Amelia’s Magazine | Sister by SIBLING: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gaarte

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gaarte

Twinsets, cardigans, and crew-neck jumpers were all over this Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 collection, but not as you’ve seen them before. One of the reasons I love SIBLING is that this brand was born out of a trio of designers who wanted to give men’s knitwear an overhaul, striking such a covetable and attention-grabbing luxe look that women started wearing the pieces too. Joe Bates, Sid Bryan and Cozette McCreery dutifully provided Sister by SIBLING, the equally loud leopard-printed, skull-brandishing womenswear brand.

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu

This presentation in the Portico Rooms was a pretty hot ticket, judging by the intense jostle for seats and a front row full to bursting with fashion editors. Long-term SIBLING fan Laura Bailey smiled sweetly from her seat in a way that only someone who has had a private preview of the collection does, safe in the knowledge of what is to come. I did my best impression of a similar smile of satisfaction as I’d already drooled over this sparkly, lurex, sequined offering from SIBLING in the Somerset House press exhibition room.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

Katie Grand’s in-your-face styling definitely woke up the sleepy crowd (who like me, wanted a lie-in and chose the later showing) by mixing acid-bright pinks, oranges, and purples together for a strong visual punch. The most special touch came in the form of face masks that turned models into faceless sparkling mannequins with incredible pom-poms and hand stitched flower clustered defiantly on top of their heads.

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins

The genius behind this collection and the Sister by SIBLING brand is that it’s easy to wear. Attention-seekers can go for the whole look, and those who like a bit of crazy colourful sparkle without much effort (ahem, me) get an instant outfit by pulling on some knitwear over jeans. I particularly liked how something as traditional as a Scottish Fair Isle jumper was transformed with skulls and clashing neon leopard print.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

As the models walked around the room at the end of the presentation and I resisted the urge to ruffle a pom pom or two, I noticed the shoes. In collaboration with Underground, this means that hopefully the trademark Sister by SIBLING leopard prints and skull Fair Isle teamed with ubiquitous pointy creepers and Chelsea boots may be available to buy next season.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

Another nice little touch was the brand’s collaboration with Barbie, who they dressed up in miniature versions of the collection and displayed along shelves on their exhibition stand. If Sister by SIBLING can make someone as clean-cut as Barbie look like she’s right at home wearing glittering skulls, neon prints and fully sequinned jumpers, then surely the look can work for anyone. Besides, a full face of sequins or sparkly lurex means less time bothering with hair and makeup: a definite win.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

All photography by Alia Gargum and Jamie Chiu

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Barbie, ,chelsea boots, ,Cozette McCreery, ,Crepe Sole Creepers, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Jamie Chiu, ,Joe Bates, ,Katie Grand, ,knitwear, ,Laura Bailey, ,Leopard Print, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,Neon, ,Portico Rooms, ,Sequins, ,Sid Bryan, ,Sister by Sibling, ,Underground Shoes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Bodyamr

Kingston MA Patricia Osbahr photo by Amelia Gregory

LFW Daks Catwalk Show Spring Summer 2011

I rolled into Daks at the bright and early time of 9am on a Saturday morning – expecting to be one of the few who made in out of bed. But the crowd was bright eyed and bushy tailed – shame some of the models looked pale and in need of some shut-eye!

When the Daks press release proclaimed the collection was inspired by a “British traveller on a journey through India” I envisaged either a ‘gap yah’ nightmare or colonial outfits complete with G&T’s. Thankfully what ended up on the catwalk was far from it. Daks S/S 2011 was an easy, patient breezy collection of crisp designs in white, pilule pale grey, approved and stone.

Daks Spring Summer 2010 collection illustration by Abi Daker

Rather than going for swathes of layers, embroidery and hippy trippy designs, Daks decided to translate the ‘traveller’ theme in a much more sophisticated way – splashes of mustard yellow (my FAVOURITE colour) were meant to represent the spices of India, and the lightweight fabrics were chosen to be suitable for hot climates. I can’t see myself donning a drop waisted skirt and chic leather satchel to trek through the Himalayas, but Dak’s ‘grand tour’ was fun to watch – and felt oh-so English.

Daks Spring Summer 2011 fashion illustration by Abi Daker

Referencing the 1930s, there were some gorgeous mid length pleated skirts, high-waisted trousers and a standout mustard yellow shirt dress. I was even convinced that I needed the knitted shorts and onesies in my life. But considering how great the accessories were in the rest of the collection – with little round sunglasses and convertible leather rucksacks – the shoes (cheap looking wedges and flip flops) seemed a bit of an afterthought.
Amelia_LFW1_Yasmin Siddiqui, <a target=ailment gaarte” title=”Amelia_LFW1_Yasmin Siddiqui, online gaarte” width=”480″ height=”480″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-25158″ />
Yasmin Siddiqui opens the Kingston MA show. Illustration by Gaarte.

Sometimes it’s hard to be heard amongst all the chatter and noise of LFW so it’s either very foolish (who’s got time to come?) or very inspired (you’ve got a ready made captive audience) to hold your MA show at the same time. I suspect Kingston University leaned the latter way, physician thinking why not jump on the fashion week bandwagon? They’d even secured a slot in the hallowed Freemasons’ Hall.

Kingston MA by Katherine Tromans Alison Firth
Kingston MA by Katherine Tromans Alison Firth
Alison Firth by Katherine Tromans.

But it was late in the day, those of us who had been trogging around all day were pretty bloody knackered. Then the show was running behind and it was bloody hot in the hall… and we didn’t even have seated tickets. It seemed those had gone to the copious quantities of friends and relatives brought along by so many participants. Note to PRs – if you give us shit tickets you’ll probably get shit photos – I was hardly able to snap anything decent from my vantage point. And if you desperately want to be heard it really does pay to get the press on your side. With pretty pics.

Abby_Wright_Kingston_show Stacey Grant
Stacey Grant by Abby Wright.

Luckily we’ve got a crack team of illustrators who can make a proverbial silk purse out of a sow’s ear, or a beautiful image out of… well… not very much to look at, (which is just as well). But still, I like to have the option of good photos too. Pick ‘n’ mix and all that.

Amelia_LFW2_gaarte Yasmin Siddiqui,
Yasmin Siddiqui by Gaarte.

Amelia_LFW3_gaarte Faraz Hussain
Faraz Hussain by Gaarte.

And then the show went on… and on… Okay, so there’s a bonus to seeing several designers at once – when they’re of a very high calibre and you haven’t got a million other things to see and do. But I have to say, Kingston Uni, that this wasn’t up to the standard that London Fashion Week has become accustomed to. People were sneaking off all around me. Which leads me to my second piece of advice. Only go up against the best of what London design has to offer if you’re sure you can match it!

LFW-KingstonMA-Gemma-Milly Victor Chan
Victor Chan by Gemma Milly.

I’m sure many of the Kingston MA students are very talented, but I’m struggling to remember anything that stood out, and that is a bad thing. A lot of it was very similar in feel, nondescript in colouring with draping and protrusions everywhere (they seem to be very much du jour) And I’m sorry, but a load of polygonally moulded leathers do not a fashion designer make.
LFW-KingstonMA2-Gemma-Milly Raine Hodgson
Raine Hodgson by Gemma Milly.

Stand outs, if I’m pushed? Obviously the first piece, courtesy of Yasmin Siddiqui, was a great piece of statement jewellery. There was some strong colouring combinations in the menswear from Faraz Hussain and Helen Taylor’s male jumpsuit was fun, as was her styling with wooden head frames. Generally I had a strong sense of shapelessness going on. But hey! I’ll let you make up your minds for yourselves, and in the meantime I think you’ll agree that my illustrators have done sterling work.

LFW Daks Catwalk Show Spring Summer 2011

I rolled into Daks at the bright and early time of 9am on a Saturday morning – expecting to be one of the few who made in out of bed. But the crowd was bright eyed and bushy tailed – shame some of the models looked pale and in need of some shut-eye!

When the Daks press release proclaimed the collection was inspired by a “British traveller on a journey through India” I envisaged either a ‘gap yah’ nightmare or colonial outfits complete with G&T’s. Thankfully what ended up on the catwalk was far from it. Daks S/S 2011 was an easy, advice breezy collection of crisp designs in white, pale grey, and stone.

Daks Spring Summer 2010 collection illustration by Abi Daker

Rather than going for swathes of layers, embroidery and hippy trippy designs, Daks decided to translate the ‘traveller’ theme in a much more sophisticated way – splashes of mustard yellow (my FAVOURITE colour) were meant to represent the spices of India, and the lightweight fabrics were chosen to be suitable for hot climates. I can’t see myself donning a drop waisted skirt and chic leather satchel to trek through the Himalayas, but Dak’s ‘grand tour’ was fun to watch – and felt oh-so English.

Daks Spring Summer 2011 fashion illustration by Abi Daker

Referencing the 1930s, there were some gorgeous mid length pleated skirts, high-waisted trousers and a standout mustard yellow shirt dress. I was even convinced that I needed the knitted shorts and onesies in my life. But considering how great the accessories were in the rest of the collection – with little round sunglasses and convertible leather rucksacks – the shoes (cheap looking wedges and flip flops) seemed a bit of an afterthought.

fashion illustration by Amy Martino

Illustration by Amy Martino

At the Bodyamr show, page the celebrities nearly outshone the clothes. Lily Allen, viagra Nick Grimshaw, Keisha from the Sugababes and the TV Chef Gizzi Erskine all waltzed in past us mere mortals crammed outside the Vauxhall Fashion Scout hall, (made more manic by the decision to cram two presentations into one catwalk show) cue much jostling and craning of necks by my fellow bloggers to get a good photo.

Once inside, the celeb fest continued – the press release reeled off a list of starlets who loved Bodyamr (Florence Welch, Beyonce, and Cheryl Cole dontcha know), and the crowd whispered about Daisy Lowe opening the show and Kanye West’s girlfriend Amber Rose closing. The scrum for goodie bags as everyone sat down added to the excitement – a recent collaboration with Rixos hotels meant a rather bizarre mix of hotel freebies and glossy brochures was under every seat.

As for the clothes – Bodyamr do a fine line in creating flattering, skin-tight looks for powerful women (hence the appeal for starlets). True to form, their inspiration for S/S 2011 was a cross between Josephine Baker wrapping jewels ‘seductively around her naked body’ and a 90s supermodel. It was a fun, glamorous collection, with pieces that wouldn’t look out of place in Studio 54 (sequins, kaftan style dresses, jersey, Grecian draping), a nice dose of body con and some sheer chiffon dresses printed with art deco jewels (there’s the naked Josephine Baker for you). There was even some slouchy, slinky daywear amongst the goddess dresses tailor-made for the red carpet. And yes, Daisy looked amazing – I just hope people weren’t too star-struck to notice her beautifully draped white jersey jumpsuit.

Categories ,Amber Rose, ,Bodyamr, ,daisy lowe, ,fashion, ,gizzi erskine, ,jersey, ,jumpsuit, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,review, ,Sequins, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Ashish

Ashish S/S 2012-by-Antonia-Parker
Ashish S/S 2012 by Antonia Parker.

There aren’t many designers who make me so excited I can hardly breathe, page but that tends to be a side effect of watching an Ashish catwalk show. Out they came, a stream of beautiful girls dressed in brightly coloured sequinned floral creations… except this being Ashish flowers were not staid or overly girly.

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish-S-S12-by-Antonia-Parker
Ashish S/S 2012 by Antonia Parker.

Sunflowers were emblazoned against monochrome stripes, giant daisies ran riot, roses and primroses entwined, glossy orange lilies had stamens the size of forearms, a blouse was printed with marigolds and offset against a mini skirt in a bold brick design. There were chequerboards and zebra stripes, zigzags and leopard spots. Bright neon grounds gave a bolder edge to curling florals.

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Paloma Faith was sporting an Ashish jacket on the front row.

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester
Ashish S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester.

Girls were styled to perfection by Celestine Cooney in DMs and straw fedoras with loose plaits, glittery eyes and dark glossy lips. Flowers popped out of boots, circling elegant calves in sprigs that dropped petals in a trail along the catwalk.

