman is but I think she might be famous as she was quite pissed at me when I asked to take her pic. So sorry to offend you with my request Miss Sourpuss, but loved your pastel colour blocking.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Hmm, slightly questionable look this one.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
These two looks are both by the same Polish based Russian designer, whose name escapes me right now. If you read this remind me what your name is please!

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
These are actually British fashion bloggers, The Style Crusader, Style Slicker and Park & Cube.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
This is actually the man who drove me into town from the airport in a Jaguar. Fancies himself a bit James Bond, quite hilar but such a sweet guy.

?ód? Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 Malgosia Kralkowska-photography by Amelia Gregory
That’s me with organiser Malgosia Kralkowska, who invited me to Fashion Week Poland.

Fashion Week Poland 2011 street style - all photography Amelia Gregory
And finally – it can’t all be high fashion can it?!

Next up, best of the street fashion style from the Off Out Of Schedule shows.

Categories ,80s, ,Colour Blocking, ,Designers’ Avenue, ,Expo, ,fashion, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Fashion Week Poland, ,James Bond, ,Lodz, ,Malgosia Kralkowska, ,Park and Cube, ,Pink Voyager, ,poland, ,Street Fashion, ,Street Style, ,Style Slicker, ,The Style Crusader, ,vintage

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | 100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style by Josh Sims

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style is the new book from style guru Josh Sims, a charming fellow that I was lucky enough to first meet when I was just a lowly intern at The Face and Arena. Since those long ago days Josh has written for a diverse roster of publications, building up a well deserved reputation for his knowledge of fashion and style. This new book takes a look at how street styles have impacted the mainstream, helped to unite people, reinforced stereotypes and created social division, with text accompanied by iconic photography by the likes of Liz Johnson Artur. 100 Ideas That Changed Street Style is a must read for anyone intrigued by the way that fashion shapes society. Josh tells me more…

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims

When and why did your obsession with street style begin?
I can’t say it’s an obsession – sounds unhealthy – but I’ve always been interested in the cultural subtext of certain men’s fashion, especially in the UK. I was an 80s Casual so that sense of membership through sartorial detail has always been there.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims

What particular styles are your favourites, and why?
Mod I think did much to define modern menswear, though it’s bastard offspring skinhead is more exacting and memorable. I have a soft spot for the Japanese women’s street styles – decora, Lolita, gangaro etc. Crazy stuff.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims

Photo by Startracks Photo/Rex Features.

Did you struggle to differentiate between elements of any styles, and if so which ones were they?
Yes, the Japanese ones above. To outsider eyes they seem to blur into a general wackiness, especially to westerners. You have to be on the inside to see what’s what with those.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims Halloween Horse

Halloween Horse.

Have any styles influenced your own way of dress, and how have these influences changed over the years?
Other than the classic British men’s sub cultures – mod, two tone, skin head, casual – I can’t say they have; especially after, ahem, a certain age. You find your own uniform and tend to stick with it I think, or at least men do. Perhaps that’s just laziness.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims Dancehall Girls

Dancehall Girls.

Where do the richest sources of street style spring up from?
You mean geographically? In which case probably America is ahead on that. Culturally many tend to be fed by a shared appreciation for a certain kind of music – or some influence outside of fashion at least. The clothes are just a reflection of a shared fandom really.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims

In your introduction you question whether the concept of street style can still exist in a globalised fast moving digital age. If so what could replace clothing as a signifier of belonging or individualism?
I thick clothing will still play a part – the point is that we’re more and more confident in cherry picking our influences and dressing as individuals. Styles may be less underground in the future, but they will at least be our own.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims NorthernSoul

Northern Soul.

Can you share with us any clues about what to expect from the next big street style, in clothing or otherwise?
One considered for the book but dropped is more current than future – it’s a kind of blend of heritage workwear and Americana in menswear. It’s been fairly niche for a few years but is now entering the mainstream.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style: An interview with Josh Sims NorthernSoul

How has fatherhood altered or changed your approach to work and life?
Well as you know you end up with much less time and even less energy, so you have to work with greater efficiency. More positively still perhaps it gives you perspective – you realise what might be fascinating and fun but perhaps nowhere near as important as you perhaps thought it was. Like street styles for example. I think you’re just happier being yourself and less concerned about what strangers think of you – a concern that fashion is in part predicated on. Maybe that’s just being older…

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style- An interview with Josh Sims NorthernSoul - photo by Liz Johnson Artur

Photo by Liz Johnson Artur.

What are you working on next, do you have any sneak peaks you can share with us?
I wrote a book a while back called Icons of Men’s Style – about the history of the most important garments in the male wardrobe. So there’s a womenswear version of that on its way.

100 Ideas That Changed Street Style by Josh Sims is available now from Laurence King, priced £19.95.

Categories ,100 Ideas That Changed Street Style, ,book, ,fashion, ,Icons of Men’s Style, ,Josh Sims, ,Laurence King, ,Liz Johnson-Artur, ,review, ,Street Style, ,Style

Similar Posts: