Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)


Illustration by Joana Faria

On Tuesday night Amelia, myself and Zandra Rhodes met at the Freemason’s Hall to attend the FAD Junior Fashion Awards. Well, Zandra was there, across the catwalk, she didn’t technically ARRIVE with us. We’d been invited by email: an email that was gushing in gratitude for the work we had done to support this charity. I am ashamed to admit that I didn’t have a clue what this lovely lady was talking about – there’s so much good stuff on here that I occasionally miss the odd article. But Fran from FAD was happy, and I was to attend!

The usual beginning ensued – I quiverred in the background having forgotten my ticket while Amelia dragged me by the arm, kicking and screaming, onto the front row. I have to say that I am finally starting to get used to all this and by the A/W 2012 shows I’ll be poised at the front of the queues, shoulders back, sunglasses on, marching to the front.

The Freemason’s was absolutely boiling as always (please sort some air conditioning out for next year, VFS!). In fact, somebody should have supplied fans in goodie bags. Imagine! You could show bin bags covered in sh*t and people would say nice things if you kept them cool.

Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) are a charity who work with young people to give them the confidence to get into fashion. Where do I sign up?! One of last year’s students, Prash Muraleetharan, delivered the most inspirational speech that I was almost in tears, and the show hadn’t even started. Amelia and I scrambled to write down what he had said. All this before we’d seen a single badly made dressed or batiked skirt (as I imagined).


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Amelia and I continually remarked throughout the show about how young these budding designers were. I can honestly say that there was very little difference between this show and those on the BFC catwalk (you know, the on-schedule one that is supposedly the creme-de-la-creme of current British fashion).

You can read Amelia’s full report here. I couldn’t make head nor tail of who was who – the looks appeared, the names changed so quickly, and the running order was in the wrong order. AND, to top it off, it was impossible to take pictures because a certain somebody kept telling me off for getting in the way. Tehe.

This year’s theme had been inspired by the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries at the V&A, which was evident on the catwalk, but not in a typically student way by any means. When the theme was announced, before the show, I thought ‘Oh hear we go – cue silly headgear and bucket top boots’. No such thing – the inspiration had been handled with such sophistication that it acted as a discrete point of reference rather than a fancy dress theme.

So to the winners. The winning collection was David Short’s medieval emerald number, crowning him the first boy ever to scoop the coveted prize.


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

My favourite was Andre Augusto’s body-con number with exaggerated sleeves and strap detail – an Alexander McQueen in the making.

Sarah Kilkenny’s simple a-line dress with rope detail scooped the Award for Research.

Karmen-Marie Parker burst into tears when Zandra Rhodes (my Zandra) presented her with the award for Commercial Innovation – her sports-luxe denim creation had real style.

A totally inspirational show, which reduced me to tears and left me reeling. In amongst all the ridiculous ludicrousness of fashion week, this was the perfect antidote.

Oh do pop over to Amelia’s review because she’s far more diligent than I am and has listed all the other fabulous youngsters and their creations – and has more gratuitous shots of MY Zandra for your delectation. Oh and here’s a video, in which you can probably see me blubbing somewhere on the left…

Photography by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford

Categories ,Aniela Murphy, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Awareness Direct, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Joana Faria, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,M&S, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: The FAD Junior Awards (again)


Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, salve visit this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewelery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, nurse everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Joana Faria

Nearing the end of fashion week, this site everyone begins to look forward to a little light relief and a break from running from venue to venue – maybe some music, recipe a bit of dancing and a drink or two? The Tatty Devine party ticked all the boxes and added an abundance of their snazzy jewellery to oogle at.

Held in their Covent Garden store on Monmouth Street, there was a lively crowd from seven onwards mixing those who had turned up for the party, with the people spilling out from nearby pubs and bars. The Severed Limb were playing on and off with my favourite member playing something which when I asked, was told (in an its-matter-of-fact-way), that it was the wash board.

So…the dulcet tones of the washboard, the bass, and the accordion accompanied the Can Do dancers from Pineapple Studios. With their amazing ruffled, flared skirts and Tatty Devine jewellery, the party was literally jumping by 8 o’clock. Western themed jewellery matched the music with fringed necklaces, brooches, horseshoe earrings and cowboy boot charms.


Illustration by Joana Faria

I have always enjoyed the quirkiness of Tatty Devine jewellery and their new pieces do not let the brand down. The moustache and pipe rings are great, as are the famous name tag necklaces and the pom pom earrings Amelia spotted when she popped down later. Rifling through my goodie bag, I was delighted to find a pipe ring included – definite style win.

