Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Eugene Lin

“It was when we were awarded a giant golden penis at the Erotic Awards, prostate malady that has to be my best moment here so far. It was a fashion show that went really well and everything came to plan.” Holly Jade picked up, check with grinning pride, a huge, winged and golden figurine of male genitalia. As manager of a successful London business, you might expect a more contained answer from Holly, who sits adorned with silver chains, ripped tights and purple streaked hair. Wait a second. Scrap that.

Prangsta Costumiers is far from conventional. “We don’t try and be something that we’re not.” And quite rightly so. Why play the fashion game when their concept already oozes the type of London decadence, imagination and crisp tailoring that one would expect from the likes of Westwood? Seem like an overstatement? Well, yes. But don’t knock this place until you’ve seen it.

I first came across Prangsta when strolling through the streets of New Cross with my mum (as you do). We stopped outside the barred up, clouded shop window and strained our eyes through the metal, trying to fathom what this place was. Despite my mum’s adamance that it was a brothel, she confidently ducked under the corrugated iron and called out for any possible inhabitants. A French lady emerged. She beckoned us inside, casually wearing a riding helmet (as one also does).

An Aladdin’s cave still is the only way to describe it. Trunks and dressers spilling with jewels, brooches, elaborate belts, crowns and masks; dishevelled bustiers heaped with wigs and mad fabric; a trapeze swinging from the ceiling. There was no order. It was undisputed beautiful chaos.

The best part? Every costume is hand-made and tailored by the tight-nit Prangsta team. “We try to purchase as little material as possible so we go to a lot of vintage markets and also get a lot of materials donated to us. We take apart old costumes and old fabrics and then restore them and make them into our own Prangsta designs.” This kind of eco-awareness has been a core principle of Prangsta ever since Melanie Wilson founded the company in 1998. “She studied fashion at Central Saint Martins and really hated how wasteful the fashion industry was portrayed to her.”

Theatrical and period costume dominates Prangsta’s extensive mish-mash gallery of stunning work. A Victorian suited wolf, a burlesque fox or perhaps a two of diamonds playing card? (The shop does have an astonishingly brilliant Alice in Wonderland collection). Simply enter their hidden world and you could transform into characters you barely knew of. Hell, you could make up your own! Or at least leave the imagination to Holly herself, who styles her clients’ costumes rather than creating the pieces in their 1500 square foot studio in Deptford.

I of course guided the conversation onto that 21st birthday party of one Daisy Lowe. Daisy, her mother Pearl and several members of the star-studded guestlist were dressed by Holly and her talented team. Daisy, in particular, wore floor-skimming jaw-dropping ‘Ice Queen’-esque attire. “It was great… They are rock n’ roll royalty. Daisy is a lovely girl and a pleasure to dress.”  ? ?And their impressive list of clients doesn’t end there. Prangsta have also dressed The Noisettes (Shingai, the lead singer, used to work for the company), the Moulettes, the White Stripes, the BBC2 comedy drama ‘Psychoville’ and, get this, have even dressed Florence & The Machine.

Holly insists, however, that dressing such high-flying stars aren’t considered amongst Prangsta’s greatest achievements. I know. ‘You what?’ was my reaction too. But she continued… “I think it’s more of an achievement that we’ve been going like this for 12 years. We’ve made everything ourselves and we’re a London-based local business. Everyone works really hard. We work long hours, sometimes 12 hour days, and keeping the business running I think is more of an achievement.”

And she’s right. The Prangsta team do seem to work incessantly hard. They don’t just simply lend beautiful costumes to individuals. They tour all different festivals throughout the summer. They organize community nights for local performers and artists. They scour markets and thrift stores for the beautiful trinkets and treasures you’ll see placed around their shop. They even run their own dressmaking classes which take place in their Deptford studio. “Classes are taught by Mel and two of her seamstresses,” she says. I then of course comment on the advantage to the class members by being taught by Melanie, being an ex-Saint Martin’s student and pioneer of this mad palace. Holly even mentioned to me how Melanie began squatting in the building that we were sitting in. “Mel started out completely alone, from nothing. She now owns this row of shops and rents them out and also has Prangsta.”How’s that for a success story?

I also just HAD to ask about that haunting but quirky shop-front that had my mum so convinced we were about to come across prostitutes. Holly laughed when I told of her of this.  ?“We do what we can. We’re in New Cross, not in Soho. And I guess we’re quite an urban team. We’re quite subversive, eccentric characters. It is quite dilapidated but we’re a small business in a rundown area.” But no excuses were necessary. I really and truly loved the subversive exterior. And, well, the mysterious look of Prangsta is certainly parallel with the mysterious Melanie, who apparently prefers not to do interviews (damn, eh?).  ? ?Prangsta sure has got a good thing going, but they’re not stopping there. They have pretty big plans for future expansion. “One day we will have an online shop. People will be able to click on, say, a little hat and will be able to request one to be made for them. Within the next five years I’d say we’d like to be working on expanding our costume collection and maybe pump out a fashion collection aswell. We’d like to break through this wall to next door so that we can have an exhibition space and put a lot of costumes up on the walls like a bit of a gallery, have some music playing with a DJ, have some chai on the go. Above all, we want to provide a really quality service by restoring and recycling aswell as contributing to the community.”

After seeing the place for the second time, and speaking to Holly, it appears that not only Prangsta’s enchanting costumes, but also it’s intriguing story and extensive achievement is a true example of what those young, fun, London minds are made of.

Prangsta can be found at 304, New Cross Road, London. ?Costumes are between £80-100 to rent for 5 days and are also sold at individual prices. ?Their next dressmaking classes begin on Wednesday 22nd September from 7 – 9.30pm and cost £200. There is a maximum class size of 10 (so get in there quick if you’re interested!).

Eugene Lin, page A/W 2010, stomach illustrated by Abby Wright

It is the impeccable designs of Eugene Lin that have captivated us here at Amelia’s Magazine. The Central Saint Martins graduate’s intricate and feminine designs are a force to be reckoned with in the near future, patient and it is his expertise in pattern cutting that has given him this power. While we wait for Eugene Lin’s ultra-swish designs to bulldoze their way into magazine editorials and on the bodies of celebrities alike, we get to know the designer behind his eponymous label…

Your autumn/winter 2010 collection ‘The Gordian Knot’ and your spring/summer ?2010 collection both have a unique, tailored simplicity that flatteringly ?emphasises the feminine form. Is this a key factor when designing your collections, or do you feel it comes naturally to you? 
In the words of the great Hubert De Givenchy ‘Adding a flower or piling on details is not couture. But make an utterly simple dress, with a simple style line, this is the key to haute couture.’  The legendary Coco Chanel also said, ‘Simplicity is the keynote of all true elegance.’ My clothes are not haute couture, but the essence of what the two aforementioned designers is something I totally agree with and embody in my work. Simplicity should not be confused with plainness; the elegance of my work becomes very evident on closer inspection and that is what the women who buy my pieces appreciate and love. While some of the pieces from both collections are very feminine, there are also large appropriations taken from menswear, right down to the fabrics of the S/S 2010 collection where I used fine menswear shirting for the best-selling dresses. Ultimately, it is a combination of both a feel and a conscious reminder that it is a womenswear line after all. ?


S/S 2010

You’ve spent a lot of time with influential British designers – Preen, Vivienne WestwoodRoksanda Ilincic and Ashley Isham. Do you feel your designs exemplify what British fashion is all about? Would you define your aesthetic as British, or otherwise?
I love British fashion. I always have and always will.  British fashion for me stands for designers who are bold, directional and cutting edge. There is a burning spirit and huge support for new British designers which far surpasses any other city, including the other three fashion capitals. While the catwalks are teeming with unwearable showpieces which often draw flak from the public and other cities, there are also other designers such as myself which push the boundaries in a quieter, unexaggerated way in terms of innovative cut, fabrication and wearability.  Jackie JS Lee and Joana Sykes are examples of this.

I would define my aesthetic as Euro-centric, but not necessarily British. A designer can say all they want about who they think they are or are like, but at the end of the day, the buyers and customers are the ones who ultimately decide because customers never lie with their money. They are the ones who, through the pure forces of economics, decide which market responds the best and whose collections sit alongside yours in the multi-brand boutiques. So far, my work has been described as very chic, very Italian and very Parisian. But I am stocked along other great British designers both in the UK and in Asia, hence I feel the label has a broad European appeal. ?


