Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Menswear Day Presentation Review: SIBLING


Sibling S/S 2012 by Antonia Parker

I had raced around the Fashion East installations in record time to ensure that I had the opportunity to have enough time to look around the Sibling presentation.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I loved the Sibling A/W 2012 collection so much – a whistle stop tour around East End boozers – that I was a little concerned that they couldn’t top it. Where do take it from there? To the fairground, physician of course! Entering the room they’d been assigned was a bit like a trip to the fairground itself: a dodgem car was positioned in one corner, drugs in which a mannequin had a TV for a head. It was all part of Sibling’s slightly mysterious world. Enormous illuminated letters spelling out S I B were casually leaning against another wall, and rollercoaster graphics adorned the walls.


Sibling S/S 2012 by Rebecca Strickson

As per usual, there wasn’t a single piece in this new offering that I wouldn’t buy instantly. Each piece evoked childhood memories of fairgrounds and all their kitsch connotations: delicious but dirty food, the rides that satisfy thrill-seekers’ pleasures and the boys you shouldn’t really fancy but who spin you on the waltzers so hard that you occasionally revisit that hot dog that you just ate.

Knitwear was on top form as usual, including cardigans with Argyll prints in edible sorbet colours and the show piece: a grey sweater with a wonderful embroidered pattern, cramming in as much fairground action as possible.

S/S brings an exciting t-shirt range, with LOVE and HATE logos, an I HEART HOT DOG motif, and various other fairground-themed designs. It was a little like fantasy shopping. I particularly like the Waltzer print on a pale blue t-shirt, should anybody wish to buy me a gift.

This season sees the trio collaborate with artist Yuko Kondo, who is responsible for the tattoo-like design on aforementioned sweater and the I HEART HOT DOG logo. Pastel-coloured leopard print sweaters are also a real winner. Playful LOVE and HATE t-shirts are sure to be everywhere come next summer, thanks to this wonderful collection. Last, but not least, I think the denim jacket with Kiss Me Quick emblem speaks for itself.


Sister by Sibling S/S 2012 by Matt Bramford

The weekend before saw the launch of womenswear line SISTER. I didn’t get much time to peruse this offering, such is the jam-packed weekend of London Fashion Week, but what I did see (a girl mounting a carousel horse) had the same fashion-as-fun ethos. Kondo’s emblems, sequins, foil prints and the dreamy leopard-print pattern in similar sorbet tones were the mainstay, proving that Sibling’s unique vision translates from menswear to womenswear with ease.

See highlights from the Sister presentation here:

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Argyll, ,Cozette McCreery, ,Dodgems, ,Fairgrounds, ,Hate, ,Hot dogs, ,Ice Cream, ,Joe Bates, ,Kiss Me Quick, ,knitwear, ,London Fashion Week, ,Love, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Menswear Day, ,Newgen, ,Presentation, ,Rebecca Strickson, ,review, ,Rollercoaster, ,Sibling, ,Sid Bryan, ,Sister by Sibling, ,Somerset House, ,Sorbet, ,T-shirts, ,Waltzer, ,Womenswear, ,Yuko Knodo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Menswear Day Presentation Review: SIBLING


Sibling S/S 2012 by Antonia Parker

I had raced around the Fashion East installations in record time to ensure that I had the opportunity to have enough time to look around the Sibling presentation.


All photography by Matt Bramford

I loved the Sibling A/W 2012 collection so much – a whistle stop tour around East End boozers – that I was a little concerned that they couldn’t top it. Where do take it from there? To the fairground, of course! Entering the room they’d been assigned was a bit like a trip to the fairground itself: a dodgem car was positioned in one corner, in which a mannequin had a TV for a head. It was all part of Sibling’s slightly mysterious world. Enormous illuminated letters spelling out S I B were casually leaning against another wall, and rollercoaster graphics adorned the walls.


Sibling S/S 2012 by Rebecca Strickson

As per usual, there wasn’t a single piece in this new offering that I wouldn’t buy instantly. Each piece evoked childhood memories of fairgrounds and all their kitsch connotations: delicious but dirty food, the rides that satisfy thrill-seekers’ pleasures and the boys you shouldn’t really fancy but who spin you on the waltzers so hard that you occasionally revisit that hot dog that you just ate.

Knitwear was on top form as usual, including cardigans with Argyll prints in edible sorbet colours and the show piece: a grey sweater with a wonderful embroidered pattern, cramming in as much fairground action as possible.

S/S brings an exciting t-shirt range, with LOVE and HATE logos, an I HEART HOT DOG motif, and various other fairground-themed designs. It was a little like fantasy shopping. I particularly like the Waltzer print on a pale blue t-shirt, should anybody wish to buy me a gift.

This season sees the trio collaborate with artist Yuko Kondo, who is responsible for the tattoo-like design on aforementioned sweater and the I HEART HOT DOG logo. Pastel-coloured leopard print sweaters are also a real winner. Playful LOVE and HATE t-shirts are sure to be everywhere come next summer, thanks to this wonderful collection. Last, but not least, I think the denim jacket with Kiss Me Quick emblem speaks for itself.


Sister by Sibling S/S 2012 by Matt Bramford

The weekend before saw the launch of womenswear line SISTER. I didn’t get much time to peruse this offering, such is the jam-packed weekend of London Fashion Week, but what I did see (a girl mounting a carousel horse) had the same fashion-as-fun ethos. Kondo’s emblems, sequins, foil prints and the dreamy leopard-print pattern in similar sorbet tones were the mainstay, proving that Sibling’s unique vision translates from menswear to womenswear with ease.

See highlights from the Sister presentation here:

Categories ,Antonia Parker, ,Argyll, ,Cozette McCreery, ,Dodgems, ,Fairgrounds, ,Hate, ,Hot dogs, ,Ice Cream, ,Joe Bates, ,Kiss Me Quick, ,knitwear, ,London Fashion Week, ,Love, ,Matt Bramford, ,menswear, ,Menswear Day, ,Newgen, ,Presentation, ,Rebecca Strickson, ,review, ,Rollercoaster, ,Sibling, ,Sid Bryan, ,Sister by Sibling, ,Somerset House, ,Sorbet, ,T-shirts, ,Waltzer, ,Womenswear, ,Yuko Knodo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Menswear Day Catwalk Review: D.GNAK by KANG.D

Illustration by Romain Lambert-Louis

It’s good thing it’s starting to feel like spring outside, rx as listening to Lulu and the Lampshades in the dead of winter strikes me as being something akin to torture. This is music that makes me want to ride my bicycle along gravel roads, healing slurping down iced lollies and squinting as the sunshine pokes through my eyelashes.

There is a lot of sweetness to Lulu and the Lampshades – starting with the playfulness of the name itself, link down to the music which is a bucketful of sunshine. At least that was my first impression, before I listened to the new ‘Cold Water’ EP. The only thing I’d heard of the London-based foursome before was ‘Feet to the sky’, a cheery little number with an even cheerier video, but for a release with just four tracks, ‘Cold Water’ does an impressive job of delivering diversity.

Illustration by Matilde Sazio

My favourite thing about Lulu and the Lampshades is probably main singer Luisa Gerstein’s voice – a rich, chocolatey sound which makes you think of bigger songs and swoonier music productions. But the stripped back style of the Lulu songs do an excellent job of accompanying Luisa. The overall effect is something akin to listening to your favourite act playing at a musical, just a few feet away and it feels like they‘re playing just for you.

It certainly sounds like the Lulus having fun though, skipping along (or at least that’s what it sounds like) on the title track ’Cold Water’. Although the lyrics tell a more complex story: ’I hate to be wrapped in cotton although I think it’s better for me / Yes I see there’s trouble but it’s proven to me I’m better off this way’ … I’m not sure if the music and lyrics are mismatched, or if Luisa is simply the happiest when causing a bit of trouble?

Illustration by Mhairi-stella McEwan

Illustration by Sarah Matthews

The video to ‘Cups’, or ‘You’re gonna miss me’, has had over half a million YouTube hits, as Luisa and Heloise banging those plastic beakers into the kitchen table really needs to be seen. ‘Cups’ started out as a routine Louisa learnt at percussion class, combined with new verses and a chorus from a traditional folk song. The result is a lovely little ’all together now’ call-and-response song, but it’s that cup action that has us all going Whoa Lulu! Have a look:

‘I’ll keep my demons underground if it keeps you smiling’, Luisa sings as ‘Demons’ start. Although the flute and glockenspiel keeps things light, the darker undertones are definitely there now, both in terms of lyrics and tone. ‘Cause you’ve punctured me / I’ve ruptured at the seams and though its strange for me / I’ll do my best to keep the rest from falling out’ … But there is something fairytale-like about it too, like the stories about witches and evil creatures that we like because it gives us a chill down our backs.

‘Moccasin Mile’ mixes vocal harmonies, ukulele and some nifty drumstick action as the tempos change. ‘If you can’t be good then please be careful,’ Luisa sings … But then the flute comes in again at the chorus, as Lulu regulars Luisa, Heloise, Jemma and Dan were joined by flutist Isobel to add some extra ‘dance around the maypole’ feeling. And that’s it – four tracks are done and Lulu and the Lampshades have certainly managed to whet our appetites for a full-length album. As well as a dip in a lake that’s still a little too cold, before skipping on home with sunburnt cheeks.

Illustration by Matilde Sazio

Illustration by Sarah Matthews

‘Cold Water’ by Lulu and the Lampshades is out now on Moshi Moshi. Have a look at the website for the current gig schedule, or see the YouTube channel for more music videos.

Illustration by Oliver John Quinn

After hanging out with contributor Nick for lunch during Menswear Day, information pills I hot-footed it up to Vauxhall Fashion Scout to check out D.GNAK‘s latest offerings. It was the only menswear show I’d see at the Freemasons’ Hall and it was fairly quiet. I’d enjoyed his outing last season and was looking forward to seeing how his quirky Japanese aesthetic would translate for A/W.


Contributor Georgia with Paul Weller

I bumped into contributor Georgia Takacs there and we headed into the venue, more about sitting on opposite sides so not to get the same pictures. As we sat down, she started FREAKING OUT. ‘Is that Paul Weller? IS THAT PAUL WELLER?!’ she began yelling. It turns out it was, and he was nestled on the front row with his missus and two children. Georgia immediately went over to chat to him and I took a few pictures of them together, grinned nervously at him and thought to myself that his haircut has a lot to answer for.


Illustration by Joana Faria

On with the show. In a bold move from last season’s classic tailoring with contemporary twists, Kang D (the designer behind D.GNAK) had injected strong colours, interesting knits and enormous rucksacks.


All photography by Matt Bramford

The show opened with utilitarian tailoring that you might expect George Orwell’s Winston Smith to wear dark grey baggy trousers with an apron-like upper half was teamed with a luxurious floor-length cable knit cardigan. Next, a rich pea-coat with over-sized lapels and plaid-detail shoulders.

D.GNAK as a label is quickly establishing itself as an expert in materials and textures. Wools, corduroy, tweed and cotton were all on display, spiced up using colours like mustard and burgundy.


Illustration by Rob Wallace

There’s also an eye for the unfinished – that’ll be the Japanese ma influence then – with fraid hems that look a bit like a Savile Row tailor has had the day off – but teamed with polished blazers and expensive-looking coats, this works really well.

Every man is pretty much catered for here. There’s sartorial tailoring in the form of suits and Sherlock Holmes-esque coats for the sharpest dresser; wool blazers with contrasting buttons and vibrant trousers work well for casuals; corduroy onesies will have the more fashion-forward males racing to the shops.

Ace accessories were on offer – oversized patent leather rucksacks with suede details were worn on both shoulders, buckle straps revealed helpful features like an umbrella carrier. I like.

This was a much fresher collection than last time – the same level of craftsmanship was on offer, but it’s interesting to see D-GNAK explore different pieces, experiment with colours and toy with the traditions of sartorial menswear.

See more of Joana Faria’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Catwalk review, ,D.GNAK, ,Dong Jun Kang, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,George Orwell, ,Joana Faria, ,KANG.D, ,London Fashion Week, ,ma, ,Menswear Day, ,Nineteen Eighty Four, ,Oliver John Quinn, ,Paul Weller, ,Rob Wallace, ,Savile Row, ,Sherlock Holmes, ,tailoring, ,Unfinished, ,Utilitarian, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Winston Smith

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Menswear Day Presentation Review: Mr Start

Cakes for Japan

Illustration by June Chanpoomidole

To those of you that have been to any of the Start boutiques in Shoreditch you’ll know they represent a relaxed luxury that more than compliments the clothes. This is most true for the mens formalwear boutique. I love it and could quiet happily spend hours in there. So when I saw that the Mr Start presentation was being held in One Aldwych I was very excited. Having graced the lobby bar with my presence on at least  one occasion to sip their very tasty cocktails, price I couldn’t think of a more suitable venue. Sadly we were shuffled downstairs to a tiny and ill-lit room. Pleased we’d arrived early to avoid the mounting queues, for sale myself and Matt surveyed the clothes.  


Illustration by Joana Faria

Thankfully the collection more than made up for the choice of venue, as did the dynamicism of Mr Start himself, and the lovely Brix Smith Start. Seeing people passionate about what they do never fails to lift my spirits. Despite living my life in jeans, I have a love of all things formal. I long for the day that dress down Fridays are a thing of the past; I’m just too lazy to do it myself. Very hypocritical, you might say. Suits, jackets and ties are almost always appropriate attire, however, they often take more consideration and thought than I am capable of bleary eyed at 7am on workday morning.  


All photography by Matt Bramford

This collection would inspire me to rise just that little bit earlier and make just a bit more effort. Mixing heritage fabrics such as Harris Tweeds with a modern cut, the collection worked really well. The colours chosen also lifted this collection from being too stayed; crushed grape and turquoise green statement jackets provided a subtle lift to everything. But we weren’t just treated to suits, elegantly tailored shirts in a variety of collar shapes were also a sight to behold. A clean colour palette of white, black and grey, the shirts complimented the suiting without overpowering it; my favourite being a smaller but starkly cutaway collar. I’d say understated luxury for those in the know was a common theme of the whole collection but the deep velvet suit and dinner jackets were far from understated.  


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Another great piece was the double breasted cropped peacoat. We’ve seen these on every boy band and All Saints clone in the past few seasons, but there was still something fresh about this piece. Mr Start’s accessories were equally strong with many of the fashion pack gushing over the suede brogues and loafers. They have a definite place on my wishlist, but I fear no amount of scotchguarding will protect them from my clumsy ways.  

In store this collection will shine even brighter than it did during the presentation, and leaving the store dressed head to toe in Mr Start will be a feat of inordinate self control. It’s just a shame the lighting and crowding let things down a little. Here’s looking forward to next seasons presentation, and a quick/expensive trip to Shoreditch in the meantime.  

See more from June Chanpoomidole and Joana Faria in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Brix Smith Start, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,menswear, ,Menswear Day, ,Mr Start, ,One Aldwych, ,Presentation, ,review, ,shoreditch, ,Start, ,Suits, ,tailoring

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Menswear Day Presentation Review: Mr Start


Illustration by June Chanpoomidole

To those of you that have been to any of the Start boutiques in Shoreditch you’ll know they represent a relaxed luxury that more than compliments the clothes. This is most true for the mens formalwear boutique. I love it and could quiet happily spend hours in there. So when I saw that the Mr Start presentation was being held in One Aldwych I was very excited. Having graced the lobby bar with my presence on at least  one occasion to sip their very tasty cocktails, I couldn’t think of a more suitable venue. Sadly we were shuffled downstairs to a tiny and ill-lit room. Pleased we’d arrived early to avoid the mounting queues, myself and Matt surveyed the clothes.  


Illustration by Joana Faria

Thankfully the collection more than made up for the choice of venue, as did the dynamicism of Mr Start himself, and the lovely Brix Smith Start. Seeing people passionate about what they do never fails to lift my spirits. Despite living my life in jeans, I have a love of all things formal. I long for the day that dress down Fridays are a thing of the past; I’m just too lazy to do it myself. Very hypocritical, you might say. Suits, jackets and ties are almost always appropriate attire, however, they often take more consideration and thought than I am capable of bleary eyed at 7am on workday morning.  


All photography by Matt Bramford

This collection would inspire me to rise just that little bit earlier and make just a bit more effort. Mixing heritage fabrics such as Harris Tweeds with a modern cut, the collection worked really well. The colours chosen also lifted this collection from being too stayed; crushed grape and turquoise green statement jackets provided a subtle lift to everything. But we weren’t just treated to suits, elegantly tailored shirts in a variety of collar shapes were also a sight to behold. A clean colour palette of white, black and grey, the shirts complimented the suiting without overpowering it; my favourite being a smaller but starkly cutaway collar. I’d say understated luxury for those in the know was a common theme of the whole collection but the deep velvet suit and dinner jackets were far from understated.  


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Another great piece was the double breasted cropped peacoat. We’ve seen these on every boy band and All Saints clone in the past few seasons, but there was still something fresh about this piece. Mr Start’s accessories were equally strong with many of the fashion pack gushing over the suede brogues and loafers. They have a definite place on my wishlist, but I fear no amount of scotchguarding will protect them from my clumsy ways.  

In store this collection will shine even brighter than it did during the presentation, and leaving the store dressed head to toe in Mr Start will be a feat of inordinate self control. It’s just a shame the lighting and crowding let things down a little. Here’s looking forward to next seasons presentation, and a quick/expensive trip to Shoreditch in the meantime.  

See more from June Chanpoomidole and Joana Faria in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Brix Smith Start, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,menswear, ,Menswear Day, ,Mr Start, ,One Aldwych, ,Presentation, ,review, ,shoreditch, ,Start, ,Suits, ,tailoring

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011: Illustrator Gareth does Menswear Day!

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, treat enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, cialis 40mg enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, viagra order and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, clinic enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, buy more about and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, remedy enticingly printed on pearly lilac paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, clinic it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection… there were some nice ideas; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. But it didn’t exactly blow me away, and yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. And I loved the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, side effects enticingly printed on pearly lilac paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, dosage it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, visit and you can read the interview here. The lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection… there were some nice ideas; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. But it didn’t exactly blow me away, and yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. Here’s hoping that the next season might see the reintroduction of colour again. Go on Jayne!
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Every now and again London Fashion Week throws out a curveball and you end up in the most random of places with the most ridiculous collection of people, physician wondering what the hell is going on. The Olivia Rubin show was just such an occasion.

I was very early to this show – a confluence of circumstances that left me standing at the front of a line outside the Jalouse nightclub in central London until I was completely numb with cold. From my prime vantage point I was able to ogle as the paps pounced on a series of D-Z list celebrities. I recognised Konnie Huq and footballer’s wife Danielle Lloyd but after that it was anyone’s guess. In my mind it’s never a good idea for the guests to overshadow a fashion show, dosage and especially not if I haven’t got a clue who they are.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once the celebs had been swept into the hallowed basement of Jalouse I too was invited in. I picked up a drink and swiftly headed towards the sunken seating area, viagra approved ignoring the protestations of the press girl to wait and see if there was space later on. As if! We’ve run an extensive interview with Olivia Rubin on this website and I didn’t much feel like standing around on my own anymore, so I plonked myself down next to a friendly looking bunch of people on a curved sofa. I soon discovered that the lad next to me was on work experience at a fashion magazine and somewhat in thrall to his first fashion week. Herein is revealed the ridiculousness of seating arrangements at fashion shows – at the end of the day they are completely arbitrary. Depending on who you know and whether you’re bolshy enough you can sit wherever you want, be you intern or editor.

Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon
Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon.

As guests slowly filled the club celebrities stepped up on to the catwalk at my head height to pose for the paps. First Danielle, swishing her hair this way and that like a prime racehorse. Then, to my delight, Laura Goodger and friends from The Only Way is Essex. Don’t worry, I had to look up her full name. I did watch a few episodes, but I’m not THAT SAD. By this point I was gobsmacked by the stunning level of celeb-dom in attendance. I later discovered that another fashion PR had been approached for tickets by the *cast* of The Only Way is Essex, but had rapidly turned them down as way too tacky. I must say, I don’t really understand the logic. Rather than making me think, way-hey, this must mean Olivia Rubin is really cool… it makes me utterly distracted… anthropologically fascinated by these strange creatures.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The result? I spent the entire catwalk show trying to capture Lauren pouting and preening, rather than concentrating on the clothes – which in any case were hard to see against the glare of flashbulbs. Famous model Olivia Inge certainly enjoyed herself too; gunning at friends in the audience as she pranced down the catwalk.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In a way it’s a shame that there was so much flimshaw surrounding this show because Olivia Rubin makes very cute clothes that feature colourful, fun prints and simple 80s styling. This collection encompassed giant splodgy animal prints, flowery brick designs and lacey goodness. To my mind not at all Essex.

As soon as the show was done the music leapt up to dancing volume, and yet more Essex girls headed to the toilets to touch up wondrously over-wrought hair and make-up that must surely have taken all day to perfect. I could happily have stayed next to the basins all night with my camera, but Matt and I instead drank free cocktails and put the world to rights.

You can read Matt Bramford’s fabby review here. Read our interview with Olivia Rubin here.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Every now and again London Fashion Week throws out a curveball and you end up in the most random of places with the most ridiculous collection of people, viagra sale wondering what the hell is going on. The Olivia Rubin show was just such an occasion.

I was very early to this show – a confluence of circumstances that left me standing at the front of a line outside the Jalouse nightclub in central London until I was completely numb with cold. From my prime vantage point I was able to ogle as the paps pounced on a series of D-Z list celebrities. I recognised Konnie Huq and footballer’s wife Danielle Lloyd but after that it was anyone’s guess. In my mind it’s never a good idea for the guests to overshadow a fashion show, seek and especially not if I haven’t got a clue who they are.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once the celebs had been swept into the hallowed basement of Jalouse I too was invited in. I picked up a drink and swiftly headed towards the sunken seating area, ignoring the protestations of the press girl to wait and see if there was space later on. As if! We’ve run an extensive interview with Olivia Rubin on this website and I didn’t much feel like standing around on my own anymore, so I plonked myself down next to a friendly looking bunch of people on a curved sofa. I soon discovered that the lad next to me was on work experience at a fashion magazine and somewhat in thrall to his first fashion week. Herein is revealed the ridiculousness of seating arrangements at fashion shows – at the end of the day they are completely arbitrary. Depending on who you know and whether you’re bolshy enough you can sit wherever you want, be you intern or editor.

Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon
Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon.

As guests slowly filled the club celebrities stepped up on to the catwalk at my head height to pose for the paps. First Danielle, swishing her hair this way and that like a prime racehorse. Then, to my delight, Laura Goodger and friends from The Only Way is Essex. Don’t worry, I had to look up her full name. I did watch a few episodes, but I’m not THAT SAD. By this point I was gobsmacked by the stunning level of celeb-dom in attendance. I later discovered that another fashion PR had been approached for tickets by the *cast* of The Only Way is Essex, but had rapidly turned them down as way too tacky. I must say, I don’t really understand the logic. Rather than making me think, way-hey, this must mean Olivia Rubin is really cool… it made me utterly distracted… anthropologically fascinated by these strange creatures.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The result? I spent the entire catwalk show trying to capture Lauren pouting and preening, rather than concentrating on the clothes – which in any case were hard to see against the glare of flashbulbs. Famous model Olivia Inge certainly enjoyed herself too; gurning at friends in the audience as she pranced down the catwalk.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In a way it’s a shame that there was so much flimshaw surrounding this show because Olivia Rubin makes very cute clothes that feature colourful, fun prints and simple 80s styling. This collection encompassed giant splodgy animal prints, flowery brick designs and lacey goodness. To my mind not at all Essex.

As soon as the show was done the music leapt up to dancing volume, and yet more Essex girls headed to the toilets to touch up wondrously over-wrought hair and make-up that must surely have taken all day to perfect. I could happily have stayed next to the basins all night with my camera, but Matt and I instead drank free cocktails and put the world to rights.

You can read Matt Bramford’s fabby review here. Read our interview with Olivia Rubin here.


J.W. Anderson (not Gareth) photographed by Matt Bramford

It’s 8:45 on a cold wet Wednesday and I’m stalking the entrance to Somerset House, order waiting for Matt Bramford to come and meet me for my first ever day of London Fashion Week, check which I’ve come to with a view to doing some live fashion illustration. I’m feeling surprisingly calm, considering how out of my depth I’m expecting to find myself. I put my serenity down to sleep deprivation, busying myself with not looking too out of place. At the point where the security guards are starting to wonder what I’m hanging around for, Matt texts me and I amble off, as coolly as I can, to meet him at the doors into the main ‘Tent’.

As I arrive, Matt hands me my Press Pass and I feel like he’s given me a Willy Wonky Golden Ticket which provides access to a new and magical world. I flash it on the way into the Press Room where Matt picks up his stuff, hands me the ridiculously over-sized invitation to J.W. Anderson and we’re out again, straight into the queue for the show. The bouncer in charge of the queue takes a look at our invites and sends us to opposite sides of the room. I experiment with making myself look natural in my surroundings, the queue that Matt’s in gets allowed through, and once that’s cleared, my queue starts shuffling forward.


J.W. Anderson, photographed by Matt Bramford

I’m allowed past some rope barriers into the main room, and am… well, not unimpressed, rather just not as overwhelmed as I’d prepared myself for. The room’s long and poorly lit, its sides lined with rows of wooden benches, and a polythene-covered runway running up the middle – I don’t know what I was expecting, but this is a lot plainer than I’d thought it was going to be. I make my way over to the row of benches dictated by my ticket, and then busy myself with getting my video-camera, pad and pens ready. As the room settles down I realise that in an almost-full room, I’ve got an entire bench to myself, and am not sure whether to feel lucky or to take offence. 


All illustrations by Gareth A Hopkins

The room hushes as the polythene sheet is pulled away by some burly stagehands and then before I’m really ready for it the lights are on full-blast and there’s a man marching down the catwalk. I pop the lid off my pen, put the nib to the page and the model’s already been and gone. I wait for the next few guys to come and go, then pick my target and start frantically sketching. By the time he’s tucked away backstage I’ve managed to capture the top corner of his sleeve and that’s it. I write in my sketchbook “Shit, I can’t draw this fast” and get out my video camera, with a view to capturing the outfits and then working from the videos – the trouble is the lights are so bright that all I get on the viewing screen is a bright white shape moving at speed, like the aliens from Cocoon are parading for a crowd assembled in a gymnasium. 


J.W. Anderson, photographed by Matt Bramford

I realise that I’m not going to achieve very much through either drawing or filming, and so instead take the opportunity to enjoy the show, and concentrate on the clothes as much as I can. The clothes are sharply tailored, often military-style, but made out of combinations of textures and textiles – a jumper with furry arms and Barbour-style body for instance. There are also some skirts in there, which I think look pretty cool. The only thing I’m not keen on is the use of paisley, which of all patterns in the world is probably my least favourite. And then ‘Wave Of Mutilation’ by Pixies is playing over the PA and all the models are walking in a line to applause from the audience – in joining in, I manage to drop both my camera and my pad, and spend this final section of the show flicking my attention between applauding, watching the clothes and trying to find my dropped possessions. 

After it’s all over I re-locate Matt, who asks if I got much done, and I explain about my inability to draw as fast as I needed to. He reassures me by saying that next up is Sibling, who are holding a presentation, and that I’ll have much more time to get some decent drawing done. With some time to kill, we wait outside in the thankfully quite mild weather. Nick Bain comes and joins us after a while and tells us about Charlie Le Mindu’s show from earlier in the week and I feel a little disappointed that none of the models from JW Anderson’s show were covered in pig’s blood.

As 10:30am rolls around, we make our way up to the Sibling presentation. I don’t know what to expect from Sibling – I’d researched them in preparation and in all honesty wasn’t that fussed about them. Their mix of high fashion and self-aware bloke-ishness didn’t really do anything from me, but I kept an open mind. I know Nick loved the clothes on show, but I still can’t get behind it – I find their use of the ‘Kiss Pandas’ a bit boorish, and this combined with a inbuilt distrust of knitted ski masks and people dressed as pandas puts me on edge. That’s not to say I hate it, though – there’s a furry headwear/scarf combination that I wish I could get away with wearing, and I really like some of the jumpers. I manage to get some sketching of two of the outfits done, but find myself being more and more in the way of people with cameras and notebooks and pens tapping against their lips, and sidle out of the room after Matt and Nick. 
 


Sibling, photographed by Matt Bramford

Once outside I make the most of my half-day from work, and go back to my office for a few hours, to return for some more catwalk shows in the afternoon…

Look out for the rest of Gareth’s account tomorrow!

See Gareth’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Barbour, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Cocoon, ,fashion, ,illustration, ,J.W. Anderson, ,Kiss, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Menswear Day, ,Nick Bain, ,Pandas, ,Portico Rooms, ,press, ,Sibling, ,Somerset House, ,the pixies, ,Wave of Mutliation, ,Willy Wonka

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011: Illustrator Gareth does Menswear Day!

Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, treat enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, cialis 40mg enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, viagra order and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, clinic enticingly printed on pearly lilac-y grey paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, buy more about and you can read the interview here. The pearly lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection – there were some nice ideas – especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s – but it didn’t exactly blow me away. And yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. But I did really love the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, remedy enticingly printed on pearly lilac paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, clinic it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, and you can read the interview here. The lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection… there were some nice ideas; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. But it didn’t exactly blow me away, and yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. And I loved the jewellery – I’d love myself a bit of that I would.
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton
Jayne Pierson A/W 2011 by Ellie Sutton.

For Jayne Pierson I raced into town alone – yet another early morning show for which we only had one ticket, side effects enticingly printed on pearly lilac paper. This despite a very nice mention of our support in the accompanying press release – thankyou whoever thought to mention us, dosage it’s appreciated! We did in fact catch up with Jayne just prior to her show, visit and you can read the interview here. The lilac invite and goodie bag were not, however, an indicator of a colourful show but rather the favoured shade of lipstick. Kingdom of Shadows began on a black note and carried on in the same vein, broken up only by a curious grey and beige striped taffeta that is something of a Pierson signature but would not have looked out of place on curtains or a sofa in a certain type of house.

Jayne Pierson Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme
Jayne Pierson’s Kingdom of Shadows by Kerri-Ann Hulme.