We’ve always been fans of Tatty Devine and I was pleased to see that they are still going strong with their collaborations. At the moment, Rob Ryan jewellery (who collaborated with us for our second issue) is available from their online store as well as in Covent Garden. Other designers they are working with include Mrs Jones and Gilbert & George.




Illustration by Andrea Peterson

As part of Designers Remix, shop designer Charlotte Eskildsen, discount who is creative director of the enterprise published their signature collection last week. After winning the prestigious Danish Design Guldknappen award she has become a force to be reckoned with in international fashion since starting the line in 2002. Her S/S 2011 collection ‘Liquid Sky’ is inspired by cloud formations.

Draped fabrics. Origami folds. A flash orange dress. Scraped back hair tied in tight knots. The show, diagnosis held in the Portico rooms was one of my favourites of the week. Like many others, it stuck strongly to a muted colour range, beginning with pieces in greys, creams and blacks. Small details like the delicate lace insets and just-seen underskirts pulled the collection together extremely well.

Charlotte’s skill lies in how well she collects the fabric together and makes it hang. Ruffles on the shoulders of her cream dresses are restrained and kept from looking fussy, the great bright orange dress (which I desperately want) is understated in all other ways bar the colour and the waterfall collars on the jackets carried the theme of softness through even on heavier fabrics.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The clothes ranged from smart black dresses, to sand toned wafty jackets and ruffled party frocks in various shades of cream. This is a collection that is just good. I can’t put my finger on an exact feature or piece that puts it into a higher category for me and I think that’s why I like it.

More than just a wearable summer collection, it mars together a floaty casual look with added details of specialness without being over the top. If I wanted to sound very fashiony I would call it perfect ‘understated chic’, but hopefully I’ve described it better than that!


Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being banded around the press releases this season – it sappears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposidly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, information pills an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, price the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such has Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s Africa inspired show. There was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases this season – it appears the majority of designers forget that Africa is not simply Africa but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, physician an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, more about the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?

Illustration by Katie Harnett

This post is being written nine days after Kinder Aggugini’s ‘Africa’ inspired show. This season there was a lot of this lazy naming of inspiration being bandied around the press releases – it appears designers forget Africa is not simply ‘Africa’ but a complex continent subdivided via colonial rule and consisting of multiple languages and cultures. But for the purposes of Fashion Africa it has been relegated to Tiger skins and “super fantastic” Safari outfits. For a supposedly fashion forward industry; fashion is (un)surprisingly chained to particular ideas of wealth and escapism.

Illustration by Gemma Randall

It was not ‘Africa’ which inspired Kinder but a European idea of Africa, prescription an idea which often fills the pages of Vogue’s distasteful summer fashion shoots of caucasian models in ‘Colonial Explorer’ inspired outfits striding the Safari. In a twist for a Spring Summer collection inspired by Africa, try the catwalk featured Linen Jackets with trousers to match alongside simple shift dresses. The most exciting thing that appeared on the catwalk were the cardboard hats made by the fantastic Stephen Jones.

Fashion survives and feeds on escapist desires, pills Dior encapsulated a sense of jubilance with his “New Look” after years of rationing. Whether you want to or not we buy into the idea that what we wear is a projection of our opinions. As a result an entire industry (the High Street,the Ateliers and the Fashion Press) has developed to transform ideas created on the catwalk into the trends currently seen dominating shop window displays. Suddenly have an urge to feel like a pre-Second World War pilot? Then why not buy the Burberry inspired aviator jacket?

Since Kinder’s show, London has finished, Milan began and ended and Paris is in the process of starting. The month of Spring Summer Fashion is drawing to a close. Trend spotters and bloggers waiting eagle eyed for a clue to what we will all be wearing next season, will have already produced trend forecasted. The main problem, lies not with the designers such as Kinder Aggugini who are transcribing their inspiration into garments, but with the increasing dislocation between clothes and the wearer. Fast Fashion means you can be one look tomorrow and another look tomorrow, the result at the moment is the constant plundering of the 70′s aesthetic. Perhaps, in these straightened times, the loss of ‘simpler’ times are being mourned?