A/W 2010, illustrated by Gareth A Hopkins

Your spring/summer collection made use of a beautiful royal blue colour, ?whilst your autumn/winter collection visited a flattering and seductive red. Do you find inspiration in the rich colours, or do the rich colours inspire you? Do you feel you must be selective in your colour choices to match ?your aesthetic? 
There is always an accent colour in each of my collections, but the question is finding it and making it work in harmony with the rest of the palette. I choose my colours very carefully, and if I cannot envision a piece in a certain colour, I will re-evaluate the entire palette.  The accent colours are rich, but the rest tend to be muted to balance it. Sometimes, the fabric jumps out at me and I immediately know I will use it, like the rich blue for S/S 2010. For the red in A/W 2010, the inspiration came from the concept; red is the colour of Mars, the Roman God of War. Finding the right shade, weight and texture is very tricky especially for new designers who cannot afford large minimums. The colours have to sit in blocks across the collection, as well as in the order of silhouettes. This process is a constant delicate juggling act, but getting it right really pays off as it makes each collection cohesive – something that all my buyers have really appreciated when visiting my stands and buying into the collections for their stores.


A/W 2010, illustrated by Katherine Tromans

Your intricately made ‘Bella’ top (above) is both draped and unmistakeably tailored to fit the female form. Is your unique tailoring going to be a pleasantly recurring theme in your future work, like a calling card or so to speak?
The key difference between a Eugene Lin piece and many other designer pieces is the amount of attention that is paid to the intelligent cut and detail, both in draped and tailored pieces.  The entire front of Bella is actually draped out of one single piece, being pinched together at the knot. With such a rich experience in pattern cutting, it came as a natural progression to my work, and it’s one of the few things that is incredibly difficult to imitate due to the level of technical difficulty in my work. S/S 2010 had a lot of panels and pieces which were cut from a single piece of fabric – draped or intricately split, while A/W 2010 revolved around the knots and loops.  I have been accused of being a minimalist, but ask any one of my interns or machinists who have worked on my pieces and they will laugh it off. As I mentioned before, my work always reveals something on closer inspection.  I find it incredibly insulting to both customers and other designers who really put in a lot of effort into creating a real designer garment when a pretender slaps a couple of metal studs and rings onto a piece of leather and calls it a designer dress or jacket. I would never insult my customers this way. I will always push my tailoring in different directions each season to give them something new, yet draw them back because of the familiar guarantee of quality of an impeccable fit.   ?



A/W 2010

Speaking of your future work, what do you have in store for the future of the ?Eugene Lin label? Can you divulge any information on future ventures, or even ?Spring/Summer 2011?
I will be exhibiting my third collection, S/S 2011 ‘The Vanishing Twin’, on-schedule at Somerset House this coming London Fashion Week, and for the first time taking the collection to Paris Fashion Week to an even bigger international audience. S/S 2011 was inspired by Stephen King’s novel ‘The Dark Half’ and based on the medical condition foetus in fetu (FIF), commonly known as Vanishing Twin Syndrome, whereby a foetus develops around its twin in the womb. The result, although rare, causes cases where a foot has been found growing in a boy’s brain, and limbs growing in stomachs.  However, for me a concept is only as good as its translation, and I’d like to think I’ve translated all my themes successfully so far. The pieces for S/S 2011 feature tailored trousers with extra ‘grown in’ features like an extra waistband, mutated skirts and dresses and separates which have been draped to resemble muscle and tissue.  Bottom line, I am selling clothes, and even if the customer is not aware of the inspiration or does not buy into the concept, they can always walk away with an incredible designer piece.  The concept becomes a bonus for those interested in more than just a beautifully created garment. ? ?


A/W 2010, illustrated by Jaymie O’Callaghan

Do you prefer sketching designs or actually constructing them?
I prefer constructing them, although I do sketch of course. Seeing the piece come to life is like birthing an idea, and sometimes I discover things on the stand which makes it even more beautiful than the sketch. Anyone can draw a sketch, but a woman is not going to walk into a boutique to buy a sketch to wear to an event now, is she?
 
?What do you like most about designing clothes?
The fulfilment of seeing women buy and wear a piece of their identity based on my aesthetics which originated from a simple thought. It’s like watching a seed grow right to fruitation.

?Describe your personal style in three words.
Clean, precise, elegant. In that order.

What does fashion mean to you in three words?
Love. Life. Light.

What advice would you give to those that would like to get into fashion ?design? 
Haha!! Where do we start on this….It’s really not for everyone, you have got to be really, really tough – it’s not a profession for little farm girls. Ask yourself WHERE exactly you want to be in the industry – a designer of your own label or designing for a house, and WHY you want to do it. For some like myself, I know that I will never be happy working under someone else and I wanted my own career, but for others they enjoy a design team. There is no right or wrong solution, and you should never expect to emulate another designer’s path. Internships are vital, do as many as you can to see the real face of our industry.

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Abby Wright, ,Ashley Islam, ,Asia, ,Bella, ,british, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Coco Chanel, ,Eugene Lin, ,europe, ,fashion, ,FIF, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Hubert De Givenchy, ,Jackie JS Lee, ,Jaymie O’Callaghan, ,Joana Sykes, ,Katherine Tromans, ,London Fashion Week, ,Parisian, ,Preen, ,Roksanda Ilincic, ,S/S 2010, ,S/S 2011, ,Simplicity, ,Somerset House, ,tailoring, ,UK, ,Vanishing Twin Syndrome, ,Vivienne Westwood

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: best Jewellery Designers at Somerset House

frances conteh – lfw – ss11 – jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make managed to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows.

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, cure apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate off citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book, rendered in all shades of beige.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make manage to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows. But here is the best of what I saw…

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, medications apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, side effects she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses, price massive mohair cardigans and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate of citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
frances conteh - lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Frances Conteh by Jenny Robins.

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book, rendered in all shades of beige.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make manage to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows. But here is the best of what I saw…

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, this apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses, massive mohair cardigans and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate of citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
frances conteh - lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Frances Conteh by Jenny Robins.

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and tasteful cream and beige ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, information pills I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, viagra 40mg evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Philippa Holland
Over on the Philippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.

Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff: be warned, it’s quite heavy. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on, or indeed to give me the impression she even remembers her appearance in Amelia’s Magazine. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Categories ,Acrylic jewellery, ,Ashish, ,Buba, ,Cabinet 4 Buba, ,David Koma, ,Dee Andrews, ,Esoterica, ,esthetica, ,Euan McDonald, ,Future Mystic, ,Harriet Vine, ,jewellery, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Kellie Black, ,LeJu, ,Lesley Silwood, ,Mawi, ,Phillippa Holland, ,Phoebe Coleman, ,Rosie Wolfenden, ,Somerset House, ,Tatty Devine

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Kingston MA

Amelia_LFW1_Yasmin Siddiqui, gaarte
Yasmin Siddiqui opens the Kingston MA show. Illustration by Gaarte.

Sometimes it’s hard to be heard amongst all the chatter and noise of LFW so it’s either very foolish (who’s got time to come?) or very inspired (you’ve got a ready made captive audience) to hold your MA show at the same time. I suspect Kingston University leaned the latter way, thinking why not jump on the fashion week bandwagon? They’d even secured a slot in the hallowed Freemasons’ Hall.

Kingston MA by Katherine Tromans Helen Taylor
Helen Taylor by Katherine Tromans.

Kingston MA by Katherine Tromans Alison Firth
Kingston MA by Katherine Tromans Alison Firth
Alison Firth by Katherine Tromans.

But it was late in the day, those of us who had been trogging around all day were pretty bloody knackered. Then the show was running behind and it was bloody hot in the hall… and we didn’t even have seated tickets. It seemed those had gone to the copious quantities of friends and relatives brought along by so many participants. Note to PRs – if you give us shit tickets you’ll probably get shit photos – I was hardly able to snap anything decent from my vantage point. And if you desperately want to be heard it really does pay to get the press on your side. With pretty pics.

Abby_Wright_Kingston_show Stacey Grant
Judy Zhang by Abby Wright.

Luckily we’ve got a crack team of illustrators who can make a proverbial silk purse out of a sow’s ear, or a beautiful image out of… well… not very much to look at, (which is just as well). But still, I like to have the option of good photos too. Pick ‘n’ mix and all that.

Amelia_LFW2_gaarte Yasmin Siddiqui,
Yasmin Siddiqui by Gaarte.

Amelia_LFW3_gaarte Faraz Hussain
Faraz Hussain by Gaarte.

And then the show went on… and on… Okay, so there’s a bonus to seeing several designers at once – when they’re of a very high calibre and you haven’t got a million other things to see and do. But I have to say, Kingston Uni, that this wasn’t up to the standard that London Fashion Week has become accustomed to. People were sneaking off all around me. Which leads me to my second piece of advice. Only go up against the best of what London design has to offer if you’re sure you can match it!

LFW-KingstonMA-Gemma-Milly Victor Chan
Victor Chan by Gemma Milly.