Jayne Pierson formerly worked in the music business and this show felt deeply imbued with the remnants of an 80s rock sensibility. A gothic Victorian kind of rock, with swaggering shoulders and bunched bustle skirts. The models sported messy up dos, pallid faces with lilac lips and pin sharp shapely heels. Black tailored jackets featured inset patent fabric shoulders and cuffs, leather minidresses cowl-necked atop rubberised leggings. The sudden introduction of striped silk was balanced with patent detailing on collar, waist and cuffs – a jaunty pillbox hat set askance. Devore lacy velvet also made an appearance, not to mention a terribly racy see through crop top and leggings. I particularly liked the large but lightly draped silver jewellery by Fiona Paxton, who fuses Indian artisanship with a British punk sensibility and Bauhaus design. A corseted jumpsuit that hit the catwalk in a tipsy fashion was less desirable: the poor dresser must have got a shafting but I blame the model’s lack of boobs. What’s the point of a shaped bodice if there’s nothing to put in them?

Jayne took her bow on the catwalk accompanied by her celebrity model – which no one knew. I had to check in with the PR to find out who she was but I can’t for the life of me remember – apparently a Welsh singer of some description.

If I’m honest I’m not entirely sure what to make of this collection… there were some nice ideas; especially the strong shoulders and nipped in waists that recalled my fondest decade, the 80s. But it didn’t exactly blow me away, and yet again there was all that pesky black, which will never ever be my favourite fashion colour. Here’s hoping that the next season might see the reintroduction of colour again. Go on Jayne!
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Every now and again London Fashion Week throws out a curveball and you end up in the most random of places with the most ridiculous collection of people, physician wondering what the hell is going on. The Olivia Rubin show was just such an occasion.

I was very early to this show – a confluence of circumstances that left me standing at the front of a line outside the Jalouse nightclub in central London until I was completely numb with cold. From my prime vantage point I was able to ogle as the paps pounced on a series of D-Z list celebrities. I recognised Konnie Huq and footballer’s wife Danielle Lloyd but after that it was anyone’s guess. In my mind it’s never a good idea for the guests to overshadow a fashion show, dosage and especially not if I haven’t got a clue who they are.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once the celebs had been swept into the hallowed basement of Jalouse I too was invited in. I picked up a drink and swiftly headed towards the sunken seating area, viagra approved ignoring the protestations of the press girl to wait and see if there was space later on. As if! We’ve run an extensive interview with Olivia Rubin on this website and I didn’t much feel like standing around on my own anymore, so I plonked myself down next to a friendly looking bunch of people on a curved sofa. I soon discovered that the lad next to me was on work experience at a fashion magazine and somewhat in thrall to his first fashion week. Herein is revealed the ridiculousness of seating arrangements at fashion shows – at the end of the day they are completely arbitrary. Depending on who you know and whether you’re bolshy enough you can sit wherever you want, be you intern or editor.

Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon
Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon.

As guests slowly filled the club celebrities stepped up on to the catwalk at my head height to pose for the paps. First Danielle, swishing her hair this way and that like a prime racehorse. Then, to my delight, Laura Goodger and friends from The Only Way is Essex. Don’t worry, I had to look up her full name. I did watch a few episodes, but I’m not THAT SAD. By this point I was gobsmacked by the stunning level of celeb-dom in attendance. I later discovered that another fashion PR had been approached for tickets by the *cast* of The Only Way is Essex, but had rapidly turned them down as way too tacky. I must say, I don’t really understand the logic. Rather than making me think, way-hey, this must mean Olivia Rubin is really cool… it makes me utterly distracted… anthropologically fascinated by these strange creatures.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The result? I spent the entire catwalk show trying to capture Lauren pouting and preening, rather than concentrating on the clothes – which in any case were hard to see against the glare of flashbulbs. Famous model Olivia Inge certainly enjoyed herself too; gunning at friends in the audience as she pranced down the catwalk.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In a way it’s a shame that there was so much flimshaw surrounding this show because Olivia Rubin makes very cute clothes that feature colourful, fun prints and simple 80s styling. This collection encompassed giant splodgy animal prints, flowery brick designs and lacey goodness. To my mind not at all Essex.

As soon as the show was done the music leapt up to dancing volume, and yet more Essex girls headed to the toilets to touch up wondrously over-wrought hair and make-up that must surely have taken all day to perfect. I could happily have stayed next to the basins all night with my camera, but Matt and I instead drank free cocktails and put the world to rights.

You can read Matt Bramford’s fabby review here. Read our interview with Olivia Rubin here.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

Every now and again London Fashion Week throws out a curveball and you end up in the most random of places with the most ridiculous collection of people, viagra sale wondering what the hell is going on. The Olivia Rubin show was just such an occasion.

I was very early to this show – a confluence of circumstances that left me standing at the front of a line outside the Jalouse nightclub in central London until I was completely numb with cold. From my prime vantage point I was able to ogle as the paps pounced on a series of D-Z list celebrities. I recognised Konnie Huq and footballer’s wife Danielle Lloyd but after that it was anyone’s guess. In my mind it’s never a good idea for the guests to overshadow a fashion show, seek and especially not if I haven’t got a clue who they are.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Once the celebs had been swept into the hallowed basement of Jalouse I too was invited in. I picked up a drink and swiftly headed towards the sunken seating area, ignoring the protestations of the press girl to wait and see if there was space later on. As if! We’ve run an extensive interview with Olivia Rubin on this website and I didn’t much feel like standing around on my own anymore, so I plonked myself down next to a friendly looking bunch of people on a curved sofa. I soon discovered that the lad next to me was on work experience at a fashion magazine and somewhat in thrall to his first fashion week. Herein is revealed the ridiculousness of seating arrangements at fashion shows – at the end of the day they are completely arbitrary. Depending on who you know and whether you’re bolshy enough you can sit wherever you want, be you intern or editor.

Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon
Olivia Rubin by Karolina Burdon.

As guests slowly filled the club celebrities stepped up on to the catwalk at my head height to pose for the paps. First Danielle, swishing her hair this way and that like a prime racehorse. Then, to my delight, Laura Goodger and friends from The Only Way is Essex. Don’t worry, I had to look up her full name. I did watch a few episodes, but I’m not THAT SAD. By this point I was gobsmacked by the stunning level of celeb-dom in attendance. I later discovered that another fashion PR had been approached for tickets by the *cast* of The Only Way is Essex, but had rapidly turned them down as way too tacky. I must say, I don’t really understand the logic. Rather than making me think, way-hey, this must mean Olivia Rubin is really cool… it made me utterly distracted… anthropologically fascinated by these strange creatures.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

The result? I spent the entire catwalk show trying to capture Lauren pouting and preening, rather than concentrating on the clothes – which in any case were hard to see against the glare of flashbulbs. Famous model Olivia Inge certainly enjoyed herself too; gurning at friends in the audience as she pranced down the catwalk.

Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryOlivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Olivia Rubin A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In a way it’s a shame that there was so much flimshaw surrounding this show because Olivia Rubin makes very cute clothes that feature colourful, fun prints and simple 80s styling. This collection encompassed giant splodgy animal prints, flowery brick designs and lacey goodness. To my mind not at all Essex.

As soon as the show was done the music leapt up to dancing volume, and yet more Essex girls headed to the toilets to touch up wondrously over-wrought hair and make-up that must surely have taken all day to perfect. I could happily have stayed next to the basins all night with my camera, but Matt and I instead drank free cocktails and put the world to rights.

You can read Matt Bramford’s fabby review here. Read our interview with Olivia Rubin here.


J.W. Anderson (not Gareth) photographed by Matt Bramford

It’s 8:45 on a cold wet Wednesday and I’m stalking the entrance to Somerset House, order waiting for Matt Bramford to come and meet me for my first ever day of London Fashion Week, check which I’ve come to with a view to doing some live fashion illustration. I’m feeling surprisingly calm, considering how out of my depth I’m expecting to find myself. I put my serenity down to sleep deprivation, busying myself with not looking too out of place. At the point where the security guards are starting to wonder what I’m hanging around for, Matt texts me and I amble off, as coolly as I can, to meet him at the doors into the main ‘Tent’.

As I arrive, Matt hands me my Press Pass and I feel like he’s given me a Willy Wonky Golden Ticket which provides access to a new and magical world. I flash it on the way into the Press Room where Matt picks up his stuff, hands me the ridiculously over-sized invitation to J.W. Anderson and we’re out again, straight into the queue for the show. The bouncer in charge of the queue takes a look at our invites and sends us to opposite sides of the room. I experiment with making myself look natural in my surroundings, the queue that Matt’s in gets allowed through, and once that’s cleared, my queue starts shuffling forward.


J.W. Anderson, photographed by Matt Bramford

I’m allowed past some rope barriers into the main room, and am… well, not unimpressed, rather just not as overwhelmed as I’d prepared myself for. The room’s long and poorly lit, its sides lined with rows of wooden benches, and a polythene-covered runway running up the middle – I don’t know what I was expecting, but this is a lot plainer than I’d thought it was going to be. I make my way over to the row of benches dictated by my ticket, and then busy myself with getting my video-camera, pad and pens ready. As the room settles down I realise that in an almost-full room, I’ve got an entire bench to myself, and am not sure whether to feel lucky or to take offence. 


All illustrations by Gareth A Hopkins

The room hushes as the polythene sheet is pulled away by some burly stagehands and then before I’m really ready for it the lights are on full-blast and there’s a man marching down the catwalk. I pop the lid off my pen, put the nib to the page and the model’s already been and gone. I wait for the next few guys to come and go, then pick my target and start frantically sketching. By the time he’s tucked away backstage I’ve managed to capture the top corner of his sleeve and that’s it. I write in my sketchbook “Shit, I can’t draw this fast” and get out my video camera, with a view to capturing the outfits and then working from the videos – the trouble is the lights are so bright that all I get on the viewing screen is a bright white shape moving at speed, like the aliens from Cocoon are parading for a crowd assembled in a gymnasium. 


J.W. Anderson, photographed by Matt Bramford

I realise that I’m not going to achieve very much through either drawing or filming, and so instead take the opportunity to enjoy the show, and concentrate on the clothes as much as I can. The clothes are sharply tailored, often military-style, but made out of combinations of textures and textiles – a jumper with furry arms and Barbour-style body for instance. There are also some skirts in there, which I think look pretty cool. The only thing I’m not keen on is the use of paisley, which of all patterns in the world is probably my least favourite. And then ‘Wave Of Mutilation’ by Pixies is playing over the PA and all the models are walking in a line to applause from the audience – in joining in, I manage to drop both my camera and my pad, and spend this final section of the show flicking my attention between applauding, watching the clothes and trying to find my dropped possessions. 

After it’s all over I re-locate Matt, who asks if I got much done, and I explain about my inability to draw as fast as I needed to. He reassures me by saying that next up is Sibling, who are holding a presentation, and that I’ll have much more time to get some decent drawing done. With some time to kill, we wait outside in the thankfully quite mild weather. Nick Bain comes and joins us after a while and tells us about Charlie Le Mindu’s show from earlier in the week and I feel a little disappointed that none of the models from JW Anderson’s show were covered in pig’s blood.

As 10:30am rolls around, we make our way up to the Sibling presentation. I don’t know what to expect from Sibling – I’d researched them in preparation and in all honesty wasn’t that fussed about them. Their mix of high fashion and self-aware bloke-ishness didn’t really do anything from me, but I kept an open mind. I know Nick loved the clothes on show, but I still can’t get behind it – I find their use of the ‘Kiss Pandas’ a bit boorish, and this combined with a inbuilt distrust of knitted ski masks and people dressed as pandas puts me on edge. That’s not to say I hate it, though – there’s a furry headwear/scarf combination that I wish I could get away with wearing, and I really like some of the jumpers. I manage to get some sketching of two of the outfits done, but find myself being more and more in the way of people with cameras and notebooks and pens tapping against their lips, and sidle out of the room after Matt and Nick. 
 


Sibling, photographed by Matt Bramford

Once outside I make the most of my half-day from work, and go back to my office for a few hours, to return for some more catwalk shows in the afternoon…

Look out for the rest of Gareth’s account tomorrow!

See Gareth’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Barbour, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Cocoon, ,fashion, ,illustration, ,J.W. Anderson, ,Kiss, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Menswear Day, ,Nick Bain, ,Pandas, ,Portico Rooms, ,press, ,Sibling, ,Somerset House, ,the pixies, ,Wave of Mutliation, ,Willy Wonka

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Menswear Day Catwalk Review: Christopher Shannon

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=link aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, cheap aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, order aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, rem…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=ed aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, for sale aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, rem…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=more about aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, rem…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=pills aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, rem…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=discount aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, remedy aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, site aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=hospital aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, pilule aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, order aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing. This collection was by no means for the faint hearted, but that, in my book, is a very good thing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for styling this show, she who also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=medications aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, buy information pills aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing. This collection was by no means for the faint hearted, but that, in my book, is a very good thing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for the styling; she also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=look aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, hospital aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing. This collection was by no means for the faint hearted, but that, in my book, is a very good thing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for the styling; she also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, <a target=erectile aka Artist Andrea” title=”KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, medical aka Artist Andrea” width=”480″ height=”595″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-37005″ />
KTZ A/W 2011 by Andrea Peterson, symptoms aka Artist Andrea.

I wasn’t going to go into Somerset House on Wednesday, I really wasn’t. But the lure of a new Kokon To Zai collection was just too much. And boy was I glad that I did head into town for what turned out to be one of my very favourites shows of the week.

KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration
KTZ A/W 2011 by LJG Art and Illustration.

On entering an extremely packed BFC tent (menswear seemed much busier this season) I was left wondering where to sit when Lida Hujic grabbed me and led me to a prime spot near the catwalk entrance, right next to Prince Cassius, Leroy of Diary of a Clothes Horse and, erm…. the Bosnian ambassador. There’s nothing like a bit of diversity on the front row!

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kayleigh Bluck.

Building on their monochromatic S/S season KTZ served up a primary coloured delight…. a little bit 80s, a little bit Memphis and a whole lot of fun. Calder-like 80s graphic sculptures rose in whorls out of heads. Huge ball bangles created bold wrist protuberances.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou
KTZ A/W 2011 by Maria Papadimitriou.

Earrings, necklaces, brooches and sunglasses were striped, gold, abstracted statements. And for the men? Primary coloured balaclavas with bobbles: part bank robber, part cold small child.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea
KTZ groupies by Andrea Peterson, aka Artist Andrea.

But, onto the main course. This was a massive collection that took in easy to wear striped jersey tops and Dynasty meets Mondrian statement dresses with amazing marbled, flounce waists and layered tailoring. For men there were patent leather jackets, striped trousers and zig zag braces. The shoes are most definitely worth a mention – striped and block-heeled for women, platformed and buckled for the men – they were a wonderful complement to the clothing. This collection was by no means for the faint hearted, but that, in my book, is a very good thing.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia-Parker-
KTZ A/W 2011 by Antonia Parker.

But then I started to worry, just a little bit, that a dampener was about to be put on my enthusiasm. These days it really is so hard to tell what is real fur and what is not, and without the aid of a press release I presumed the former. Luckily I was put right straight away after the show through the power of twitter when KTZ informed me that only fake fur was used to create the fabulous oversized pompom scarf and killer colour hooded duffle coat.

KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black
KTZ A/W 2011 by Kellie Black.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I think I’m in love… I actually left this show beaming from ear to ear, and I can’t often say that. Major kudos must surely be given to Anna Trevelyan for the styling; she also styled the Alex Noble installation, and Charlie Le Mindu’s show. This lady has got some seriously diverse and wonderful ideas going on. You can follow her adventures on twitter here.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford
Kokon to Zai by Dan Stafford.

KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
KTZ A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can see more work by Andrea Peterson, Antonia Parker and Kellie Black in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Illustration by Krister Selin

Christopher Shannon burst back on to the catwalk on Menswear Day at London Fashion Week in typical chav-luxe fashion. Menswear day was a bit hot and cold this season – some of the shows were extremely busy, healing but when I arrived at Christopher Shannon’s there didn’t seem to be that many attendees, so I plonked myself on the front row and fiddled with my iPhone in a bid to look belonging and important. I even adjusted my crumbling posture (which is hella difficult after the cruel strains of back-to-back slumping at shows).


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

The show soon filled up, mind, and I was squashed along the frankly miserable BFC benches. Shannon’s infamous taste in music with which I wholeheartedly side (Rihanna’s What’s My Name and Te Amo being this season’s choice tunes) began the show, and out popped the street-cast models we’re familiar with. Some of them look terrified, some achingly nonchalant, but all are suited to Shannon’s unique take on menswear.


All photography by Matt Bramford

A mix of jersey sweatshirts, scarves and oversized rucksacks started the show – each with a Shannon twist. Shirts were cut through the middle to mix up the patterns – this time with a more ‘worldly’ influence. His obsession with sportswear derives from the fact that wherever you go, ‘there’s always sportswear’ – too true – and Shannon has drawn upon the variations of sportswear in different cultures for this ‘Hold Yer Head Up’ collection.


Illustration by Oscar Rubio

Bolder prints – abstract forms that have a more biological feel (influenced by his affection for David Attenborough!) make up the body of designs. Later came shirts separated down the middle in varying ways – sometimes texture, sometimes colour. Some shirts had woven-blanket details with different kitsch embellishments – a surprising move but a welcome one nonetheless.

Shannon’s clean nylons were spiced up with some frou-frou details this season – I wouldn’t be seen dead in any of this (mostly because my friends would snort, point and laugh) but I think the aesthetic of it is just fabulous. The lights, imposing over the catwalk, bounced in between each ruffle to give a shiny, futuristic look. A colour palette of navy blue, black, grey came with splashes of colour from the woven elements and bits of baby pink to remind us that this is still sportswear. Flat caps and flashy vibrant trainers complimented each outfit.


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

Much preferred the Eastpak collaboration rucksacks this time – again, the woven blanket details showed up and looked ace.

But, in spite of all this, I’ll forever remember Christopher Shannon’s A/W 2011 outing for those incredible Frank Sidebottom-esque hair-dos and embellished eyebrows. Why, you might ask? Because this is FASHION, darling.

See more of Krister Selin and Michelle Urval Nyrén’s illustrations in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration!

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,BFC, ,chavs, ,Christopher Shannon, ,Eastpak, ,Ethnic, ,Eyebrows, ,Flat caps, ,Frank Sidebottom, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Luxe, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Menswear Day, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Oscar Rubio, ,Rihanna, ,Rucksacks, ,Somerset House, ,sportswear, ,Te Amo, ,What’s My Name?

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Komakino S/S 2010 – Paint it Black

loudalton5

Lou Dalton presented her collection in the Portico Rooms of Somerset House, stuff a rather opulent setting reached by a romantic, troche winding staircase. This idyllic space couldn’t have suited the Dalton’s collection better, web unless it had been adorned in seafaring regalia.

This isn’t to say that Lou’s vision for Spring/Summer 2010 is a direct pastiche of maritime outfits. Instead, more subtle referencing was present.

The stripe – the seaside staple – was there in a number of outfits, but it had been re-worked for a more mature look, despite the models having a mean age of 14 (I surmise). I particularly loved the way it had be knitted into these two pieces…

2_1

loudalton7

Basics were simple, with white vests featuring graphic patterns and loose fitting tailoring, such as blazer-waistcoats or knee-length shorts.

loudalton6

loud

As the collection progressed, it was clear that Dalton’s phantasm was less straight-forward sea. New-romantic elements and the channelling of pirates evoked memories a more decadent, classical period in history, when travelling by sea was the only way to travel. Wide brimmed hats and neat safari jackets, which were exquisitely tailored, fall into this category.

6_1

There was also a hint of femininity to the collection, juxtaposed with more masculine pieces. Tailored chambray shirts were teamed with gold corsages and neck ties, for example.

loudalton5

Fantastic accessories on display – oversized bags featuring graphic prints by Ricardo Fumanal and embellished with more metallic corsages. Sunglasses were provided by Linda Farrow, need I say more?

loudalton2

Overall a very wearable collection where different pieces can be fused together to create different looks. Some of which I hope to try pretty soon…

loudalton4

Photography by Matt Bramford

loudalton5

Lou Dalton presented her collection in the Portico Rooms of Somerset House, ailment a rather opulent setting reached by a romantic, and winding staircase. This idyllic space couldn’t have suited the Dalton’s collection better, unless it had been adorned in seafaring regalia.

This isn’t to say that Lou’s vision for Spring/Summer 2010 is a direct pastiche of maritime outfits. Instead, more subtle referencing was present.

The stripe – the seaside staple – was there in a number of outfits, but it had been re-worked for a more mature look, despite the models having a mean age of 14 (I surmise). I particularly loved the way it had be knitted into these two pieces…

2_1

loudalton7

Basics were simple, with white vests featuring graphic patterns and loose fitting tailoring, such as blazer-waistcoats or knee-length shorts.

loudalton6

loud

As the collection progressed, it was clear that Dalton’s phantasm was less straight-forward sea. New-romantic elements and the channelling of pirates evoked memories a more decadent, classical period in history, when travelling by sea was the only way to travel. Wide brimmed hats and neat safari jackets, which were exquisitely tailored, fall into this category.

6_1

There was also a hint of femininity to the collection, juxtaposed with more masculine pieces. Tailored chambray shirts were teamed with gold corsages and neck ties, for example.

loudalton5

Fantastic accessories on display – oversized bags featuring graphic prints by Ricardo Fumanal and embellished with more metallic corsages. Sunglasses were provided by Linda Farrow, need I say more?

loudalton2

Overall a very wearable collection where different pieces can be fused together to create different looks. Some of which I hope to try pretty soon…

loudalton4

Photography by Matt Bramford
loudalton5

Lou Dalton presented her collection in the Portico Rooms of Somerset House, viagra a rather opulent setting reached by a romantic, winding staircase. This idyllic space couldn’t have suited the Dalton’s collection better, unless it had been adorned in seafaring regalia.

This isn’t to say that Lou’s vision for Spring/Summer 2010 is a direct pastiche of maritime outfits. Instead, more subtle referencing was present.

The stripe – the seaside staple – was there in a number of outfits, but it had been re-worked for a more mature look, despite the models having a mean age of 14 (I surmise). I particularly loved the way it had be knitted into these two pieces…

2_1

loudalton7

Basics were simple, with white vests featuring graphic patterns and loose fitting tailoring, such as blazer-waistcoats or knee-length shorts.

loudalton6

loud

As the collection progressed, it was clear that Dalton’s phantasm was less straight-forward sea. New-romantic elements and the channelling of pirates evoked memories a more decadent, classical period in history, when travelling by sea was the only way to travel. Wide brimmed hats and neat safari jackets, which were exquisitely tailored, fall into this category.

