Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Presentation Review: Kingston MA

Kingston-MA-by-Alia-Gargum
Stephanie Nieuwenhuyse by Alia Gargum

Located in Kingston upon Thames, buy South West London, more about Kingston University London doesn’t seem to have a buzzing reputation for academia. But with art the institution are widely regarded as one of the best in the country, particularly for fashion education. Kingston fashion graduates have gone on to senior posts in a range of leading labels which include Armani, Burberry, Calvin Klein, Vivienne Westwood and Yves Saint Laurent. And it goes without saying that the Fashion Scout presentation at London Fashion Week is a thoroughly unique opportunity to showcase work to the industry’s elite at such an early stage in a designer’s career.

Kingston Fashion Textiles MA SS 2011 review-002

Kingston Fashion Textiles MA SS 2011 review-004

The university has been presenting the best of it’s MA Fashion graduates at Vauxhall Fashion Scout for two years now, and the theme has remained the same – The Body Laboratory. This time, there was an array of interpretations of the theme from full-on brain-like, mouldy textiles (yes, really) to delicate references through elegant style details. My favourites of the presentation were Stefanie Nieuwenhuyse, Fay Gascoigne, Ninela Ivanova and Han Gu.

Stefanie Nieuwenhuyse Kingston MA LFW S/S 2012 by Kirstie Battson
Stefanie Nieuwenhuyse by Kirstie Battson

I saw perhaps the most bustle around Stefanie Nieuwenhuyse, who had a corset and shoe displayed as part of a collection inspired by Biomimicry. The pieces were created from an intricate shell of thin wood that was broken into tiny hexagonal shapes then arranged in the most impressive and fiddly way; it must have taken yonks to put together. Her business cards were also made out of the thin wood she had used in her collection pieces – a great touch!

Fay Gascoigne
Photography courtesy of Fay Gascoigne.

I asked Fay Gascoigne about her pieces and she spoke with such passion and expression that I couldn’t help but admire her work! She displayed a funky, sporty jacket, formed with purple digital printed fabric, gathered in sections to make a volumnous shape. She also had everyone in the room sniffing her giant white plastic necklace that smelt like lavender.

Kingston Fashion Textiles MA SS 2011 review-014

Kingston Fashion Textiles MA SS 2011 review-012

Ninela Ivanova created a somewhat controversial collection that was displayed in the center of the room in all its glory. The collection, titled Moulded Mind was largely made up of lazer-cut velvet encased in silicone (which created a wonderful veiny/brainy effect). These pieces were named Second Skin. What was even more bizarre was the thick mould that were contained in transparent vests and shoulder pads. This was much more of a textile venture than a fashion one but I was intrigued by the concept, as was everyone else in the room as they touched and stared at the pieces and badgered Ninela with questions.

Han Gu Kingston MA S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc
Han Gu by Aysim Genc

Han Gu‘s work stood out beautifully. It was just a shame that there wasn’t more of her collection on display for the presentation. She’d created pieces that were much more wearable but that still showed fantastic textile skill in minute triangular features that seemed to hark back to Japanese origami. It turns out that the collection, titled Triangular Memories, was inspired by memories of her grandma who liked to fold the smallest notes to make little triangles. My favourite feature was the collar, made from tiny transparent plastic triangles; a simple but beautifully constructed piece.

Kingston Fashion Textiles MA SS 2011 review-007q=
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

The Kingston MA Fashion presentation at Vauxhall Fashion Scout continues to show off the university’s ability to stretch their students’ capabilities, give them the creative freedom to push new boundaries and inject something new into the fashion world.