I’m sure many of the Kingston MA students are very talented, but I’m struggling to remember anything that stood out, and that is a bad thing. A lot of it was very similar in feel, nondescript in colouring with draping, oversize accessories and protrusions everywhere (they seem to be very much du jour) And I’m sorry, but a load of polygonally moulded leathers do not a fashion designer make.

LFW-KingstonMA2-Gemma-Milly Raine Hodgson
Raine Hodgson by Gemma Milly.

Stand outs, if I’m pushed? Obviously the first piece, courtesy of Yasmin Siddiqui, was a great piece of statement jewellery. There was some strong colouring combinations in the menswear from Faraz Hussain and Helen Taylor’s male jumpsuit was fun, as was her styling with wooden head frames. Generally I had a strong sense of shapelessness going on. But hey! I’ll let you make up your minds for yourselves, and in the meantime I think you’ll agree that my illustrators have done sterling work.

Kingston MA Yasmin Siddiqui photo by Amelia Gregory
Kingston MA Yasmin Siddiqui photo by Amelia Gregory
Yasmin Siddiqui. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Kingston MA Stacey Grant photo by Amelia Gregory
Stacey Grant

Kingston MA Faraz Hussain photo by Amelia Gregory
Faraz Hussain

Kingston MA Judy Zhang photo by Amelia Gregory
Kingston MA Judy Zhang photo by Amelia Gregory
Judy Zhang

Kingston MA Alison Firth photo by Amelia Gregory
Alison Firth

Kingston MA Helen Taylor photo by Amelia Gregory
Kingston MA Helen Taylor photo by Amelia Gregory
Helen Taylor

Kingston MA Victor Chan photo by Amelia Gregory
Victor Chan

Kingston MA Patricia Osbahr photo by Amelia Gregory
Patricia Osbahr

Categories ,Abby Wright, ,Alison Firth, ,Faraz Hussain, ,Gaarte, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Gemma Milly, ,Graduate Show, ,Helen Taylor, ,Judy Zhang, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Kingston MA. LFW, ,London Fashion Week, ,Patricia Osbahr, ,Raine Hodgson, ,Stacey Grant, ,Victor Chan, ,Yasmin Siddiqui

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Jaeger

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai.

I really don’t know what it is about fashion that attracts so many people with a dark sensibility. Is it because an obsession with the way we look can easily tip into self flagellation? Maybe for striving but somehow never attaining perfection? Punishment, tadalafil pain and even death are a major inspiration for all sorts of fashionable creativity… and ideas provoked by S&M were present in spades at this LFW, visit this site as always.

Úna Burke presented her leatherwear collection at Fashion Scout accompanied by a somewhat disturbing film that my more erudite boyfriend informed me was similar to the work of Bjork’s one time other half Matthew Barney.

It featured scenes of a semi clad model in a dungeon – opening her eyes in gory close up before grappling her way towards the light and a crowd of bemused onlookers.

In cabinets we were invited to admire the bondage inspired pieces up close, presented alongside grainy black and white photos, stills from the film. Her website cites her stated aim “to create leather objects which are both visually captivating and technically challenging.” Úna Burke inhabits that grey area between art and fashion – making wearable art. Using traditional techniques, there is undoubtedly a fine sense of craftsmanship to her work. All well and good for a bit of sex play, but this kind of presentation leaves me wondering – what exactly is the market for this? Can one make a living this way? Or must one diversify into slightly more commercial pieces to survive? Witness the Maria Francesca Pepe exhibition a few days later…

You can read Matthew Bramford’s complimentary review of the same presentation right here.
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai.

I really don’t know what it is about fashion that attracts so many people with a dark sensibility. Is it because an obsession with the way we look can easily tip into self flagellation? Maybe for striving but somehow never attaining perfection? Punishment, purchase pain and even death are a major inspiration for all sorts of fashionable creativity… and ideas provoked by S&M were present in spades at this LFW, find as always.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Úna Burke presented her leatherwear collection at Fashion Scout accompanied by a somewhat disturbing film that my more erudite boyfriend informed me was similar to the work of Bjork’s one time other half Matthew Barney. It featured scenes of a semi clad model in a dungeon – opening her eyes in gory close up before grappling her way towards the light and a crowd of bemused onlookers.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In cabinets we were invited to admire the bondage inspired pieces up close, splayed out and presented alongside grainy black and white photos, stills from the film. Her website cites her stated aim “to create leather objects which are both visually captivating and technically challenging.” Úna Burke inhabits that grey area between art and fashion – making wearable art. Using traditional techniques, there is undoubtedly a fine sense of craftsmanship to her work. All well and good for a bit of sex play, but this kind of presentation leaves me wondering – what exactly is the market for this? Can one make a living this way? Or must one diversify into slightly more commercial pieces to survive? Witness the Maria Francesca Pepe exhibition a few days later…

You can read Matthew Bramford’s complimentary review of the same presentation right here.
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai.

I really don’t know what it is about fashion that attracts so many people with a dark sensibility. Is it because an obsession with the way we look can easily tip into self flagellation? Maybe encouraged by the desire to strive for but never being able to attain perfection? Punishment, advice pain and even death are a major inspiration for all sorts of fashionable creativity… and ideas provoked by S&M were present in spades at this LFW, as always.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Úna Burke presented her leatherwear collection at Fashion Scout accompanied by a somewhat disturbing film that my more erudite boyfriend informed me was similar to the work of Bjork’s one time other half Matthew Barney. It featured scenes of a semi clad model in a dungeon – opening her eyes in gory close up before grappling her way towards the light and a crowd of bemused onlookers.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In cabinets we were invited to admire the bondage inspired pieces up close, splayed out and presented alongside grainy black and white photos, stills from the film. Her website cites her stated aim “to create leather objects which are both visually captivating and technically challenging.” Úna Burke inhabits that grey area between art and fashion – making wearable art. Using traditional techniques, there is undoubtedly a fine sense of craftsmanship to her work. All well and good for a bit of sex play, but this kind of presentation leaves me wondering – what exactly is the market for this? Can one make a living this way? Or must one diversify into slightly more commercial pieces to survive? Witness the Maria Francesca Pepe exhibition a few days later…

You can read Matthew Bramford’s complimentary review of the same presentation right here.
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai
Una Burke A/W 2011 by Joy Chokchai.

I really don’t know what it is about fashion that attracts so many people with a dark sensibility. Is it because an obsession with the way we look can easily tip into self flagellation? Maybe encouraged by the desire to strive for but never being able to attain perfection? Punishment, sales pain and even death are a major inspiration for all sorts of fashionable creativity… and ideas provoked by S&M were present in spades at this LFW, sildenafil as always.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory

Úna Burke presented her leatherwear collection at Fashion Scout accompanied by a somewhat disturbing film that my more erudite boyfriend informed me was similar to the work of Bjork’s one time other half Matthew Barney. It featured scenes of a semi clad model in a dungeon – opening her eyes in gory close up before grappling her way towards the light and a crowd of bemused onlookers.

Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryUna Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Una Burke A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

In cabinets we were invited to admire the bondage inspired pieces up close, splayed out and presented alongside grainy black and white photos, stills from the film. Her website cites her stated aim “to create leather objects which are both visually captivating and technically challenging.” Úna Burke inhabits that grey area between art and fashion – making wearable art. Using traditional techniques, there is undoubtedly a fine sense of craftsmanship to her work. All well and good for a bit of sex play, but this kind of presentation leaves me wondering – what exactly is the market for this? Can one make a living this way? Or must one diversify into slightly more commercial pieces to survive? Witness the Maria Francesca Pepe exhibition a few days later…

You can read Matthew Bramford’s complimentary review of the same presentation right here.
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Madi.

Jaeger, find I’m afraid, viagra 60mg is one of those shows for which I lost the press release several weeks ago. That’s if there ever was one – but who needs a blurb anyway? Surely the clothes should be able to do the talking…

Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011 by Katherine Tromans
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Katherine Tromans.

Jaeger is a traditional brand that has managed to up the fashion style stakes with in house design team shake ups. The current creative director is Stuart Stockdale, malady who formerly worked for Pringle of Scotland amongst others. He’s been with Jaeger for several years now and after a prolonged period in the doldrums he has succeeded in reinvigorating the brand. What is it with British heritage fashion brands? They’re just so very good at reinventing themselves.

Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana FariaJaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Joana Faria.

It was under the clean lights of the BFC tent that Jaeger hit the catwalk, itself all clean lines and considered tailoring. Sharp, beautifully crisp well fitting garments ploughed out to meet the photographers. The collection was a delicious mix of autumnal colours: blocks of cinnamon, caramel, fallen leaf orange, paprika, mustard and moss gathering around punctual navy blues and sensible chocolate brown. Capacious leather bags and handheld clutches were the accessory of choice but I couldn’t keep my eyes off the shoes, cleverly styled with stripy woollen socks. Present and correct was the colour du jour – sharp bursts of orange red. Or on dazzling silky blouses a lip-smacking deep fuchsia pink. Yum.

Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011 by Zoe Georgiou
Jaeger A/W 2011 by Zoe Georgiou.

This is what I would wear if I were a different kind of person: one who always looks immaculately turned out, whatever the occasion. And of course one who has a very nice steady stream of income. Working women in a certain type of job would do well to look to Jaeger for fabulous style and quality that won’t go out of fashion in a hurry.

Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.
Jaeger A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

As you can see, I got a bit hypnotised by the feet…

You can see more illustrations by Joana Faria and Katherine Tromans in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,BFC, ,Heritage, ,Jaeger, ,Joana Faria, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Madi, ,Madi Illustrates, ,Pringle of Scotland, ,Somerset House, ,Stuart Stockdale, ,Zoe Georgiou

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Presentation Review: Designers Remix (by Amelia)

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd.

Michael Van Der Ham was held at the New Gen space in Billingsgate, information pills and in the queue I bumped into *name drop alert* Courtney of Forward PR, Jeff Garner of Prophetik, Louisa of Cent Magazine and Jessica of Vogue. Usually I just slink in and out of shows as fast as possible, so it was nice to have a friendly little crew to hang out with as we made the most of free food laid on courtesy of Topshop… glasses of champagne, or juice… and creamy butternut squash risotto served in dinky little pots: quite possibly the best risotto I have ever tasted.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

This was only Michael Van Der Ham‘s second stand alone show, and as we were ushered in to our seats I was left wondering why the hell it had been so hard to get tickets for New Gen shows… the Billingsgate venue is huge, and the PR girls had to hurry standing tickets into seats as the lights went down. It was not exactly busy for either of the shows that I attended here, so it’s a shame that allocation of tickets was so tight.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie HarnettMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett.

Michael Van Der Ham has made his name from a unique cut and paste approach to fashion. Last season he mashed up all sorts of clashing fabrics to create something universally lauded but perhaps not wholly wearable. This season he appeared to address the commerciality question, so first out onto the catwalk came a series of eminently desirable velvet outfits in a range of jewel brights. Each one featured his signature asymmetric draped tailoring, but rendered all in one shade: delicious rose, fuchsia, lime, turquoise and orange.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi.

From then on in we were in more familiar territory: assorted fabric panels and intarsia knitwear inspired by vintage floral paisleys in 70s style shades of purple and orange, complete with accents of lurex. Heavily tasseled trousers were fun for editorial but of questionable taste for the buying public; far more successful were the wide legged high waisted trousers worn with panelled wool crop jackets.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril KellyMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

But for me the standouts were unquestionably the range of sumptuous velvet dresses. Want. One. Experimenting with more wearable concepts suits Michael Van Der Ham well.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

You can read Jemma Crow’s review of this show here and see more of Katie Harnett’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd.

Michael Van Der Ham was held at the New Gen space in Billingsgate, approved and in the queue I bumped into *name drop alert* Courtney of Forward PR, Jeff Garner of Prophetik, Louisa of Cent Magazine and Jessica of Vogue. Usually I just slink in and out of shows as fast as possible, so it was nice to have a friendly little crew to hang out with as we made the most of free food laid on courtesy of Topshop… glasses of champagne, or juice… and creamy butternut squash risotto served in dinky little pots: quite possibly the best risotto I have ever tasted.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

This was only Michael Van Der Ham‘s second stand alone show, and as we were ushered in to our seats I was left wondering why the hell it had been so hard to get tickets for New Gen shows… the Billingsgate venue is huge, and the PR girls had to hurry standing tickets into seats as the lights went down. It was not exactly busy for either of the shows that I attended here, so it’s a shame that allocation of tickets was so tight.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie HarnettMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett.

Michael Van Der Ham has made his name from a unique cut and paste approach to fashion. Last season he mashed up all sorts of clashing fabrics to create something universally lauded but perhaps not wholly wearable. This season he appeared to address the commerciality question, so first out onto the catwalk came a series of eminently desirable velvet outfits in a range of jewel brights. Each one featured his signature asymmetric draped tailoring, but rendered all in one shade: delicious rose, fuchsia, lime, turquoise and orange.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi.

From then on in we were in more familiar territory: assorted fabric panels and intarsia knitwear inspired by vintage floral paisleys in 70s style shades of purple and orange, complete with accents of lurex. Heavily tasseled trousers were fun for editorial but of questionable taste for the buying public; far more successful were the wide legged high waisted trousers worn with panelled wool crop jackets.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

But for me the standouts were unquestionably the range of sumptuous velvet dresses. Want. One. Experimenting with more wearable concepts suits Michael Van Der Ham well.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

You can read Jemma Crow’s review of this show here and see more of Katie Harnett’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Jenny Lloyd.

Michael Van Der Ham was held at the New Gen space in Billingsgate, viagra and in the queue I bumped into *name drop alert* Courtney of Forward PR, medical Jeff Garner of Prophetik, erectile Louisa of Cent Magazine and Jessica of Vogue. Usually I just slink in and out of shows as fast as possible, so it was nice to have a friendly little crew to hang out with as we made the most of free food laid on courtesy of Topshop… glasses of champagne, or juice… and creamy butternut squash risotto served in dinky little pots: quite possibly the best risotto I have ever tasted.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

This was only Michael Van Der Ham‘s second stand alone show, and as we were ushered in to our seats I was left wondering why the hell it had been so hard to get tickets for New Gen shows… the Billingsgate venue is huge, and the PR girls had to hurry standing tickets into seats as the lights went down. It was not exactly busy for either of the shows that I attended here, so it’s a shame that allocation of tickets was so tight.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie HarnettMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Katie Harnett.

Michael Van Der Ham has made his name from a unique cut and paste approach to fashion. Last season he mashed up all sorts of clashing fabrics to create something universally lauded but perhaps not wholly wearable. This season he appeared to address the commerciality question, so first out onto the catwalk came a series of eminently desirable velvet outfits in a range of jewel brights. Each one featured his signature asymmetric draped tailoring, but rendered all in one shade: delicious rose, fuchsia, lime, turquoise and orange.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Madi.

From then on in we were in more familiar territory: assorted fabric panels and intarsia knitwear inspired by vintage floral paisleys in 70s style shades of purple and orange, complete with accents of lurex. Heavily tasseled trousers were fun for editorial but of questionable taste for the buying public; far more successful were the wide legged high waisted trousers worn with panelled wool crop jackets.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

But for me the standouts were unquestionably the range of sumptuous velvet dresses. Want. One. Experimenting with more wearable concepts suits Michael Van Der Ham well.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryMichael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly
Michael Van Der Ham A/W 2011 by Avril Kelly.

You can read Jemma Crow’s review of this show here and see more of Katie Harnett’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Designers Remix by Charlotte Eskildsen. Illustration by Faye West
Designers Remix by Charlotte Eskildsen. Illustration by Faye West.

Designers Remix is a somewhat ridiculous name for the signature brand from Danish designer Charlotte Eskildsen. The press release states that she took as her point of reference the Palais Royal de Paris, ed where architecture by the minimalist Daniel Buren exists alongside traditional buildings and opulent decor. This idea was exemplified in her presentation in the Portico Rooms as Somerset House, mind which featured minimalist clothing worn by models stood against a plain white ground, pilule versus beehived models in curvaceous boned ruffles who posed against painted backgrounds that alluded to the traditional Palais.

Designers Remix A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryDesigners Remix by Charlotte Eskildsen. Illustration by Katherine Tromans
Designers Remix by Charlotte Eskildsen. Illustration by Katherine Tromans.

This duality only became clear on reading the press release: at the show it just came across as two very different collections. Of course, the one which the photographers loved most is not hard to guess. Two models cuddled up against an orange and grey photo-real scene was by far the best presentation idea I’ve seen in some time, and ensured some great images for press – photographers thrusting each other out of the way to get the best faux lesbian picture. Sadly the minimalist crew were not nearly as inspiring… and I felt sorry for the under loved models in their poker straight hair and clean black tailoring.