6_1

There was also a hint of femininity to the collection, juxtaposed with more masculine pieces. Tailored chambray shirts were teamed with gold corsages and neck ties, for example.

loudalton5

Fantastic accessories on display – oversized bags featuring graphic prints by Ricardo Fumanal and embellished with more metallic corsages. Sunglasses were provided by Linda Farrow, need I say more?

loudalton2

Overall a very wearable collection where different pieces can be fused together to create different looks. Some of which I hope to try pretty soon…

loudalton4

Photography by Matt Bramford
1_1

London based design duo Jin Kim and Federico Capalbo, pill aka Komakino, page are fast becoming the dark knights of the London fashion scene. Spring/Summer 09 gave us monochrome t-shirts with graphic prints, order whilst their Autumn/Winter collection of the same year was an all-black bondage affair.

Along similar lines, and retaining their status of one of London’s most innovative menswear brands, this season’s collection fuses sleek, smart tailoring contradicted by deconstructed materials and hyper-aesthtetic fabrics.

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The first pieces were graphic-print, oversized t-shirts. These were distressed with zillions of holes or embellished with sleek materials. Fearsome muzzles completed the look.

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The collection moved onto tailoring, where panels were added to bomber jackets and shirts, never without fraying or some hint of distress. Heaven forbid a piece of clothing is mundane.

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The use of latex and leather created ethereal outfits, and high necks that covered the mouth and zipper embellishments created eery silhouettes.

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Arm bands hinted at military, while latex trousers a minimal bondage straps stole this idea almost as quick as it was conjured.

The thing I like about Komakino as a label is that they refuse to confirm to the norm – presenting an all black Spring/Summer collection, save for a couple of very discrete colours here and there – is quite risky courageous. The boys didn’t fail to pull this off, though – garments matched with the aforementioned accessories like muzzles and latex boots made this stand-out collection work.

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komakino3

All Photographs by Matt Bramford

Categories ,black, ,Bondage, ,british fashion council, ,Komanino, ,London Fashion Week, ,Menswear Day, ,Somerset House

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Lou Dalton S/S2010 – Ahoy There, Mateys!

natasha muhl 1

Australian artist Natasha Muhl’s cleanly executed but quietly sinister images caught my eye as soon as they dropped into my inbox. With a slightly folky edge, find probably because of the mainly animal subject matter, shop who become supernatural characters, like the king bird in his crown, coughing up gemstones instead of food for chicks.

Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Natasha about her process, her views of her images and what the future holds for her and her curious cast of fauna.

natasha muhl 2

Tell me a little about the stories behind your images. They seem quite narrative – I can imagine the world surrounding these quirky characters.

I know there’s a story in there somewhere, but I’m not sure what it is yet. These little characters like to pop up in my sketch book doing various tasks in their world. Sometimes they’re there all the time and other times they just disappear.
natasha muhl 3

How do you create your work? Tell me a bit about the process you go through from original idea to finished product. Do you work organically and spontaneously or does it involve a lot of research?

This series was fairly spontaneous, they popped out of my fingers in a matter of days. I drew the horses one afternoon, and the rest just followed freely. My full coloured illustrations generally have a longer process. There’s a lot of research into composition. That gets followed by a few colour roughs before I spend a few hours colouring the work neatly.

Do you work in a solitary way or do you enjoy collaborating? Are you secretive about your work or do you invite commentary from an early stage?

I love to collaborate, but the opportunity seems to rarely come by. At the moment I’m working on some little bits and pieces with another illustrator friend where I do the traditional work and he follows up digitally. I guess I’m sort of secretive, but not on purpose. My graduating year just had an exhibition where I showed a few pieces, and half of the year didn’t even know I liked to draw. I’m always open to criticism though.

natasha muhl 4
What kind of objects, people or things do you love to draw? What is it about certain things that really grabs you?

I love to draw animals and ugly women. I’ve always loved animals and started drawing when I started horse riding. The ugly women are slightly more difficult to explain. I think primarily because it’s entertaining to draw all their saggy bits and put things where people traditionally wouldn’t want them. Sometimes I give them beautiful faces and ugly bodies, or vice versa, I always enjoy that juxtaposition. My more recent obsessions include little birds and jewels.

natasha muhl 5
Where do you hope to go next with your work? Any dream collaborations/venues/media?

It’s always an ideal world where I’d be able to illustrate for a living, but I’m not getting my hopes up. At the moment I’m just interested in personal improvement and maybe doing some shows.

Shelter house of cards thumbShelter House of Cards

Homelessness charity Shelter has recently been running a poster campaign showing houses built of cards, pill as a measure to remind us how quickly people’s lives can fall apart and homes be lost when things go wrong. To support the campaign, cialis 40mg Shelter has also commissioned 53 playing cards from artists, which will be exhibited at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London, starting tomorrow, September 25th.

All works will be auctioned off on Monday to benefit Shelter, including the winner of a public competition to design the 8 of clubs, below. There are also cards by Amelia’s Magazine artists and Damien Hirst.

eight-clubs

Shelter House of Cards

Homelessness charity Shelter has recently been running a poster campaign showing houses built of cards, no rx as a measure to remind us how quickly people’s lives can fall apart and homes be lost when things go wrong. To support the campaign, Shelter has also commissioned 53 playing cards from artists, which will be exhibited at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London, starting tomorrow, September 25th.

All works will be auctioned off on Monday to benefit Shelter, including the winner of a public competition to design the 8 of clubs, below. There are also cards by Amelia’s Magazine artists and Damien Hirst.

eight-clubs
Shelter House of Cards

Homelessness charity Shelter has recently been running a poster campaign showing houses built of cards, rx as a measure to remind us how quickly people’s lives can fall apart and homes be lost when things go wrong. To support the campaign, Shelter has also commissioned 53 playing cards from artists, which will be exhibited at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London, starting tomorrow.

eight-clubs
Shelter House of Cards

Homelessness charity Shelter has recently been running a poster campaign showing houses built of cards, buy information pills as a measure to remind us how quickly people’s lives can fall apart and homes be lost when things go wrong. To support the campaign, Shelter has also commissioned 53 playing cards from artists, which will be exhibited at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London, starting tomorrow.

eight-clubs
loudalton5

Lou Dalton presented her collection in the Portico Rooms of Somerset House, malady a rather opulent setting reached by a romantic, purchase winding staircase. This idyllic space couldn’t have suited the Dalton’s collection better, viagra unless it had been adorned in seafaring regalia.

This isn’t to say that Lou’s vision for Spring/Summer 2010 is a direct pastiche of maritime outfits. Instead, more subtle referencing was present.

The stripe – the seaside staple – was there in a number of outfits, but it had been re-worked for a more mature look, despite the models having a mean age of 14 (I surmise). I particularly loved the way it had be knitted into these two pieces…

2_1

loudalton7

Basics were simple, with white vests featuring graphic patterns and loose fitting tailoring, such as blazer-waistcoats or knee-length shorts.

loudalton6

loud

As the collection progressed, it was clear that Dalton’s phantasm was less straight-forward sea. New-romantic elements and the channelling of pirates evoked memories a more decadent, classical period in history, when travelling by sea was the only way to travel. Wide brimmed hats and neat safari jackets, which were exquisitely tailored, fall into this category.

6_1

There was also a hint of femininity to the collection, juxtaposed with more masculine pieces. Tailored chambray shirts were teamed with gold corsages and neck ties, for example.

loudalton5

Fantastic accessories on display – oversized bags featuring graphic prints by Ricardo Fumanal and embellished with more metallic corsages. Sunglasses were provided by Linda Farrow, need I say more?

loudalton2

Overall a very wearable collection where different pieces can be fused together to create different looks. Some of which I hope to try pretty soon…

loudalton4

Photography by Matt Bramford

Categories ,London Fashion Week, ,Lou Dalton, ,Menswear Day, ,Portico Rooms, ,Somerset House, ,Sunglasses

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