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Armani, ,Aysim Genc, ,Biomimicry, ,Body Laboratory, ,Burberry, ,Calvin Klein, ,Fay Gascoigne, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Georgia Takacs, ,Han Gu, ,Kingston, ,Kingston MA Fashion, ,Kingston University, ,Kingston University London, ,Kingston upon Thames, ,lfw, ,LFW S/S 2012, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Fashion Week S/S 2012, ,Mould, ,Moulded Mind, ,Ninela Ivanova, ,origami, ,Second Skin, ,Silicone, ,Stefanie Nieuwenhuyse, ,The Body Laboratory, ,Triangular Memories, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Velvet, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,YSL, ,Yves Saint Laurent

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Amelia’s Magazine | Kingston University: Graduate Fashion Week 2014 Catwalk Review

GraduateCollection_StefanieTschirky-4
Graduate Collection by Stefanie Tschirky

It was a predictably brilliant outing for Kingston on Monday at this year’s Graduate Fashion Week. Finally the organisers have had some sense and clocked that the Earl’s Court Two venue, home to the event for a number of years, doesn’t do this showcase of the next generation of fashion designers any favours. Relocated at the Truman Brewery, home of numerous other graduate shows, Graduate Fashion Week felt more current, more exciting and a damn sight bloody easier to get to.

Having said that, and as per usual, I hadn’t been particularly organised in the run up to the event and the only ticket I’d managed to get hold of was for Kingston‘s presentation, thanks to some on-it staff who go to the trouble of inviting you rather than waiting for you to email. Drinks and canapés were served across the road in Corbet’s Place, a bar I try to avoid on account of it being at the heart of the misery that is Brick Lane at weekends. I left there precisely one hour later, blind drunk and stuffed full of duck tagine and chicken skewers. Even if the show itself had been terrible, which it definitely wasn’t, I wouldn’t say a bad word about Kingston.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_003LaurenLake

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_006LaurenLake

All photography by Matt Bramford

It was down to Lauren Lake (above) to launch the show, with a fresh approach to outerwear. Pale pink coats with fur trims were teamed with hot pink accessories and it set a heady, exciting tone to the proceedings as the booze started to wear off.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_018MariaBarreto

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_028MariaBarreto

Luckily Maria Barreto (above) was awarded the job of following, doing it in style with a collection of sharp tailored coats and dresses in a more serious, sophisticated palette of blue and black.

Karen Verey 01
Graduate Collection by Karen Verey

Karen Varey was first up representing menswear, with a mixture of sportwear and tailoring. Unique, shiny jackets had embroidered floral details.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_034KarenVerey

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_042KarenVerey

Not dissimilar was Merle Ingram‘s approach to womenswear, making use of futuristic materials, like the plastic jacket with zip detail. Abstract shapes were brought together in pale-coloured separates:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_047MerleIngrama

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_051MerleIngram

Stefanie Tschirky also worked with glossy fabrics, but in a strong palette of black and blue – pencil skirts and wide-leg trousers were teamed with oversized jackets:

GraduateCollection_StefanieTschirky-4
Graduate Collection by Stefanie Tschirky

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_068StefanieTschirky

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_066StefanieTschirky

Jasmine Sellers‘ models were enveloped in soft materials, in beige and salmon:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_094JasmineSellers

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_101JasmineSellers

Tamsin Pick‘s menswear was fresh and unique, with majestic colours, sportswear shapes and towelling details:

collectionlineupflat

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_103TamsinPick

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_115TamsinPick

Abigail Irving-Munro‘s womenswear also used sports elements like varsity jackets and zip hoodies, jazzed up with all sorts of embellishments, like contrasting knits and unfinished strips:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_120AbigailIrvingMunroe

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_127AbigailIrvingMunroe

More menswear came courtesy of Catriona Outram; vibrant sketchy patterns were combined with heavy knitwear, while models wore iPad necklaces:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_166CatrionaOutram

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_177CatrionaOutram

Kanrawee line up
Graduate collection by Kanrawee Vechiboonsom

Kanrawee Vechiboonsom presented a sophisticated collection of striking blue and white separates, one featuring an intricate concertina design:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_194KanraweeVechiboonsom

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_197KanraweeVechiboonsom

Maria Brimelow‘s Scandinivian-inspired collection of elongated coats and cardigans drew loud whoops; I particularly like the knotted orange number:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_272MariaBrimelow

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_263MariaBrimelow

Meanwhile, Susanne Wen‘s truly unique collection featured pleated fabrics stitched together in a haphazard fashion:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_276SusanneWen

My favourite collection of Kingston’s outing was without doubt Hannah Cawley. Voluminous silhouettes featured orange and black prints with silver buckle fastening details. Oversized clutch bags in these rich, loud patterns completed the looks:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_285HannahCawley

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_287HannahCawley

Closing menswear was left in the hands of Isabelle Sallis, showing vibrant green prints and a sinister hooded figure:

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_301IsabelleSallis

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_302IsabelleSallis

And finally, Phoebe Kowalska closed this stunning show with an ethereal, Comme des Garçons-esque collection of long dresses with multiple panels.

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_331PhoebeKowalska

MattBramford_GraduateFashionWeek_Kingston_339PhoebeKowalska

Until next year, Kingston!

IMG_0348

Categories ,2014, ,Abigail Irving-Munro, ,BA, ,Catriona Outram, ,catwalk, ,GFW, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Hannah Cawley, ,Isabelle Sallis, ,Jasmine Sellers, ,Kanrawee Vechiboonsom, ,Karen Verey, ,Kingston, ,Lauren Lake, ,Maria Barreto, ,Maria Brimelow, ,Matt Bramford, ,Merle Ingram, ,review, ,Stefanie Tschirky, ,Susanne Wen, ,Tamsin Pick, ,Truman Brewery

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Amelia’s Magazine | Kingston University Fashion MA Graduate Catwalk Show Review 2013


Elina Priha MA collection by Claire Kearns

With London Fashion Week beginning the next day, graduating MA students from Kingston University commandeered the inspiring Queen Elizabeth Hall foyer to present their collections to a central London audience. The angular, brutalist roof and stone floor were the perfect setting for a show full of forward-thinking fashion.

A dynamic catwalk that formed a triangular shape hosted the collections, appearing from an installation of coloured speakers. Twelve designers spanning menswear, womenswear and knitwear made up the show – here’s a run down.

Barry Jude‘s ‘Artifical Intelligence & Divinity’ launched the show with an innovative and sustainable collection of tailored menswear:

Jen Hope presented a stunning collection of laser cut and embossed patent leathers in wide, futuristic shapes. Models carried carrier bags containing roses:

Julia Skergeth‘s all white collection saw luxury woollen jackets transformed by laser cut plastic embellishments:


I LOVED Minka Lüsse‘s striking menswear with an urban edge – a red, gold and black colour palette with triangular motifs, hip hop bombers and elongated shapes:

I’m pretty sure Eppie Conrad likes Jedward. Her collection of incredibly illustrated womenswear, from jackets to dresses in acid colours, had the crowd squealing.

In contrast, Kristen Mossbacher presented a sensual set of womens pieces in ‘The Game’, a collection inspired by gender identity. Elements of menswear contrasted with sleek silk dresses and sexy leather jackets.

Kristen Mossbacher MA collection by Claire Kearns

Jelena Borsc‘s ‘Estranged Hedonist’ saw men model dandyish tailoring, loaded with period drama. High waisted pants, tartans, low-cut waistcoars and angular jackets all featured.

F A Ball‘s guys and girls appeared all at once, wearing perhaps the most diverse and futuristic collection of the entire show. Armadillo-like jackets eveloped models and the women wore conical bras. The colour palette of grey, yellow and blue perfectly complimented each other.

Elizabeth Gilbey‘s describes her take on knitwear as ‘feminine yet strong’. Models wore knitted braids over their faces like veils, which also transferred to garments. It was the bold colour palette of black and gold and the exemplary use of contrasting fabrics that I’ll remember this collection for.

My favourite menswear came courtesy of C. Duncan, inspired by fisherman’s Ganseys. A combination of oversized knitwear, jackets and capes appeared in blue and yellow.

Elina Priha‘s fusion of fabrics, colours and shapes was a stand out collection. Oversized jackets and elongated knitwear worked effortlessly side by side.

Finally, it was left to Laura Buechner to close the show with her use of a range of fabrics with high aesthetic appeal. Innovative leather cut with a zünd machine, quilted jumpers and metallic jackets were stand out pieces.

Nice one, Kingston!

All photography by Matt Bramford; illustrations supplied by and courtesy of the designers except where stated.

Categories ,Barry Jude, ,C Duncan, ,catwalk, ,Claire Kearns, ,Elina Priha, ,Elizabeth Gilbey, ,Eppie Conrad, ,FA Ball, ,fashion, ,graduate, ,Jelena Borsc, ,Jen Hope, ,Julia Skergeth, ,Kingston, ,Kristin Mossbacher, ,Laura Buechner, ,ma, ,Matt Bramford, ,Minka Lüsse, ,Queen Elizabeth Hall, ,review

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week Interview: Northumbria’s Stephanie Jayne Price


Barry Flanagan’s Nijinski Hare, treat illustrated by Naomi Law

I recently stepped out of London’s unusually baking sun to enjoy an afternoon visit to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. On reaching the courtyard, more about the whole place seemed to be in high spirits with Barry Flanagan’s bronze hares prancing around and the ordinarily stern permanent statue sporting a floral sash.


Photograph by Naomi Law

During the largest open exhibition in the UK, the labyrinthine rooms of Burlington House play host to a swarm of artists, from the unknown to the infamous, waiting to surprise visitors around every corner. Everyone is welcome to submit work to the exhibition each year, resulting in a diverse collection ranging from painting to architecture, and sculpture to film. The majority of the works on display are for sale, and although the prices predictably reach the astronomical, there are several pieces accessible to those with more modest purse strings if you take a closer look.

This year’s theme is Raw, which according to David Chipperfield, co-ordinator of the architecture room, signifies ‘vitality, risk taking and a necessary sense of adventure.’ Stephen Chambers, the main co-ordinator of this year’s show, states that raw art is ‘fresh, new, visceral and affirmative. Some of it is fairly scary too’.

Perhaps one of the most talked about pieces in the show is David Mach’s Silver Streak, a ferocious larger-than-life gorilla made entirely from wire coat hangers. These are surprisingly effective in creating a sense of weight and movement – he’s an imposing figure!


David Mach’s Silver Streak, illustrated by Paul Shinn

Mach appears again just behind the gorilla with Babel Towers, a huge and complex collage of an outlandish seaside town with the mountainous ‘tower’ ascending into the clouds.

On entering many of the rooms, your eye is dutifully drawn to plenty of bold and large-scale works. Somehow the flamboyance of these pieces drew my attention to the smaller or less immediately-noticeable pieces, and this is what I have largely chosen to focus on.

My childhood fascination with anything miniature (and consequent hours spent creating minute little things from Fimo) was happily indulged by the collection of architects’ models and drawings in the Lecture Room.

Visitors are treated to views of buildings in their ‘raw’ forms, as seen through the eyes of the architect. The methods of construction and presentation of these models is as fascinating as the designs themselves.

It will come as no surprise that I spent the longest time in the Small Weston Room, which is filled with over two hundred smaller paintings, some no larger than a postcard.

Several otherwise everyday scenes are beautified in oils: Francis Matthews’ The Coombe depicts a Dublin street corner whilst Josephine Greenman uses the familiar blue and white of a traditional dinner service to render miniscule domestic settings in Silence I & II.

Amazing craftsmanship can also be seen in Claire Moynihan’s Moth Balls, 2010; dozens of moths are intricately embroidered onto their own Alpaca wool felt ball.

In the Large Weston Room, David Borrington predicts the state of the high street in 2020 if a certain supermarket is allowed to continue its invasion of our neighbourhoods. Globull Internashll Tescgoows 2020 is a stark reminder of the need to find an alternative.


David Borrington’s Globull Internashll Tescgoows, courtesy of the artist’s website

Just around the corner Oran O’Reilly’s beautifully comic Rizla, after Hokusai shows the famous Great Wave surging from a pack of cigarette papers. Maybe not such an odd pairing considering the prevalence of Hokusai’s wave in poster form in student accommodation up and down the country (admittedly including my own not so long ago).

Also currently on display at the Royal Academy, and well worth seeing, is a collection of work by academicians who have passed away over the last year. I was particularly taken with Michael Kidner’s painstakingly drawn geometric forms in No Thing Nothing.

If you can’t make it to the Royal Academy, you can see work from A-level students selected for the online exhibition here.

All photographs courtesy of the Royal Academy, unless otherwise stated.

Barry Flanagan’s Nijinski Hare, price illustrated by Naomi Law

I recently stepped out of London’s unusually baking sun to enjoy an afternoon visit to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. On reaching the courtyard, find the whole place seemed to be in high spirits with Barry Flanagan’s bronze hares prancing around and the ordinarily stern permanent statue sporting a floral sash.


Photograph by Naomi Law

During the largest open exhibition in the UK, the labyrinthine rooms of Burlington House play host to a swarm of artists, from the unknown to the infamous, waiting to surprise visitors around every corner. Everyone is welcome to submit work to the exhibition each year, resulting in a diverse collection ranging from painting to architecture, and sculpture to film. The majority of the works on display are for sale, and although the prices predictably reach the astronomical, there are several pieces accessible to those with more modest purse strings if you take a closer look.

This year’s theme is Raw, which according to David Chipperfield, co-ordinator of the architecture room, signifies ‘vitality, risk taking and a necessary sense of adventure.’ Stephen Chambers, the main co-ordinator of this year’s show, states that raw art is ‘fresh, new, visceral and affirmative. Some of it is fairly scary too’.

Perhaps one of the most talked about pieces in the show is David Mach’s Silver Streak, a ferocious larger-than-life gorilla made entirely from wire coat hangers. These are surprisingly effective in creating a sense of weight and movement – he’s an imposing figure!


David Mach’s Silver Streak, illustrated by Paul Shinn

Mach appears again just behind the gorilla with Babel Towers, a huge and complex collage of an outlandish seaside town with the mountainous ‘tower’ ascending into the clouds.

On entering many of the rooms, your eye is dutifully drawn to plenty of bold and large-scale works. Somehow the flamboyance of these pieces drew my attention to the smaller or less immediately-noticeable pieces, and this is what I have largely chosen to focus on.

My childhood fascination with anything miniature (and consequent hours spent creating minute little things from Fimo) was happily indulged by the collection of architects’ models and drawings in the Lecture Room.

Visitors are treated to views of buildings in their ‘raw’ forms, as seen through the eyes of the architect. The methods of construction and presentation of these models is as fascinating as the designs themselves.

It will come as no surprise that I spent the longest time in the Small Weston Room, which is filled with over two hundred smaller paintings, some no larger than a postcard.

Several otherwise everyday scenes are beautified in oils: Francis Matthews’ The Coombe depicts a Dublin street corner whilst Josephine Greenman uses the familiar blue and white of a traditional dinner service to render miniscule domestic settings in Silence I & II.

Amazing craftsmanship can also be seen in Claire Moynihan’s Moth Balls, 2010; dozens of moths are intricately embroidered onto their own Alpaca wool felt ball.

In the Large Weston Room, David Borrington predicts the state of the high street in 2020 if a certain supermarket is allowed to continue its invasion of our neighbourhoods. Globull Internashll Tescgoows 2020 is a stark reminder of the need to find an alternative.


David Borrington’s Globull Internashll Tescgoows, courtesy of the artist’s website

Just around the corner Oran O’Reilly’s beautifully comic Rizla, after Hokusai shows the famous Great Wave surging from a pack of cigarette papers. Maybe not such an odd pairing considering the prevalence of Hokusai’s wave in poster form in student accommodation up and down the country (admittedly including my own not so long ago).

Also currently on display at the Royal Academy, and well worth seeing, is a collection of work by academicians who have passed away over the last year. I was particularly taken with Michael Kidner’s painstakingly drawn geometric forms in No Thing Nothing.

If you can’t make it to the Royal Academy, you can see work from A-level students selected for the online exhibition here.

All photographs courtesy of the Royal Academy, unless otherwise stated.

Stephanie Jayne Price‘s slick, buy futuristic collection at Northumbria University‘s Graduate Fashion Week show was a real winner – combining masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. I loved the lines that the creations formed, order and the sophistication of each of the pieces – so much so that I couldn’t wait to have a chat with Miss Price and find out what is was all about.

What are the benefits of showing at Graduate Fashion Week?
GFW is an excellent platform for young designers to exhibit work to the industry. It’s a great opportunity to see what the other schools have been up to and ultimately the future of British fashion. For the individual it provides a chance to show your collection to a much wider audience. After spending a year putting your heart and soul into your work, GFW offers a prestigious and professional setting to exhibit your work. It’s a real honour!


Photographs by Matt Bramford

?Northumbria students put on a show at the Baltic in Newcastle before heading for Earl’s Court – how did the two venues compare?
Oh the Baltic is a wonderful space! I have such a soft spot for it! It was our first fashion show, and it was the entire year; only 25 show at GFW, so it was a really nice way to see all the collections together. After seeing bits and bobs around the studio it is so exciting to see everything and everyone come together! We were really fortunate to have such a good location in Newcastle and it was done really well.
On the other hand, Graduate Fashion Week is on a far larger scale – the catwalk and the space is set up a lot differently.  The raised runway, the models, the lighting – they are more professional I guess. But, I don’t know really. I enjoyed both immensely!
?
What’s your fashion history?
My Grandma was a tailoress, she taught me to sew and it went from there. I always wanted to study fashion. I was in primary school drawing cartoons of my friends, in secondary school drawing ball gowns and making business cards for my future self! And from textiles in school, I became fascinated by it all!

?Did you get the chance to work alongside anybody in the industry during your studies?
I’ve been very lucky and done a few placements, and no doubt I’ll be doing a few more! After 1st year, I worked for a month at Philip Treacy. I’ve always had a passion for hats! To be able to meet Philip and work there was amazing! I loved it! Then during our placement year I spent three months working with [friends of Amelia’s Magazine] Emilio de la Morena. Then I worked for The Collection, a sampling and textile company, Tatty Devine and Gareth Pugh. Now, I’m really hoping to get involved with another studio before fashion week in September. I’m a bit of a geek for pattern cutting and toiling so I’d like to get stuck in to that!

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, but for my own work I am very concept led. There is something very exciting about capturing a meaning, telling a story, and watching it direct ideas. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Generally, it can be when I’m out and about, reading, having a coffee, chatting up with friends… endless possibilities! I love visiting museums and exhibitions… My collection captures the idea of being trapped in a kaleidoscope, which stemmed from considering how we see, travelling light, and light reflecting… I ended up eventually, asking lots of people how they’d feel if they were trapped in a kaleidoscope! I’d initially been focused on building lights into the garments, and it happened for the Newcastle show – sadly there wasn’t time for the London show, but this fusion with technology is something I’d like to further.
?
Your collection mixes masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. Why did you choose the cuts/techniques that you worked with?
Until recently I never really thought about it, but you’re right! It is a bit masculine; you’ve captured it well! I’m not sure really, I think that’s my own personal taste, I’m a bit boyish in my own dress. All the geometric shapes stemmed from cutting, and distorting the body, as though being looked upon inside that kaleidoscopic world. There were lots of triangles too! Kaleidoscopes are triangular mirrors, so the cutting used triangular inserts to push and pull the cloth, and then you put it on a body and you get a whole new dimension!


 
The colour palette is very simple – why didn’t you use colour? (This is a question, not a criticism!)
This was inspired by the concept as well. Since it was based on light, I avoided black – black absorbs light. I wear a lot of black, so I wanted to stay clear of it for this concept. White was too clinical, too bright, so everything was toned down. I wanted it to be soft and unobtrusive and to be honest colour stresses me out a bit! I’m learning to deal with it haha!
 
What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle? How’s the fashion scene in the Toon?
Well, when I was looking to choose a University, Northumbria was the last place on my mind. I was set on getting far away from home, until I reluctantly came to the open day for Northumbria 5 years ago, and from that day it felt like home. I sat in the old design school and was inspired. I thought, ‘I actually quite like this place… can I stay?!’
I don’t know, is there a scene?!? I haven’t really left the studio much this year to know! Haha!


?
Which fashion designers do you look to for inspiration?
Years ago I started reading about ‘conceptual’ designers, and I have a fascination with Viktor & Rolf. I’d really like to meet them. I think we’d have nice chats! Haha! I’d really like to work for them! I also have admiration for Hussein Chalayan and Rei Kawakubo. Heroes I guess! I’d like to work for both of these as well. I’m a bit of a dreamer!

Did your collection receive positive attention at GFW?
Well I’ve had some lovely blogs and feedback at GFW. On a different occasion I’d been able to present it to a small panel at the BFC and they gave me some really good advice and said some really lovely things.  I was flattered they liked my cutting, and I’ve had feedback from other names from industry with similar comments and interest.

?What do the next few months hold for Stephanie Jayne Price?
At the minute I’m looking into undertaking an MA at the University of Kingston. I met the course leader the other day and she is wonderful! I’m really hoping to continue with the integration of lights and technology fused with this style of cutting and silhouette I’ve developed over the year. Fingers crossed for that! Hopefully I’ll also get involved with some studios to get some more experience – doing some cutting for them, maybe some freelance work. There are a few things to consider really. The world is my oyster!

Categories ,Baltic, ,Earls Court, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Grandma, ,Heroes, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Kaleidoscope, ,Kingston, ,light, ,london, ,Newcastle, ,Northumbria, ,Phillip Treacy, ,Rei Kawakubo, ,Stephanie Jayne Price, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Collection, ,University, ,Viktor & Rolf

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Amelia’s Magazine | In Place Peckham: Camberwell College of Arts Illustration Degree Show 2014 Review

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review
This year the Camberwell College of Arts illustration graduates eschewed central London to hold their show in a warehouse in Copeland Park behind the Bussey Building, an area which has changed beyond all recognition since I shared a studio there after graduation with Simone Lia and Catherine Vase. Nowadays Peckham is a seething hub of creativity, with the cafe culture to support it. Eighteen years ago (gulp!) not so much so.

Bussey Building, Phlegm
Phlegm artwork adorning the Bussey Building, which used to be known as SANA.

The exhibition was aptly named In Place Peckham: when I arrived some of the illustrators were kicking a ball around with local kids, and a few of the final projects were the result of work (and play) within the community. Peckham may be changing but it’s still a very deprived area of London, so it was good to see a thoughtful engagement from students who clearly consider the place where they studied an important factor in their creative development.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Soonmi Jung
Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_soonmi jung after the tide
I’ve been to a lot of shows this summer and I’m incredibly late posting my reviews because we’ve been away a lot as well. So here, without further ado, is my run down of favourite pieces found in Peckham. Soonmi Jung creates wildly energetic paintings and I fell in love with her book, After the Tide, about becoming engulfed in the sea whilst hunting for pretty pebbles – with illustrations that wonderfully evoke the untamed nature of the coast in glorious technicolour.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Matt Dunlop
This subtle wood texture print is by Matt Dunlop.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Daryl Rainbow
I thoroughly enjoyed some spot on commentary about excessive mobile phone use from Daryl Rainbow. Of course, I fully get the irony of taking photos of his illustrations on my mobile phone and subsequently sharing them on instagram (where I first shared all my finds a few weeks back).

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Laura Preiti
Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Laura Preiti ceramic
This interactive sculpture by Lara Preiti explores the reasons why structures might collapse in earthquakes. I also like the quizzical faces on ceramics that remind me of the Easter Island monoliths.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Gaurab Thakali
Nepalese illustrator Gaurab Thakali created colourful illustration inspired by a love of jazz.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Jess Money
Large scale fabric cacti and succulents by Jess Money dominated the corner of a room.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Haylea Rush
Haylea Rush also worked in fabric to create this somewhat jokey fabric sarcophagus.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Lisa Mallinson
Bizarre aggregations of flowers, fruit and body parts remain a very popular trend amongst graduating illustrators, by Lisa Mallinson.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Camille Thirot-Lafond
A decorative ceramic roast chicken by Camille Thirot-Lafond was cast from a plastic one she found in a pound shop, part of a commentary on how we attribute value to objects.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Soo Nyeong Shin
These pretty patterns are by Soo Nyeong Shin.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Ara Cho
Ara Cho had created a plethora of tiny colourful collages inspired by the act of dining.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Caz Slattery soap
Soap was re-formed into oddly familiar shapes by Caz Slattery, one of many artists interested in imbuing everyday objects with a new significance.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Chloe Greenfield
Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_chloe greenfield
I really liked Chloe Greenfield’s patterned ceramics and textiles display, part of her Greasy Shrine installation.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Anna baldwin
Beautiful fine porcelain was adorned with delicate illustration by Anna Baldwin.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Rebecca Barnett
This joyful astronaut cat and giraffe illustration is by Rebecca Barnett.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_amy glover
Amy Glover showcased a clever and much needed project, the result of making dens and spaces for play in collaboration with local Peckham kids.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Yvonne Wiecek
Surreal interiors by Yvonne Wiecek were inspired by a love of fiction.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_Amy Grimes
Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_amy grimes ceramics
I love the perspective on this campfire scene by Amy Grimes. She also created these coral ceramics and sheep.

Camberwell illustration in place peckham review_natalie rowe
A love of science and nature inspired a series of very detailed work by Natalie Rowe.

To support the In Place Peckham exhibition the students raised money via Kickstarter to produce a beautiful show catalogue. The exhibition was also lovingly realised, but I had to spend an inordinate amount of time matching the work to the illustrators, as everything was number coded and had to be checked back to an A4 sheet. This made for a slick show on the walls but it was a nightmare to write about: future graduates please take note! It’s a shame, also, that Camberwell students did not accept my offer to list their graduate show on my website (as I did for Kingston and Bournemouth). When I didn’t hear back I clicked on over to their website and nicked a few images to use in a listing for the June Open House at Camberwell College of Arts. The result? A major art book publisher got in touch with me because they want to work with one of the students whose work I featured. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: new graduates have to grab every opportunity to promote their work, for this is not the end it is only the beginning… and you never know where offers such as mine may lead.

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Categories ,2014, ,After the Tide, ,Amy Glover, ,Amy Grimes, ,Anna Baldwin, ,Ara Cho, ,bournemouth, ,Bussey Building, ,Camberwell College of Arts, ,Camille Thirot-Lafond, ,Caz Slattery, ,ceramics, ,Chloe Greenfield, ,community, ,Copeland Park, ,Daryl Rainbow, ,Degree Show, ,Gaurab Thakali, ,graduate, ,Greasy Shrine, ,Haylea Rush, ,illustration, ,In Place Peckham, ,Jess Money, ,Kickstarter, ,Kingston, ,Lara Preiti, ,Lisa Mallinson, ,Matt Dunlop, ,Natalie Rowe, ,Peckham, ,Phlegm, ,Rebecca Barnett, ,review, ,SANA, ,Simone Lia, ,Soo Nyeong Shin, ,Soonmi Jung, ,Yvonne Wiecek

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