Designers Remix A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryDesigners Remix A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryDesigners Remix A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Designers Remix A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Read Jemma Crow’s review of Designers Remix here. You can see more work from Faye West and Katherine Troman in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Charlotte Eskildsen, ,Daniel Buren, ,Danish, ,Designers Remix, ,Faye West, ,Jemma Crow, ,Katherine Tromans, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,minimalist, ,Opulent, ,Palais Royal de Paris, ,Portico Rooms, ,Presentation, ,Somerset House

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Canon launches DIGITAL IXUS 80 IS

Recently the weather has been getting warmer and we seem to be having less miserable days. It’s almost like Spring is on its way; until the wind picks up, the skies turn grey and the rain pours down. But January mustn’t be remembered for the side effects of global warming, as Canon is about to launch a new camera for this spring – the digital IXUS 80 IS. They have four colours to choose from: Classic Silver, Caramel, Chocolate, and Candy Pink. Highly compact and super stylish; they’re not just pretty, they’re also uber-functional. Canon have introduced a new clear 2.5” PureColor LCD II screen, which means that you get to see your subject in true colour (which is sometimes a bit of a reality shock at the end of a night out). I gave it a try and the screen was as advertised, particularly compared to the one I bought two years ago. But before you head off to your nearest electronic shop, there’s more! It has brand new Motion Detection Technology, enabling the camera to sense movement – no more blurry pictures! This is technology at its finest, if only it could magic the January rain away…
canon1.jpg

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | EFF Innovation Awards

Featuring competitions in the already overly competitive world that is Art may seem somewhat crude to say the least. But in fact it’s through these well supported and sponsored prizes that new and underexposed artists and creative mediums gain a platform and a voice, information pills page and a fairly fair and just route for career progression out of the studios and into the spotlight. It’s also a darn good excuse to curate a fine exhibition of very talented folk, hospital and in a collaborative sense get together with a common thread, clinic be it the format, subject matter or genre, and share opinions, ideas and approaches. I call to the stand Foto8 and their annual Photographic Prize an exhibition of which opens with a right knees up of a party this weekend in London.

FOTO8%202brueggermann.jpg

Joerg Brueggermann (2009 Entry)

Foto8, in their own words, is ‘a space to share, comment and debate photography. The site exists to bridge the divide between photographers, authors and their audience through interactive displays and a constant stream of new works and resources’. Based on the belief that documentary photography has a vital role to play in contemporary society, Foto8′s ethos firmly pushes the medium as a valued tool for communication and self education about the world around us and the lesser understood worlds of others.

FOTO8%204traylor.png

Abbie Traylor-Smith (2009 Entry)

The London based website has regular postings of reviews, commentaries, interviews and picture stories as well as photographic events and news items, and serves as an outlet for the biannually published 8 magazine, which can be previewed, ordered and subscribed to from there. Now up to issue 25 the magazine blurs and tests the boundaries between photography, journalism and art and represents ‘the very best in design and print, following a graphic format that uses the medium of the printed page to its fullest.’

FOTO8%203hackman.jpg

Robert Hackman (2009 Entry)

The Gallery that will house this spectacular show was established by director of Foto8 Jon Levy along with Adrian Evans, the director of Panos Pictures, and celebrates it’s fourth birthday this year. HOST is dedicated to the specialised promotion and exploration of photojournalism and documentary photography, ‘from classical black and white reportage to contemporary mixed media’. They pioneer both new and traditional methods of manipulating the gallery setting with innovation and passion. The gallery proudly boasts a highly-respected exhibition schedule, complimented by an on-going program of face-to-face encounters with photography and film, including screenings, talks and regular book club meetings.

FOTO8%203linburg.jpg

Clemence de Limburg (2009 Entry)

From around 2300 images submitted from 44 different countries from as far afield as Thailand and Turkey, just over 100 carefully selected images will make up the final display at this year’s Foto 8 Summer Show at London’s HOST Gallery. As well as each entry appearing in the show’s published book, each photograph will be for sale to the public from the opening night and throughout the exhibition, and of course each and every exhibit will be in with the chance to win either the ‘Best in Show’ category or the ‘People’s Choice’, both highly sort after and respected prizes in the industry.

foto8%207wallace.jpg

Dougie Wallace (2008 Winner of ‘Best in Show’)

foto8%208castagnoli.jpg

Guido Castagnoli (2008 Winner of ‘People’s Choice’)

Whereas the Best in Show is awarded by an elite team of experts in the field, including The Times’ Director of Photography Graham Wood and the V&A’s Head of Images Andrea Stern, and entails a £1500 reward, the People’s Choice will be determined by public visitors to the show and in many respects is a more coveted title, given that each exhibitor’s work must speak to those with perhaps a less trained eye for artistic and technical merit, and must rely on more personal and emotional responses from the everyday spectator.

FOTO8%206pugliese.jpg

Domenico Pugliese (2009 Entry)

The brief for prospective entrants was simple. They seek images that challenge and engage, convey stories and raise questions. They state that they ‘encourage free expression’ and ‘new ways of seeing and telling’, also adding that they value photography ‘that conveys feeling as much as fact.’ The entry requirements allow for up to three submitted images per person, and the submissions look set to be as diverse and varied as 2008′s collections were.

rachel%20photo.jpg

Rachel Bevis (2009 Entry)

Being the biased art appreciators that we are, there is already a winner of an entry in our opinion, an image that stands out for us and will be certainly receiving the ‘Amelia’s Choice’ award at the opening on Friday evening. ‘Marie’ by semi-professional London based photographer Rachel Bevis commands our attention and holds our gaze. At first seeming to be a mono-chrome image of a lone figure at night, on second appreciation is actually a wintery street scene in which a female is immersed in falling snow. Mysterious, evocative and powerful this photograph is one we cannot tire of looking at. Best of luck Miss Bevis.

Who will you be exercising your democratic rights and voting for?

Foto8 Summer Show
HOST Gallery
1 Honduras Street
London, EC1Y 0TH

24th July: Opening Night Party
6:30pm – 11:30pm

Tickets: £5 in advance, £8 on the door
Tickets available to buy here

24th July – 5th September
Opening times:
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat 11am-4pm

FOTO8%205tong.jpg

Kurt Tong (2009 Entry)
One of the organisations we’ve been following of late at Amelia’s Magazine is the Ethical Fashion Forum. Springing up in 2004 following the concerns made famous in the international press during the 1990s – sweatshop working, information pills terrible wages and mass environmental damage – a group of designers decided to do something about it by raising awareness. Liasing with over 400 designers, fashion brands and other fashion businesses, the EFF connects people who want to promote a sustainable future for the fashion industry; this includes creating safe working environments and increasing wages in oft-exploited third world countries, as well as encouraging minimal environmental damage. Closely tied to this venture is the Fair Trade Foundation – pinpointing exactly how topical a sustainable fashion industry has become in recent years alongside the massive interest in Fair Trade products.

Earlier in the year EFF launched it’s biannual “Innovation” competition for designers, the first being PURE, rewarding and recognising those who have shown innovation (!) and initiative regarding the greater good of the fashion world. The shortlist of competitors was announced last month, and gave publicity to an assortment of passionate designers who are keen to support a sustainable and ethical fashion future through their business strategies and design work. The competition hopes to raise awareness of the EFF’s goals and views by rewarding those who have shown similar ethical principles to itself, whilst at the same time inspiring this generation of designers to work together for a better future. The overused cliché of “green is the new black” really seems to be ringing true at EFF!

This years shortlist of 12 included designers from all over the world, all excited to promote the EFF message; those from or working in South Africa, Malawi, India, China and North America were all on show, with a good percentage of designers working in poverty-stricken Third World countries. The designers largely sourced their materials from traditional industries all over the world, and particularly in struggling areas, as shown by this quick survey of the territories they work within. Others are supporting local industries within the UK, such as crofting in the Scottish Highlands. Each were judged on their collection’s overall design and finish, their brand ethics, and their sale-ability, by a panel including Anna Orsini, head of London Fashion Week, Donna Wallace of ELLE magazine, alongside other senior fashion journalists and lecturers.

So who came up trumps in the end? Being selected to show at the PURE trade show, the winners were Cape Town brand Lalesso, and MIA, another African working in Malawi. Lalesso was a clear box-ticker: initially set up to provide a “socially responsible method of manufacturing”.

Lalesso_image_1.jpg

Lalesso_image_2.jpg

Designing clothes based on East African traditions and current trends, the label aids struggling unemployment by providing well-paid work for several different groups, from the unskilled ‘beach boys’ to the traditionally skilled Masaai tradesmen. The clothes are vibrant, fun and youthful, including patterned prom dresses and casual beach wear, showcasing typical laidback African style tailored for a fashion-conscious audience who care.

MIA was an equally obvious winner. Recycling vintage pieces is no new idea; however MIA has taken this to new lengths with her remade clothing. Using second- hand streetwear combined with traditional Malawian dress, she has created designs that are thoroughly modern, embracing the current fascination with all things retro and uniquely individual.

MIA_image_2.jpg

MIA’s message is to embrace our wardrobes and recycle them in order to prevent such widespread textile waste in the way that we recycle food packaging and other products in the new millennium. She’s another designer interested in the capacities of upcycled clothing, and is keen to promote change with her range of smock style mini dresses combining different materials in their zig-zag skirts.

