Amelia’s Magazine | The Clothes Off Your Back

Richard Hogg: Off The Wall

Concrete Hermit Gallery
Concrete Hermit?5a Club Row?
London?E1 6JX

Until 29th August
10am – 6pm Mon – Sat

Richard%20Hogg.jpg

Off the wall is a simple story about happiness, order medicine freedom, check rebellion and its consequences, told across three pictures. Like a kind of triptych or a very simple comic. It forms the centrepiece of this show, Richards first since leaving Airside in 2007.

Candy Coated Canvas

http://www.londonmiles.com/
212 Kensington Park Road
Notting Hill, W11 1NR

Until 24th August
Tuesday & Wednesday : 10am to 6pm
Thursday : 11am to 8pm
Friday: 10am to 7pm
Saturday: 11am to 7pm

candyCoated.jpg

CANDY COATED CANVAS is a themed group exhibition showcasing unique artworks by various established and emerging international talent. All artists have been asked to take inspiration from the title “Candy Coated Canvas” and create a unique art piece which is visually extremely colourful and playful, whilst sparking up memories of childhood, sweets, fantasy lands and those naughty but nice pleasures in life.
Scrumptious Delight (Canada)
Scrumptious Delight creates handmade plush dolls and sweets. All the toys are made to her original designs with much care and attention at her home in Canada. This is the first exhibition of Scrumptious Delights’ work in an art gallery setting and fits the Candy Coated theme perfectly.

Anthony Burrill: In A New Place

http://kemistrygallery.co.uk/
43 Charlotte Road, Shoreditch
London EC2A 3PD

Until 5th September

aburrill-front.jpg

For In a New Place, the exhibition presents Anthony’s exploration of industrial processes and materials with large scale laser–cut perspex pieces as well as digital prints. The subject of the exhibition focusses upon archetypal forms of nature, from rainbows to thunderstorms, all within Burrill’s uncomplicated and distinctive geometric style..

Jeff Koons : Popeye Series

http://www.serpentinegallery.org/
Kensington Gardens?
London W2 3XA

Open daily, 10am – 6pm
Free
Until 13th September

JeffKoons_Popeye_email.jpg

The Serpentine Gallery presents an exhibition of the work of the celebrated American artist Jeff Koons, his first major exhibition in a public gallery in England.

Alexandre de Cunha

http://www.camdenartscentre.org/home/
Arkwright Road?
London NW3 6DG

Tuesday-Sunday 10am-6pm ?
Wednesday 10am-9pm ?
Closed Mondays & Bank Holidays
Until 13th September
Free

Alexandre%20de%20Cunha.jpg

Camden Arts Centre is proud to present an exhibition of newly commissioned work by London-based Brazilian artist Alexandre da Cunha. His dynamic, large-scale sculptures improvise on the concept of the readymade by reusing everyday objects: job lots from pound shops, surplus fabrics and recycled goods, reflecting on their specific histories and aesthetics.
Amelia’s Magazine have been pals with Finnish crafty-fan Outi from brilliant trashion blog Outsapop for a while now, sale and Outi has sent us over a piece which is an example of what she loves best – creating something new out of something old. Ladies and gentleman, information pills Amelia’s Magazine presents: the Outsapop Trashion t-shirt hobo bag tutorial – also for our Finnish readers, in Finnish! If you can speak both, well, there’s jolly well no excuse for not making this bag. Thanks to Outi!

1.jpg

You´ll need:
2 same colored t-shirts (don´t have to be the same size)
scissors
sewing machine
needle and thread

STEP 1.

Cut the hem out from both t-shirts, about 1/4 inches from stitchings. Don´t cut the hem strips open, but keep them in one circular piece. Save these strips for later.

s1.jpg

STEP 2.
Cut sleeves and collar out. Save them.

s2.jpg

STEP 3.
Cut the sideseams out.

s3.jpg

STEP 4.
If the other t-shirt has a longer hem than the other, fold the longer bodice pieces in half and cut the hem curved like in the picture.

s4.jpg

STEP 5.
A) Pin the t-shirt pieces together (reverse sides out) from the sideseams. The shorter pieces will be sides and the pieces with curved hem will be bag front and bag back. B) Draw a slightly curved line from sideseam to shoulder. Sew all four seams.

s5.jpg

STEP 6.
Pin the curvy hem pieces together (reverse sides out) and sew.

s6.jpg

STEP 7.
A) Fold the sidepieces over (reverse sides out) the bag bottom and sew. B) Turn the bag right sides out.

s7a.jpg
s7b.jpg

STEP 8.
Collar pieces will be our bag handles. If you want the handles to be short (like in my bag) take only one collar and cut it into two equal length pieces. If you want the handles to be longer, cut both collars open once to make each one handle.

s8.jpg

STEP 9.
Fold all t-shirt shoulders (8 fold layers each) to match the width of the collar pieces / handles. It does not have to be exact as the handle seams will be covered.

s9.jpg

STEP 10.
Place the collar/handle in between the folded shoulder layers and pin. Try the bag to see if the handles are placed correctly. Sew when ready.

s10.jpg
s10b.jpg

STEP 11.
Take the all hem strips, cut them into four pieces and tie each around one handle seam. Sew the strip ends by hand so they won´t unravel.

s11.jpg


STEP 12.

If you want inside pockets for your bag, make them by sewing the sleeve openings closed, and then attaching them inside the bag by sewing or with safety pins. My bag has no inside pockets but I kinda wished I had made them as the bag is big and small things get lost in it easily.

s12.jpg

You’re all done!

outi%20with%20bag.jpg

Drawings by Outi
Photos courtesy of Mika Pollari

Categories ,DIY Fashion, ,Finnish Fashion, ,Recycled, ,Trashion

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Amelia’s Magazine | The Golden Thread Awards at Fashion Week Poland A/W 2011: lovers of Raggedy Grunge

Agnieszka Kowalska by Victoria Haynes
Agnieszka Kowalska by Victoria Haynes.

I have learnt that grungey raggedy looks are a great favourite of Polish fashion designers. And so is grey. How they love their greys! No surprise then that this round up includes both of The Golden Thread winners.

Sabina Koryl
Sabina Koryl Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Sabina Koryl Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Sabina Koryl Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Sabina Koryl Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011
Sabina Koryl showed a 90s influenced grunge collection of deconstructed leather and rubberised garments in dark shades, more about accessorised with dangling reflectors and round sunglasses.

