Amelia’s Magazine | Simeon Farrar, The Great British Summertime: New S/S 2012 Season Preview Interview

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Madi Illustrates
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Madi Illustrates

What began as an ‘art experiment’ by London-based Simeon Farrar has now turned into a successful fashion label; winning not only international acclaim but also the prestigious NEWGEN award three times along the way. Despite being crowned a fashion buyer favourite with stockists such as Liberty in the UK and many more in Paris, Tokyo, and Sydney (to name a few), Simeon hasn’t lost sight of his Fine Art training gained at the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham. Every collection begins with a philosophical root from which the designs and drawings develop and each one-off piece is then created with Simeon’s trademark dash of humour delivered through experiments with colour and print, done by hand in his Shoreditch studio.

Simeon Farrar
Simeon Farrar, all photographs courtesy of Iroquois PR

As someone who trained as a fine artist, what was it that made you want to turn your hand from canvas and paper to fabric?
I’ve always been into printmaking and I used to use a lot of screen-printing in my paintings. I would load them up with all sorts of images and paint over them to form multiple layers. I started putting some of these images on to t-shirts purely as another surface rather than as fashion. The first t-shirts were so loaded with paint like the canvases that they could never be worn. I got so into this that it soon evolved into fashion.

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by JL Illustration
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Jason Lear

As a ‘non-fashion’ person, did you expect to make such a big impression when you first exhibited at London Fashion Week?
Absolutely not. I had no idea what people would think of me. I didn’t even have an order book so I guess I didn’t expect to write any orders. Suddenly I had all these people wanting to order this junk I’d made which I found all a bit weird. It was still an art experiment at that point.

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Abi Hall
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Abi Hall

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned about being a designer and the way the world of Fashion works?
As an artist you develop a certain degree of snobbery towards anything that isn’t ‘Art’. I can safely say that I have been cleansed of that snobbery after being welcomed so openly into the fashion world. I’ve learned that it’s all a load of rubbish and an artist just does what ever he/she feels is the most honest path for their creativity and it doesn’t need a label to make it valid.

Neon Butterfly Chiffon Maxi
Butterfly Chiffon Maxi

Your ‘Kate Mouse‘ illustration has become a widely recognised and coveted t-shirt graphic. Why do you think it’s had so much success?
For me it was one of those magical moments when an image just works perfectly. I’d drawn the image for a nursery rhyme collection we were doing at the time and I wanted to do Three Blind Mice. So, to name the file on Photoshop I used ‘Kate Mouse’ so I would recognise it. Then it just clicked, like a light bulb coming on above my head. I think it’s been a success for the same reason. It’s not forced or contrived, just simple and genius. There’s been such a demand ever since her birth that she’s featured in every collection since, with various additions. She gets pimped up every season. Except this forthcoming A/W 2012.

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Alia Gargum
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Alia Gargum

What personally inspired you to create a ‘Kate Mouse’ t-shirt with Net-A-Porter especially for the Japan Earthquake relief appeal?
Two of my staff are Japanese and they have been with me for years so due to that I feel a certain closeness with Japan. We sell a lot in Japan, and since I began the label the Japanese have been so supportive and loyal to my brand that when the earthquake hit it felt like an opportunity to repay some of that. The Kate Mouse print was our obvious big hitter, so I thought it would make the most money if we offered it for the appeal. We did it by ourselves at first, offering a free t-shirt with every donation to Save The Children. That went very well but as we were paying postage we had to limit it to the UK only. My PR company Iroquois and I approached Net-A-Porter so we could take it further. They were amazing with how they took it up and offered so much percentage of the profit to the appeal. I was very impressed with their instant generosity.

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Dana Bocai
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Dana Bocai

Your current S/S 2012 collection not only has your own charming take on the uniquely temperamental British summer through neon colours, raindrop prints and a nod to the new Royalty, but a uniquely feel-good quote that runs throughout. How did the slogan ‘You Are My Silver Lining’ form in your head?
There is always a sense of romance in my collections, and no matter what the theme I always like to bring that in. I like the idea of someone being your Silver Lining. No matter what happens in life there is someone who’s very presence brings with it a sense of hope or a way out of darkness.

Slogan Print Tote with Leather Handles
Slogan Print Tote with Leather Handles

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Alejandra Espino
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Alejandra Espino

What are your favourite colours to print in (at the moment) and why?
I loved using the neon colours in the S/S 2012 collection. I like printing images in neon then overlaying that with a black print and washing it all out so the greys defuse the neon a bit.

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Mitika Chohan
Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Mitika Chohan
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Mitika Chohan

What can we expect for A/W 2012 from Simeon Farrar?
For S/S 2012 we had a ghost print that did very well, so I’ve built the next collection round that. So I guess it’s a Haunted House collection. We’ve got lots of ghost drawings, howling wolves, that kind of thing. But, there’s also a romantic side to it. I’ve always been interested in the tragic side of vampires and the sense of undying love that runs through it. So I’ve brought a lot of that in to the collection. And for the first time, NO KATE MOUSE. I didn’t want to cheapen her and put some fangs on her or something. Kate Mouse is dead, you heard it here first.

Cloud Print Tote Bag
Cloud Print Tote Bag

Simeon Farrar Spring/Summer 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins
Simeon Farrar S/S 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins

Simeon Farrar’s current S/S 2012 collection is available to buy in store and online at a variety of stockists, and his forthcoming A/W 2012 collection will be exhibited at Tranoi this March.

Categories ,Abi Hall, ,Alejandra Espino, ,Alia Gargum, ,Autumn/Winter 2012-13, ,british summer, ,canvas, ,Creativity, ,Dana Bocai, ,drawing, ,Fine Art, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Haunted House, ,illustration, ,Iroquois, ,Jason Lear, ,Kate Mouse, ,liberty, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Mitika Chohan, ,Neon, ,Net-A-Porter, ,Newgen, ,painting, ,paris, ,Romance, ,royalty, ,Save The Children, ,screen-printing, ,shoreditch, ,Simeon Farrar, ,Spring/Summer 2012, ,sydney, ,T-shirts, ,tokyo, ,Tranoi, ,University of Creative Arts Farnham, ,Vampires, ,You Are My Silver Lining

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Amelia’s Magazine | Sister by SIBLING: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gaarte

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gaarte

Twinsets, cardigans, and crew-neck jumpers were all over this Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 collection, but not as you’ve seen them before. One of the reasons I love SIBLING is that this brand was born out of a trio of designers who wanted to give men’s knitwear an overhaul, striking such a covetable and attention-grabbing luxe look that women started wearing the pieces too. Joe Bates, Sid Bryan and Cozette McCreery dutifully provided Sister by SIBLING, the equally loud leopard-printed, skull-brandishing womenswear brand.

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu

This presentation in the Portico Rooms was a pretty hot ticket, judging by the intense jostle for seats and a front row full to bursting with fashion editors. Long-term SIBLING fan Laura Bailey smiled sweetly from her seat in a way that only someone who has had a private preview of the collection does, safe in the knowledge of what is to come. I did my best impression of a similar smile of satisfaction as I’d already drooled over this sparkly, lurex, sequined offering from SIBLING in the Somerset House press exhibition room.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

Katie Grand’s in-your-face styling definitely woke up the sleepy crowd (who like me, wanted a lie-in and chose the later showing) by mixing acid-bright pinks, oranges, and purples together for a strong visual punch. The most special touch came in the form of face masks that turned models into faceless sparkling mannequins with incredible pom-poms and hand stitched flower clustered defiantly on top of their heads.

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins

Sister by Sibling A/W 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins

The genius behind this collection and the Sister by SIBLING brand is that it’s easy to wear. Attention-seekers can go for the whole look, and those who like a bit of crazy colourful sparkle without much effort (ahem, me) get an instant outfit by pulling on some knitwear over jeans. I particularly liked how something as traditional as a Scottish Fair Isle jumper was transformed with skulls and clashing neon leopard print.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Jamie Chiu
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

As the models walked around the room at the end of the presentation and I resisted the urge to ruffle a pom pom or two, I noticed the shoes. In collaboration with Underground, this means that hopefully the trademark Sister by SIBLING leopard prints and skull Fair Isle teamed with ubiquitous pointy creepers and Chelsea boots may be available to buy next season.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

Another nice little touch was the brand’s collaboration with Barbie, who they dressed up in miniature versions of the collection and displayed along shelves on their exhibition stand. If Sister by SIBLING can make someone as clean-cut as Barbie look like she’s right at home wearing glittering skulls, neon prints and fully sequinned jumpers, then surely the look can work for anyone. Besides, a full face of sequins or sparkly lurex means less time bothering with hair and makeup: a definite win.

Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Sister by SIBLING A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

All photography by Alia Gargum and Jamie Chiu

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Barbie, ,chelsea boots, ,Cozette McCreery, ,Crepe Sole Creepers, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Jamie Chiu, ,Joe Bates, ,Katie Grand, ,knitwear, ,Laura Bailey, ,Leopard Print, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,Neon, ,Portico Rooms, ,Sequins, ,Sid Bryan, ,Sister by Sibling, ,Underground Shoes

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Amelia’s Magazine | Teatum Jones: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Away from the busy rush of Somerset House, away from the mobs of photographers, willing subjects and flashing lights, Teatum Jones chose to retreat to a secret room behind large wood-panelled doors. This wasn’t any room, but the official personal office of Arthur Liberty himself, which still retains the charm of it’s original design. Completely hidden away from the public in the Mock Tudor labyrinth that is Liberty, I was directed down a panelled hall before reaching the beautiful presentation Teatum Jones had prepared.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum_88
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

One thing I have loved doing this London Fashion Week is talking to design duos. There is something incredibly sweet about how each designer will talk about the other when you interview them, complimenting them endlessly. As soon as I entered the room, I was introduced to Rob Jones, who immediately beamed when he heard I was reviewing the presentation for Amelia’s Magazine. After giving his thanks to the Amelia’s Magazine team for all the continued support and gorgeous illustrations from the last review, he began to talk me through the intriguing collection.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

These Ravensbourne College of Design and Central Saint Martin’s graduates began to work together due to their mutual love for escapism and the power of a story, which is how this collection began. Rob Jones described how they start with a ‘screenplay’ when working on a collection, and this one began from looking at the menacing and dark qualities to fairytales. ‘I found it interesting that stories we read to children deal with such dark and frightening themes. It made me think about how I’d react if a fairytale was re-told in a newspaper today, would I see it differently?Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum were drawn to the mix of innocence and frighteningly dark folklore, wanting to explore the underlying beauty in something considered traditionally sinister.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

I was immediately drawn to the intricate prints, swirling with dark reds, bright pinks and forest greens, highlighted with touches of neon. Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum pointed out how these beautiful floral-like patterns were actually cut-up crime scene photography from the 1940’s. I was immediately surprised, which I couldn’t hide. Really? But they were such beautiful prints… suddenly I saw the numbered markers police use for blood spatters, dropped weapons, or worse. The thought sunk in…and it made sense. In a strange way, it felt nice to know, like being let in on a secret or the thrill of when the murderer almost catches someone in a horror movie. In order to place such a dark theme on clothing in a lighter way, a harlequin diamond pattern was used instead of simply overlaying the imagery.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Other items of clothes glittered and shimmered, almost like childhood dress-up clothes, or to mimic the magic of fairytales and shining sweets like that shown in the film created for the collection, currently showing on the Teatum Jones website. Although several mannequins displayed the collection in the centre of the room, it wasn’t until I saw the models that I noticed that most of the clothing had large pockets, even in the more formal dresses. One of the models commented on how relaxed she felt, resting her hands in the silk pockets of her neon yellow dress.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

This team have found a perfect niche for womenswear that is considered and subtle, yet attention-grabbing. Alluring without being obvious. The midi length of the dresses and nipped-in light fabrics allow the wearer to be feminine in a relaxed way. It’s clear that the Teatum Jones woman is at ease with herself, a modern-day enchantress with a penchant for neon, skilled design and something a little wickedly different. The warm and positive outlook of these designers created an unforgettable London Fashion Week presentation experience; a drop of magical escapism from the busy London Fashion Week storm.

All photography by Alia Gargum

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Anna Higgie, ,Catherine Teatum, ,Duo, ,Fairytale, ,Fashion films, ,Forests, ,graduates, ,Horror Films, ,Innocence, ,Liberty of London, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,mock tudor, ,Neon, ,photography, ,print, ,Rob Jones, ,Silks, ,sinister, ,Teatum Jones, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Neon AW10 at Sao Paulo Fashion Week- Exclusive Report

neon_i10_056_altaPhotography throughout courtesy of Raymond Chan /Ag. Fotosite

If one took a time machine wanting to meet his or her favourite 1940’s diva in a distant tropical forest, viagra order they would surely have been transported to Thursday’s Neon fashion show. Playing with our notions of glamour in a shiny, information pills yet colourful way, viagra the brand presented an exotic yet elegant and wearable collection.

neon_i10_051_alta

neon_i10_098_altaNeon was born as a side project of college friends Dudu Bertholini and Rita Comparato in 2002. When photographer J.R. Duran invited Dudu to create a swimwear story, Rita was invited to collaborate and the results were so thrilling they decided to keep going. As the demand for their specially handcrafted one-piece bathing suits grew, the brand began to mass produce and commission different artists to create explosive colourful graphic signature prints every season. In 2004, Caca Ribeiro joined them in collaboration.

neon_i10_049_altaThursday’s AW10 collection had the hunter and the hunted as a theme. Wool, tweed, leather, silk, chiffon, felt, flannel, tricot, faux-fur and African cotton were some of the materials sampled to build upon the already traditional loose silhouettes and feminine shapes such as pencil skirts, tailleurs, imponent coats and bodies. The combination of duck and butterfly prints and handcrafts of Kuna Indians from Panama was hugely successful and with a giant lion placed in the middle of the runway Neon built up a dreamy illusion of being in a modern jungle, where both animals and the clothing come to life.

Categories ,Caca Ribeiro, ,Dudu Bertholini and Rita Comparato, ,J.R. Duran, ,Mariana Guimaraes, ,Neon, ,Sao Paulo Fashion Week

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Amelia’s Magazine | Nova Chiu: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review

Nova Chiu AW2013 by Gaarte
Nova Chiu A/W 2013 by Gaarte

The ethereal eruption of colour and texture at Nova Chiu was a perfect way to end a tiring first day at London Fashion Week.

Nova Chiu AW 2013 by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013 by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Following last season’s showcase of a light and predominantly print-based collection, the house of Nova Chiu brought the label back to it’s roots of heavy embroidery and embellishments for A/W 2013.

Nova Chiu AW 2013 by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu by Laura Hickman
Nova Chiu A/W 2013 by Laura Hickman

An immensely exciting colour palette was on display – a mix of piercing neons and rich earthy tones, much like The Electronic Super Highway’ by Korean-American artist Nam June Paik, an evident inspiration to the collection. Eclectic blends of material were also used – coloured leather, suede and horsehair blocks with embroideries and beaded trims, giving a three dimensional depth to the clothes.

Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW 2013-photo by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu AW by Amelia Gregory
Nova Chiu by Shy Illustrations
Nova Chiu A/W 2013 by Shy Illustrations

The garments coming down the runway were beautiful and meticulously crafted, but I found myself distracted by how bright the set lights were; unfortunately this made all the models skin look patchy with caked on foundation. Lighting aside, design duo Nova Chiu and Jeff Archer impressed with a dynamic collection that featured designs true to the label’s initial aesthetics and that are wearable enough to sell.

Categories ,A/W 2013, ,catwalk, ,collection, ,colour, ,fashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gaarte, ,garments, ,illustration, ,Jeff Archer, ,Laura Hickman, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Nam June Paik, ,Neon, ,Nova Chiu, ,runway, ,Shy Illustrations, ,Texture, ,The Electronic Super Highway

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week 2010: Northumbria

I always look forward to the Northumbria University BA fashion degree show for two reasons. One, price because it’s always effing good – the innovation, salve technique and creativity on display is second to pretty much nobody at Graduate Fashion Week. Secondly, I studied at the university, so this review might seem like a big fat plate of bias – I assure you, though, that it isn’t.

Nestled on the front row in between Style Savage Steve and the ever wonderful Hilary Alexander (who bopped, sketched and scribbled her way through the show) I was a little concerned that my big lens (baaaooowappp) might block the view of either of these fashion journalists. Neither said anything though, so I think I got away with it…

Opening the show with an explosion of glam-rock-meets-Elvis-meets-Lady-Gaga, Naomi New presented a very polished micro-collection featuring exaggerated shoulders of leather, spikes and studs, and horse-hair tails. Models strutted back and forth with real sex appeal and the quality of Naomi’s craftsmanship looked, from what I could see, incredible.

The key theme in this year’s show was digital prints, and it’s a testament to the late, great Alexander McQueen’s legacy that this is such a mainstay on graduate catwalks. Faye Chamberlain’s was the most striking of collections, owing to its wild neon prints reminiscent of MIA’s Kala album cover, and blingy embellishment. Short, short dresses with spikey hips challenged the traditional constraints of the female form.

Further print patrons included the work of Sophie Dee and Ludmila Maida. Sophie Dee presented a feminine, playful collection of vibrant prints, micro shorts and bubble skirts, accessorised with childlike objects such as candy floss and helium balloons, harping back to the glory days of the seaside. Ludmila Maida’s collection was a slightly more mature one, with elegant maxi dresses in neon, gathered into sections to create flattering asymmetrical shapes.

Gemma Williamson also hopped on the print train, with her slightly eery collection making use of religious iconography.


Illustration by Gemma Williamson from her graduate work

Menswear was, as always, well represented; one of the few menswear graduates to win the prestigious Gold Award in recent years was a Northumbria student. Sara Wilson set the standard with a mixture of soft tailoring and Japanese influence – loose fitting blazers were teamed with skinny trousers and shorts, while snood-like pieces of material attempted to cover the face, giving each outfit a martial-art feel.

Louise Dickinson’s inspired outfits seemed to draw influence from historical Britain and tradition in general. An oversized Barbour-style jacket here and a triangular-shaped cape printed with a vintage map there made for a intriguing and genuinely unique collection.

But it was Caroline Rowland’s eccentric tailoring that captured my imagination the most. A bit Sebastian Flyte, a bit Dries Van Noten, it was the perfect mix of traditional tailoring and quirky design flair. Ill-fitting gingham shirts (I presume on purpose) were teamed with tucked-in waistcoats and patterned bow ties, while cropped blazers looked great with high-waisted tailored trousers. You can never go wrong with a sock suspender either.

And now for a quick round of some of my favourite womesnwear collections. It’ll have to be a whistle-stop tour because I have 3 other shows to write up and I’m having my hair cut in an hour.

One of my absolute faves was Julie Perry, who combined body-concious all-in-ones with Meccano-style leather creations. These outfits had real sex appeal – not one for the supermarket but definitely for the fierce fashionista who isn’t afraid to show off. Julie’s pieces were architectural in shape and hinted at a little bit of kink.


Illustration by Julie Perry from her graduate work

Holly Farrar’s super sleek collection toyed with masculine tailoring and models had structured shoulders with outfits tapering downwards. Defined v-necklines gave the outfits an overall geometric look and were very sophisticated indeed.


Illustration by Holly Farrar from her graduate work

These gemoetric-slash-linear-slash-structured themes ran through many a collection, executed most effectively by Stephanie Price. Her futuristic collection married materials with aesthetic appeal with flattering shapes – mesh covered body-concious shift dresses had a dazzling effect, as did this dynamic jacket…


Illustrations by Stephanie Price, from her graduate work

Closing the show was Victoria Kirby, who had clearly been selected for her fresh innovation and coutourier-like craftsmanship. Elegant floor sweepers made from silk and velour had the appearance of two dresses in one, cut and merged down the middle. Exaggerating the shoulders and synching in at the waist created beautiful feminine shapes that flattered.


Illustration by Victoria Kirby, from her graduate work

All photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,Barbour, ,Bow Ties, ,Caroline Rowland, ,Digital Prints, ,Dries Van Noten, ,Elvis, ,Faye Chamberlain, ,Gemma Williamson, ,Gold Award, ,Graduate Fashion Week 2010, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Holly Farrar, ,japanese, ,Julie Perry, ,Kala, ,Lady Gaga, ,Louise Dickinson, ,Ludmila Maida, ,McQueen, ,Meccano, ,menswear, ,MIA, ,Naomi New, ,Neon, ,Newcastle, ,Northumbria, ,print, ,Sara Wilson, ,Sebastian Flyte, ,Sophie Dee, ,Stephanie Price, ,Style Savage, ,Victoria Kirby, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland Off Out Of Schedule S/S 2012 in Łódź: Olga Szynkarczuk

Olga Szynkarczuk S/S 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins
Olga Szynkarczuk S/S 2012 by Gareth A Hopkins.

I loved Olga Szynkarczuk‘s show on Sunday. BIOmimicry featured plenty of neon fabrics mixed with clever textured knitwear, sheers and laser cut showpieces, all worn with oversized perspex visors and accessorised with on trend clutches. Shapes were rounded at hemlines and around shoulders, with cut-out details a big feature of summery ice-cream coloured separates. Metallic highlights culminated with the most amazing final creation – a flexible laser cut top with a huge hooped train.

Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

I was delighted to discover that Olga Szynkarczuk works according to fair-trade principals, using organic materials where possible and working with craftspeople to modernise traditional techniques. Her exhibition was inspired by an exhibition called My Way by artist Jean Michel Othoniel (who designed the new Swatch watches) and the spectacle of Planet Lem at the Biuro Podrozy Theatre. ‘It is an analysis of society and its weaknesses contrasted with the superhuman world of outer space and robots.’ She is currently based in London, and I was told that she has just secured a full time job designing for a well known high street brand. I hope she still finds the time to create her own collections, because her talent is too good to be lost.

Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory
Olga Szynkarczuk Fashion Week Poland SS 2012-photography by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Biuro Podrozy Theatre, ,craft, ,fairtrade, ,Fashion Philosophy Fashion Week Poland, ,Futurism, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Jean-Michel Othoniel, ,knitwear, ,Lodz, ,My Way, ,Neon, ,Olga Szynkarczuk, ,Planet Lem, ,S/S 2012, ,Sheer, ,Swatch, ,traditional

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Amelia’s Magazine | Royal College of Art MA Degree Show 2011 Review: Textile Design

Emma Lundgren by Natasha Waddon
Emma Lundgren by Natasha Waddon.

Textiles were displayed amongst product design at the Royal College of Art 2011 degree show – fitting, health as many textile designers showed practical applications for their textiles on cushions, trunks, tables and more.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Shipley RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Shipley RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Shipley RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Shipley RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Shipley
Emma Shipley had produced an intricate print collection from fine pencil drawings that captured the patterns of nature… and some curious beasties. I’d love some of this on my wall… Follow Emma Shipley on Twitter.

Emma Lundgren by Sophia O'Connor
Emma Lundgren by Sophia O’Connor.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Emma LundgrenRCA MA degree show 2011-Emma LundgrenRCA MA degree show 2011-Emma Lundgren
I loved Emma Lundgren‘s Scandinavian inspired collection of brightly coloured costume and accessories. Think traditional Sami costume meets the rainbows of the Northern Lights. Lapland reworked for the modern age. Follow Emma Lundgren on Twitter.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Yunshin Cho
I liked the striking surface patterns of Yunshin Cho‘s print, based on the skeleton of a ship. It reminds me of wood laminate and 50s design classics. But her website on her business card doesn’t work… hopefully soon?

RCA MA degree show 2011-Rachel Philpott
Rachel Philpott chose a more avante garde approach: cotton covered with glitter and folded into intricate origami shapes. I don’t know how she did it but it was pretty amazing.

Thorunn Arnadottir by Natasha Waddon
Thorunn Arnadottir by Natasha Waddon.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Thorunn Arnadottir RCA MA degree show 2011-Thorunn Arnadottir
Thorunn Arnadottir chose that favourite contemporary source of inspiration the QR code, beading it into this amazing dress. Follow Thorunn Arnadottir on twitter.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Lauren Barfoot
Dresses printed by Lauren Barfoot hung wafting in the light breeze near the window – dominated by orange and purple shades these designs were inspired by Matisse and Fauvism. She’s well up on Twitter. Go follow her.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Kit Miles
Kit Miles collided classical baroque with digital music for these bold graphical prints.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Hannah Sabapathy
An exploration between the natural and manmade was also the basis for Hannah Sabapathy‘s collection – seen here on an architectural side table.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Jonna Saarinen
Jonna Saarinen of Finland brought a Scandinvian sensibility to her Hundreds and Thousands print collection that was display to great affect on picnic ware and table cloths. Follow Jonna Saarinen on Twitter.

RCA MA degree show 2011-David Bradley
David Bradley explored printing and pleats in some extraordinary dresses. Best appreciated for their technical expertise close up.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Kitty Joseph
Kitty Joseph created saturated colour prints in Colour Immersion.

RCA MA degree show 2011-Marie Parsons RCA MA degree show 2011-Marie Parsons
Lastly, Marie Parsons used traditional stitched quilting as the basis for her final piece – a brightly coloured trunk that juxtaposed digital embroidery and laser cutting of latex on hard and soft surfaces. Her collection was influenced by East End building sites, Mykonos Town and Paris flea market finds.

The RCA Graduate Show continues until 3rd July so I highly recommend that you check it out soon, and get on board with my other write ups.

Categories ,2011, ,50s, ,baroque, ,Beading, ,Colour Immersion, ,contemporary, ,cushions, ,David Bradley, ,digital, ,Emma Lundgren, ,Emma Shipley, ,EmmaEvaCaroline, ,Fauvism, ,finland, ,Graduate Shows, ,Hannah Sabapathy, ,Hundreds and Thousands, ,Jonna Saarinen, ,Katherine Joseph, ,Kit Miles, ,Kitty Joseph, ,Lapland, ,Lauren Barfoot, ,Marie Parsons, ,matisse, ,Natasha Waddon, ,Neon, ,Northern Lights, ,origami, ,print, ,Product Design, ,QR code, ,Quilting, ,Rachel Philpott, ,rca, ,Royal College of Art, ,Sami, ,Scandinavian, ,Sophia O’Connor, ,Stitching, ,Textile Design, ,textiles, ,Thorunn Arnadottir, ,traditional, ,Trunk, ,twitter, ,Yunshin Cho

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Amelia’s Magazine | Frieze Art Fair 2011: Exhibition Review

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-salon-94
Salon 94 at Frieze Art Fair 2011.

It shouldn’t really be possible to deduce trends in the art world, approved should it? Yet that is exactly what I was able to do at Frieze Art Fair. By housing a spectacular array of galleries all alongside each other in vast tents, dosage some with work by the same artist shown on different continents, medicine the sameness of much art is highlighted. And I say trends because none of these similarities can really be named a movement, not when the artists are flung so far and wide that they can have no possible involvement with each other than a fleeting knowledge gleaned from the media or touring art shows.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Amelia
This year the biggest trends seemed to follow only a couple of themes.. deducible even as I zipped around the fair in a matter of hours. I must admit that I make judgements on what I like within milliseconds at such events, so by default most of the art that I picked up on were things that spoke to me (and not always for a good reason).

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Dominique-Gonzalez-Foerster
After by Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review From the River-Christina-Mackie
From the River by Christina Mackie at Herald St.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Map of Truths and Beliefs by Grayson-Perry
Map of Truths and Beliefs by Grayson Perry.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Isa-Genzken
Isa Genzken.

Neon letter artwork and giant typography in general are popular (Tracey Emin, hello), as are craft inspired pieces that pile together assortments of materials to create something that often looks similar to a school art project. Add to this ceramics, tapestry (Grayson Perry, you have a lot to answer for, and I love you) and old toys, and the potential to create something exciting becomes seriously viable – though that line between primary school art project and stroke of genius is often hard to distinguish.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-David-Altmejd
David Altmejd at Andrea Rosen Gallery.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Ramiken Crucible by Andra-Ursuta
Ramiken Crucible by Andra Ursuta.

This trend sometimes crosses over with a very strong theme that says a lot about the spiritual deficit of our current lives: curious creations that bear significant reference to tribal deities and animist beliefs but also often with strong links to our present lives. Think crystallised heads on sticks, strange shaped skulls with flapping teeth, a flattened woman who looks like she’s just been removed from a peat bog: her body glistens with a jelly like substance, yet she wears trainers.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Joy-by-Tomoaki-Suzuki
Joy by Tomoaki Suzuki.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Elmgreen-and-Dragset
Elmgreen and Dragset.

In opposition to this present day esotericism I also found realistic figures in banal situations, often in miniature size. Or play dead, high heels and Blackberry at the feet or a morgue trolley. Ring a bell, Ron Mueck?

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Doppelganger-(Blue)-Peter-Liversidge
Doppelganger (Blue) by Peter Liversidge.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Gert-and-Uwe-Tobias Contemporary Fine Arts Berlin
Gert and Uwe Tobias at Contemporary Fine Arts Berlin.

Odd arrangements of objet trouvé on shelves have never been more popular. As ever I was also attracted to all the colourful decorative paintings. Aesthetically pleasing, and close in many ways to illustration.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Pierre-Huyghe-Recollection
Pierre Huyghe: Recollection.

And then of course there was the hermit crab in Pierre Huyghe‘s Recollection. That funny creature in a darkened room, benignly going about his own business in a small tank with only smaller creatures for friends. He bears a sculpted head on his back ( a replica of Brancussi’s Sleeping Muse) as he is coo-ed over by the moneyed hordes, marvelling at out total dominion over nature. But maybe the last laugh is on us? For what cares the hermit crab where he makes his bed.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-378
Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-378
Colourful art world characters.

In the past I have been put off attending Frieze Art Fair by what I have heard about the experience. And it was, indeed, a bizarre one. Whilst the plethora of artwork on display undoubtedly provides loads of inspiration, I think a whistle stop tour is necessary to weed out all the dross (of which there is much) and retain a modicum of sanity. But the event undeniably left a curiously icky feeling inside: I’ve never seen so many rich people in one place, and Frieze stank of serious wealth. Ridiculous, unnecessary wealth, of the kind that sucks the lifeblood out of whole nations and forces us to reevaluate our connection the universe. Do you sense the irony? We all know that art is a huge commodity in our money obsessed times, but here it is laid bare for all to see… and it’s disheartening to realise just how much the art world relies on the buying and selling powers of the mega rich to survive. Surely art is about more than this?

Frieze Art Fair continues until Sunday 16th October – you can visit the Sculpture Park for free, more details here.

Categories ,Andra Ursuta, ,Andrea Rosen Gallery, ,Animist, ,berlin, ,Brancussi, ,Christina Mackie, ,Contemporary Fine Arts, ,craft, ,David Altmejd, ,Deities, ,Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, ,Doppelganger (Blue), ,Elmgreen and Dragset, ,Frieze Art Fair, ,Gert and Uwe Tobias, ,Grayson Perry, ,Herald St, ,Hermit Crab, ,Isa Genzken, ,Joy, ,Magic, ,Neon, ,Objet Trouvé, ,Peter Liversidge, ,Pierre Huyghe, ,Pottery, ,Recollection, ,Ron Mueck, ,Salon 94, ,School Art Project, ,Sleeping Muse, ,spiritual, ,Tapestry, ,Tomoaki Suzuki, ,Tracey Emin, ,typography

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Amelia’s Magazine | Frieze Art Fair 2011 Trends: Neon Signs and Typography

Doug-Aitken
Now (#2 mirror) by Doug Aitken

Now for the first in my round up of trends from Frieze Art Fair 2011: my pick of neon sign writing and typographic treats. Make what you will of the words that have been chosen for pride of place in these artworks…

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Jack-Pierson
Jack Pierson

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Dominique-Gonzalez-Foerster
After by Dominque Gonzalez-Foerster

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-All-You-Can-Eat-by-Farhad-Moshiri
All You Can Eat by Farhad Moshiri

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Jung-Lee-at-One-and-J.-Gallery
Jung Lee at One and J. Gallery, there Seoul.

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Warm-Broad-Glow-II-by-Glenn-Ligon-2
Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Warm-Broad-Glow-II-by-Glenn-Ligon-2
Warm Broad Glow II (this read negro sunshine in full) by Glenn Ligon

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-tracey-emin
You made ME LOVE You by Tracey Emin

Frieze-Art-Fair-2011-review-Jason-Rhoades
Hairy Beaver; Glory Road 2003 by Jason Rhoades

Categories ,2011, ,After, ,All You Can Eat, ,Dominque Gonzalez-Foerster, ,Doug Aitken, ,Farhad Moshiri, ,Frieze Art Fair, ,Glenn Ligon, ,Hairy Beaver; Glory Road 2003, ,Jack Pierson, ,Jason Rhoades, ,Jung Lee, ,Letters, ,Neon, ,Now (#2 mirror), ,One and J. Gallery, ,review, ,Seoul, ,Tracey Emin, ,trend, ,typography, ,Warm Broad Glow II, ,You made ME LOVE You

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