Some of the other candidates we were keen on included Henrietta Ludgate, a Central Saint Martins graduate and Scottish designer hailing from the Highlands.

henrietta-ludgate-cigar-dre.jpg

Embracing her Highland roots, this designer used crofting techniques in her collections in a way that has not been seen in recent years, supporting local industries with her work. Crofting involves reusing excess waste material from mills as part of a small community of workers who all support each other.

A similar idea can be seen with Outsider, who support the oft-abused textile industries in China and India through sourcing organic fabrics and providing fair labour conditions and wages, true to the EFF message. Stating that “we believe ethical fashion should just look like fashion” these designers are certainly up there with the best of the bunch.

OUTSIDERlowres.jpg

Their latest collection featured reworked classic shapes with pleat detailing and simple lines, all in sophisticated black, with the main focus of the design work being on the use of sustainable fabrics to inspire confidence in what we’re wearing and how it is sustaining the fashion industry globally.

Coming up in September will be the Esethetica awards when more winners will be announced – what did you make of the shortlist and did you agree with the winners? Let us know!

Categories ,Crofting, ,Global Fashion, ,Streetwear, ,Sustainable Fashion, ,Traditional, ,Vintage

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration is OUT NOW!

Willow candle by daria hlazatova
Willow Organic Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova.

I don’t know what it is about candles that gets me so excited. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that I love beautiful smells. My house may be a mess but I quite often spritz my office with a sweetly scented room spray or light a candle to imbue a relaxing mood. I think that this is the nub of what is so brilliant about candles, generic link especially the really high quality ones that contain high quantities of essential oils – they are the simplest way to create a delightfully relaxing and cosy feeling within a space.

willow organics candle

And of course Christmas is all about candles. Since I lived in Sweden as a little girl my family has had a tradition of lighting advent candles during the month of December – and whilst I don’t spend much time at my parent’s home anymore, look I always look forward to candlelit dinners when I return for Christmas. Candles impart a certain cosiness which the Danish call “hygge” – and during these bitterly cold dark winter months is most sorely appreciated.

Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova
Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova.

This year my favourite discovery is the Willow Organic Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle. It comes beautifully presented in a beribboned fold out box and utilises the naturally healing and calming effects of precious oils that have been synonymous with Christmas since biblical times.

Willow candle box
willow candle box open

From the wonderful scents to the gold leaf that floats glittering in the top of the wax, information pills it doesn’t get more christmassy than this. The Willow Organic shop in Kings Road, Chelsea is open until the 23rd December, so there’s still time to grab a fabulous Christmas candle before the big day.

Cire_Trudon_by_Megan_Piontkowski
Cire Trudon by Megan Piontkowski.

Earlier this year I discovered the French Cire Trudon brand, which has been in operation in various guises since 1643. Alongside very high quality candles presented in beautiful glass pots with heraldic shields, they also produce stunning room sprays in statement bottles and a boxed set containing a room spray, candle and illustrated fairy tale – the idea being to encourage children to enjoy evocative scents from a very young age. Not for the hard up these boxed sets don’t come cheap, but I love the idea and the illustrated booklets are a delight.

Sinbad the Sailor - Fairy Tale Box - Cire Trudon

Recently discovered: the Albam independent menswear clothing store in Spitalfields stocks three yummy varieties of candle, my favourite being the figgy one. When I went in they were also testing out a new scent called Library, which was suitably masculine. Unfortunately I don’t think you can buy these online but it’s definitely worth taking a trip down to this great little store.

Spitalfields Candle Co by ellie sutton
Spitalfields Candle Co and Tocca candles by Ellie Sutton.

There is also the Spitalfields Candle Co. which uses sustainably sourced soya wax in all candles. It was hard to choose my favourite from such a yummy range only briefly sniffed in the Inspitalfields gift store, but I think it has to be Lemon Verbena – I just love that clean bright scent.

Diptyque Candle - The Cloud Commission
Diptyque Candle by The Cloud Commission.

Tocca are a high end scent company that stock in Liberty – I particularly like the sound of the Bianca candle which contains Green Tea and Lemon. Each year the Parisian brand Diptyque creates a special Christmas range, in beautifully decorated coloured glass jars. The Orange Epicee sounds yummy, as does the Canelle.

Jo Malone by Gareth A Hopkins
Jo Malone by Gareth A Hopkins.

Lastly but no means least Jo Malone offers incredibly classy scents, all tastefully presented in cream boxes with crisp branding. The limited edition Pine & Eucalyptus Collection sounds glorious, and how about a giant candle with not one but four wicks to make a major statement?

Right, I’m off to get on with my present wrapping by the scent of my Willow Organic candle. Have a glorious Christmas everyone.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-cover

So, pills the book is finally here! You can find it at Tate Modern, about it Magma, Design Museum, Serpentine Gallery, Tatty Devine, Cornerhouse, Arnolfini and many other good independent book stores across the UK and by early 2011 around the world.

Tatty Devine Amelia's Compendium
Harriet of Tatty Devine takes receipt of her copies of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Amelia's Compendium Magma
On the shelves of Magma.

Or you can buy it online here for a reduced price and receive 12 unique Amelia’s Magazine postcards, plus a selection of bookmarks. This offer is EXCLUSIVE to my website. You can’t get these postcards anywhere else!

Amelia's Compendium postcards
Postcards come free with all orders of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration made through this website.

The following up and coming fashion illustrators feature in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration:
Abigail Daker, Abby Wright, Amy Martino, Andrea Peterson, Aniela Murphy, Antonia Parker, Bex Glover, Emma Block, Erica Sharp, Faye West, Gemma Milly, Jennifer Costello, Jenny Robins, Jo Cheung, Joana Faria, June Chanpoomidole, Katherine Tromans, Katie Harnett, Kellie Black, Krister Selin, Lesley Barnes, Lisa Stannard, Michelle Urvall Nyren, Naomi Law, Natasha Thompson, Natsuki Otani, Rachel de Ste Croix, Yelena Bryksenkova, Zarina Liew & Gareth A Hopkins.

And…. the book features interviews with the following ethical fashion designers:
123 Bethnal Green Road, Ada Zanditon, Andrea Crews, Anja Hynynen, Beautiful Soul, By Stamo, Camilla Norrback, Christopher Raeburn, Ciel, Dem Collective, Edun, Emesha, Emma Ware, Fifi Bijoux, From Somewhere, Goodone, Gossypium, Henrietta Ludgate, Hetty Rose, Howies, Ivana Basilotta, Izzy Lane, Joanna Cave, Junky Styling, Little Glass Clementine, Lu Flux, Martina Spetlova, Maxjenny, Michelle Lowe-Holder, Minna, Nancy Dee, Nina Dolcetti, Noir, Noki, Oria, Partimi, People Tree, Pia Anjou, Prophetik, Romina Karamanea, Sägen, Satoshi Date, Tara Starlet, Ute Decker & Wilfried Pletzinger

Below are some pages from inside the book – which is the usual riot of colour and pattern for which I have become known. You can also watch a flick video of the book on the website of my international distributor Idea Books here.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-From Somewhere
From Somewhere illustrated by Rachel de Ste Croix.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-By Stamo
By Stamo illustrated by Krister Selin.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Christopher Raeburn
Christopher Raeburn illustrated by Gemma Milly.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Edun
Edun illustrated by Katherine Tromans.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Dem Collective
Dem Collective illustrated by Michelle Urvall Nyren.

Amelia's Compendium Aniela Murphy
Aniela Murphy’s pages in the content proofs.

Amelia's Compendium Antonia Parker
Antonia Parker’s pages in the content proofs.

Please note that I will not be posting any orders out until the 4th January 2011. Have a very merry Christmas!

Categories ,123, ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,Abby Wright, ,Abigail Daker, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Amy Martino, ,Andrea Crews, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Aniela Murphy, ,Anja Hynynen, ,Antonia Parker, ,arnolfini, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Bex Glover, ,book, ,Book shop, ,Bookstores, ,By Stamo, ,Camilla Norrback, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,ciel, ,Cornerhouse, ,Dem Collective, ,Design Museum, ,Eco fashion, ,Edun, ,Emesha, ,Emma Block, ,Emma Ware, ,Erica Sharp, ,Ethical Fashion Design, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Faye West, ,Fifi Bijoux, ,From Somewhere, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gemma Milly, ,goodone, ,gossypium, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Hetty Rose, ,howies, ,Idea Books, ,illustration, ,Ivana Basilotta, ,Izzy Lane, ,Jennifer Costello, ,Jenny Robins, ,Jo Cheung, ,Joana Faria, ,Joanna Cave, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Junky Styling, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Katie Harnett, ,Kellie Black, ,Krister Selin, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Little Glass Clementine, ,Lu Flux, ,Magma, ,Martina Spetlova, ,Maxjenny, ,Michelle Lowe-Holder, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Minna, ,Nancy Dee, ,Naomi Law, ,Natasha Thompson, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,noir, ,Noki, ,Oria, ,Partimi, ,People Tree, ,Pia Anjou, ,Prophetik, ,Rachel De Ste. Croix, ,Romina Karamanea, ,Sägen, ,Satoshi Date, ,Serpentine Gallery, ,Tara Starlet, ,Tate Modern, ,Tatty Devine, ,Ute Decker, ,Wilfried Pletzinger, ,Yelena Bryksenkova, ,Zarina Liew

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | An Evening of Retro Hollywood Glamour at the Victoria & Albert Museum


Mumford & Sons illustration by Lana Hughes

5. Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons have had a special piece in my heart for a couple of years now. Having played their debut to death and enjoyed their live shows just as much, ampoule the band never fail to disappoint. When they arrived at the NME/Radio 1 Tent they packed out the space and the surrounding areas had hundreds of fans trying to capture the performance.