Dominka Naziebly
Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Dominika Naziebly Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011
Dominka Naziebly was all about the distressed denim, mangled knitwear dangling in swishing loops and my favourite piece: a fun squished fabric layered red dress that called to mind the work of Georgia Hardinge. I think the garments might have been made from recycled fabrics, for which she gets massive brownie points.

Gareth A Hopkins Monika Jaworska Golden Thread
Monika Jaworska by Gareth A Hopkins.

Monika Jaworska
Monika Jaworska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Monika Jaworska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Monika Jaworska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011Monika Jaworska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011
Monika Jaworska showed a military meets peasant collection with lots of highly wearable frayed louche shapes in beiges and neutrals; a clear commercial favourite that would easily translate into production. She won the Pret a Porter Golden Thread category.

Agnieszka Kowalska
Agnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 WinnerAgnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 Winner
Agnieszka Kowalska presented one of my favourite Golden Thread collections: flamboyant tea stained flounces layered in tattered circus style sent down the catwalk to a soundtrack of traditional hornpipes. Tights and socks were holey and muddy, exposing bony knees, and in the case of one particular man, way too much.

Agnieszka Kowalska Golden Thread Fashion Week Poland AW 2011 Winner
It was all going so incredibly well until he stepped out on the catwalk. No no no, man with chunky thighs in tights not good. Not for Fall/Winter, not ever. Despite this glaring faux pas Agnieszka Kowalska was a worthy winner of the Premiere Vision category.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Agnieszka Kowalska, ,Dominka Naziebly, ,Eco fashion, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Georgia Hardinge, ,grunge, ,Lodz, ,Modus Vivendi, ,Monika Jaworska, ,poland, ,Premiere Vision, ,Pret-a-porter, ,Raggedy Grunge, ,recycled, ,Sabina Koryl, ,Szałapot, ,The Golden Thread, ,Victoria Haynes, ,Winner

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Amelia’s Magazine | ROKIT Recycled


Illustration by Natasha Thompson

ROKIT – the originators of vintage fashion boutiques (and my favourite vintage store) have done it again. Not so long ago they had me reminiscing of my time mincing around Hollywood, with their Bailey Hats of Hollywood collaboration that bought silver screen glamour to any look.

This time around, ROKIT have excelled themselves with ROKIT Recycled.

ROKIT Recycled, previously known as ROKIT Originals, is the brand’s mission to upturn fast and throwaway fashion. Let’s face it – the statistics are shocking and in a world of #2 t-shirts and £4 dresses, things aren’t changing very rapidly.

It is estimated by National Recycle Week that if every fashionista purchased one item of recycled clothing each year (each YEAR for God’s sake) it would save 371 millions gallons of waterand 4571 million days of electricity. That’s pretty incredible.


Illustration by Dan Heffer

With this in mind, ROKIT are taking ethical to the next level – ROKIT Recycled is an initiative to use every single piece of material available, with zero waste (the ethos they’ve stuck by since their humble beginnings in 1986).

With a new design team on board to conjure up new and exciting pieces, this new range is a real winner. From bags to belts and purses to hot-pants, unwanted materials are salvaged and turned into key pieces for any wardrobe this Summer and through to the Autumn. Each creation is individually handmade and therefore unique, all depending on what materials are available at the time. You might bag yourself a patchwork purse featuring vintage calfskin and suede, or a pair of denim dungarees made entirely of jean refuse.


Illustration by Emma Block

These products give new form to old structure, re-envisaging covetable pieces from vintage goods. We’ve got a few images of a teeny tiny selection of what’s on offer, but the beauty of the initiative is that you just don’t know what you might pick up. So pop down to your local ROKIT as soon as is physically possible and check out what they’ve got in store!

Categories ,Belts, ,Dan Heffer, ,Dungarees, ,Emma Block, ,fashion, ,Handbags, ,Hollywood, ,Matt Bramford, ,Natasha Thompson, ,National Recycle Week, ,Purses, ,recycled, ,Rokit, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Plastic Seconds creates a wall for Supermarket Sarah

Plastic_Seconds_wall
It’s no secret that I am a big fan of Maria Papadimitriou‘s work. Not only does she produce many wonderful collaged illustrations for Amelia’s Magazine but she also creates the most brilliant recycled jewellery under the Plastic Seconds moniker. It’s not only bold and clever but also fully sustainable, adiposity so I am really happy that people are starting to take notice. Right now she has a wall with Supermarket Sarah, ask where you can buy some beautiful bespoke pieces. I urge you to check it out.

Plastic Seconds Clownish HeadpiecePlastic Seconds Pearls and Bottlenecks Necklace

How did you decide what to make for Supermarket Sarah?
It is absolutely great that Supermarket Sarah often feature one-off items with a lot of personality, which one would perhaps wear to be different or keep as a special fashion object – a few of the gorgeous items they sell come from prop styling and photo shoots. So I wanted most of the Plastic Seconds items for the Supermarket Sarah website to be both unique and larger or more extreme in a fashion sense.

Plastic Seconds British Lids PendantPlastic Seconds Pen Lids Necklace

Can you describe what some of the Plastic Seconds pieces are made from and how you source the materials?
I use a lot of lids – from plastic bottles, glass jars, and other containers. I also love to use one-off finds like the cloakroom tags or the large jigsaw puzzle pieces and other bits from objects that we usually throw away, but their shape and colour is so lovely and fun, especially when used in an unexpected context – examples of this are the pen lids and the sushi soy sauce containers. I have slowly been collecting materials for a few years now from the recycling boxes of the flats I have been living in – and still do. At the moment one of my other main sources is my part-time job where they let me have a Plastic Seconds collection box in the kitchen and where colleagues bring me bags of their collected finds quite regularly – also it is a public space with a lot of visitors and I often do table rounds collecting bottle neck rings from abandoned bottles. Another source is my family in Greece who keep all sorts of bits they can’t recycle in my old desk drawers for me – and I do love sushi…

Plastic Seconds Sushi NecklacePlastic Seconds Plug Necklace

What piece was the most fun to make and why?
They were all quite fun, but as I said above I really enjoyed making the bigger pieces for Supermarket Sarah – like the headpieces – because I really admire people who have a strong sense of personal style or are playful with dressing up and secretly constantly hope people wore colourful big things on all occasions! Also I find it very satisfying that simple, geometric, striking pieces can be made from readily available forms. Other items that were really fun were the ones which were created by combining two different lids by snapping them into each other without using other means to keep them together – I can spend quite a lot of time trying different combinations to see which ones will fit perfectly! And finally pieces that are very satisfying to make are the ones like the big multicharm necklace made out of a thick found chain, discarded key rings collected over some time and ring pulls from soy milk cartons, because every single element – even the clasp –  is a found object and so they are very special.

Plastic Seconds Juggling Balls NecklacePlastic Seconds Make Up Brush Pendant

What next?
I would like to make some even bigger, more complex pieces and perhaps find a way to source materials in a more organised way and a way that might have a wider positive impact. In terms of little things coming up, next week I am taking part in the filming of a new pilot show called Green Screen that introduces environmental thinking in a different light at the National Film and Television School, I am hopefully opening within June my ASOS marketplace boutique in the ethical boutiques section – next to 123 and Goodone! – and in July 29-31st I will be in the Upcycled Market section, curated by the Eco Design Fair, which is part of the Vintage Weekend at the Southbank Centre!

Plastic Seconds Large Lids Headpiece

Maria caught me marvelling at one of her recycled lid pendants at my ACOFI Book Tour evening at Tatty Devine a few weeks ago and has kindly offered to make me a pendant out of my old lids, so I’m busy collecting the most exciting ones. Turning *rubbish* into desirable jewellery, it doesn’t get much better than this!

Categories ,123, ,ASOS, ,Eco Design Fair, ,Ecodesign Fair, ,goodone, ,jewellery, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,National Film and Television School, ,Plastic Seconds, ,recycled, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Southbank centre, ,Upcycled

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Amelia’s Magazine | ROKIT Recycled

First, medications case what interested you about Womenswear and subsequently the Womenswear MA at Central Saint Martins?

A desire to design clothing for myself I guess is what first drew me to Womenswear. I also love the drama and the show of Womenswear that you don’t necessarily get with Menswear. I studied the BA Womenswear at CSM and subsequently went on to do this at MA.

What Projects are currently in the pipeline?

I have just finished working on and promoting my Weekday collection and am now planning a move to New York, where I have an exciting new project to work on.

you’re currently working with Weekday… the collection looks fantastic, how’s that collaboration going?

The collaboration has actually finished now and the designs (mostly t-shirts) are available to buy in the Weekday stores which are located in Sweden, Germany and Denmark. The collaboration was a wonderful project for me to work on and I am so pleased that my designs are now available to a wider audience.

What is your aesthetic and how did it develop?

I guess that you could say its minimalist/purist with a fun twist. An element of fun has always been essential in my design work, I don’t think that fashion should take itself too seriously! The minimalist/purist element is something that I worked on throughout the MA, as I already said I wanted my collection to be fun but I also wanted it to be taken seriously and be wearable and the minimal aesthetic seemed to offer up the perfect balance.

what is the Colin Barnes Illustration Award (congratulations!) and how do you become eligible?

The Colin Barnes Illustration Award is something that I was awarded whilst studying on the BA. It is an award that is given to St Martin’s students studying on the BA Fashion design course for their illustration. I was so surprised to receive it as I had always struggled with illustration until Howard Tangye made me realise that the way I draw doesn’t have to be the same way that everyone else draws! I owe him a lot for that!

What role does illustration play in your design process?

It played a huge role in my MA collection as we worked tirelessly to make sure that the actual clothes were as close to my original drawings as possible, the weird proportions, placement of the print and particularly the width and angle of the shoulder. I am happy to say that what went down the catwalk was exactly the same as my drawings!

You’ve mentioned in other interviews an interest in basic shapes – do these motifs often appear in your illustrations?

It does subconsciously I think, my drawings are often quite angular and square like! And going back to what I said about my aesthetic I am a big fan of pure, minimalist and clean things and what is more pure that a basic circle, square or triangle.

Do you draw outside of fashion design?

Not really as all my ladies (and they are always ladies) of course have to have great outfits on so I end up designing without even realising it. I don’t really have much time to do it anymore either which is a shame.


Who would you say informs your work, do you have a customer in mind during the design process?

I never have a specific customer. I collect images and build up a mood in that way. I am influenced by all sorts of things from all different sources. I see it as a bit like putting a jigsaw puzzle together.

Could you describe your design process?

Backwards and Forwards, up and down, moments of genius and moments of disaster. Each collection is different and so forms its own process. I don’t have any hard and fast rules.

How did your MA collection develop – from where did you inspiration come from?

I am a bit of a collector, especially when it comes to images and so the collection draws inspiration from many different reference points. The face, eyelashes etc. came from the work of François and Jean Robert, the hands were from some drawings that I found by Saul Steinberg and the shapes were from some of Jean Paul Goude’s work with Grace Jones particularly her ‘Slave To The Rhythm’ video. As I already mentioned, once I had the designs they weren’t changed at all and the development was all in making sure the clothes were just like the drawings.


Do you ever use re-cycled or up-cycled fabric in your designs?

I am ashamed to say that I didn’t in my MA, however I did explore using existing items of clothing etc a lot in my BA and it is definitely something that I would like to re visit in the future.


What fabrics do you enjoy working with?

I love wool jersey; in fact my whole collection was made out of it. I really like jersey as a whole, mainly because it allows you to do things without darts and seams, which allows the design to appear even more minimalist and clean.

Who are Francois and Jean Robert and what is the book Reggi – Secolo’?

Francois and Jean Robert are Graphic designers/photographers who did the most fantastic book called Face to Face in which they photographed inanimate objects that appear to have or make different faces. It really is worth a look, for the concept but also for the clean beautiful look of the book itself.

As for Reggi-Secolo, this is a little crazy book of totally insane and genius bra’s, it really is quite amazing.

What do you think of twitter and the ever developing blogging network as a method of self promotion? Do you use either medium?

I think that Twitter and blogging are great if you know how to make the most of them and do them well, unfortunately I don’t and so I will leave it to the experts.

Could you describe your interest in ‘bad taste’ in our current cycle of fast fashion, and endless borrowing from the past or more accurately returning to what were considered ‘fashion mistakes’ and re-inventing them do you think what was consider bad taste is now considered ‘good’ taste. Where is the line for you?

Good and bad taste for me is just a fascinating thing to play with. It is so easy to get it wrong and so hard to get it right and it can be the minutest detail that makes all the difference. I really couldn’t say where my line is, I think it varies depending on the object/image/garment etc that you are considering.

Will you be showing at London Fashion Week this Autumn?

I am afraid not, as much as I would love to I feel that I still need to get a bit more experience before I have my own label and so I am going to work in New York for a while starting in June.

Who are your favourite designers and why?

I have long been a Martin Margiela fan; he was one of the first designers that really sparked my interest in fashion. I also love Yves Saint Laurent when Yves Saint Laurent was at the helm and Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel and of course Moschino when Franco Moschino was there. I also love Hermes for the fantastic quality and unwavering levels of good taste!

What was your experience of work experience, what do you recommend about the experience and what did you take away from it?

Work experience for me was essential and it was also the time that I really developed into a designer. It makes it all more real, you realise that these things that you are designing do actually end up being worn! I would fully recommend it to anyone thinking about doing it.

First, seek what interested you about Womenswear and subsequently the Womenswear MA at Central Saint Martins?

A desire to design clothing for myself I guess is what first drew me to Womenswear. I also love the drama and the show of Womenswear that you don’t necessarily get with Menswear. I studied the BA Womenswear at CSM and subsequently went on to do this at MA.

What Projects are currently in the pipeline?

I have just finished working on and promoting my Weekday collection and am now planning a move to New York, where I have an exciting new project to work on.

you’re currently working with Weekday… the collection looks fantastic, how’s that collaboration going?

The collaboration has actually finished now and the designs (mostly t-shirts) are available to buy in the Weekday stores which are located in Sweden, Germany and Denmark. The collaboration was a wonderful project for me to work on and I am so pleased that my designs are now available to a wider audience.

What is your aesthetic and how did it develop?

I guess that you could say its minimalist/purist with a fun twist. An element of fun has always been essential in my design work, I don’t think that fashion should take itself too seriously! The minimalist/purist element is something that I worked on throughout the MA, as I already said I wanted my collection to be fun but I also wanted it to be taken seriously and be wearable and the minimal aesthetic seemed to offer up the perfect balance.

what is the Colin Barnes Illustration Award (congratulations!) and how do you become eligible?

The Colin Barnes Illustration Award is something that I was awarded whilst studying on the BA. It is an award that is given to St Martin’s students studying on the BA Fashion design course for their illustration. I was so surprised to receive it as I had always struggled with illustration until Howard Tangye made me realise that the way I draw doesn’t have to be the same way that everyone else draws! I owe him a lot for that!

What role does illustration play in your design process?

It played a huge role in my MA collection as we worked tirelessly to make sure that the actual clothes were as close to my original drawings as possible, the weird proportions, placement of the print and particularly the width and angle of the shoulder. I am happy to say that what went down the catwalk was exactly the same as my drawings!

You’ve mentioned in other interviews an interest in basic shapes – do these motifs often appear in your illustrations?

It does subconsciously I think, my drawings are often quite angular and square like! And going back to what I said about my aesthetic I am a big fan of pure, minimalist and clean things and what is more pure that a basic circle, square or triangle.

Do you draw outside of fashion design?

Not really as all my ladies (and they are always ladies) of course have to have great outfits on so I end up designing without even realising it. I don’t really have much time to do it anymore either which is a shame.


Who would you say informs your work, do you have a customer in mind during the design process?

I never have a specific customer. I collect images and build up a mood in that way. I am influenced by all sorts of things from all different sources. I see it as a bit like putting a jigsaw puzzle together.

Could you describe your design process?

Backwards and Forwards, up and down, moments of genius and moments of disaster. Each collection is different and so forms its own process. I don’t have any hard and fast rules.
How did your MA collection develop – from where did you inspiration come from?

I am a bit of a collector, especially when it comes to images and so the collection draws inspiration from many different reference points. The face, eyelashes etc. came from the work of François and Jean Robert, the hands were from some drawings that I found by Saul Steinberg and the shapes were from some of Jean Paul Goude’s work with Grace Jones particularly her ‘Slave To The Rhythm’ video. As I already mentioned, once I had the designs they weren’t changed at all and the development was all in making sure the clothes were just like the drawings.


Do you ever use re-cycled or up-cycled fabric in your designs?

I am ashamed to say that I didn’t in my MA, however I did explore using existing items of clothing etc a lot in my BA and it is definitely something that I would like to re visit in the future.

What fabrics do you enjoy working with?

I love wool jersey; in fact my whole collection was made out of it. I really like jersey as a whole, mainly because it allows you to do things without darts and seams, which allows the design to appear even more minimalist and clean.

Who are Francois and Jean Robert and what is the book Reggi – Secolo’?

Francois and Jean Robert are Graphic designers/photographers who did the most fantastic book called Face to Face in which they photographed inanimate objects that appear to have or make different faces. It really is worth a look, for the concept but also for the clean beautiful look of the book itself.

As for Reggi-Secolo, this is a little crazy book of totally insane and genius bra’s, it really is quite amazing.

What do you think of twitter and the ever developing blogging network as a method of self promotion? Do you use either medium?

I think that Twitter and blogging are great if you know how to make the most of them and do them well, unfortunately I don’t and so I will leave it to the experts.

Could you describe your interest in ‘bad taste’ in our current cycle of fast fashion, and endless borrowing from the past or more accurately returning to what were considered ‘fashion mistakes’ and re-inventing them do you think what was consider bad taste is now considered ‘good’ taste. Where is the line for you?

Good and bad taste for me is just a fascinating thing to play with. It is so easy to get it wrong and so hard to get it right and it can be the minutest detail that makes all the difference. I really couldn’t say where my line is, I think it varies depending on the object/image/garment etc that you are considering.

Will you be showing at London Fashion Week this Autumn?

I am afraid not, as much as I would love to I feel that I still need to get a bit more experience before I have my own label and so I am going to work in New York for a while starting in June.

Who are your favourite designers and why?

I have long been a Martin Margiela fan; he was one of the first designers that really sparked my interest in fashion. I also love Yves Saint Laurent when Yves Saint Laurent was at the helm and Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel and of course Moschino when Franco Moschino was there. I also love Hermes for the fantastic quality and unwavering levels of good taste!

What was your experience of work experience, what do you recommend about the experience and what did you take away from it?

Work experience for me was essential and it was also the time that I really developed into a designer. It makes it all more real, you realise that these things that you are designing do actually end up being worn! I would fully recommend it to anyone thinking about doing it.

First, online what interested you about Womenswear and subsequently the Womenswear MA at Central Saint Martins?

A desire to design clothing for myself I guess is what first drew me to Womenswear. I also love the drama and the show of Womenswear that you don’t necessarily get with Menswear. I studied the BA Womenswear at CSM and subsequently went on to do this at MA.

What Projects are currently in the pipeline?

I have just finished working on and promoting my Weekday collection and am now planning a move to New York, viagra approved where I have an exciting new project to work on.

you’re currently working with Weekday… the collection looks fantastic, how’s that collaboration going?

The collaboration has actually finished now and the designs (mostly t-shirts) are available to buy in the Weekday stores which are located in Sweden, Germany and Denmark. The collaboration was a wonderful project for me to work on and I am so pleased that my designs are now available to a wider audience.

What is your aesthetic and how did it develop?

I guess that you could say its minimalist/purist with a fun twist. An element of fun has always been essential in my design work, I don’t think that fashion should take itself too seriously! The minimalist/purist element is something that I worked on throughout the MA, as I already said I wanted my collection to be fun but I also wanted it to be taken seriously and be wearable and the minimal aesthetic seemed to offer up the perfect balance.

what is the Colin Barnes Illustration Award (congratulations!) and how do you become eligible?

The Colin Barnes Illustration Award is something that I was awarded whilst studying on the BA. It is an award that is given to St Martin’s students studying on the BA Fashion design course for their illustration. I was so surprised to receive it as I had always struggled with illustration until Howard Tangye made me realise that the way I draw doesn’t have to be the same way that everyone else draws! I owe him a lot for that!

What role does illustration play in your design process?

It played a huge role in my MA collection as we worked tirelessly to make sure that the actual clothes were as close to my original drawings as possible, the weird proportions, placement of the print and particularly the width and angle of the shoulder. I am happy to say that what went down the catwalk was exactly the same as my drawings!

You’ve mentioned in other interviews an interest in basic shapes – do these motifs often appear in your illustrations?

It does subconsciously I think, my drawings are often quite angular and square like! And going back to what I said about my aesthetic I am a big fan of pure, minimalist and clean things and what is more pure that a basic circle, square or triangle.

Do you draw outside of fashion design?

Not really as all my ladies (and they are always ladies) of course have to have great outfits on so I end up designing without even realising it. I don’t really have much time to do it anymore either which is a shame.


Who would you say informs your work, do you have a customer in mind during the design process?

I never have a specific customer. I collect images and build up a mood in that way. I am influenced by all sorts of things from all different sources. I see it as a bit like putting a jigsaw puzzle together.

Could you describe your design process?

Backwards and Forwards, up and down, moments of genius and moments of disaster. Each collection is different and so forms its own process. I don’t have any hard and fast rules.

How did your MA collection develop – from where did you inspiration come from?

I am a bit of a collector, especially when it comes to images and so the collection draws inspiration from many different reference points. The face, eyelashes etc. came from the work of François and Jean Robert, the hands were from some drawings that I found by Saul Steinberg and the shapes were from some of Jean Paul Goude’s work with Grace Jones particularly her ‘Slave To The Rhythm’ video. As I already mentioned, once I had the designs they weren’t changed at all and the development was all in making sure the clothes were just like the drawings.


Do you ever use re-cycled or up-cycled fabric in your designs?

I am ashamed to say that I didn’t in my MA, however I did explore using existing items of clothing etc a lot in my BA and it is definitely something that I would like to re visit in the future.


What fabrics do you enjoy working with?

I love wool jersey; in fact my whole collection was made out of it. I really like jersey as a whole, mainly because it allows you to do things without darts and seams, which allows the design to appear even more minimalist and clean.

Who are Francois and Jean Robert and what is the book Reggi – Secolo’?

Francois and Jean Robert are Graphic designers/photographers who did the most fantastic book called Face to Face in which they photographed inanimate objects that appear to have or make different faces. It really is worth a look, for the concept but also for the clean beautiful look of the book itself.

As for Reggi-Secolo, this is a little crazy book of totally insane and genius bra’s, it really is quite amazing.

What do you think of twitter and the ever developing blogging network as a method of self promotion? Do you use either medium?

I think that Twitter and blogging are great if you know how to make the most of them and do them well, unfortunately I don’t and so I will leave it to the experts.

Could you describe your interest in ‘bad taste’ in our current cycle of fast fashion, and endless borrowing from the past or more accurately returning to what were considered ‘fashion mistakes’ and re-inventing them do you think what was consider bad taste is now considered ‘good’ taste. Where is the line for you?

Good and bad taste for me is just a fascinating thing to play with. It is so easy to get it wrong and so hard to get it right and it can be the minutest detail that makes all the difference. I really couldn’t say where my line is, I think it varies depending on the object/image/garment etc that you are considering.

Will you be showing at London Fashion Week this Autumn?

I am afraid not, as much as I would love to I feel that I still need to get a bit more experience before I have my own label and so I am going to work in New York for a while starting in June.

Who are your favourite designers and why?

I have long been a Martin Margiela fan; he was one of the first designers that really sparked my interest in fashion. I also love Yves Saint Laurent when Yves Saint Laurent was at the helm and Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel and of course Moschino when Franco Moschino was there. I also love Hermes for the fantastic quality and unwavering levels of good taste!

What was your experience of work experience, what do you recommend about the experience and what did you take away from it?

Work experience for me was essential and it was also the time that I really developed into a designer. It makes it all more real, you realise that these things that you are designing do actually end up being worn! I would fully recommend it to anyone thinking about doing it.


Illustration by Natasha Thompson

ROKIT – the originators of vintage fashion boutiques (and my favourite vintage store) have done it again. Not so long ago they had me reminiscing of my time mincing around Hollywood, information pills with their Bailey Hats of Hollywood collaboration that bought silver screen glamour to any look.

This time around, side effects ROKIT have excelled themselves with ROKIT Recycled.

ROKIT Recycled, hospital previously known as ROKIT Originals, is the brand’s mission to upturn fast and throwaway fashion. Let’s face it – the statistics are shocking and in a world of #2 t-shirts and £4 dresses, things aren’t changing very rapidly.

It is estimated by National Recycle Week that if every fashionista purchased one item of recycled clothing each year (each YEAR for God’s sake) it would save 371 millions gallons of waterand 4571 million days of electricity. That’s pretty incredible.


Illustration by Dan Heffer

With this in mind, ROKIT are taking ethical to the next level – ROKIT Recycled is an initiative to use every single piece of material available, with zero waste (the ethos they’ve stuck by since their humble beginnings in 1986).

With a new design team on board to conjure up new and exciting pieces, this new range is a real winner. From bags to belts and purses to hot-pants, unwanted materials are salvaged and turned into key pieces for any wardrobe this Summer and through to the Autumn. Each creation is individually handmade and therefore unique, all depending on what materials are available at the time. You might bag yourself a patchwork purse featuring vintage calfskin and suede, or a pair of denim dungarees made entirely of jean refuse.


Illustration by Emma Block

These products give new form to old structure, re-envisaging covetable pieces from vintage goods. We’ve got a few images of a teeny tiny selection of what’s on offer, but the beauty of the initiative is that you just don’t know what you might pick up. So pop down to your local ROKIT as soon as is physically possible and check out what they’ve got in store!

Categories ,Belts, ,Dan Heffer, ,Dungarees, ,Emma Block, ,fashion, ,Handbags, ,Hollywood, ,Matt Bramford, ,Natasha Thompson, ,National Recycle Week, ,Purses, ,recycled, ,Rokit, ,vintage

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 in Łódź: Showroom

Kollana Shoes by Celine Elliott
Kollana Shoes by Celine Elliott.

Time for a quick round up of the best brands that I found in the Showroom at Fashion Week Poland. Held in the industrial sized factory space between the catwalks, this was a chance to catch up with some interesting niche talent from Poland and beyond.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Galadea
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Galadea
First up something a wee bit traditional: Galadea use embroidered folk designs from around Poland as the backbone to a range that includes arm cuffs and colourful belts.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Agata Mocarska
This stand displayed bizarre dolls inspired by famous fashion creatures – in this case Anna Wintour – by designer Agata Mocarska.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
I was delighted to find the work of an intriguing fashion illustrator on display. Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek goes under the name of Maggie Piu, and that’s about all I can tell you as the press release was in Polish. Highly decorative stuff.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Fiszerowa
Pretty beaded necklaces by Fiszerowa.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Shoes were a real winner – I especially liked these upcycled heels with appliqued animal motifs by Kollana.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Lola Ramona
And there were more cute shoes covered in polka dots and bows at Danish brand Lola Ramona. You can buy Lola Ramona shoes in the UK on Zalando.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Bartek Witek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Bartek Witek
Bartek Witek had a fetching range of mens’ shirting.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Manitic
Perspex necklaces caught my eye at Manitic.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-owl bags
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-owl bags
Loved these hand crafted fabric owl bags. Sadly I’ve lost the business card so can’t tell you who made them, though I do know she makes each one by hand, and they were displayed on a fab gold papermache cow. Update! I know who made them now! They are by Monika Wyłoga.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-ekoista
Over in the section dedicated to recycled and environmentally aware fashion I once again met Ekoista, otherwise known as Ania Rutkowska. She creates astonishing jewellery by bending the plastic waste from used drinks bottles.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Dr. Martens
Lastly, Dr. Martens lent their shoes to many of the catwalk shows. Liking the flowery ones!

Categories ,Agata Mocarska, ,Ania Rutkowska, ,Anna Wintour, ,Appliqué, ,Bartek Witek, ,Belts, ,Bottles, ,Celine Elliott, ,Danish, ,Dr. Martens, ,Ekoista, ,Fashion Week Poland, ,Fiszerowa, ,Galadea, ,illustration, ,jewellery, ,Kollana, ,Lodz, ,Lola Ramona, ,Maggie Piu, ,Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek, ,Manitic, ,menswear, ,Monika Wyłoga, ,owls, ,recycled, ,S/S 2012, ,Shirting, ,shoes, ,Showroom, ,Upcycled, ,Zalando

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland S/S 2012 in Łódź: Showroom

Kollana Shoes by Celine Elliott
Kollana Shoes by Celine Elliott.

Time for a quick round up of the best brands that I found in the Showroom at Fashion Week Poland. Held in the industrial sized factory space between the catwalks, this was a chance to catch up with some interesting niche talent from Poland and beyond.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Galadea
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Galadea
First up something a wee bit traditional: Galadea use embroidered folk designs from around Poland as the backbone to a range that includes arm cuffs and colourful belts.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Agata Mocarska
This stand displayed bizarre dolls inspired by famous fashion creatures – in this case Anna Wintour – by designer Agata Mocarska.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek
I was delighted to find the work of an intriguing fashion illustrator on display. Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek goes under the name of Maggie Piu, and that’s about all I can tell you as the press release was in Polish. Highly decorative stuff.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Fiszerowa
Pretty beaded necklaces by Fiszerowa.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Kollana
Shoes were a real winner – I especially liked these upcycled heels with appliqued animal motifs by Kollana.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Lola Ramona
And there were more cute shoes covered in polka dots and bows at Danish brand Lola Ramona. You can buy Lola Ramona shoes in the UK on Zalando.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Bartek Witek
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Bartek Witek
Bartek Witek had a fetching range of mens’ shirting.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Manitic
Perspex necklaces caught my eye at Manitic.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-owl bags
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-owl bags
Loved these hand crafted fabric owl bags. Sadly I’ve lost the business card so can’t tell you who made them, though I do know she makes each one by hand, and they were displayed on a fab gold papermache cow. Update! I know who made them now! They are by Monika Wyłoga.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Ekoista
Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-ekoista
Over in the section dedicated to recycled and environmentally aware fashion I once again met Ekoista, otherwise known as Ania Rutkowska. She creates astonishing jewellery by bending the plastic waste from used drinks bottles.

Fashion Week Poland stands SS 2012-Dr. Martens
Lastly, Dr. Martens lent their shoes to many of the catwalk shows. Liking the flowery ones!

Categories ,Agata Mocarska, ,Ania Rutkowska, ,Anna Wintour, ,Appliqué, ,Bartek Witek, ,Belts, ,Bottles, ,Celine Elliott, ,Danish, ,Dr. Martens, ,Ekoista, ,Fashion Week Poland, ,Fiszerowa, ,Galadea, ,illustration, ,jewellery, ,Kollana, ,Lodz, ,Lola Ramona, ,Maggie Piu, ,Malgorzata Bieniek-Straczek, ,Manitic, ,menswear, ,Monika Wyłoga, ,owls, ,recycled, ,S/S 2012, ,Shirting, ,shoes, ,Showroom, ,Upcycled, ,Zalando

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Amelia’s Magazine | Free Range Graduate Shows 2012: Middlesex University Jewellery Ba Hons Review

Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Chaca Jacobsen.

The jewellery design course at Middlesex University habitually turns out some wonderful artisans and this year was no exception, with collections inspired by themes of tradition, adornment, religion, memory, value and social identity. I visited their workshops at the Hendon campus a few months ago and was incredibly impressed by their new facilities.

Francesca Tring
Francesca Tring
Francesca Tring was inspired by Memento Mori to create these curious, dark wooden brooches… sprouting tufts of fur.

Franziska Lusser
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Franziska Lusser
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Franziska Lusser
I’m a sucker for big jewellery such as Franziska Lusser‘s designs, which made clever use of common materials (plastic combined with metal dust) to create precious looking pendants on industrial chains.

Helen Maria Faliveno
Helen Maria Faliveno
Helen Maria Faliveno
I also love delicate jewellery. Helen Maria Faliveno remembers childhood obsessions in her Polly Pocket inspired charms.

Mesh Doganay
Mesh Doganay displayed dipped neon rings which she creates quickly in one sitting, improvising the design process as she progresses.

Louise Payjack-Guillou
Louise Payjack-Guillou
Louise Payjack-Guillou fossilised sea urchins into lockets and brooches.

Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones
Lydia Miriam Jones worked at the Neema Crafts Centre in Tanzania, which totally altered her attitudes to creating material goods. Her stunning display was created using a ‘bottle to beads’ recycling process. She collects materials and then transforms them through low-tech production such as slip casting, embracing inherent imperfections from the process.

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
He loves me, he loves me not…

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Tanya Garfield
Delicate necklaces by Tanya Garfield were one of my stand out favourites in the show. By combining common sayings and the intricacies of Morse Code she has produced beautiful and desirable necklaces – something which is often difficult to do with more conceptual work.

Christiana Christoforou
Christiana Christoforou
Christiana Christoforou began her final work by leaving clay at the entrance to stranger’s homes in London, with a message inviting them to imprint something of their identity into the material. From this she had created intriguing medallions which encompass the abstract and the recognisable (a Lego figurine, Donald Duck.)

Lydia Wood-Power
Lydia Wood-Power mixed past and present in her colourful formica collection. Alongside creating jewellery she also runs a ‘vintage’ 1950s style tea room in Streatham Hill, which she opened in her year out. She works in a studio behind it: what a wonderful idea!

Samantha Cobb
Samantha Cobb‘s tiny metal amulets reminded me of paper boats or paper hats.

Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Middlesex University jewellery graduate show 2012-Middlesex Uni -Chaca Jacobsen
Using an eclectic mix of high gloss acrylic and a touch of gold, Chaca Jacobsen had created decorative yet functional necklaces with an elegant finish. ‘A ninja necklace awakes the spy; a Samurai sword-handle necklace our inner power and a police baton reflects a desire for control.

There is no doubt that this was a showcase for incredible techniques and thought process in jewellery making – I’d also love to see more collaboration with fashion, melding these skills with catwalk trends and influences. You can read my review of the 2011 graduate show here.

Categories ,2012, ,Chaca Jacobsen, ,Christiana Christoforou, ,Francesca Tring, ,Franziska Lusser, ,Free Range, ,Helen Maria Faliveno, ,Hendon campus, ,jewellery, ,Louise Payjack-Guillou, ,Lydia Miriam Jones, ,Lydia Wood-Power, ,Memento Mori, ,Memory, ,Mesh Doganay, ,middlesex university, ,Morse Code, ,Neema Crafts Centre, ,Polly Pocket, ,recycled, ,religion, ,review, ,Samantha Cobb, ,Social Identity, ,Tanya Garfield, ,Tanzania, ,Vintage tea room

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Amelia’s Magazine | Hellen Van Rees: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Preview Interview

Hellen Van Rees
Helen Van Rees A/W 2013 by Claire Kearns

Up-and-coming Dutch fashion and textile designer Hellen van Rees is presenting her independent collection SQUARE3 ANGLE: THE TRANSFORMATION at London Fashion Week A/W 2013 this weekend. Hellen graduated from the MA in Fashion at Central Saint Martins’ back in February 2012 and then packed her suitcase and moved to the Netherlands to start her own fashion label. Her first collection at LFW was pegged as a ‘One to Watch’ by Fashion Scout and Lady Gaga has since been spotted donning her clobber. She’s known for her hand-made tweed fabrics which are created using factory remnants and recycled threads, and her work has 3-dimensional, sculpture-like elements, as well as a futuristic feel. Complete with a brand-spanking new video to promote her new Chanel-inspired collection, it’s likely that her pieces will receive a lot of interest in the coming weeks.

London Fashion Week
Helen Van Rees A/W 2013 by RoshniBA

Hellen Van Rees is still exploring the ideas from her graduate collection which she developed on in her last show Square2: Exploring Excitement. Although you might expect a sprinkling of déjà vu, this collection puts a tangy new twist on her hallmark tweeds. I spoke to Hellen about her shiny new collection and her plans for the future in advance of her (second) London Fashion Week show.


Video collaboration between Hellen van Rees and Evelien Gerrits of EveMedia

What can we expect from your upcoming collection at LFW A/W’13?
Lots of tweed and colours, contrasting black & white rubber and beautiful quality wool and silk; all arty but wearable.

You released a promo video for your show, how did this project come about?
I was trying to think of a way, other than a catwalk show, to present the new collection; to show the collection moving and in a nice atmosphere so the complete image comes across, as well as the details. This seemed like an exciting way to achieve that.

London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week

Hellen Van Rees

London Fashion Week

Photography by Kim Buckard

You started your own label in February 2012, what are your greatest achievements of the last year?
The fact that I was able to show my very first independent collection during London and Paris fashion week; and that I am able to do so again.

Do you have a favourite piece in this show?
I like the pieces with the new multi-coloured tweed a lot: the long dress with shiny black sleeves especially. It’s got strange contrasts but is also very elegant and wearable as well.

Do you wear your own pieces?
Not when I work (because it can get messy!) but for presentations, interviews and special occasions, yes.

Hellen Van Rees
Helen Van Rees A/W 2013 by Victoria Haynes

You’re also exhibiting at Paris Fashion Week; do you think the reactions to your show will differ between London and Paris?
I think it will because it attracts a different crowd. London has lots of bloggers and people who are generally interested in fashion that want to absorb new things, so it’s a very excitable crowd. Paris is more serious business, people there are generally looking for something more specific.

You studied the MA in Fashion at Central Saint Martins; did this prepare you for setting up your own label?
CSM was very good for me, to bring out my strong points and help me develop a clear direction within my designs. It doesn’t really prepare you for the whole business side of how it works, for example, how to sell your clothes, but I’m finding out along the way, which is fine.

Hellen Van Reees

London Fashion Week

Hellen Van Rees

Photography by Kim Buckard

You were chosen to be part of Ones to Watch as part of Vauxhall Fashion Scout’s prestigious platform for new design talent; do you think this has helped you?
Yes it has! It has made it possible for me to show my work in a professional way to large number of professionals and I’ve been supported with advice as well. They’ve done all this again for this season, which is great!

Hellen van Rees LFW
Helen Van Rees A/W 2013 by Maya Beus

You’re known for your use of tweed and sustainable materials: is this something you’ve always been interested in?
Sustainability is very important to me because I think it makes sense. I make high-end handmade garments; it makes sense that not only the outside is nice looking, but also that the story behind it is strong. The tweed and the weaving method is something I developed about a year and a half ago, but I keep getting new ideas for it so I’ll keep going with it for a while.

3D shapes are a big part of your work, where do you get your inspiration?
Contemporary art installations mostly, like the cube installations by Rachel Whiteread.

London Fashion Week
Helen Van Rees A/W 2013 by BlackEyed Jack

What is the process behind each of your collections?
I continue with the previous collection, reinterpret it, change colours, look at art and pictures, make fabrics and then make garments. I don’t really sketch; I just start making one thing and from it comes another new idea. Halfway through I do a fitting see what I have and what’s missing. I make more, and in the end there’s suddenly a collection

LFW aside, is there anything else in the year ahead that you’re really looking forward to?
Yes! I’m doing a TED talk in March at TEDx Zwolle.

London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week

Hellen Van Rees

Hellen Van Rees’ collection can be seen in the Fashion Scout London & Paris Showroom. London 15.02 -19.02 & Freemasons Hall, 60 Great Queen Street. Paris 28.02 – 05.03, 23 Rue du Roi de Sicile, Paris. You can buy her pieces at her store here

Categories ,3D, ,A/W’13, ,BlackEyed Jack, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Claire Kearns, ,collection, ,CSM, ,designer, ,Eve Media, ,Futuristic, ,Hellen van Rees, ,interview, ,Jessica Cook, ,Kim Buckard, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maya Beus, ,Ones To Watch, ,OwlandAccordion, ,Paris Fashion Week, ,recycled, ,RoshniBA, ,sculpture, ,Square2: Exploring Excitement, ,SQUARE3 ANGLE: THE TRANSFORMATION, ,sustainable, ,TED, ,Tweed, ,University of Arts London, ,vauxhall, ,Victoria Haynes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Joanna Cave: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Collection Preview Interview

Joanna-Cave-by-Gemma-Cotterell-AW12-Collection

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 by Gemma Cotterell

Joanna Cave has become synonymous with both ethical consciousness and beautiful design. Her mother is Greek and her father is English, so after attending an international school in Greece she went onto study jewellery design at Central Saint Martins. Whilst there she interned with designer Scott Wilson. After graduating, she returned to Greece, where she now works from her studio in Athens.

Joanna-Cave-AW12-Atma-Earring

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 Atma Earring

Joanna Cave‘s designs are modern yet classic – created from simple patterns, delicate motifs and refined metals, all created using ethically sourced and recycled materials. She buys her metal from dealers who specialise in recycled silver, and the stones and gems from ethical sellers in Greece.

Joanna-Cave-Jewellery-by-Dana-Bocai

Joanna Cave by Dana Bocai

Joanna Cave AW 2012
Joanna-Cave-AW12-Zeenat-Necklaces

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 Zeenat Necklaces

Joanna-Cave-SS12-by-Elizabeth-Hudson

Joanna Cave by Elizabeth Hudson

She has always been very vocal about her environmental inclinations, and has received a lot of recognition for her hand-made and sensitive work. She is a regular name on the British Fashion Council’s ethical initiative ‘Estethica‘ at London Fashion Week, and was the only jewellery designer to be featured on the A/W 2012 stands. She is of course also profiled in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, as one of the best eco designers working today.

I spoke to Joanna Cave about her passion for jewellery design and the influences behind her new collection.

Joanna-Cave-AW12-Velvet-Hairband

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 Velvet and Metal Hairband

What can we expect from the new A/W 2012 collection?
There are lots of bright coloured tassels combined with gold plating, rose plating and charcoal black. I’ve also used Indian motifs such as paisley patterns, elephants and peacocks.

Joanna-Cave-by-Nicola-Ellen-AW12-Collection

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 by Nicola Ellen

What were the inspirations behind it?
My new collection is inspired by and dedicated to the working women of India. The beautiful and traditional women who labour in the fields, on the roads and building sites doing back-breaking work. They perform these humble tasks with such dignity, and their appearance can take your breath away. Their everyday working clothes are a riot of extravagant colours – pinks, greens, purples and blues. Their bold jewellery is intricate, and worn with pride. For me, these women embody India, they have a powerful and enduring femininity.

Joanna Cave AW 2012
Joanna-Cave-by-Jo-Ley-AW12-Collection

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 by Jo Ley

Can you explain a little about your passion for design, and explain how you moved into jewellery design?
I’m not sure how to explain this too well. I grew up in Greece on a small island in the Aegean where my father (who is English and who moved there when he met and fell in love with my mother) owned a jewellery shop. I grew up among the jewellery. From a young age I watched people trying jewellery on, falling in love with it, purchasing it… I met jewellery makers and designers. Some quite well known in Greece at the time.

When I was 19 (and studying jewellery making) I even opened my own small shop to sell my beaded creations. It was great fun and it funded my summer holidays. Designing jewellery is all I’ve ever wanted to do: I think I inherited my fathers passion for it. It’s always been a big part of my life and I always discuss everything with him.

Joanna-Cave-AW12-Bindu-And-Indra-Necklaces

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 Bindu and Indru Necklaces

Can you tell me a little about the process of your work?
I work in 2D, in flat silver cut out designs. Everything is initially cut out by hand where most people would use a laser cutter or router machine. I think that the hand made prototype is evident in the organic feel of the designs. You can see it’s not perfect. I use recycled silver and ethically sourced pearls at times. And lately I’ve been using artificial silk thread which I’m very into.

Joanna-Cave-by-Nicola-Ellen-AW12

Joanna Cave A/W 2012 by Nicola Ellen

Why is it important for there to be an environmental conscience to your work?
It’s about how I feel; I think it’s important to know how things are made and where they come from… to do as little damage as possible where we can.

You can check out more of Joanna Cave‘s wonderful work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,A/W 2012, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Central Saint Martins, ,conscious, ,Eco fashion, ,estethica, ,esthetica, ,ethical, ,ethically sourced, ,Gold, ,India, ,indian women, ,jewellery, ,jewellery design, ,Joanna Cave, ,London Fashion Week, ,metal, ,motifs, ,recycled, ,Scott Wilson, ,Silver

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