Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with Patrick Li from Fashion Scout’s ‘One’s to Watch’ A/W13, London Fashion Week

Patrick Li A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman
Sneak Preview of Patrick Li A/W 2013 by Isher Dhiman. All other images S/S 2013.

It’s that frantically fabulous point of year again, when Fashion Scout’s coveted Ones to Watch of the season is announced before the highly anticipated London Fashion Week. Among the selected talents is Patrick Li; with an MA from the Royal College of Art and experience working under the likes of Viktor & Rolf and Hussein Chalayan, it is clear that he is a force to be reckoned with. Prior to the show, I had the pleasure of picking Patrick Li’s brain to see what he’s all about and where the ease and fluidity of his designs come from.

Patrick Li by Deborah Moon
Patrick LI by Deborah Moon

Congratulations on being chosen as one of the Ones to Watch this season! How does it feel?
Thank you! It’s feels great to be chosen as once of the Ones to Watch, I am looking forward to presenting A/W 2013.

PATRICK LI SS13
What do you like to think sets you apart from the other designers?
Design, vision and the aesthetic of the brand set PATRICK LI apart from the other designers, I think every designer is unique and has his/her own take on the direction and vision of their brands.

Patrick Li by Natalie Lines
Patrick Li by Natalie Lines

Your designs are so beautifully crisp and seem almost architectural, what has inspired your collection for the Ones to Watch?
For A/W 2013, I was inspired by a V&A exhibition Shadow Catchers, especially the work of Garry-Fabian Miller. The singular lighting objects are so impeccable, yet sensual at the same time. I used the lighting coming through darkness as the initial idea for the collection. I have also looked at architecture and interiors designed by Zaha Hadid. I find the organic bold structures and lines of the buildings very intriguing. I started to develop the collection from there and I have worked with bias seams to achieve softer graphic lines for the body shape this season.

Describe your collection in 5 words.
Graphic, Contrasting, Dimensional, Asymmetrical, Sensual.

PATRICK LI SS13
When designing, what gets your creative juices flowing?
Sunshine! Minimal electro tracks.

Your clothes are to be stocked at Joyce in Hong Kong soon, which is MAJOR. Do you have any trouble balancing creativity with commerce?
It’s exciting to know that my debut collection will be stocked at Joyce. There will also be exhibition event at Joyce with my S/S 2013 collection. I found it hard to balance creativity and commerce at first, because creativity doesn’t really always translate into wearability well. There is compromise to be made along the process; I had to constantly remind myself of the woman that I am designing for.

Patrick Li by Kirsty McGill
Patrick Li by Kirsty McGill

Fashion aside, what are some of your favourite things to do in London?
Going to the Cinema, dining out, visiting museums and galleries.

What’s next for you in the near future?
I am looking forward to starting S/S 2014 straight after Ones to Watch. A solo show next season perhaps.

Patrick Li Illustration by Naomi Samara
Illustration by Naomi Samara

Patrick Li shows as part of Ones to Watch on Saturday 16th February 2013.

Categories ,Deborah Moon, ,Garry Fabian Miller, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Isher Dhiman, ,Joyce, ,Kirsty McGill, ,London Fashion Week, ,Naomi Samara, ,Natalie Lines, ,Ones To Watch, ,Patrick Li, ,Royal College of Art, ,Shadow Catchers, ,Zaha Hadid

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Exhibition Review: Headonism


Charlie Le Mindu by Claire Kearns

The exhibitions around Somerset House are one of my favourite London Fashion Week pleasures – I enjoy wandering the stands in between shows as it gives you a chance to see all of the clothes close up and even talk to some of the designers about their new collections. One such exhibition that I always make sure I catch, view is Headonsim. Curated by legendary milliner Stephen Jones, information pills who has designed for everyone from Marilyn Manson to Beyonce, medications 2011 marks its third year of existence. Read my S/S 2011 review here.


Charlie Le Mindu by Michelle Pegrume

Four milliners participated – Charlie Le Mindu, Piers Atkinson, Noel Stewart and J Smith Esquire. Situated next to the press lounge in Somerset House this time around, each designer exhibited their best talents on stands placed at different levels in quite a small room on the ground floor (rather than on the lower level as in previous years).

As expected, Charlie Le Mindu offered up some weird yet totally wonderful pieces, including this blue haired creation with amazing top headpiece and veil – the inky blue shades that used for his new pieces are a dramatically cool, dark approach to the lighter summer colours that we have seen on the catwalks so far this season. Le Mindu is well known for his hair couture creations – owing to regular nudity and his creative use of hair, his catwalk shows are always a media, blogger, fashion frenzy. For a background on some of the amazing hair couture collections he has created in the past, read Amelia’s review on his AW11 collection here.

His Headonism collection of blue wigs featured crystals, dip dyed ends and flowing curls given an edge with spiked headbands. Unlike his more avant garde creations, the ones on show at Headonism were a good flavour of what the designer is capable of in a more wearable capacity (if you are so inclined to wear a blue wig, that is!).


Piers Atkinson by Dee Andrews

Piers Atkinson has long been a favourite designer of mine. I love the way that he manages to be fun, quirky and different with his designs but still create pieces with enduring appeal. I reviewed his collection last year when the Hollywood hat stood out for me, he has since designed the cult-status Paris hat, which spawned further ‘Anna’ (but which Anna did he mean?!) and ‘London’ hats (worn by all those working behind the scenes at Somerset House). With his iconic cherry designs and loyal celebrity following (Anna Dello Russo, Kate Moss, Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Kelis, Cate Blanchett and Paloma Faith), his credentials are faultless. As part of the ‘Hot Voodoo’ S/S 2012 collection, this feather boa-esque blue snood is the ‘Ashlie’ and features a banana leaf print by Zandra Rhodes and printed blue silk chiffon Macaw.


Noel Stewart by Claire Kearns

Noel Stewart showed a beautiful collection of bright hats and headpieces, with multi-coloured cactus shapes, day-glo orange and wide rimmed sun hats, his S/S 2012 collection is bursting with the in-your-face shades that dominated many of the catwalks this season. The London based milliner has enjoyed large degrees of success since leaving the Royal College of Arts – the roll call of designers he has worked with is impressive to say the least and includes Hussein Chalayan, Oscar De La Renta and Roland Mouret. Perfectly crystallised in the illustration above, this fashion week he designed the hats for the Ready to Wear Erdem S/S 2012 catwalk show – a floral fantasy in pale blue hues played out in pretty dresses, trench coats and flowing skirts. Delicate in their execution, the small hats complimented the detailed floral prints of the collection wonderfully.


J Smith Esquire by Dee Andrews

J Smith Esquire presented a dreamy collection of Magritte inspired cloud bowler hats, sun hats and intricate leather headpieces. The sky blue and deep blue straw hats pattered with white fluffy clouds were a simple way to skip forward to thoughts of summer. Made from patent leather, his other headpieces have been cut to resemble feathers curling around the head in hues of sky blue, red and pale grey.

All in all, some exquisite design and now I can’t wait for summer.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Anna Dello Russo, ,Cate Blanchett, ,Charlie le Mindu, ,Claire Kearns, ,Dee Andrews, ,Erdem, ,Erdem S/S12, ,Florence Massey, ,Headonism, ,Hot Voodoo, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,J Smith Esquire, ,Kate Moss, ,Kelis, ,Lady Gaga, ,London Fashion Week, ,London Fashion Week Exhibition, ,London milliners, ,Magritte, ,Michelle Pegrume, ,Noel Stewart, ,Oscar De La Renta, ,paloma faith, ,piers atkinson, ,Rihanna, ,Roland Mouret, ,Somerset House, ,Stephen Jones, ,Zandra Rhodes

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Jean-Pierre Braganza

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by t.reidyJean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 illustration by t.reidy

This show was definitely a bit of a calmer affair from the start, pharmacy which can’t be said for every show at the first day of London Fashion Week where there was some customary elbowing and shoving out of the way. As I went to find my seat I spotted fashion writer legends Hilary Alexander and Colin McDowell having a good chat and a giggle together in the front row with Hilary wearing some very sensible yet awesome leopard-print Converse trainers. It was a big comfort to see all the top fashion editors mostly rocking comfortable-yet-cool footwear in fluoro colours or a flashy pattern, pharm as I’d also opted for a pair of flats and was therefore still able to walk instead of hobble to the last show by the end of day.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory

London-born (then brought up in Canada) Jean-Pierre Braganza has been a favourite of mine since my fashion illustrator student days when I modelled for my exceptionally cool japanese stylist classmate and got to wear a pair of extra-long cream leggings and a lot of crazy makeup plus a Kate Bush-esque wig (I was convinced I looked like an exotic bag lady, but my classmate was onto something with the wig as Jean-Pierre did have a few tracks by Kate in the show). Although I obviously was by no means making waves in the fashion world, what stuck in my mind was the interesting use of ruching along the lower leg that created a strong yet feminine look that gathered the extra length into an interesting shape. And, that was also way before leggings became a normal part of an outfit and were overdone to the extent they are now. Jean-Pierre has since stuck to his aesthetic of creating sculpture-like garments, making him best known for constructed tailoring with a bit of an edge.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

As the lights dimmed and the usual loud ‘shhhs’ came from somewhere (I always wonder if this is the PR people or just people like me who’d rather not have yelling over the music) I was able to give the press release a quick read. A trip to Cornwall is where the idea for the collection started; blue skies and fluffy cornish clouds (which made me also think about yummy fluffy Cornish ice-cream) contrasted with the sharp lines found in sculptures by Barbara Hepworth and works by Ben Nicholson. As a thumping song from the latest Daft Punk Tron movie soundtrack started up I wondered just how Jean-Pierre was going to mix this with inspiration from the Art-Deco area with ‘technological aspiration’ and industrial rock.

Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 illustration by Claire Kearns
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns

Girls stomped out in time to the electro-inspired music with a bit of strong blush on the cheek and hair pulled into a high but loose ponytail, which was then given a sculptural fishtail braid by the Toni & Guy session team. I bumped into of one of the models after the show, Odile from Select (she was being photographed and kept snapping into various model-perfect poses in about 0.3 of a second, incredible to see first-hand) who loved the hair so much she was going to keep it in all day. The first look out was a shift dress with a bit of a flapper silhouette and contrasting cut-out dotted panels that created an amazing effect when the models moved. Touché Mr Braganza, you’ve done it again. I loved the sharp lines around the panels, giving the dress shape (reminding me of Tron-like outfits with lit-up panels from the movie) and a strong but pretty look perfectly complimenting the figure. Very nice to see a dress you can just throw on and immediately look very sculptural and tailored.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 by Amelia Gregory
The shoes, made by Jean-Pierre for Dune, (so perhaps you’ll see them or a version of them to buy next season) were very high and very unsuitable for the everyday but my goodness they packed a punch. Black detailing was contrasted against pale lemon, bright blood red or even caramel and prints to match the dresses. The ridiculously high peep-toe heels did however come into form on the catwalk, elevating the part-dress part-sculpture girls to a skyscraper level and almost turning their legs into a plinth from which the clothes could be artfully exhibited.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 shoes photographed by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 12 shoes by Amelia Gregory
This collection definitely had a lot in it that I loved. Jean-Pierre did sexy cut-outs, which I previously felt puts too much on show and a bit too in-your-face, but in his hands they became petal-soft panels that skimmed curves and held everything in place. They looked almost demure, passing the ‘test’ in where I try to picture myself wearing the dress or shorts or whatever and wonder if I actually would wear it out somewhere nice. It was soft tailoring and sculptural shapes with a feminine yet slightly dark side, which I liked. A lot. There were some gorgeous draped dresses too that reminded me a little of the Spring/Sumer 2010 ‘Dolche Far Niente’ collection by Chalayan but I felt the fabric didn’t have that much to cling to with the slimmer models; some curvier ladies would have worked it better.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 photo by Amelia Gregory
A tailored suit or two later, I was admiring the necklaces and gawping over just how high the shoes were when without expecting it, I was completely smitten. It was a dress, but not just any dress. As a lover and illustrator of fashion, I know what colours, shapes and silhouettes will tick my boxes, but I go weak at the knees for a bit of monochrome. I just can’t help it. Blame it on having an architect dad, blame it on the way Comme des Garçons and Chanel use it, blame it on whatever you like because I don’t know why but it always gets me. And this dress got me in a bite-my-lip, ‘damn that’s amazing it’s like wearing a sculpture and can I have it now please’ kind of way. So, I was minding my business scribbling notes and wondering what the grand Hilary Alexander thought of all this when my favourite dress of the show walked out and into, well, yes into my heart. I love it when someone creates with real thought and real skills, and when that thing created is something you can wear, well let’s just say it’s a good thing my budget is no-where near being able to buy stuff like this as I think I’d just stare at it for ages.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S '12 illustrated by Alia Gargum
Jean-Pierre-Braganza S/S 2012 by Alia Gargum

The dress was the same as the first ‘modern day flapper girl’ dress on the catwalk, but in white with black lines that gloriously framed the figure. A long black line travelled from the neckline down to the hemline, where it met the other lines that framed the hips and outlined the shoulders. It was sexy in a very understated and fresh way, but was by no means casual, and I loved it. I loved that you’d just be able to slip it on, that it would go with anything, and details like the dropped hem at the back means you’d never have to worry about it was too short when you bent over to pick something up or when pulling some 20s-meets-futuristic shapes on the dance floor.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Marcus Reed
Jean-Pierre-Braganza S/S 2012 by Marcus Reed.

After the dress, I did see a nice silky jumpsuit or two and some lovely patterns that reminded me of shards of coloured glass as well as some very clever details like slightly off-set arm holes but I couldn’t help thinking about the dress. Before I knew it, Jean-Pierre was giving us a little wave from the start of the catwalk and everyone began to file out of the BFC show space. The press release mentioned fashion being ‘about capturing emotion in a glance’, and I would insert some overtly poetic line echoing this, but when it comes down to it I loved a dress so much that it made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Mr Braganza, I think you truly merit a ‘job well done’ on this collection.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

Play the video and watch the show.

Categories ,1920s, ,Art Deco, ,Barbara Hepworth, ,Ben Nicholson, ,chanel, ,Claire Kearns, ,Colin McDowell, ,converse, ,Cornwall, ,cut-outs, ,Daft Punk, ,Dune, ,electro, ,fishtail plait, ,high heels, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Industrial Rock, ,Kate Bush, ,Leopard Print, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marcus Reed, ,Modern Tailoring, ,monochrome, ,S/S 2012, ,Select Models, ,structured, ,t.reidy, ,Toni & Guy, ,Tron, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Jean-Pierre Braganza

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by t.reidyJean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 illustration by t.reidy

This show was definitely a bit of a calmer affair from the start, which can’t be said for every show at the first day of London Fashion Week where there was some customary elbowing and shoving out of the way. As I went to find my seat I spotted fashion writer legends Hilary Alexander and Colin McDowell having a good chat and a giggle together in the front row with Hilary wearing some very sensible yet awesome leopard-print Converse trainers. It was a big comfort to see all the top fashion editors mostly rocking comfortable-yet-cool footwear in fluoro colours or a flashy pattern, as I’d also opted for a pair of flats and was therefore still able to walk instead of hobble to the last show by the end of day.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012. All photography by Amelia Gregory

London-born (then brought up in Canada) Jean-Pierre Braganza has been a favourite of mine since my fashion illustrator student days when I modelled for my exceptionally cool japanese stylist classmate and got to wear a pair of extra-long cream leggings and a lot of crazy makeup plus a Kate Bush-esque wig (I was convinced I looked like an exotic bag lady, but my classmate was onto something with the wig as Jean-Pierre did have a few tracks by Kate in the show). Although I obviously was by no means making waves in the fashion world, what stuck in my mind was the interesting use of ruching along the lower leg that created a strong yet feminine look that gathered the extra length into an interesting shape. And, that was also way before leggings became a normal part of an outfit and were overdone to the extent they are now. Jean-Pierre has since stuck to his aesthetic of creating sculpture-like garments, making him best known for constructed tailoring with a bit of an edge.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

As the lights dimmed and the usual loud ‘shhhs’ came from somewhere (I always wonder if this is the PR people or just people like me who’d rather not have yelling over the music) I was able to give the press release a quick read. A trip to Cornwall is where the idea for the collection started; blue skies and fluffy cornish clouds (which made me also think about yummy fluffy Cornish ice-cream) contrasted with the sharp lines found in sculptures by Barbara Hepworth and works by Ben Nicholson. As a thumping song from the latest Daft Punk Tron movie soundtrack started up I wondered just how Jean-Pierre was going to mix this with inspiration from the Art-Deco area with ‘technological aspiration’ and industrial rock.

Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 illustration by Claire Kearns
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns

Girls stomped out in time to the electro-inspired music with a bit of strong blush on the cheek and hair pulled into a high but loose ponytail, which was then given a sculptural fishtail braid by the Toni & Guy session team. I bumped into of one of the models after the show, Odile from Select (she was being photographed and kept snapping into various model-perfect poses in about 0.3 of a second, incredible to see first-hand) who loved the hair so much she was going to keep it in all day. The first look out was a shift dress with a bit of a flapper silhouette and contrasting cut-out dotted panels that created an amazing effect when the models moved. Touché Mr Braganza, you’ve done it again. I loved the sharp lines around the panels, giving the dress shape (reminding me of Tron-like outfits with lit-up panels from the movie) and a strong but pretty look perfectly complimenting the figure. Very nice to see a dress you can just throw on and immediately look very sculptural and tailored.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 by Amelia Gregory
The shoes, made by Jean-Pierre for Dune, (so perhaps you’ll see them or a version of them to buy next season) were very high and very unsuitable for the everyday but my goodness they packed a punch. Black detailing was contrasted against pale lemon, bright blood red or even caramel and prints to match the dresses. The ridiculously high peep-toe heels did however come into form on the catwalk, elevating the part-dress part-sculpture girls to a skyscraper level and almost turning their legs into a plinth from which the clothes could be artfully exhibited.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 shoes photographed by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S 12 shoes by Amelia Gregory
This collection definitely had a lot in it that I loved. Jean-Pierre did sexy cut-outs, which I previously felt puts too much on show and a bit too in-your-face, but in his hands they became petal-soft panels that skimmed curves and held everything in place. They looked almost demure, passing the ‘test’ in where I try to picture myself wearing the dress or shorts or whatever and wonder if I actually would wear it out somewhere nice. It was soft tailoring and sculptural shapes with a feminine yet slightly dark side, which I liked. A lot. There were some gorgeous draped dresses too that reminded me a little of the Spring/Sumer 2010 ‘Dolche Far Niente’ collection by Chalayan but I felt the fabric didn’t have that much to cling to with the slimmer models; some curvier ladies would have worked it better.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 photo by Amelia Gregory
A tailored suit or two later, I was admiring the necklaces and gawping over just how high the shoes were when without expecting it, I was completely smitten. It was a dress, but not just any dress. As a lover and illustrator of fashion, I know what colours, shapes and silhouettes will tick my boxes, but I go weak at the knees for a bit of monochrome. I just can’t help it. Blame it on having an architect dad, blame it on the way Comme des Garçons and Chanel use it, blame it on whatever you like because I don’t know why but it always gets me. And this dress got me in a bite-my-lip, ‘damn that’s amazing it’s like wearing a sculpture and can I have it now please’ kind of way. So, I was minding my business scribbling notes and wondering what the grand Hilary Alexander thought of all this when my favourite dress of the show walked out and into, well, yes into my heart. I love it when someone creates with real thought and real skills, and when that thing created is something you can wear, well let’s just say it’s a good thing my budget is no-where near being able to buy stuff like this as I think I’d just stare at it for ages.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S '12 illustrated by Alia Gargum
Jean-Pierre-Braganza S/S 2012 by Alia Gargum

The dress was the same as the first ‘modern day flapper girl’ dress on the catwalk, but in white with black lines that gloriously framed the figure. A long black line travelled from the neckline down to the hemline, where it met the other lines that framed the hips and outlined the shoulders. It was sexy in a very understated and fresh way, but was by no means casual, and I loved it. I loved that you’d just be able to slip it on, that it would go with anything, and details like the dropped hem at the back means you’d never have to worry about it was too short when you bent over to pick something up or when pulling some 20s-meets-futuristic shapes on the dance floor.

Jean Pierre Braganza S/S 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean-Pierre Braganza S/S '12 by Marcus Reed
Jean-Pierre-Braganza S/S 2012 by Marcus Reed.

After the dress, I did see a nice silky jumpsuit or two and some lovely patterns that reminded me of shards of coloured glass as well as some very clever details like slightly off-set arm holes but I couldn’t help thinking about the dress. Before I knew it, Jean-Pierre was giving us a little wave from the start of the catwalk and everyone began to file out of the BFC show space. The press release mentioned fashion being ‘about capturing emotion in a glance’, and I would insert some overtly poetic line echoing this, but when it comes down to it I loved a dress so much that it made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Mr Braganza, I think you truly merit a ‘job well done’ on this collection.

Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory
Jean Pierre Braganza SS 2011 review-photo by Amelia Gregory

Play the video and watch the show.

Categories ,1920s, ,Art Deco, ,Barbara Hepworth, ,Ben Nicholson, ,chanel, ,Claire Kearns, ,Colin McDowell, ,converse, ,Cornwall, ,cut-outs, ,Daft Punk, ,Dune, ,electro, ,fishtail plait, ,high heels, ,Hilary Alexander, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Industrial Rock, ,Kate Bush, ,Leopard Print, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marcus Reed, ,Modern Tailoring, ,monochrome, ,S/S 2012, ,Select Models, ,structured, ,t.reidy, ,Toni & Guy, ,Tron, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week Interview: Northumbria’s Stephanie Jayne Price


Barry Flanagan’s Nijinski Hare, treat illustrated by Naomi Law

I recently stepped out of London’s unusually baking sun to enjoy an afternoon visit to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. On reaching the courtyard, more about the whole place seemed to be in high spirits with Barry Flanagan’s bronze hares prancing around and the ordinarily stern permanent statue sporting a floral sash.


Photograph by Naomi Law

During the largest open exhibition in the UK, the labyrinthine rooms of Burlington House play host to a swarm of artists, from the unknown to the infamous, waiting to surprise visitors around every corner. Everyone is welcome to submit work to the exhibition each year, resulting in a diverse collection ranging from painting to architecture, and sculpture to film. The majority of the works on display are for sale, and although the prices predictably reach the astronomical, there are several pieces accessible to those with more modest purse strings if you take a closer look.

This year’s theme is Raw, which according to David Chipperfield, co-ordinator of the architecture room, signifies ‘vitality, risk taking and a necessary sense of adventure.’ Stephen Chambers, the main co-ordinator of this year’s show, states that raw art is ‘fresh, new, visceral and affirmative. Some of it is fairly scary too’.

Perhaps one of the most talked about pieces in the show is David Mach’s Silver Streak, a ferocious larger-than-life gorilla made entirely from wire coat hangers. These are surprisingly effective in creating a sense of weight and movement – he’s an imposing figure!


David Mach’s Silver Streak, illustrated by Paul Shinn

Mach appears again just behind the gorilla with Babel Towers, a huge and complex collage of an outlandish seaside town with the mountainous ‘tower’ ascending into the clouds.

On entering many of the rooms, your eye is dutifully drawn to plenty of bold and large-scale works. Somehow the flamboyance of these pieces drew my attention to the smaller or less immediately-noticeable pieces, and this is what I have largely chosen to focus on.

My childhood fascination with anything miniature (and consequent hours spent creating minute little things from Fimo) was happily indulged by the collection of architects’ models and drawings in the Lecture Room.

Visitors are treated to views of buildings in their ‘raw’ forms, as seen through the eyes of the architect. The methods of construction and presentation of these models is as fascinating as the designs themselves.

It will come as no surprise that I spent the longest time in the Small Weston Room, which is filled with over two hundred smaller paintings, some no larger than a postcard.

Several otherwise everyday scenes are beautified in oils: Francis Matthews’ The Coombe depicts a Dublin street corner whilst Josephine Greenman uses the familiar blue and white of a traditional dinner service to render miniscule domestic settings in Silence I & II.

Amazing craftsmanship can also be seen in Claire Moynihan’s Moth Balls, 2010; dozens of moths are intricately embroidered onto their own Alpaca wool felt ball.

In the Large Weston Room, David Borrington predicts the state of the high street in 2020 if a certain supermarket is allowed to continue its invasion of our neighbourhoods. Globull Internashll Tescgoows 2020 is a stark reminder of the need to find an alternative.


David Borrington’s Globull Internashll Tescgoows, courtesy of the artist’s website

Just around the corner Oran O’Reilly’s beautifully comic Rizla, after Hokusai shows the famous Great Wave surging from a pack of cigarette papers. Maybe not such an odd pairing considering the prevalence of Hokusai’s wave in poster form in student accommodation up and down the country (admittedly including my own not so long ago).

Also currently on display at the Royal Academy, and well worth seeing, is a collection of work by academicians who have passed away over the last year. I was particularly taken with Michael Kidner’s painstakingly drawn geometric forms in No Thing Nothing.

If you can’t make it to the Royal Academy, you can see work from A-level students selected for the online exhibition here.

All photographs courtesy of the Royal Academy, unless otherwise stated.

Barry Flanagan’s Nijinski Hare, price illustrated by Naomi Law

I recently stepped out of London’s unusually baking sun to enjoy an afternoon visit to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. On reaching the courtyard, find the whole place seemed to be in high spirits with Barry Flanagan’s bronze hares prancing around and the ordinarily stern permanent statue sporting a floral sash.


Photograph by Naomi Law

During the largest open exhibition in the UK, the labyrinthine rooms of Burlington House play host to a swarm of artists, from the unknown to the infamous, waiting to surprise visitors around every corner. Everyone is welcome to submit work to the exhibition each year, resulting in a diverse collection ranging from painting to architecture, and sculpture to film. The majority of the works on display are for sale, and although the prices predictably reach the astronomical, there are several pieces accessible to those with more modest purse strings if you take a closer look.

This year’s theme is Raw, which according to David Chipperfield, co-ordinator of the architecture room, signifies ‘vitality, risk taking and a necessary sense of adventure.’ Stephen Chambers, the main co-ordinator of this year’s show, states that raw art is ‘fresh, new, visceral and affirmative. Some of it is fairly scary too’.

Perhaps one of the most talked about pieces in the show is David Mach’s Silver Streak, a ferocious larger-than-life gorilla made entirely from wire coat hangers. These are surprisingly effective in creating a sense of weight and movement – he’s an imposing figure!


David Mach’s Silver Streak, illustrated by Paul Shinn

Mach appears again just behind the gorilla with Babel Towers, a huge and complex collage of an outlandish seaside town with the mountainous ‘tower’ ascending into the clouds.

On entering many of the rooms, your eye is dutifully drawn to plenty of bold and large-scale works. Somehow the flamboyance of these pieces drew my attention to the smaller or less immediately-noticeable pieces, and this is what I have largely chosen to focus on.

My childhood fascination with anything miniature (and consequent hours spent creating minute little things from Fimo) was happily indulged by the collection of architects’ models and drawings in the Lecture Room.

Visitors are treated to views of buildings in their ‘raw’ forms, as seen through the eyes of the architect. The methods of construction and presentation of these models is as fascinating as the designs themselves.

It will come as no surprise that I spent the longest time in the Small Weston Room, which is filled with over two hundred smaller paintings, some no larger than a postcard.

Several otherwise everyday scenes are beautified in oils: Francis Matthews’ The Coombe depicts a Dublin street corner whilst Josephine Greenman uses the familiar blue and white of a traditional dinner service to render miniscule domestic settings in Silence I & II.

Amazing craftsmanship can also be seen in Claire Moynihan’s Moth Balls, 2010; dozens of moths are intricately embroidered onto their own Alpaca wool felt ball.

In the Large Weston Room, David Borrington predicts the state of the high street in 2020 if a certain supermarket is allowed to continue its invasion of our neighbourhoods. Globull Internashll Tescgoows 2020 is a stark reminder of the need to find an alternative.


David Borrington’s Globull Internashll Tescgoows, courtesy of the artist’s website

Just around the corner Oran O’Reilly’s beautifully comic Rizla, after Hokusai shows the famous Great Wave surging from a pack of cigarette papers. Maybe not such an odd pairing considering the prevalence of Hokusai’s wave in poster form in student accommodation up and down the country (admittedly including my own not so long ago).

Also currently on display at the Royal Academy, and well worth seeing, is a collection of work by academicians who have passed away over the last year. I was particularly taken with Michael Kidner’s painstakingly drawn geometric forms in No Thing Nothing.

If you can’t make it to the Royal Academy, you can see work from A-level students selected for the online exhibition here.

All photographs courtesy of the Royal Academy, unless otherwise stated.

Stephanie Jayne Price‘s slick, buy futuristic collection at Northumbria University‘s Graduate Fashion Week show was a real winner – combining masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. I loved the lines that the creations formed, order and the sophistication of each of the pieces – so much so that I couldn’t wait to have a chat with Miss Price and find out what is was all about.

What are the benefits of showing at Graduate Fashion Week?
GFW is an excellent platform for young designers to exhibit work to the industry. It’s a great opportunity to see what the other schools have been up to and ultimately the future of British fashion. For the individual it provides a chance to show your collection to a much wider audience. After spending a year putting your heart and soul into your work, GFW offers a prestigious and professional setting to exhibit your work. It’s a real honour!


Photographs by Matt Bramford

?Northumbria students put on a show at the Baltic in Newcastle before heading for Earl’s Court – how did the two venues compare?
Oh the Baltic is a wonderful space! I have such a soft spot for it! It was our first fashion show, and it was the entire year; only 25 show at GFW, so it was a really nice way to see all the collections together. After seeing bits and bobs around the studio it is so exciting to see everything and everyone come together! We were really fortunate to have such a good location in Newcastle and it was done really well.
On the other hand, Graduate Fashion Week is on a far larger scale – the catwalk and the space is set up a lot differently.  The raised runway, the models, the lighting – they are more professional I guess. But, I don’t know really. I enjoyed both immensely!
?
What’s your fashion history?
My Grandma was a tailoress, she taught me to sew and it went from there. I always wanted to study fashion. I was in primary school drawing cartoons of my friends, in secondary school drawing ball gowns and making business cards for my future self! And from textiles in school, I became fascinated by it all!

?Did you get the chance to work alongside anybody in the industry during your studies?
I’ve been very lucky and done a few placements, and no doubt I’ll be doing a few more! After 1st year, I worked for a month at Philip Treacy. I’ve always had a passion for hats! To be able to meet Philip and work there was amazing! I loved it! Then during our placement year I spent three months working with [friends of Amelia’s Magazine] Emilio de la Morena. Then I worked for The Collection, a sampling and textile company, Tatty Devine and Gareth Pugh. Now, I’m really hoping to get involved with another studio before fashion week in September. I’m a bit of a geek for pattern cutting and toiling so I’d like to get stuck in to that!

What inspires you, both for this collection and generally?
Inspiration can come from just about anywhere, but for my own work I am very concept led. There is something very exciting about capturing a meaning, telling a story, and watching it direct ideas. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Generally, it can be when I’m out and about, reading, having a coffee, chatting up with friends… endless possibilities! I love visiting museums and exhibitions… My collection captures the idea of being trapped in a kaleidoscope, which stemmed from considering how we see, travelling light, and light reflecting… I ended up eventually, asking lots of people how they’d feel if they were trapped in a kaleidoscope! I’d initially been focused on building lights into the garments, and it happened for the Newcastle show – sadly there wasn’t time for the London show, but this fusion with technology is something I’d like to further.
?
Your collection mixes masculine tailoring with feminine quirks. Why did you choose the cuts/techniques that you worked with?
Until recently I never really thought about it, but you’re right! It is a bit masculine; you’ve captured it well! I’m not sure really, I think that’s my own personal taste, I’m a bit boyish in my own dress. All the geometric shapes stemmed from cutting, and distorting the body, as though being looked upon inside that kaleidoscopic world. There were lots of triangles too! Kaleidoscopes are triangular mirrors, so the cutting used triangular inserts to push and pull the cloth, and then you put it on a body and you get a whole new dimension!


 
The colour palette is very simple – why didn’t you use colour? (This is a question, not a criticism!)
This was inspired by the concept as well. Since it was based on light, I avoided black – black absorbs light. I wear a lot of black, so I wanted to stay clear of it for this concept. White was too clinical, too bright, so everything was toned down. I wanted it to be soft and unobtrusive and to be honest colour stresses me out a bit! I’m learning to deal with it haha!
 
What did you like about Northumbria and Newcastle? How’s the fashion scene in the Toon?
Well, when I was looking to choose a University, Northumbria was the last place on my mind. I was set on getting far away from home, until I reluctantly came to the open day for Northumbria 5 years ago, and from that day it felt like home. I sat in the old design school and was inspired. I thought, ‘I actually quite like this place… can I stay?!’
I don’t know, is there a scene?!? I haven’t really left the studio much this year to know! Haha!


?
Which fashion designers do you look to for inspiration?
Years ago I started reading about ‘conceptual’ designers, and I have a fascination with Viktor & Rolf. I’d really like to meet them. I think we’d have nice chats! Haha! I’d really like to work for them! I also have admiration for Hussein Chalayan and Rei Kawakubo. Heroes I guess! I’d like to work for both of these as well. I’m a bit of a dreamer!

Did your collection receive positive attention at GFW?
Well I’ve had some lovely blogs and feedback at GFW. On a different occasion I’d been able to present it to a small panel at the BFC and they gave me some really good advice and said some really lovely things.  I was flattered they liked my cutting, and I’ve had feedback from other names from industry with similar comments and interest.

?What do the next few months hold for Stephanie Jayne Price?
At the minute I’m looking into undertaking an MA at the University of Kingston. I met the course leader the other day and she is wonderful! I’m really hoping to continue with the integration of lights and technology fused with this style of cutting and silhouette I’ve developed over the year. Fingers crossed for that! Hopefully I’ll also get involved with some studios to get some more experience – doing some cutting for them, maybe some freelance work. There are a few things to consider really. The world is my oyster!

Categories ,Baltic, ,Earls Court, ,Emilio de la Morena, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Grandma, ,Heroes, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Kaleidoscope, ,Kingston, ,light, ,london, ,Newcastle, ,Northumbria, ,Phillip Treacy, ,Rei Kawakubo, ,Stephanie Jayne Price, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Collection, ,University, ,Viktor & Rolf

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with fashion designer David Longshaw

Latitude 2010-Ivo Graham Blind Date by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones
James Acaster by Kathryn Jones.

Over the course of Latitude I saw numerous comedians, online some of whom appeared as comperes on other stages when not performing to surely one of their biggest ever audience (of thousands) in the Comedy Arena. The Cabaret Arena was much favoured, cialis 40mg as of course was the Literary Arena – hanging out with Robin Ince and his fabled posse.

Kevin Eldon, sildenafil Phil Jupitas, Josie Long… they all dropped by, frequently.

Latitude 2010-Phil Jupitas by Amelia Gregory
Phil Jupitas. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Robin Ince by Stacie Swift
Robin Ince by Stacie Swift.

My favourite part of the longstanding Book Club was a guide to one of Robin Ince’s favourite bad books: Mens’ Secrets, set to a duelling musical accompaniment.

Latitude 2010 James Acaster by Amelia Gregory
James Acaster.

James Acaster was one such novice who I saw happily entertaining pre-act literary crowds with clever improv. Teenage wonder Ivo Graham kept the Cabaret crowd thoroughly entertained with his impromptu rendition of Blind Date – amusingly he is so young he had to be told of Cilla’s name. Weird to think of Blind Date already consigned to ancient TV history.

The main Comedy Arena was my favourite place to hang out in 2007, and it’s popularity continues to grow. Despite additional wing tents on each side of the huge central marquee, the arena remained unable to contain the enthusiastic crowds, who kicked up huge volumes of dust with every new exodus and influx.

Abi Daker - Ivo Graham
Ivo Graham by Abigail Daker.
YouTube Preview Image

One of the biggest draws of Latitude is the chance to discover new talent. Ivo Graham is a mere 19 years old, which made his ability to engage a massive audience all the more impressive. With jokes centred around Facebook, pesky younger brothers and getting in trouble with mum, he still struck a chord with the older folks.

Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins
Eric Lambert by Gareth A Hopkins.

Eric Lambert was winner of the Latitude New Act of the Year 2010, although from what I heard Ivo would have been way more deserving…. or James. Eric’s winning performance centred around an improv routine that wasn’t always quite up to scratch.

Latitude 2010-Eric Lambert by Amelia Gregory
Eric Lambert.

He was cheeky and sexual, no doubt a hit with the ladies. It’s proved nigh on impossible to do any research into Eric since he seems to have zero internet presence… but I would guess from his demeanour that he’s a big fan of Russell Brand.

docbrown_by_iamanoctopus
Doc Brown by Iamanoctopus.

Of the better known comedians I really enjoyed the guide to slang courtesy of Doc Brown, who was formerly a rapper and just happens to be younger brother of Zadie Smith. Sucking snot out of his small child and inappropriate comments on packed buses define his descent towards the normality of family life.

stephen-k-amos-suziewinsor
Stephen K. Amos by Suzie Winsor.

Following him on Friday South Londoner Stephen K. Amos was suitably un-PC, berating his previous Yorkshire audience for its lack of diversity, ripping the piss out of posh people, bemoaning his old age (he’s 35. there’s no hope for me) and generally causing loud if somewhat uncomfortable chuckles across the arena.

On Sunday we caught the tail end of Rufus Hound, who was indeed face-painted up like a dog, if somewhat lacking of a tail. He spoke of the trials and tribulations of marriage and babies… which led onto the misogynistic diatribe of Richard Herring, a 43 year old singleton who made jokes about tit wanks and gay sex, accompanied by a signer for those hard of hearing. Or perhaps just to afford the opportunity to make yet more lewd jokes.

Richard Herring by Sine Skau
Richard Herring by Sine Skau.

He also over-milked an incredibly tedious tirade about Mars Bars that met with a fairly frosty reception… that became part of the act… that increased it’s tediousity. I think he was my least favourite comedian at Latitude.

ANDREW LAWRENCE Faye Skinner
Andrew Lawrence by Faye Skinner.

Next up Andrew Lawrence was really quite sinister but also strangely endearing, geared as his jokes were around his all round lack of appeal. Hey, why the sadness? I’ve always had a soft spot for scrawny gingers! Leaning back at a jaunty angle and grinning demonically he spoke of his semi-autistic relationship with his current (long-suffering) girlfriend. Hey, doesn’t that cover most men?

Lastly, Deborah Francis White put on a genius show on Sunday in the Cabaret Arena. “Every actor wants to be in a sitcom, every man wants to be in a woman,” she informed us, talking us through a series of pie charts that showed the different state of mind for women. Whilst we’d like practically every man we meet to want to sleep with us (approximately 95% according to Deborah) the reverse is true when it comes to the amount of men we actually want to sleep with.

Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins
Deborah Francis White Oversees a Bra Fight by Gareth A Hopkins.

To a chorus of knowing laughter from women, slightly nervous laughter from the men, she talked us through the best way to pull the opposite sex. “Be a Scorsese movie!” she opined, extolling the virtues of confidence. “You’re probably not going to get a part in me…” But the point is that every man should want to. Even if the reason they’re so fixated on lesbian porn is simply “two tits good, four tits better.” She persuaded the women in the audience to stroke themselves on the breast to turn the men on, pulled people out of the audience to follow her instructions on how to tell a girl on the tube she’s gorgeous, and finished with a bra wrestling match between two men. Because who wants to sleep with a man who can’t get a bra off with one hand?

The comedy at Latitude Festival is undeniably one of its biggest selling points… now if only they could figure out how to accommodate the heaving numbers of people that yearn to be amused.


David Longshaw, patient illustrated by Abigail Wright

David Longshaw is a man of many talents. Aside from designing his own label, look he is passionate about writing and illustrating not only for various publications but as part of the creative process behind his collections. 

After his passion for fashion lead him to an open day at the famous Central St Martins, try where all his favourite designers had attended, before even completing his GCSE’s, he decided to go ahead with A Levels at his local Grammar school whilst taking Wednesday afternoons off to study  pattern cutting at an Adult education centre as his first step onto that ladder towards success. It worked.  

Now, with an impressive resume boasting a degree, an MA, various awards, work with designers such as Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara and his own label, he is as motivated as ever and yet to satisfy that inner taste for success in the fashion industry. 


AW10, illustrated by Krister Selin

How did you get from such humble beginnings, attending just one pattern cutting class a week, to working with such big designers and creating your own label? 
During the summer that followed my A Levels, I did a work placement with Adam Entwisle, working on his LFW debut collection. I then studied Art Foundation at Manchester Metropolitan and carried on my pattern cutting, studying the advanced course. Then, during that summer I did work experience at Clements Ribeiro and Hussein Chalayan before starting at St Martins, where I studied BA (Hons) Fashion Design Womenswear. 

The fabric for my graduate collection was given to me by Richard James after doing a work placement there on Savile Row during my second year and the collection won the Colin Barnes Drawing Prize and the Esme Fairburne Award. 

After St Martins I went straight on to the Royal College of Art studying  (MA) Fashion Design Womenswear. I was asked to design for Alberta Ferretti before I finished my graduate collection but said I wanted to finish my MA, so the day after graduating I moved to Italy to design for Alberta. It was great being offered the job before graduating as it meant I could concentrate on my collection and I knew I’d get great experience from designing in Italy. 

My MA collection was selected for the Final of ITS#6 (Trieste) and Le Vif Weekend (Belgium) and I then went on to design for Max Mara in Italy before coming back to start my own label. 


David Longshaw at Ones to Watch, AW10, photographed by Matt Bramford

Where do you get inspiration from for your own label?  
I’m inspired by short illustrated stories I create specially for each new season. My last collection was called ‘Escaping Emily’, it was about a puppet who was discovered by a slightly disturbed fashion designer called Emily who had moved to work in Italy.

Some of the illustrations I then turned in to prints for the dresses – and the cogs that were in some prints and sewn on to some garment, came from the section where Emily finds the puppet in a hamper style basket that’s full of camera and watch parts. The colours, shapes and prints all come from the story.  


Illustration from David’s sketchbooks

Are there any designers that you would compare yourself to or that you admire? 
I wouldn’t compare myself to any one really but I really admire a variety of designers such as Karl Lagerfeld, Miuccia Prada and Ricardo Tisci at Givenchy. Kirsty Ward is a really exciting designer who’s launching her own label this September, after working for Alberta Ferretti and doing jewellery for my collections. 

Are there any pieces from your collections that you are particularly fond or proud of? 
I have a few favourites. One of them is a cog print cropped jacket from my last collection that wasn’t actually on the catwalk in the end as I felt there was enough going on with the dresses and it would have detracted from the total look. I also like the pleated dresses from the last collection as they were the trickiest to construct but after a severe lack of sleep, wither out how I wanted. 


Illustration by David Longshaw

What else do you get up to in any spare time that you manage to have? Is there anything other than designing that you like to immerse yourself in? 
I also do some writing and illustrating for different magazines which you can find links to on the press section of my website. There’s also a section called ‘Maudezine’ where I’ve interviewed Holly Fulton and JulieVerhoven. I’ve also written about up and coming designers with fictional character Maude for Disorder magazine which is quite amusing. 

Other than that, I really love going to galleries and the theatre with my girlfriend when we both have the time! I also really like watching rugby and football, especially live.  I’ve not had much time to go since starting working for myself but I get the odd match in with my dad or friends.   


AW10, illustrated by Krister Selin

So, what’s next for David Longshaw?  
Well short term I’m working on my new collection for September, which I’m planning on exhibiting in London and then Paris. I’m expanding my collection to include some more, simpler pieces using my illustrations as prints so they are more accessible for shops and customers. That will also mean I can have a few more extreme pieces in the collection to balance it all out which should be fun. I’ll also be continuing writing and illustrating. 

Where do you see yourself in the future? 
Hopefully still being as creative as possible – designing , writing and illustrating, just hopefully on a bigger scale with my own larger creative company.



David Longshaw at Ones to Watch, AW10, photographed by Matt Bramford

Categories ,Abigail Wright, ,Adam Entwisle, ,Alberta Ferretti, ,Central St Martins, ,Clements Ribeiro, ,David Longshaw, ,Disorder Magazine, ,Emily, ,Givenchy, ,Holly Fulton, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,JulieVerhoven, ,Karl Lagerfeld, ,Kirsty Ward, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,ma, ,Manchester Metropolitan, ,Maudezine, ,Max Mara, ,Miuccia Prada, ,Ones To Watch, ,paris, ,Pattern Cutting, ,Ricardo Tisci, ,Richard James, ,Royal College of Art, ,Savile Row, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Middlesex University: Ba Hons Jewellery and Accessories Design Graduate Show 2011 Review

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Louise McKay photo by Amelia Gregory
Ceramic pendant by Louise McKay. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

The Middlesex Ba Hons Jewellery and Accessories display at Free Range Art and Design Show was by far the most impressive part of the exhibition held on the weekend of the 4-5th June at the Truman Brewery. It’s no wonder that this is one of the most respected jewellery degrees in the country, order with an extremely high quality of work on display throughout. Only a few weeks back I met Myia Bonner, a recent Middlesex graduate who is already producing some brilliant work with the Metric Collective just one year out of college. Here are some of my favourite finds:

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Joys Cheung photo by Amelia Gregory
Joys Cheung had produced some clever acrylic bangles – I particularly liked their use as plastic bag holders, the bright colours of the disposable bags becoming something beautiful in themselves, and ever ready to be used down the shops.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Samira Mazloom photo by Amelia Gregory
Samira Mazloom had some lovely chunky shell shaped rings with gems in the spikes. How I would love one of those on my hands.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Jenny Konnaris photo by Amelia Gregory
Jenny Konnaris used metallic leather to create flat laser cut neck accessories. During 2010 Jenny worked alongside Hussein Chalayan to produce jewellery and eyewear for his Mirage A/W 2010 collection which might explain why she has a website showcasing her work. Her final degree collection was inspired by Narcissus, questioning the idea of perfection through conscious asymmetry.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Kirstie Maclaren photo by Amelia GregoryMiddlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Kirstie Maclaren photo by Amelia Gregory
Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Kirstie Maclaren photo by Amelia Gregory
The stunning work of Kirstie Maclaren crossed the boundaries of jewellery and fashion, with origami influenced cascading folded garments that move position to change shape. Simply gorgeous. The images of a model were taken from Kirstie Maclaren’s blogspot. Keep an eye on this one!

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Rebecca Ng photo by Amelia GregoryMiddlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Rebecca Ng photo by Amelia Gregory
Rounded button hats in softly tactile stingray leathers and felt were rendered in berry colours from Rebecca Ng. Yummy indeed.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Louise McKay photo by Amelia Gregory
Huge metallic ceramic glazed balls hung on an oversized chain from Louise McKay. Wonderful.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Dino Wear By Kali Clever photo by Amelia Gregory
Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Dino Wear By Kali Clever photo by Amelia Gregory
Dino Wear By Kali Clever was a range of interlocking jigsaw necklaces that can be remade in different shapes, created by Kali Ratcliffe. She has a wonderful website which plays on her name – multiple hands show the way to some even more avante garde Dino inspired designs (see above). Go check it out.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Esme Newdick photo by Amelia Gregory
Latex collars were etched with dark circles by Esme Newdick, then decorated with brass and zinc.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Kerry Howley photo by Amelia Gregory
Winner of MoDA’s Arthur Silver Award prize, Kerry Howley had created bizarre necklaces out of human hair – they drew a gasp of disgust from the person next to me but were certainly very clever and innovative. She is inspired by emotional responses from the wearing of jewellery and frequently uses biotic materials in her jewellery such as bone, teeth and hair. Hair is already familiar in jewellery but is more usually found in lockets, rather than in intricate patterns inspired by wallpaper designs.

Middlesex University Jewellery graduate show 2011-Francesca Samels photo by Amelia Gregory
Francesca Samels showed her delicate jewellery on a beautiful dressing table installation. She was inspired by the mystery of objects that retain memories, thinking of ways to give life to forgotten jewels.

This was a really quite magical selection of new jewellery design but I have one major gripe – no websites on promotional postcards AT ALL. Luckily I found a few designers online anyway. The others, nowhere to be found at all. What were they thinking?!!!!

Categories ,ceramics, ,Dino, ,Dino Wear By Kali Clever, ,Esme Newdick, ,Francesca Samels, ,Free Range, ,Free Range Art and Design Show, ,freerange, ,Gold, ,Graduate Shows, ,Hair, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Jenny Konnaris, ,jewellery, ,Jewellery and Accessories, ,Joys Cheung, ,Kali Jewellery, ,Kali Ratcliffe, ,Kerry Howley, ,Kirstie Maclaren, ,Latex, ,London Jewellery Week, ,Louise McKay, ,Memories, ,Metric Collective, ,middlesex university, ,millinery, ,MoDA’s Arthur Silver Award, ,Myia Bonner, ,Necklaces, ,Rebecca Ng, ,Samira Mazloom, ,shells, ,Stingray leather

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with Owlle: introducing new album FRANCE

Owlle by Andrew Khosravani

Owlle by Andrew Khosravani.

French electro-pop chanteuse Owlle is set to take the world by storm with her unique fusing of 80s era melody, super danceable beats and a pop-art aesthetic. Owlle describes the process of her musical creations with us, all accompanied by fabulous illustrations.

Owlle wall

Owlle by Sarah Bromley

Owlle by Sarah Bromley.

What ideas tend to permeate your lyrics and music the most?
I love telling stories, most of the time very personal, through descriptions, landscapes or surreal visions. I like mixing different or even antagonist atmospheres. Something that stroke me when I went through all my lyrics when I’d finished the album is that there’s the notion of someone running incessantly after something, someone impossible to catch all along. I didn’t realize that at first, that this was my theme lyrically, but also rhythmically in a way!

OWLLE by Alexandra Dzhiganskaya

OWLLE by Alexandra Dzhiganskaya.

How has your background in Fine Arts influenced your approach to music?
My time as a Fine Arts student was decisive, it helped me refine what I really wanted to do, I discovered and met many talented artists, Pierre Huyghe and Brian Eno to name just two that really had an influence on me; I also experienced lots of different mediums myself, visuals mainly. I learnt to mix visuals and music, to stage things. All of this helped me broaden my vision, my culture, and ultimately my horizons as a musician! Art continues to feed and inspire me on a daily basis!

Owlle by Emma McMorrow

Owlle by Emma McMorrow.

It is said that – despite your music – you prefer solitude over heaving dance floors, why is this?
Dancefloors can also be a very lonely place, a place of solitude, not necessarily in a bad way, somewhere you let go, you forget everything and everyone around you, and that can be very thrilling. But there’s truth in that I’m more the introspective type.

Owlle by David Tolu Graham

Owlle by David Tolu Graham.

When and how did you discover the work of Brian Eno and how has it influenced you?
I first discovered Eno not through a record or a concert but through an art installation he’d done at an Art Fair in Lyon in 2005, called « Quiet club », such installation obviously had music in it too, but not only… and all of a sudden, it was a blinding revelation to me: how much visual arts and sounds/electronic could interact. Suddenly I realized how I could combine both myself. I stared at it indefinitely, I was struck. Visuals play a key part in what I try do as an artist, they matter as much as music, it’s an integral part of the project!

Owlle by Emma Farrarons

Owlle by Emma Farrarons.

How did you get involved with Depeche Mode and what was the highlight of your collaboration?
That was totally unexpected and an unforgettable moment for me. I’m a big fan of them. Their live drummer had apparently heard of my first ep – Ticky Ticky – and liked it enough to put my name forward to the rest of the band when the time came for them to look for remixers! Their team contacted me on the eve of Christmas 2012… for a minute it was so unreal… quite the Xmas gift! The title of the song – Heaven – was very appropriate to the situation! I tried to give a part of me into this remix. I even dared adding backing vocals, I couldn’t resist ;) When I heard the melody and Dave’s beautiful voice, I knew that it’d be a great experience. I had zero direction from them but only stems and complete freedom to do whatever i wanted. I had no pressure from anyone except myself to live up to the challenge and the chance I was given! I hope I did. Feedback from Depeche Mode themselves and then their fans when the remix came out were an immense reward to me, and a huge encouragement at the vey moment I was working on writing my first album

Owlle multi

What has most influenced the look you create in your videos and artwork?
The fashion aesthetics from the 80’s, its craziness and theatrical aspect inspired me most, the 90’s are an obvious influence of mine too for that is when I grew up and I was very permeable to it, listening as much as watching artists like Madonna, Cindy Lauper or even Boy George but also designers like Alaia and Hussein Chalayan. I like things that have a dramatic aspect to them!

YouTube Preview Image

Owlle: Don’t Lose It

Where did the name Owlle come from?
It’s derived from ‘Owl’. At first I mainly liked the sound it makes when you pronounce Owl, then I feminized it with two L and a E. Then everyone started asking if I had kind of an obsession for owls. Well, I don’t but, yeah I’m a night-ish person, I mainly compose at night, I love this bird and the whole mythology it carries too. I can be quite inhibited or, say, discreet, in my everyday life, having an alias is also a way to overcome this somehow.

owlle france cover

What next for Owlle?
2014 is going to be quite the busy year! I’ve just released my debut album FRANCE in Europe, it should come out stateside in the next few months and I’m going to tour a lot with it, as far and in as many countries as I can!

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Owlle: Ticky Ticky

Categories ,Alaia, ,Alexandra Dzhiganskaya, ,Andrew Khosravani, ,boy george, ,brian eno, ,Cindy Lauper, ,David Tolu Graham, ,Depeche Mode, ,Emma Farrarons, ,Emma McMorrow, ,heaven, ,Hussein Chalayan, ,Madonna, ,Owlle, ,Pierre Huyghe, ,Sarah Bromley, ,Ticky Ticky, ,« Quiet club »

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