Despite not being able to see the band or even hear them over the crowd singing along, shop I still had hairs on my neck shooting up. I felt quite proud of the most modest band around who could not have put more effort in. They were made for moments like this. ‘Little Lion Man’ had never sounded so perfect and the new songs were greeted with the same enthusiasm from the crowd.


Weezer illustration by Natsuki Otani

4. Weezer
Sunday evening, abortion there was a chill in the air, ‘nu metal’ pioneers Limp Bizit had been and gone, the heavy rain had done the same. American geek rockers Weezer brought the sun to the main-stage along with a greatest hits set. They are a band I would never choose the listen to but I wouldn’t turn them off either.

Along with the classics, ‘Buddy Holly’, ‘Hash Pipe’ and ‘Beverly Hills’ the old timers covered Wheatus’ ‘Teenage Dirtbag’, MGMT’s ‘Kids’ and Lady GaGa’s ‘Pokerface’ where energetic front-man Rivers Cuomo sported a blonde wig whilst rolling about in the mud.


Mystery Jets illustration by Antonia Makes

3. Mystery Jets
Mystery Jets have been knocking about for sometime now with a collection of pop songs that would give Simon Cowell’s song-writing team a fright. Today wasn’t just about the hits, it was to see if the band could work main-stage after a few appearances on the smaller ones previously.

Not only did they get some sing-a-longs from the crowd but also got them dancing when Count & Sinden joined the band to play the party tune of the year, ‘After Dark’. It wasn’t just the stage that the band controlled as the lively band members spent a decent about of time amongst the crowd too.


The Libertines illustrated by Abi Daker

2. The Libertines
2002, the NME. Radio 1 Tent saw Peter Doherty, Carl Barat, John Hassall and Gary Powell play their only Reading Festival together. Since then The Libertines have performed twice without Peter, and since the group disbanded six years ago they have all appeared under different guises.

The main-stage witnessed the band play just their forth gig since their recent reformation. It was professional and energetic. I don’t think I have ever seen the band play that well; they meant business. Talk was kept to a minimum whilst thrashing out tune after tune, they were unfazed when they had to have a quick break whilst the crowd calmed down. A tear was shed when Pete and Carl, hugged and kissed onstage, I had been waiting too long for that moment.


Libertines illustration by Miss Pearl Grey aka Kellie B.


Arcade Fire, illustration by Jenny Robins.

1. Arcade Fire
It was Arcade Fire’s last Reading Festival performance that really won me over. Win Butler lead the seven piece on a emphatic set that included songs from all three records but it was the material from their latest, The Suburbs that really had the wow factor. Words struggle to some up this performance, it was more than just music, more like a religion.

Many thanks to our illustrators. Thumbnail illustration of Weezer by Julie Lee

Delorean by Clare Delaney

Opening on Wednesday, buy information pills PayneShurvell (in association with the anti-design festival) are for four weeks, buy holding four, visit this four day exhibitions. Titled 4×4, the gallery’s first show (Dream’s of Desire) curated by James Payne features artist Clare Delaney.

The gallery doors currently find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

Opening on Wednesday, viagra approved PayneShurvell (in association with the anti-design festival) are for four weeks, seek holding four, four day exhibitions. Titled 4×4, the gallery’s first show (Dream’s of Desire) curated by James Payne features artist Clare Delaney.

The gallery doors currently find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

4×4 the new exhibition at PayneShurvell opens on Wednesday, information pills in association with the anti-design festival. For four weeks, viagra dosage the gallery will be home to four seperate exhibitions each on view for four days only. The first show Clare Delaney’s Dream’s of Desire has been curated by James Payne.

The gallery doors find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.

Delorean by Clare Delaney

4×4 the new exhibition at PayneShurvell opens on Wednesday, mind in association with the anti-design festival. For four weeks, this site the gallery will be home to four seperate exhibitions each on view for four days. The first has been curated by James Payne, features Clare Delaney’s Dream’s of Desire.

The gallery doors find themselves nestled between two cars customised by Clare for the Liverpool Biennale 5 and 6. The biennale sponsors appearance on the cars mimic the advertisers stack usually associated with F1, the spoilers added by the artist subvert a family car into those more usually seen running around F3 race tracks.

Upon entering PayneShurvell the viewer is greeted by the framed remnants of Delauney’s most recent performance. These beautifully presented receipts document an interaction between the artist and several unaware cashiers of major London Galleries. The act of consumerism encouraged within a gallery space is made apparent by the act of deciding and controlling the order Clare’s purchases passed through the tills .

Sensation by Clare Delaney

By presenting the receipts within frames along the crisp white walls of an exhibition space, the viewer is provided with the opportunity to reconsider the ‘everydayness’ usually associated with a receipt. Instead there is the time to muse over the thought, that (as discussed by James Payne in an introductory tour) at some point a designer would have been required to design the layout in accordance to the individual Galleries requirements.

This Wedneday (8th September) PayneShurvell will be open from 6-8 and Clare Delaney’s Dreams of Desire will be showing until Saturday 11th September.

Wednesday 15th September: sees the opening of an exhibition curated by Dermot O’Brien exploring the use of text and typography.

Ian Whittlesea, ‘Sol Sans Typeface’

Wednesday 22nd September: Edward Vince presents Matthew Robinson and himself in ‘How Am I Not Myself’.

325 by Edward Vince

Week four opens on the 29th September with the gallery transformed by the requirements of sound art in the last exhibition ‘Silencer’ curated by Mark Jackson. This exhibition will include ‘Not Playing,’ Corrado Morgana’s handicapped helicopter which despite the players best attempt will never take over. Lastly this show will include Audio Research Editions’ ‘Real English Tea Made Here,’ a sound piece which includes tapes by Willam S. Burroughs previously unheard in the UK.

Amelia’s Magazine had the pleasure of visiting a PayneShurvell preview of 4×4 on Friday and will be visiting the gallery each week to see how this ambitious project plays out. We recommend you do the same.

PayneShurvell: 16 Hewett Street, London, EC2A 3NN
4×4 runs from 6th September to 2nd October 2010.


Glamour at the V&A, no rx illustrated by Gabriel Ayala

It’s been a year for the bygone eras, view that’s for sure. First we had Vintage at Goodwood, then there’s an exhibition celebrating Horrockses 1950s style at the Fashion & Textile Museum, and now the V&A wants in on the action. Well it’s not strictly their first foray into the era; in fact it was all the way back in April that Grace Kelly: Style Icon hit down in London and has been fully booked ever since (well that’s how it seemed whenever I’ve tried to visit anyway.)


Illustration by Katherine Tromans

So what perfect timing for them to present…..drum roll please……an evening of “Retro Hollywood Glamour.” And it was at the end of August that I was whisked away to party with the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Marilyn Monroe (metaphorically speaking) whilst the DJ spun the hits of yesteryear. All in all people were drinking champagne and were having a jolly spiffing time.

But probably the most spectacular aspect of the evening was the amount of people who committed and dressed up to the nines as their heroes. Men and women put on their most dapper suits and fullest skirts to party, and most made a pretty good job of it.


Illustration by Kellie Black

If you so fancied (and could cope with the queue!) your flowing locks could also be transformed into something quite spectacular (involving rollers and a lot of hairspray) and similarly a Hollywood makeover was available all within movie star tents boasting lighted mirrors in the grand entrance hall. The perfect way to complement your 1950s outfit and finally feel like a movie star.

And that wasn’t all for the events going on throughout the evening. Everything was thought of; from acting out radio plays, partaking in a screen printing workshop, doodling away with Daisy de Villeneuve or simply reminiscing over old movie trailers. Not bad for a night out at the museum.

As part of the Friday Lates this Summer at the V&A, it was a spectacular event. Maybe we can hope for the swinging 60s in the Autumn?