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS12 Ashish by Kristina Vasiljeva
Ashish S/S 2012 by Kristina Vasiljeva.

As each outfit came out I just about managed to contain my excitement, imagining just how easy it would be to wear these beautiful clothes: simple shift dresses with cowl backs, drawstring waisted shorts, casual t-shirts and floppy collared jackets that would suit women of all shapes and sizes.

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish-by-Kate-Eldridge
Ashish S/S 2012 by Kate Eldridge.

Le Jardin d’Ashish was everything that Ashish does best: using signature sequins to inject very wearable clothing with a sense of colour and fun that no other designer could ever dare replicate. Long may Ashish continue to plough his very own idiosyncratic fashion furrow. He even thanked his mum on the show notes, how sweet is that?

Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2012 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Ashish, ,BFC Tent, ,Brick, ,Celestine Cooney, ,DMs, ,DS Dundee, ,florals, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Kate Eldridge, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,Le Jardin d’Ashish, ,Leopard, ,lfw, ,Lilies, ,London Fashion Week, ,paloma faith, ,S/S 2012, ,Sequins, ,Somerset House, ,Straw Fedora, ,Zebra

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012: Catwalk Review: Jasper Garvida

Jasper Garvida SS 2012 by Emma Block

Jasper Garvida SS 2012 illustrated by Emma Block

Some may think that having previewed this Spring/Summer 2012 collection in my recent London Fashion Week interview with Jasper Garvida would have dampened my excitement about the show, healing as I’d already seen it all, right? Let me tell you, I was more excited than a teenage girl turning up to her first dance (with cute boys and everything). Having chatted to the warm and sensitive Jasper about his collection, learning about the process and inspiration that went into it, I couldn’t wait to see it modelled on the catwalk at the luxurious Bloomsbury Hotel, which was a nice little break from the rush of Somerset House.

Jasper Garvida SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jasper Garvida SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jasper Garvida SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory

All photography by Amelia Gregory

A restricted colour palette of black and white served as the perfect backdrop to what Jasper loves: his intricate hand-embellished details and natural ability to make feminine garments without them being saccharine sweet and over-the-top. For this collection, the silver and gold detailing as well as the circular prints were inspired by a painting that gave the collection it’s name: ‘Autour d’un Point’ by František Kupka.

Jasper Garvida S/S '12 illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Hemlines were either above the knee or down to the floor in a series of futuristic-meets-delicate dresses. Jasper showed off his sense of how to flatter the figure without showing too much (as opposed to recurring the boob and nipple-flashing trend that seemed to emerge this London Fashion Week).

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Circular metallic panels made from silver and gold leather created beautiful frames for the shoulders, neckline and hips, as well as sequins cleverly folded and sewn in rows to look like heavy studding without all the extra weight. Perfect for the likes of socialite Lady Victoria Hervey, Katie Melua and MTV presenter Laura Whitmore who all atended the show and would most likely rather not be carrying a ton in studs while presenting the latest Lady Gaga video, attending an event or dancing around on stage. Two pieces that caught my eye (especially as I’d felt how surprisingly butter-soft and light they were in the studio) were the distressed silver and gold raincoat and a black dress with ‘studded’ gold pockets. I could already see many a celebrity stylist clamoring for the attention-grabbing yet wearable collection.

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 illustrated by Charlotte Hoyle

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 illustrated by Charlotte Hoyle

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Fashion editor legend Diana Vreeland was the other main influence for Jasper and his S/S 2012, as he loves her individual sense of style (I’d also recommend watching some of her old interviews online, her bonkers and overly-dramatic way of talking fashion is second-to-none) and passion for the exotic. He was also inspired by her innate way of mixing contrasts, which he explored in this collection, creating garments that are hard yet soft and feminine with a strong silhouette thanks to defined silhouettes which reminded me a little of Jean Paul Gaultier and his strong definition of femininity.

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

As each model walked past I couldn’t help smiling with pride for Jasper. Details like pockets that stood away and out from the body perfectly aligned with the hips, and the last few dresses completely made from sequins to create a shimmering disco-ball effect got some audible squeals of joy. Sparkle and sequins can go so wrong so easily, but in the hands of Jasper and his team they became wearable and breathtaking without making the models look like they got ready for a New Year’s Eve party months too early. The dresses looked comfortable, and the workmanship shone through as I inspected how well-stitched the sequins were, even catching a glimpse of myself reflected in the dress.

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 illustrated by Charlotte Hoyle

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 illustrated by Charlotte Hoyle

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Jasper is serious about well-made clothes (perhaps a couture line would be appropriate in the future) and it shows. I would however have liked to see the look pushed even further with a shoe or jewellry collaboration to compliment the outfits, imagining how incredible a pair of disco-ball Jasper Garvida shoes would look like with one of his tailored black or white dresses. Although in terms of completing the look, it has to be said that the hair suited the collection perfectly; a modern version of a Diana Vreeland-eque strong and high hairstyle sculpted into place with a lot of backcombing.

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia GregoryJasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

The Garvida crowd strike a pose

Jasper Garvida S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Our very own contributing writer Akeela Bhattay getting that perfect shot

When the show was over, Laura Whitmore and Lady Victoria Harvey both stayed to congratulate him, gushing over the collection (Laura has been a Jasper Garvida fan for a few seasons). I’m sure Jasper will also be getting more mentions, as the Head of Fashion at the Evening Standard, Maurice Mullen also attended the show, and many a blogger and editor hung around to get a snippet of what went into the collection. In-between socialites and TV presenters and other well-wishers I managed to give the beaming Jasper a quick congratulatory hug, safe in the knowledge that I’d already had the mother of all chats about the collection with him in the studio over a nice cup of tea.

Categories ,Akeela Bhattay, ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Charlotte Hoyle, ,Diana Vreeland, ,Emma Block, ,Frantisek Kupka, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,jasper garvida, ,John Paul Gaultier, ,Katie Melua, ,Lady Gaga, ,Lady Victoria Hervey, ,Laura Whitmore, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maurice Mullen, ,monochrome, ,MTV, ,Nipples, ,pattern, ,S/S 2012, ,Sequins, ,Somerset House, ,The Bloomsbury Hotel, ,The Evening Standard, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 in Łódź: MMC Studio Design

MMC Studio Design S/S 2012 by SarahJayneDraws aka Sarah Jayne Morris
MMC Studio Design S/S 2012 by SarahJayneDraws aka Sarah Jayne Morris.

MMC Studio Design closed Friday night at Fashion Week Poland with a dramatic catwalk show. Things kicked off with a stage hand struggling gleefully down the stage as she held aloft a large amount of helium balloons. As the lights went up she released them towards the ceiling as fake snow began to fall. Except this being a spring/summer show I guess it was supposed to be more like confetti.

MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Out stepped the models in a selection of relaxed white separates paired with heavy white eyelids that blinked again the snowy onslaught. Legs were daubed with lines in place of old fashioned stockings and their feet were clad in white Dr. Martens. For variety there were a few grey garments and the odd bit of swishy transparent chiffon. As the lighting was lowered to ever more dramatic levels the snow – sorry, confetti – continued to fall. The final pieces really maxed up the sportsluxe look with deep crusts of sequins arranged in snowy camouflage patterns. A collection fit for an ice queen, sorry, summer princess. You can read my review of MMC Studio Design‘s A/W 2011 collection here.

MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
YouTube Preview Image
Watch the finale here.

At the end everyone had fun playing with the thick piles of white tissue paper that had descended onto the catwalk.

MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
MMC Studio Design Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Systeme D and Jemima Daisy play in the *snow*

Categories ,Confetti, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Grey, ,Jemima Daisy, ,Lodz, ,MMC Studio Design, ,Sarah Jayne Morris, ,SarahJayneDraws, ,Sequins, ,Snow, ,sportsluxe, ,Systeme D

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week Interview: Northumbria’s Naomi New

Illustration by Dan Heffer

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, unhealthy there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, treatment some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, link Alice in Wonderland to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Krister Selin

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Illustration by Dan Heffer

Around the monolithic event that is Graduate Fashion Week at Earl’s Court, prescription there exists what might be known as satellite events. This is no way refers to the quality of work that is on display only to the difference in size between shows. I was lucky enough to visit the millenary on show at Kensington and Chelsea College’s end of year show.

I’m not sure whether it’s the wedding’s I’ve been too recently or the constant press attention regarding the ladies hats at certain races (hello Ainscourt) but recently I’ve been paying more attention to headwear.

Illustration by Lauren

The quality of the work on display was unmistakable and a joy to photograph through the sculpture shapes. Each Milliner had created a story around their final product, some of the topics covered envoked narcassim, Alice in Wonderland

to old myths and Legends.

Illustration by Krister Selin

Photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

Naomi New was undoubtedly one of the highlights at Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her incredible costumes dazzled the press and had me bouncing up and down on my seat at the Northumbria show and the Gala Show, medical for which Naomi was one of very few students selected.

I had a chance to have a chat with Naomi about her experience of Graduate Fashion Week, her advice for next year’s brood, and what the future has in store.

Why did you choose to study fashion?
I have always been fascinated with clothes, how they define who we are and communicate that to others. When I was young I used to dance and loved designing my own costumes, picking fabrics and even helping sewing on sequins; so from early on I have always known I was going to be a fashion designer.

Did you undertake any placements during your studies?
I did two internships. I spent one month with womenswear designer Aimee McWilliams, then went on to spend five months with a high street supply company, Pentex Ltd. This gave me a fantastic insight into working in fashion in two different areas.

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
I am a hands on designer who immerses themselves into the brief. I believe that inspiration is all around us and never leave home without a camera or a sketchpad. I like to visit as many exhibitions and museums as possible, visit archives to get a closer look at my subject and always feel inspired by theatre and film. The inspiration for my collection came from my life long love of horse riding and a visit to the royal armouries at the Tower of London where they were showing Henry VIII armour. As my research developed I looked at military wear and most importantly the post-apocalypse films Mad Max.
The concept behind the collection really came from the Mad Max Road Warrior film, where Max battles with both good and bad to survive in a world that had been abused; where survivors were left with nothing. I felt that the story wasn’t too dissimilar to what we are living now, with the recession. I wanted to make a collection to equip the modern day woman in her quest to be successful throughout her life.

Your collection was one of the most flamboyant and creative of any I saw at GFW. Did you consciously decide to avoid commercial viability, or was this not a factor?
I didn’t set out to make something crazy and out there, I just knew that that was what was going to happen – it’s just me and I am very happy you think my collection was one of the most creative at GFW. That’s a massive compliment.
When designing and making the collection I was very conscious of the fact that this was probably going to be the only chance I would have to do something totally me and totally the way I wanted it. I took a risk in doing so but I worked very hard to ensure the collection was theatrical and flamboyant while still beautiful with intricate and authentic details. I think the risk paid off, the collection is everything I dreamed of.

You made use of materials with high aesthetic appeal and avoided bright colours. Is there any reason for this?
The colour story of my collection was inspired by the Mad Max film I have mentioned – in the film two rival gangs fight, one dressed in white and the other black, so I decided to have halve the collection with these colours.
I wanted each look to make a statement, so I decided to have each look mainly one-block colour for the most graphic impact.
From my equestrian and armour influence I knew I wanted to use leather, suede, metal and neoprene, all fabrics that protect the body. But the Mad Max film inspired me to push the metal hardware content and look to further alternative materials such as ostrich, bone, chain, horse hair and human hair.

What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle in general?
I chose to study at Northumbria for its amazing reputation and facilities. I couldn’t have asked for better tutors and technical staff. I’m also based close by in Sunderland and at the time of applying for universities I felt it would be foolish to move away when I live so close to a great university. Living at home also ment that I have been able to really focus on my studies.

How did it feel to be selected for the Gala show? Did you expect to win?
I never in a million years thought I would be chosen for the gala. I was delighted to show at GFW and that was enough for me, seeing my collection open the Northumbria show was amazing. In fact, as soon as the last look in my collection left the catwalk, I couldn’t stop crying! It was so overwhelming and what I had dreamed for.
When I found out about the gala I couldn’t believe it, it is such an honor that the judges liked my work and it was a privilege to show the gala judges my portfolio. The gala show itself was amazing and I got to meet some great people through it, too.

Does this open even more doors?
I think being in the top ten has opened more doors for me, I have had a lot of interest from stylists and photographers who want to use pieces after seeing them in the gala show, which is fantastic. A few looks are possibly going to China in the next couple of weeks for a promotion event for GFW, which is amazing too.


Photographs by Matt Bramford

You received a lot of attention from the press, who compared your collection to both Lady Gaga and Elvis‘ wardrobes. How does that feel?
I was over the moon with all of the press attention. My muse is Lady Gaga, so when I read the references to her I was delighted. I admire her strength and individuality and feel she is the prime example of a woman who has had to use dramatic fashion in the battle to be noticed and be successful. When working on the collection having Lady Gaga as my muse gave me confidence to keep pushing myself further and further, to create something people could see her wearing, it would be a dream to see them on her. The Elvis suggestions are a compliment too, I grew up with my dad always playing Elvis’ music and I have always regarded him as one of my personal fashion icons, so this must have shown through.

Which designers do you admire or look to for inspiration?
As you can see from my collection I like drama in fashion and have always admired Alexander McQueen’s showmanship and rebelliousness. I am also really inspired by the work of Iris Van Herpen; she uses a lot of leather in her collections with amazing detail so I worked hard to aspire to her standards when making my collection.

What advice would you give to students preparing their collections for GFW 2011?
I would tell them to go with their heart and work harder than you ever thought you could work. Always look for ways that you can improve and develop your work and ask for and listen to feedback from tutors and peers. It is the most amazing year you will ever have and all the hard work really does pay off – you will want to do it all over again.

What do you have planned for the coming months?
In the next couple of months I will be sending some pieces to China as I said and will also be showing some pieces from the collection at Pure London where they are organising a similar GFW show, which is really exciting. I want to continue making one off pieces that have a similar feel to my collection. Other than that I will be looking to relocate in London where I will be open to all opportunities that (hopefully) come my way!

Categories ,Aimee McWilliams, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Armour, ,China, ,dance, ,drama, ,Elvis, ,fashion, ,film, ,Gala Show, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Henry VIII, ,Iris Van Harpen, ,Lady Gaga, ,london, ,Mad Max, ,Matt Bramford, ,Naomi New, ,Newcastle, ,Northumbria, ,Pentex Ltd, ,Pure London, ,Sequins, ,theatre, ,Tower of London, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ashish: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Ashish S:S 2013 by Charlie Rallings
Ashish S/S 2013 by Charlie Rallings.

This season Ashish decided to buck the trend for extravagant prints and steer clear of his usual riot of colour and pattern to produce a sobre S/S 2013 collection inspired by a mix of estate chic and 90s grunge. Girls in shiny white trainers wore their hair piled high on their head with that most stylish of hair accessories, the scrunch. Round glasses completed the look.

Ashish S/S 2013 by Geiko Louve
Ashish S/S 2013 by Geiko Louve.

Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
xAshish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish S:S 2013 by Charlie Rallings
Ashish S:S 2013 by Charlie Rallings
Ashish S/S 2013 by Charlie Rallings.

Colours were unashamedly downbeat… steel greys, copper and creams mixed in with denim. Dungarees were worn hanging lopsided as were shirts with a subtle scatter number print. An over sized asymmetric trench and white work shirts hung low, mixed up with loose one colour sequin maxi dresses and polka dot chiffon. Even glitz took on an everyday wearability as a zip top track suit. The show opened with the statement I’m Serious emblazoned on a baggy sweat top and ended with Tres Fatigue on a t-shirt. Quite what Ashish was trying to say this season I have no idea, but despite the break from the norm it was as stylish as ever.

Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish SS 2013 Sept 2012-PHOTOGRAHY by Amelia Gregory
Ashish S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Ashish S/S 2013 by Isher Dhiman
Ashish S/S 2012 by Isher Dhiman. A year ago flowers reigned supreme on the Ashish catwalk.

Categories ,Ashish, ,Charlie Rallings, ,Geiko Louve, ,grunge, ,I’m Serious, ,Isher Dhiman, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Walk, ,S/S 2013, ,Sequins, ,Tres Fatigue

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ashish: London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review


Ashish S/S 2014 by Gabriel Ayala

I’m probably not the first person to tell you that the main catwalk space at Somerset House has been remodelled for the S/S 2014 season. Instead of the archetypal singular catwalk, a horseshoe shape has taken its place. If you’re in the cheap seats, as I inexplicably (!) was, then you only see the models disappear through the second door, leaving you with the glorious sights of shoulder blades and arses. The models only walk past you once. I now realise why a catwalk is a catwalk. Not all pieces are symmetrical, are they? Imagine seeing one side of a frock and thinking ‘yep, that’ll sell. I’ll take 100 please’ only to get it in store to find the other side is smeared in dog shit, or has ‘TWAT’ written up the side, or something. YES I know you’d see a look book or view it in a showroom, but that’s beside the point.


Ashish S/S 2014 by Laura Hickman

Anyway, the set up wasn’t going to stop me enjoying Ashish‘s outing on Saturday. A rare, hedonistic atmosphere filled the air as techno music warmed up the crowds. Inspiration this season came from the off license and tribes, with emphasis on a sportier aesthetic compared to A/W 2013′s smocks and floor-length dresses. Sequins were aplenty as per, but this time appearing on ripped denims, cropped vests and polo-shirt shapes.


Ashish S/S 2014 by Gabriel Ayala


All photography by Matt Bramford


Ashish S/S 2014 by Marina Muun

A riot of patterns appeared across various pieces: zebra, tiger, angular lines, tartans, stripes; no design facet was left unturned. Shoppers, modelled as carrier bags but fashioned in fabrics and sequins, mocked various retail outlets – the ‘Tesco‘ version left attendees in fits of laughter, while the Marks and Spencer-inspired ‘S&M’ brought whoops and cheers. Tribal jewellery and headpieces complimented certain looks and every model was visually stimulating. Ashish‘s is a unique aesthetic that doesn’t appeal to everybody, but certainly appeals to me and my camera.

Categories ,Ashish, ,catwalk, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Laura Hickman, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,review, ,Sequins, ,SS14, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ashley Isham: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gemma Cotterell
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gemma Cotterell.

This season Ashley Isham decided to up his game, producing a collection that was a dramatic break from what we’ve come to expect from this lover of draped party frocks. So it was out with the floral chiffon and jewel coloured jersey and in with hard edged military inspired jackets and sharp shouldered shift dresses. Models strode out bearing intriguing headwear: glossy black visors tilted over their eyes and tied at the back with delicate ribbon under a towering top knot. The effect was one of high octane glamour infused with an attitude of powerful defiance.

Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Rosa Middleton
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Rosa Middleton.

Standout garments included a sumptuous brocade coat decorated in exotic red and orange flowers and a bright red double breasted jacket worn over a pencil skirt with an interesting circular detail in yellow piping. An all over tropical print on loungewear appeared a bit out of place for winter, but was nonetheless welcome relief in the midst of this predominantly sombre collection.

Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gaarte
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gaarte.

Not all of Ashley Isham‘s new found love of tailoring was successful: too much layering felt unnecessary and this was proof that peplums, capes, frills and panelling don’t always work well together. The few draped garments in this collection – khaki belted minidresses – were effortlessly simple as always, and the hard edged styling suited them well.

Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gaarte
Ashley Isham A/W 2013 by Gaarte.

For the finale Isham reverted to type, sending out a series of sweeping floor length dresses in rich browns topped with gunmetal embroidery, the kind that swish threateningly around ankles and cause tottering models to trip and swoop. The closing dress featured a huge skirt with an intriguing abstract grey rippled effect: I’ll be intrigued to see what Ashley Isham will do with this new exploratory vibe next season.

Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashey Isham A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman
Ashey Isham A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman.

Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Ashley Isham A/W 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Ashley Isham, ,draping, ,Gaarte, ,Gemma Cotterell, ,Isher Dhiman, ,military, ,Rosa Middleton

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