Illustration by Joana Faria

On Tuesday night Amelia, approved myself and Zandra Rhodes met at the Freemason’s Hall to attend the FAD Junior Fashion Awards. Well, advice Zandra was there, adiposity across the catwalk, she didn’t technically ARRIVE with us. We’d been invited by email: an email that was gushing in gratitude for the work we had done to support this charity. I am ashamed to admit that I didn’t have a clue what this lovely lady was talking about – there’s so much good stuff on here that I occasionally miss the odd article. But Fran from FAD was happy, and I was to attend!

The usual beginning ensued – I quiverred in the background having forgotten my ticket while Amelia dragged me by the arm, kicking and screaming, onto the front row. I have to say that I am finally starting to get used to all this and by the A/W 2012 shows I’ll be poised at the front of the queues, shoulders back, sunglasses on, marching to the front.

The Freemason’s was absolutely boiling as always (please sort some air conditioning out for next year, VFS!). In fact, somebody should have supplied fans in goodie bags. Imagine! You could show bin bags covered in sh*t and people would say nice things if you kept them cool.

Fashion Awareness Direct (FAD) are a charity who work with young people to give them the confidence to get into fashion. Where do I sign up?! One of last year’s students, Prash Muraleetharan, delivered the most inspirational speech that I was almost in tears, and the show hadn’t even started. Amelia and I scrambled to write down what he had said. All this before we’d seen a single badly made dressed or batiked skirt (as I imagined).


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

Amelia and I continually remarked throughout the show about how young these budding designers were. I can honestly say that there was very little difference between this show and those on the BFC catwalk (you know, the on-schedule one that is supposedly the creme-de-la-creme of current British fashion).

You can read Amelia’s full report here. I couldn’t make head nor tail of who was who – the looks appeared, the names changed so quickly, and the running order was in the wrong order. AND, to top it off, it was impossible to take pictures because a certain somebody kept telling me off for getting in the way. Tehe.

This year’s theme had been inspired by the Medieval and Renaissance Galleries at the V&A, which was evident on the catwalk, but not in a typically student way by any means. When the theme was announced, before the show, I thought ‘Oh hear we go – cue silly headgear and bucket top boots’. No such thing – the inspiration had been handled with such sophistication that it acted as a discrete point of reference rather than a fancy dress theme.

So to the winners. The winning collection was David Short’s medieval emerald number, crowning him the first boy ever to scoop the coveted prize.


Illustration by Aniela Murphy

My favourite was Andre Augusto’s body-con number with exaggerated sleeves and strap detail – an Alexander McQueen in the making.

Sarah Kilkenny’s simple a-line dress with rope detail scooped the Award for Research.

Karmen-Marie Parker burst into tears when Zandra Rhodes (my Zandra) presented her with the award for Commercial Innovation – her sports-luxe denim creation had real style.

A totally inspirational show, which reduced me to tears and left me reeling. In amongst all the ridiculous ludicrousness of fashion week, this was the perfect antidote.

Oh do pop over to Amelia’s review because she’s far more diligent than I am and has listed all the other fabulous youngsters and their creations – and has more gratuitous shots of MY Zandra for your delectation. Oh and here’s a video, in which you can probably see me blubbing somewhere on the left…

Photography by Amelia Gregory and Matt Bramford

Categories ,Aniela Murphy, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Awareness Direct, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Joana Faria, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,M&S, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week: 2010 FAD Junior Awards


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, decease starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Abby Wright

It’s always a treat at Fashion Week to find that the show you are about to see, doctor starting in the next few minutes, is at a totally different venue to the one you had in your head and are currently standing at. I found myself in this marvellous situation as Tim Soar’s show approached. God knows why I thought it was at Somerset House and not at the Freemason’s Hall. Menswear day brought these kind of surprises all day – with many designers scaling down their presence. I had seen Tim’s show a year ago in the BFC tent, so how dare they move its location?!

I need not have worried as I legged it up Drury Lane, for, true to form, the show was running late and hadn’t even been seated when I showed up. I was right at the back of the queue, though – AGAIN – so decided to perch by the photographer’s pit in the hope of getting a better shot than I would have positioned on one of the back rows.

This show saw Soar draw inspiration from the 1970s, and in particular David Bowie’s character ‘Mr Newton’ in Nicholas Roeg’s epic ‘The Man Who Fell From Earth.’ This inspiration was, in true Tim Soar style, handled with delicacy and acted only as a descrete reference here and there. Trousers flared off, but not in a grotesque fancy dress sense, and lapels were elongated, but not in a Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive, Hah Hah Hah Hah sense. The bulk of the collection relied on Soar’s showmanship as a really great tailor with a unique vision.


Illustration by Abby Wright

Making the best use of luxe fabrics like mohair, satin, wool crepe and linen, models wore strict suits with a piecemeal utilitarian aesthetic. The use of Tyvek, the waxy crushed industrial material usually reserved for workers boiler suits, also adds to this technical flavour.

Blazers were banded with cummerbund-like straps in contrasting colours – where jackets were dark, the bands were of gold silk, and where jackets were sand, the bands were black. Denim made an appearance, also creating horizontal lines across structured tailoring.

Alongside this semi-formal attire, there were the usual design quirks that Tim Soar is quickly faming himself for. His appreciation of the aesthetic properties of materials and quality of texture was also on display, with crushed materials and bursts of vibrant colour (he is, after all, also a graphic designer).

It’s hard to imagine how a Tyvek jailer-style striped suit will work alongside an exemplary tailored blazer, but somehow Tim Soar’s collections always convey a stylish coherence.

This season also brought more womenswear, which is basically menswear with allowances for hips, busts and bums. It’s a testament to Tim Soar’s generally cool attitude, though, that his aesthetic works wonders on both women and men.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Born in India, sale Stefan Orschel-Read grew up in Scotland, he won gold medals as a dressage rider for Great Britain and also studied law before deciding on a career in fashion. His Central Saint Martins graduate collection in 2008 was based on Virginia Wolfe’s novel ‘Orlando’; a historical biography in which the subject’s lives over 400 years and changes gender mid way. Subsequent collections were inspired by cathedral murals and the works of Shakespeare, so it was interesting to see the RCA graduate’s stimulus for S/S 2011 being something a slightly more conventional.

Entitled ‘The Spy Who Becomes Me’, SS11 is inspired by an imagined playboy youth in the Riviera of the Ligurian Sea and his struggle to evolve into ‘a self-sufficient gentleman of responsibilities’.

Although more subdued than his previous seasons, this sophisticated collection successfully utlilised an array of luxurious fabrics which were expertly tailored and incorporated some distinctive detailing. The tag line of the collection is ’We all have a little bit of espionage in us’, but I doubt Orschel Read would be the best outfitter for a Bond-style spy-on-a-mission who hopes to be easily lost in a crowd.

Looks were presented in a refined palette of greys, soft khakis and airforce blues, punctuated with jewel tones and blazes of iridescence.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Modern slim-fitting suits with traces of utilitarian military styling, such as extended epaulettes, were created in sumptuous British cashmere tailoring wools and iridescent tonic suiting.  The blazers at the more muted end of the palette were complemented with dupion silk shirts, glowing in emerald and olive tones.

Digitally printed monograms, paisley and bird motifs were applied to boxers and shirt panels, some silk brocade being produced in collaboration with Italian luxury tailor Brioni, apparently the go-to-coutouriers of a whole host of names from Nelson Mandela to Robert Kennedy and Luciano Pavarotti to Donald Trump.

Alongside his blazers and formal trousers, Orschel-Read showed biker jackets in cashmere suiting, jeans named after MI5 and MI6 and gauzy hand dyed and beaded bias cut vests seen under many of the blazers.  Oversized trench coats in pale denim continued the spy theme, and monogrammed underwear was shown with raglan sleeve sweaters with rib detailing.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Born in India, decease Stefan Orschel-Read grew up in Scotland, he won gold medals as a dressage rider for Great Britain and also studied law before deciding on a career in fashion. His Central Saint Martins graduate collection in 2008 was based on Virginia Wolfe’s novel ‘Orlando’; a historical biography in which the subject’s lives over 400 years and changes gender mid way. Subsequent collections were inspired by cathedral murals and the works of Shakespeare, so it was interesting to see the RCA graduate’s stimulus for S/S 2011 being something a slightly more conventional.

Entitled ‘The Spy Who Becomes Me’, SS11 is inspired by an imagined playboy youth in the Riviera of the Ligurian Sea and his struggle to evolve into ‘a self-sufficient gentleman of responsibilities’.

Although more subdued than his previous seasons, this sophisticated collection successfully utlilised an array of luxurious fabrics which were expertly tailored and incorporated some distinctive detailing. The tag line of the collection is ’We all have a little bit of espionage in us’, but I doubt Orschel Read would be the best outfitter for a Bond-style spy-on-a-mission who hopes to be easily lost in a crowd.

Looks were presented in a refined palette of greys, soft khakis and airforce blues, punctuated with jewel tones and blazes of iridescence.


Illustration by Yuann Shen

Modern slim-fitting suits with traces of utilitarian military styling, such as extended epaulettes, were created in sumptuous British cashmere tailoring wools and iridescent tonic suiting.  The blazers at the more muted end of the palette were complemented with dupion silk shirts, glowing in emerald and olive tones.

Digitally printed monograms, paisley and bird motifs were applied to boxers and shirt panels, some silk brocade being produced in collaboration with Italian luxury tailor Brioni, apparently the go-to-coutouriers of a whole host of names from Nelson Mandela to Robert Kennedy and Luciano Pavarotti to Donald Trump.

Alongside his blazers and formal trousers, Orschel-Read showed biker jackets in cashmere suiting, jeans named after MI5 and MI6 and gauzy hand dyed and beaded bias cut vests seen under many of the blazers.  Oversized trench coats in pale denim continued the spy theme, and monogrammed underwear was shown with raglan sleeve sweaters with rib detailing.

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, find illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, approved and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, prescription and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Yashodah Rodgers as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous finalist Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the V&A inspired catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Lucy Jones of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Yashodah Rodgers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Adam Preece, ,Andre Augusto, ,Antonia Parker, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Charlie Ibouillie, ,Chelsey Ward, ,City & Islington College, ,David Short, ,European Fashion Designer Competition, ,FAD, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Melrose, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,Katie Grand, ,Kila Kitu, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,M&S, ,Misbah Siddique, ,Natalie Goreham, ,Paul Vasileff, ,Prash London, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Rebecca Glyn-Blanco, ,Salford City College, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,Shahira Bakhoum, ,Shomari Williams, ,Sinead Cloonan, ,Susan Aubrey-Cound, ,The Face, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Yashodah Rodgers, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week: 2010 FAD Junior Awards

FADAwards-the tightrope walker-Florence Melrose by-Barbara-Ana-G
The Tightrope Walker – an illustration of a dress designed by Florence Melrose, illustrated by Barbara Ana Gomez.

I’m a bit rubbish when it actually comes to checking what’s what during fashion week – I will generally go to most things that I’m invited to on the grounds that if someone has bothered to invite me then I should generally return the honour by actually turning up. Not so most magazine editors I might add – many was the time that I would swan into a fashion show under the guise of Katie Grand at The Face. She never went, and yours truly got the golden tickets.

FAD awards SS2011 - abi daker
Dress by Rebecca Glyn-Blanco of Camden School for Girls. Illustration by Abigail Daker.

FADAwards Keep it secret-by-Barbara-Ana-Gomez
Keep it Secret – illustration of a dress by Sinead Cloonan from City & Islington College by Barbara Ana Gomez.

And as I’ve already mentioned I don’t do queues – not in Tescos, and certainly not during fashion week. To this end my heart sank as I rounded the corner to Freemasons’ Hall and found a line of people streaming down the street. What was this FAD awards malarkey anyway? Heading to the front of the queue I waggled my ticket at an unknown PR person and hoped for the best, so was somewhat surprised to be informed in hushed tones that I was a VIP and could go straight on through. Upstairs in one of the many architecturally fabulous chambers, Matt and I sipped on sweet fizzy stuff as we tried to figure out what this was all about.

FAD-Awards-sketches-Amelias-Magazine-by-kila_kitu
FAD-Awards 2010-Kila Kitu
Dress by Yashodah Rodgers as illustrated by Kila Kitu.

Apparently we’ve been very supportive of FAD in the past, and once I’d looked up our previous coverage it did suddenly all ring a bell. But I wasn’t quite prepared for the sheer unadulterated upbeat joy of this event. Right in the thick of a hectic fashion week it’s a true testament to the achievement of this organisation that I could sit through yet another long catwalk show and come out the other end beaming with goodwill.

LFW_FAD_Awards_Abigail_Nottingham
The European Fashion Designer award winning dress from Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum. Illustrated by Abigail Nottingham.

FADAwards Flower-Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by-Barbara-Ana-G
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco by Barbara Ana Gomez.

Just to recap quickly, FAD stands for Fashion Awareness Direct and it is a charity that aims to empower young people – as the brochure says “Fashion is a great way to connect with young people from different backgrounds, to give them confidence and raise their aspirations for the future.”

FAD awards SS2011 - Adam Preece by Abi Daker
Adam Preece by Abigail Daker.

LFW_FAD_awards Chelsey Ward by Abigail-Nottingham
Chelsey Ward by Abigail Nottingham.

Last year we covered the undergraduates awards show, but this year we were in for a much younger treat: the FAD Junior Awards showcased the designs of finalists chosen from 130 teenagers aged 16-19. Yes dear reader, you may well have to keep pinching yourself as you take a look through the images. I know I did, and I was sitting right there when they paraded past. Created over the course of five days at the University of East London with the help of an experienced team of tutors, the outfits put together by these young designers would put many graduates to shame.

LFW_FAD_Awards Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail_Nottingham
Karmen-Marie Parker by Abigail Nottingham.

FAD-Awards-Natalie Goreham by-kila_kitu
Natalie Goreham by Kila Kitu.

To start off the evening’s events previous finalist Prash Muraleetharan took to the stage with a bit of confident advice, endearingly delivered. “It’s what you do with this moment which determines a winner…. so get upstairs and network,” he advised, somewhat sagely. At the end he winked. And I’m sure he winked at me. Blimey… what a charmer… it’s quite hard to countenance that Prash must still be a teenager, and yet he already runs his own fashion label with a website and everything.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prash Muraleetharan dispels his words of wisdom at the start of the ceremony. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

After the V&A inspired catwalk show we had speeches from the sleek Susan Aubrey-Cound of M&S and Lucy Jones of UEL, followed by the prizegiving by the extremely fabulous Zandra Rhodes, who is *the cutest* when she smiles! The winners and their parents looked so overwhelmed it really did warm the cockles of my jaded fashionista heart.

Zandra-Rhodes-FAD-Awards-2010-Antonia-Parker-Amelias-Magazine-A
Zandra Rhodes by Antonia Parker. I wuv her.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Paul Vasileff and Shahira Bakhoum of Milan step up first to take the prize for the European Fashion Designer Competition, which was the culmination of a two year project.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Karmen-Marie Parker with her winning design shortly before she burst into tears… aw, bless.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Andre Augusto: pattern cutting award winner.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
Research award winner Sarah Kilkenny.

FAD junior awards 2010 photo by Amelia Gregory
17 year old David Short – the first boy to become overall winner and a proper little fashionista in the making.

Within this blog you’ll find my favourite pieces to hit the runway – and just remember, they were all designed and made by 16-19 year olds. Quite astonishing I’m sure you’ll agree.

FAD junior awards 2010 Shomari Williams photo by Amelia Gregory
Shomari Williams.

FAD junior awards 2010 Emily Rogers photo by Amelia Gregory
Yashodah Rodgers.

FAD junior awards 2010 Charlie Ibouillie photo by Amelia Gregory
Charlie Ibouillie.

FAD junior awards 2010 Sinead Cloonan photo by Amelia Gregory
Sinead Cloonan.

FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
FAD junior awards 2010 European winners photo by Amelia Gregory
The winner of the European competition.

FAD junior awards 2010 Rebecca Glyn-Blanco photo by Amelia Gregory
Rebecca Glyn-Blanco.

FAD junior awards 2010 Natalie Goreham photo by Amelia Gregory
Natalie Goreham.

FAD junior awards 2010 Florence Melrose photo by Amelia Gregory
Florence Melrose.

FAD junior awards 2010 Misbah Siddique photo by Amelia Gregory
Misbah Siddique.

FAD junior awards 2010 Zandra Rhodes photo by Amelia Gregory
And another completely gratuitous shot of Zandra because this post isn’t long enough already. Because I WUV HER.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Abigail Nottingham, ,Adam Preece, ,Andre Augusto, ,Antonia Parker, ,Barbara Ana Gomez, ,Charlie Ibouillie, ,Chelsey Ward, ,City & Islington College, ,David Short, ,European Fashion Designer Competition, ,FAD, ,FAD Junior Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Melrose, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Karmen-Marie Parker, ,Katie Grand, ,Kila Kitu, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,M&S, ,Misbah Siddique, ,Natalie Goreham, ,Paul Vasileff, ,Prash London, ,Prash Muraleetharan, ,Rebecca Glyn-Blanco, ,Salford City College, ,Sarah Kilkenny, ,Shahira Bakhoum, ,Shomari Williams, ,Sinead Cloonan, ,Susan Aubrey-Cound, ,The Face, ,University of East London, ,va, ,Yashodah Rodgers, ,Zandra Rhodes

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