Retro Hollywood Glamour at the V&A: in Pictures






All photographs by Jemma Crow

Categories ,1950s, ,Alfred Hithcock, ,fashion, ,film, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Glamour, ,Hollywood, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Kellie Black, ,london, ,Marilyn Monroe, ,retro, ,Silver screen, ,va, ,vintage

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration is OUT NOW!

Willow candle by daria hlazatova
Willow Organic Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova.

I don’t know what it is about candles that gets me so excited. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that I love beautiful smells. My house may be a mess but I quite often spritz my office with a sweetly scented room spray or light a candle to imbue a relaxing mood. I think that this is the nub of what is so brilliant about candles, generic link especially the really high quality ones that contain high quantities of essential oils – they are the simplest way to create a delightfully relaxing and cosy feeling within a space.

willow organics candle

And of course Christmas is all about candles. Since I lived in Sweden as a little girl my family has had a tradition of lighting advent candles during the month of December – and whilst I don’t spend much time at my parent’s home anymore, look I always look forward to candlelit dinners when I return for Christmas. Candles impart a certain cosiness which the Danish call “hygge” – and during these bitterly cold dark winter months is most sorely appreciated.

Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova
Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle by Daria Hlazatova.

This year my favourite discovery is the Willow Organic Gold Frankincense and Myrrh candle. It comes beautifully presented in a beribboned fold out box and utilises the naturally healing and calming effects of precious oils that have been synonymous with Christmas since biblical times.

Willow candle box
willow candle box open

From the wonderful scents to the gold leaf that floats glittering in the top of the wax, information pills it doesn’t get more christmassy than this. The Willow Organic shop in Kings Road, Chelsea is open until the 23rd December, so there’s still time to grab a fabulous Christmas candle before the big day.

Cire_Trudon_by_Megan_Piontkowski
Cire Trudon by Megan Piontkowski.

Earlier this year I discovered the French Cire Trudon brand, which has been in operation in various guises since 1643. Alongside very high quality candles presented in beautiful glass pots with heraldic shields, they also produce stunning room sprays in statement bottles and a boxed set containing a room spray, candle and illustrated fairy tale – the idea being to encourage children to enjoy evocative scents from a very young age. Not for the hard up these boxed sets don’t come cheap, but I love the idea and the illustrated booklets are a delight.

Sinbad the Sailor - Fairy Tale Box - Cire Trudon

Recently discovered: the Albam independent menswear clothing store in Spitalfields stocks three yummy varieties of candle, my favourite being the figgy one. When I went in they were also testing out a new scent called Library, which was suitably masculine. Unfortunately I don’t think you can buy these online but it’s definitely worth taking a trip down to this great little store.

Spitalfields Candle Co by ellie sutton
Spitalfields Candle Co and Tocca candles by Ellie Sutton.

There is also the Spitalfields Candle Co. which uses sustainably sourced soya wax in all candles. It was hard to choose my favourite from such a yummy range only briefly sniffed in the Inspitalfields gift store, but I think it has to be Lemon Verbena – I just love that clean bright scent.

Diptyque Candle - The Cloud Commission
Diptyque Candle by The Cloud Commission.

Tocca are a high end scent company that stock in Liberty – I particularly like the sound of the Bianca candle which contains Green Tea and Lemon. Each year the Parisian brand Diptyque creates a special Christmas range, in beautifully decorated coloured glass jars. The Orange Epicee sounds yummy, as does the Canelle.

Jo Malone by Gareth A Hopkins
Jo Malone by Gareth A Hopkins.

Lastly but no means least Jo Malone offers incredibly classy scents, all tastefully presented in cream boxes with crisp branding. The limited edition Pine & Eucalyptus Collection sounds glorious, and how about a giant candle with not one but four wicks to make a major statement?

Right, I’m off to get on with my present wrapping by the scent of my Willow Organic candle. Have a glorious Christmas everyone.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-cover

So, pills the book is finally here! You can find it at Tate Modern, about it Magma, Design Museum, Serpentine Gallery, Tatty Devine, Cornerhouse, Arnolfini and many other good independent book stores across the UK and by early 2011 around the world.

Tatty Devine Amelia's Compendium
Harriet of Tatty Devine takes receipt of her copies of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Amelia's Compendium Magma
On the shelves of Magma.

Or you can buy it online here for a reduced price and receive 12 unique Amelia’s Magazine postcards, plus a selection of bookmarks. This offer is EXCLUSIVE to my website. You can’t get these postcards anywhere else!

Amelia's Compendium postcards
Postcards come free with all orders of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration made through this website.

The following up and coming fashion illustrators feature in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration:
Abigail Daker, Abby Wright, Amy Martino, Andrea Peterson, Aniela Murphy, Antonia Parker, Bex Glover, Emma Block, Erica Sharp, Faye West, Gemma Milly, Jennifer Costello, Jenny Robins, Jo Cheung, Joana Faria, June Chanpoomidole, Katherine Tromans, Katie Harnett, Kellie Black, Krister Selin, Lesley Barnes, Lisa Stannard, Michelle Urvall Nyren, Naomi Law, Natasha Thompson, Natsuki Otani, Rachel de Ste Croix, Yelena Bryksenkova, Zarina Liew & Gareth A Hopkins.

And…. the book features interviews with the following ethical fashion designers:
123 Bethnal Green Road, Ada Zanditon, Andrea Crews, Anja Hynynen, Beautiful Soul, By Stamo, Camilla Norrback, Christopher Raeburn, Ciel, Dem Collective, Edun, Emesha, Emma Ware, Fifi Bijoux, From Somewhere, Goodone, Gossypium, Henrietta Ludgate, Hetty Rose, Howies, Ivana Basilotta, Izzy Lane, Joanna Cave, Junky Styling, Little Glass Clementine, Lu Flux, Martina Spetlova, Maxjenny, Michelle Lowe-Holder, Minna, Nancy Dee, Nina Dolcetti, Noir, Noki, Oria, Partimi, People Tree, Pia Anjou, Prophetik, Romina Karamanea, Sägen, Satoshi Date, Tara Starlet, Ute Decker & Wilfried Pletzinger

Below are some pages from inside the book – which is the usual riot of colour and pattern for which I have become known. You can also watch a flick video of the book on the website of my international distributor Idea Books here.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-From Somewhere
From Somewhere illustrated by Rachel de Ste Croix.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-By Stamo
By Stamo illustrated by Krister Selin.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Christopher Raeburn
Christopher Raeburn illustrated by Gemma Milly.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Edun
Edun illustrated by Katherine Tromans.

Amelia's Compendium of Fashion-sm-Dem Collective
Dem Collective illustrated by Michelle Urvall Nyren.

Amelia's Compendium Aniela Murphy
Aniela Murphy’s pages in the content proofs.

Amelia's Compendium Antonia Parker
Antonia Parker’s pages in the content proofs.

Please note that I will not be posting any orders out until the 4th January 2011. Have a very merry Christmas!

Categories ,123, ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,Abby Wright, ,Abigail Daker, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Amy Martino, ,Andrea Crews, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Aniela Murphy, ,Anja Hynynen, ,Antonia Parker, ,arnolfini, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Bex Glover, ,book, ,Book shop, ,Bookstores, ,By Stamo, ,Camilla Norrback, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,ciel, ,Cornerhouse, ,Dem Collective, ,Design Museum, ,Eco fashion, ,Edun, ,Emesha, ,Emma Block, ,Emma Ware, ,Erica Sharp, ,Ethical Fashion Design, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Faye West, ,Fifi Bijoux, ,From Somewhere, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Gemma Milly, ,goodone, ,gossypium, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Hetty Rose, ,howies, ,Idea Books, ,illustration, ,Ivana Basilotta, ,Izzy Lane, ,Jennifer Costello, ,Jenny Robins, ,Jo Cheung, ,Joana Faria, ,Joanna Cave, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Junky Styling, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Katie Harnett, ,Kellie Black, ,Krister Selin, ,Lesley Barnes, ,Lisa Stannard, ,Little Glass Clementine, ,Lu Flux, ,Magma, ,Martina Spetlova, ,Maxjenny, ,Michelle Lowe-Holder, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Minna, ,Nancy Dee, ,Naomi Law, ,Natasha Thompson, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,noir, ,Noki, ,Oria, ,Partimi, ,People Tree, ,Pia Anjou, ,Prophetik, ,Rachel De Ste. Croix, ,Romina Karamanea, ,Sägen, ,Satoshi Date, ,Serpentine Gallery, ,Tara Starlet, ,Tate Modern, ,Tatty Devine, ,Ute Decker, ,Wilfried Pletzinger, ,Yelena Bryksenkova, ,Zarina Liew

Similar Posts: