Amelia’s Magazine | Tatty Devine launch new central London store in style

The ExtInked project dreamt up by the Ultimate Holding Company to mark Charles Darwin’s bicentennial birthday is no doubt one of the most unique and amazing projects I’ve heard about in a long time. Along with an exhibition illustrating 100 of the most endangered animals in the British Isles, viagra 40mg sick the event came to an astounding conclusion with the tattooing of 100 volunteers who then became ambassadors for their animal. So as the exhibition closed yesterday, pilule what is to become of the ambassadors, now back in their natural habitats?

A friend of mine was lucky to be involved in the project and here he shares his experiences with me.

So why did you take part in the ExtInked Project?

Since getting involved with UHC sometime last winter, I’ve been a part of a number of really interesting projects with them. ExtInked was something they have been talking about for a long time and the idea always really appealed to me. I think it’s a really great thing to be a part of, people have learned so much about which animals are endangered and hopefully will think about why that is, and what can be done about it. For me, I try to make a lot of environmental decisions in my life and feel extremely passionate about the use of animals and our finite natural resources for human gain.

Wildlife conservation and the environment are extremely important, in our relatively short time on this earth we have managed to destroy so much. Positive and big things are happening from the ground up. There is a fast growing environmental movement, but the important decisions need to be made from the top, which, unfortunately is not happening nearly enough.

It seems easier for leaders of governments and corporations to pretend they are doing something, rather than making an important change, that could make a really big difference.

Ext Inked was a great way to be involved in one of the most creative bottom-up environmental actions I know of, I now have a species permanently on my body, which throughout my life no doubt, hundreds of people will ask about, and I will be able to tell them the information I learned about that particular species, the project, the movement, and, in my case, the RSPB and other organisations helping to protect birds in the UK.

Which animal did you get? Tell me about the tattoo!

I went for the Black Grouse; I love birds, so for me it had to be a bird. The black grouse is found in the north of England, much of Wales and Scotland. I think to me, it was important to get something that I would be likely to come into contact with, I love golden eagles and leatherback turtles, but I’ve never seen either unfortunately! I don’t think it really matters too much which species I had tattooed though, as it’s more about the project and the issues as a whole than one particular species.

Tell me about the experience! What happened when you went to Manchester?

We went along on the last day around lunch time, which was bit quieter than when I visited on the Thursday night. I was quite pleased about that as all the tattooing happened much like a tattoo convention. There were barriers up at the front, and a stage with the three tattooists from Ink vs. Steel in Leeds, tattooing live in front of whoever was there to watch. As it was my first tattoo, and I didn’t know how much it would hurt, I was a bit nervous about being watched!

I thought I was being tattooed at 1 o clock, but somebody was running late, and I was early, so they switched our places, I didn’t really have any time to feel too nervous, before I knew it I was laid face down, being tattooed. I’d be lying if I said it didn’t hurt, because it did, but the mix of the atmosphere, and the rush of adrenaline you get puts you in a really strange place. I just laid their trying to work out how much it hurt and which bit he was doing, it was actually a pretty good feeling! Having had the tattoo a couple of days now, the pain seems totally insignificant.

Your girlfriend was part of the project too wasn’t she?

My girlfriend Sally got involved too; she got the Rampion Bellflower on her inner arm. She has a lot of tattoos already, so I think she probably had a different experience to me, although she was still a bit nervous. She was really excited to be a part of the project and has already done some good work telling people about the project and spreading the word! Sally is a very creative person, but isn’t able to be too involved in art, so I think it’s great that she really connected with this project and was really receptive to the ideas artists had on conservation.

What about the future? How do you think you’ll feel about the tattoo in 20 years time?

In twenty years time I have no idea how I will feel about the tattoo, but the more I live, the more I learn, and the more I learn, the more passionate I become.

Climate change and human activity is affecting our wildlife, and that’s only going to get worse unless we act quickly and dramatically. If we act now, while we still have a bit of a chance, I will be able to look at my tattoo and think, I’m glad we did something, and If not, I don’t think anybody will see it because my leg will probably be under water!

DSC_0608All imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen.

The recent grand opening of Tatty Devine’s new Covent Garden boutique was an affair to remember. A mini marching band led an excited crowd from Tatty Devine’s Soho shop to the new boutique in Covent Garden’s Seven Dials. Wearing giant Tatty Devine jewellery pieces and holding banners, web balloons and streamers the crowd ascended on to the brand’s new central London home on Monmouth Street. Guests enjoyed mulled cider and cupcakes as they celebrated the momentous occasion for the ‘plastic fantastic’, rx cult jewellery brand. Everyone who attended was treated to a lovely gift bag containing, among other treats, a beautiful pendant necklace from the ‘Button Up’ range.

DSC_0676Tatty Devine founders Rosie and Harriet pictured in the new store.

Tatty Devine founders, Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine will, next year, celebrate the 10th birthday of the company they started together way back in 2000. Since their humble beginning the brand has released well over 20 Collections and has collaborated with a wealth of creatives such as Rob Ryan, Ashish, Peter Jensen, Gilbert and George, Peaches, Bernstock Speirs and the V+A to name but a few. In addition to their stand alone stores Tatty Devine now have over 100 stockists worldwide including MOMA, Selfridges, Tate and Urban Outfitters. With such an established position within London’s fashion scene makes the brand an ideal addition to the exclusive Seven Dials location.  “Monmouth Street has a tradition of independent British fashion boutiques, which suits us perfectly. We’re bringing the spirit of our Soho shop to a new space where we can celebrate our 10th birthday next year in style!”

DSC_0604

The boutique will sell all the current collections, the Best of Tatty Devine range featuring the 50 most popular pieces, and of course their famous name necklaces. Also in stock will be; knitwear by KIND, sunglasses by Jeremy Scott and Alexander Wong, bags by Mimi, and excitingly they will be the exclusive UK stockist of Eley Kishimoto’s flash print purses.

DSC_0599

The Autumn/Winter 2009 ‘Button Up’ collection, inspired by the classic iconography of London’s Pearly Kings and Queens brings out a sense of London pride (and when you buy the Pearly King Brooch or Necklace, £1 from every sale will be donated to charity through the Pearly Kings and Queens Association). For the Tatty Devine aficionados out there you can also see Tatty Devine at Bust’s Craftacular event on December 12th, from 12-7pm, at York Hall in Bethnal Green.  Tatty Devine, 44 Monmouth Street, London WC2H 9EP.

Categories ,Alexander Wong, ,Ashish, ,Bernstock Speirs, ,Bust Magazine, ,Covent Garden, ,Crafacular, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Ester Kneen, ,Gilbert and George, ,Harriet Vine, ,Jeremy Scott, ,KIND, ,London’s Pearly Kings and Queens, ,Mimi, ,MOMA, ,Peaches, ,Peter Jensen, ,rob ryan, ,Rosie Wolfenden, ,Selfridges, ,Seven Dials, ,Tate, ,Tatty Devine, ,Urban Outfitters, ,va

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: best Jewellery Designers at Somerset House

frances conteh – lfw – ss11 – jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make managed to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows.

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, cure apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate off citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book, rendered in all shades of beige.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make manage to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows. But here is the best of what I saw…

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, medications apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, side effects she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses, price massive mohair cardigans and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate of citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
frances conteh - lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Frances Conteh by Jenny Robins.

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book, rendered in all shades of beige.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Carmen Secareanu On/Off by jenny robins
Illustration by Jenny Robins.

I didn’t make manage to take in the whole of On/Off exhibition this year because I was inevitably racing between shows when I passed through. And I always forget that it finishes a day before the other static shows. But here is the best of what I saw…

Iris Serban by Chris Morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Cecile Bahnsen
Two designers that I really warmed to were graduates of the RCA that we’ve already covered. Cecile Bahnsen is a Danish designer who works with complex textile combinations inspired by modernism and resulting in delicate laser cut dresses and geometric shapes galore. I loved the batwing oversized coats, this apparently a reference to her teenage years in the 90s.

Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
Cecile Bahnsen photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters
Cecilie Bahnsen by Ella Masters.

Frances Conteh
Frances Conteh could be found next door – delightfully colourful in the face of so much tasteful monochrome. Another RCA graduate who specialises in beautiful knitwear, she produced a range of slim fitting graphic dresses, massive mohair cardigans and oversized patterned coats in a yummy palate of citrus flavours. Stunning stuff.

Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
Frances Conteh photo by Amelia Gregory
frances conteh - lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Frances Conteh by Jenny Robins.

Carmen Secareanu
Hailing from Romania Carmen Secareanu creates strangely shaped garments inspired by “angels or birds”. Her stand was buzzing when I passed, with lots of people trying on her bulbous big shouldered black jacket replete with massive over-sized cuffs. Do garments get larger as models get slimmer, I wonder?

Carmen Secareanau photo by Amelia Gregory
Carmen Secareanu- lfw - ss11 - jenny robins
Carmen Secareanu by Jenny Robins.

Iris Serban
Another Romanian designer, Iris Serban plays with subtle broken prints, beading and tasteful cream and beige ruffled textures like the carefully laid out pages of a very old book.

Iris Serban photo by Amelia Gregory
iris serban by chris morris
Iris Serban by Chris Morris.

Laura Theiss
My fifth and final On/Off tip is the work of Lithuanian born Laura Theiss, who first trained in business so she should be good at this fashion malarkey. She’s another knitwear designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins, and divides herself between the UK and Germany. She specialises in the combination of different yarns and colours to create unusual textures and feeling.

Laura Theiss by Ella Masters
Laura Theiss by Ella Masters.

I’m sure I may have missed other talent, but hey, if you close a day before everyone else what do you expect?

Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Harriet Vine of Tatty Devine by Dee Andrews.

I’m a girl. I quite like jewellery, information pills I can’t help it. Here’s my round up of the sweetest pieces I saw at Somerset House this year.

Phoebe Coleman
Phoebe Coleman was new to LFW this year, viagra 40mg evident in her slightly small simple stand and eager demeanour. But that’s no bad thing! Rather that than some shirty designer who barks at me if I take a photo. It’s understandable that some people get narked what with lots of pesky manufacturers sneaking in to nick their ideas, but I’m only too happy to share my business card so a bit of decorum is always good. Anyway, like I said Phoebe was lovely and chatty. Her first degree was in fine art and she then went onto study jewellery in San Diego, California whilst also producing plays. She’s a big old romantic, so alongside her previous dewdrop collection she has just launched the most darling heart collection at LFW. I love big brash jewellery for making a bit of a noise, but for day to day wear you can’t beat simple gold pendants. So want one. What’s more she’s determined to support local jewellers so everything is made in London.

Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans
Phoebe Coleman By Katherine Tromans.

LeJu
I’ve written about the jewellery brand LeJu in Amelia’s Magazine before. Back then they were one of only a few ethical jewellery companies but they now have some strong competition. The brand deserves a special mention for breaking out of the Esthetica ghetto and pushing into more exciting boundaries of design than in previous seasons. Loved this huge piece making best use of dyed vegetable ivory.

Somerset House SS2011 Le Ju
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Philippa Holland
Over on the Philippa Holland stand I was captivated by an absolutely gorgeous moveable sycamore ring. It comes in both gold and silver options but unfortunately it’s quite pricey. *sad face* Still, if you’re a money bags this is one beautiful and unique bit of jewellery. Philippa is inspired by the ancient and natural worlds as well as English folklore, so she creates lots of exciting bug pieces that obviously appeal to the fashion forward man – there was one fawning over them when I was visiting. Like Phoebe she’s keen to support British craftsmanship and eschews commercial production practices. Last Christmas she did personal engravings on pieces bought as gifts so let’s hope she does that again… what a fabulous idea for a totally unique present.

Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans
Philippa Holland By Katherine Tromans.

Cabinet 4 Buba
The Buba stand was all beaded and glittery: Ashish distilled into a handbag. This season Lesley Silwood and Euan McDonald have branched out into jewellery for the first time, and this was what drew me in, though I’d love one of their cross strap bags too now that my damn Vivienne Westwood bag is bust. All the beading is done by their own factory in India, which Lesley assured me means that working conditions are impeccable. Loved the big beaded hoop earrings and long sausage necklaces put together in abstract designs. Just fabulous. Even if she looked at me blankly when I told her I was from Amelia’s Magazine. Clearly not a fan then.

Buba-Jewellery-by-Kellie-Black
Buba Jewellery by Kellie Black.

Tatty Devine
Now, you all know I love Tatty Devine. Not only are Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine two of my very favourite people in the whole of fashiondom but they’re so bloomin’ talented. Since they started off the whole acrylic jewellery thing (ten years ago, my word) they have been so incredibly copied by everyone – from graduate jewellers to Top Shop – that it’s become a bit ridiculous. But NONE of them will touch what Tatty Devine can design – because in terms of imagination and innovation they are always about ten steps ahead of the game. Every season I can’t wait to see what they’ve come up with next, and naturally this collection did not disappoint. Expect a continuation of the Future Mystic theme that has just hit the stands for A/W – with huge crystal necklaces and Esoterica a big influence. Look out especially for some amazing hinged glitter bird necklaces and headpieces. We also went to their party, read about it here.

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Somerset House SS2011 Tatty Devine
Dee-Andrews-Tatty-Devine
Illustrations by Dee Andrews.

Mawi
We did a huge old feature on Mawi in one of the last issues of Amelia’s Magazine so safe to say that I’m quite a big fan – but somewhat miffed that in the course of writing this article I discovered that Mawi has reposted a pdf of that very same interview on a prominent part of her website with absolutely NO credit at all to where it came from. And I don’t even merit a mention on her “Cool Blogs and Websites” list. So yes, I like Mawi’s jewellery. She does big stuff: be warned, it’s quite heavy. She’s not worried about the current trend towards much smaller pieces (you’re in there Phoebe Coleman!) That’s it folks. Suffice to say I’d be more enthusiastic about the new collection if she bothered to acknowledge the promotion we gave her early on, or indeed to give me the impression she even remembers her appearance in Amelia’s Magazine. Love it when that happens. *sigh*

LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW SS2011-photo by Amelia Gregory
Mawi knuckledusters for the David Koma catwalk show.

Categories ,Acrylic jewellery, ,Ashish, ,Buba, ,Cabinet 4 Buba, ,David Koma, ,Dee Andrews, ,Esoterica, ,esthetica, ,Euan McDonald, ,Future Mystic, ,Harriet Vine, ,jewellery, ,Katherine Tromans, ,Kellie Black, ,LeJu, ,Lesley Silwood, ,Mawi, ,Phillippa Holland, ,Phoebe Coleman, ,Rosie Wolfenden, ,Somerset House, ,Tatty Devine

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour closes at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane Biscuiteers

Okay, hospital I admit it, more about it’s taken me over three weeks to get around to writing about my final date on the ACOFI Book Tour… but it was all part of my cunning plan to let you all forget about it and then bring it up all over again! Plus, let’s be honest, I had some pretty darn great coverage around the time of the event. For example this beautiful blog by Alia Gargum, who describes how the process for working for me as a contributor to Amelia’s Magazine has helped her to develop as an illustrator. It’s really nice to get this kind of feedback as I work devilishly hard to promote up and coming creatives and it doesn’t exactly earn me much of a living.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

A few ACOFI contributors also came along for the night – read lovely blogs by Emma Block (who has just graduated from Middlesex University with a first) and Gareth A Hopkins. Emily of Tatty Devine also did a round up, as did Mistry of Habs, Ickleson and Katie of The Young Creatives. Spoilt really! And they wrote theirs a lot faster than me… In the intervening weeks time just seems to have flown past and as the graduate shows have piled up I’ve let it slip and slip…

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma Block
Emma Block.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Alia Gargum
Alia Gargum.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Gareth A Hopkins
Gareth A Hopkins – pretending that the camera is not really there. I’m not fooled.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emily
Emily Prichard of Tatty Devine helping out on the door.

Plus I just knew that this blog would become a bit of biscuit porn fest (in a good way). You have been warned.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassieTatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassieTatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

The last date on my ACOFI Book Tour was held on Tuesday 7th June at the Brick Lane branch of Tatty Devine and it was a homecoming of sorts… mere minutes from my house. I had expected it to be a busy night but I was really quite overwhelmed by the amount of people who turned up: creatives of every age, stage of career and creative discipline, not just illustrators – although it was wonderful to meet so many contributors to Amelia’s Magazine who I speak to regularly by email.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Colourful icing ready to pipe onto biscuits.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassie
Cassie Merrick of the Biscuiteers with her assistant Lou Newton.

Cassie and Lou had laid out a wonderful Biscuiteers display on the counter by the time of my (as usual) frantic arrival: a delightful carpet of pretty biscuits – tiny iced gem tasters in a rainbow of colours and plenty of half iced biscuits on which guests were invited to pipe their own designs. It took awhile for people to warm to the idea, but once we got going there was no stopping us. Even my boyfriend had a go! (and he wasn’t the only boy who stepped up to the mark)

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

Biscuiteers biscuits come in yummy vanilla and chocolate flavours but it is the handmade decoration that makes them so special. They have a rotating team of trained icers, and Emma Block (having met them at my event) will be joining them as a freelancer this summer. What a great part time job – where can I sign up?! In the meantime Biscuiteers will be helping out with the Letter Lounge event at Tatty Devine Covent Garden on Wednesday 6th July, a result of meeting up on the ACOFI Book Tour.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Sonja
Sonja from Tatty Devine welcomes a visitor to the shop.

It was also lovely to meet Richard Watson, who is the maestro behind Juiceology, the new juice brand that has been supporting all ACOFI Book Tour dates. He’d brought along some updated flavours for us to try in slightly bigger bottles of the type preferred by bars. I really couldn’t have hoped for a better sponsor, and it’s nice to know that the ACOFI Book Tour has enabled yet more introductions – Juiceology recently sponsored the Andy Smith solo show at Soma Gallery, which I visited a month ago.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Richard Watson Juiceology
Richard Watson of Juiceology.

I’ve started to see Juiceology for sale in boutique sandwich shops, so make sure you check them out next time you see them on the shelf – I can’t recommend them highly enough. Richard has some other flavours in the pipeline and I’m looking forward to trying his next flavour soon.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Lahloo TeaACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Lahloo Tea
Lahloo Tea once again provided some delicious peppermint and earl grey tea for the event, which was served to guests in dainty china cups.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Heather Stanton
And of course no event would be complete without some samples of Dr. Hauschka products. This time Heather Stanton of Dr.Hauschka was actually able to make it along and join in the fun with her hubby Will. It was lovely to catch up with her.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011

Once everyone had had ample time to meet, mingle, share work and decorate a Biscuiteers biscuit I invited everyone to gather around and stood with my computer held aloft on my shoulder to give the talk. Having done the spiel five times already I raced through it even faster than I have done in the past – mostly because I was aware that everyone was squished into the shop, all standing, and I felt pretty bad about that. I think everyone enjoyed it though.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Amelia Gregory

Amongst the many Amelia’s Magazine contributors who came along to the event were these lovely illustrators:

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Kristina Vasiljeva
Kristina Vasiljeva has just finished her FdA illustration course at Camberwell. She has been contributing some wonderful fashion illustrations to the magazine.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Hannah Simpson was recently awarded a prize at the V&A illustration awards. Here she is icing biscuits with Kristina.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Helena Maratheftis
Illustrator Helena Maratheftis also posted some photos of the event.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Naomi Law and Matt Bramford
Naomi Law is of course featured in ACOFI, here with her old chum, my ex fashion editor Matt Bramford.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Soni Speight, aka IcklesonACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Soni Speight, aka Ickleson
Soni Speight, aka Ickleson showed us her wonderful business cards.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Lou Cloud
Lou Cloud and her boyfriend.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Katie Byrne Emma Block
Other guests included Katie Byrne of The Young Creatives with her friend Emma Block, who showed us through some loose collage bits in her portfolio.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma BlockACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma Block
Emma Block’s delicate collage work.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Alia Gargum
Alia Gargum and a friend enjoy a nice cup of Lahloo tea.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-plastic seconds
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Maria Gareth and Alia
Maria Papadimitriou of Slowly the Eggs came along again (she also came to the first Tatty Devine event) this time sporting yet another amazing Plastic Seconds necklace (here with Gareth and Alia). Maria even went to the trouble of doing another write up on her blog. What a star!

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Gareth a Hopkins
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-The Intercorstal: Valentine
New work by Gareth A Hopkins – The Intercorstal: Valentine.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Karen
I first met Karen from Stepney City Farm on my twitter feed. Since meeting Gareth and Alia at my event they have helped to create artwork for the Paul Foot Farm Favourite Jigsaw Puzzle East End Weekend which is taking place at the farm on the 9th-10th July to raise much needed funds. You can see their wonderful artwork on Paul Foot’s website.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Agnes Bataclan Melinda Barbi
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011- Melinda Barbi Sara Lofwander
Other attendees included Melinda Barbi, an LCF Fashion Photography student who came along with Sara Lofwander and Agnes Bataclan in advance of my lecturing visit to the London College of Fashion. Inspired by the ACOFI event they made me cookies and cake for my visit, which was MUCH appreciated.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Siobhan of Flamingo Magazine
It was nice to see Siobhan Leddy of Flamingo Magazine – with whom I did an interview awhile back.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Susannah Cartwright
Susannah Cartwright is a textile designer who is taking part in The Stinging Netil Art Mart on Sunday 10th July in the Netil House car park. Why not check it out?

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Harriet Vine
Tatty Devine’s Harriet Vine.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Cari Steel Emma Crosby
My former music editor Cari Steel popped in briefly and I made her pose with sales agent Emma Crosby like they’ve known each other forever. Convincing no?

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011

Don’t forget that you can buy Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration on my website or from all good retailers (including Amazon) – please do buy the book and support the wealth of talent within. And that, my friends, is the ACOFI Book Tour done and dusted…

Categories ,ACOFI, ,ACOFI Book Tour, ,Agnes Bataclan, ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andy Smith, ,Biscuiteers, ,Book Tour, ,Cari Steel, ,Cassie Merrick, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Emma Block, ,Emma Crosby, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Flamingo Magazine, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Hannah Simpson, ,Harriet Vine, ,Heather Stanton, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Ickleson, ,Juiceology, ,Katie Byrne, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Letter Lounge, ,London College of Fashion, ,Lou Cloud, ,Lou Newton, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Matt Bramford, ,Melinda Barbi, ,Naomi Law, ,Netil House, ,Paul Foot, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Richard Watson, ,Sara Lofwander, ,Siobhan Leddy, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Soma Gallery, ,Soni Speight, ,Stepney City Farm, ,Susannah Cartwright, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Stinging Netil Art Mart, ,The Young Creatives

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour closes at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane Biscuiteers

Okay, I admit it, it’s taken me over three weeks to get around to writing about my final date on the ACOFI Book Tour… but it was all part of my cunning plan to let you all forget about it and then bring it up all over again! Plus, let’s be honest, I had some pretty darn great coverage around the time of the event. For example this beautiful blog by Alia Gargum, who describes how the process for working for me as a contributor to Amelia’s Magazine has helped her to develop as an illustrator. It’s really nice to get this kind of feedback as I work devilishly hard to promote up and coming creatives and it doesn’t exactly earn me much of a living.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

A few ACOFI contributors also came along for the night – read lovely blogs by Emma Block (who has just graduated from Middlesex University with a first) and Gareth A Hopkins. Emily of Tatty Devine also did a round up, as did Mistry of Habs, Ickleson and Katie of The Young Creatives. Spoilt really! And they wrote theirs a lot faster than me… In the intervening weeks time just seems to have flown past and as the graduate shows have piled up I’ve let it slip and slip…

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma Block
Emma Block.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Alia Gargum
Alia Gargum.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Gareth A Hopkins
Gareth A Hopkins – pretending that the camera is not really there. I’m not fooled.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emily
Emily Prichard of Tatty Devine helping out on the door.

Plus I just knew that this blog would become a bit of biscuit porn fest (in a good way). You have been warned.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassieTatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassieTatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

The last date on my ACOFI Book Tour was held on Tuesday 7th June at the Brick Lane branch of Tatty Devine and it was a homecoming of sorts… mere minutes from my house. I had expected it to be a busy night but I was really quite overwhelmed by the amount of people who turned up: creatives of every age, stage of career and creative discipline, not just illustrators – although it was wonderful to meet so many contributors to Amelia’s Magazine who I speak to regularly by email.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Colourful icing ready to pipe onto biscuits.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers cassie
Cassie Merrick of the Biscuiteers with her assistant Lou Newton.

Cassie and Lou had laid out a wonderful Biscuiteers display on the counter by the time of my (as usual) frantic arrival: a delightful carpet of pretty biscuits – tiny iced gem tasters in a rainbow of colours and plenty of half iced biscuits on which guests were invited to pipe their own designs. It took awhile for people to warm to the idea, but once we got going there was no stopping us. Even my boyfriend had a go! (and he wasn’t the only boy who stepped up to the mark)

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

Biscuiteers biscuits come in yummy vanilla and chocolate flavours but it is the handmade decoration that makes them so special. They have a rotating team of trained icers, and Emma Block (having met them at my event) will be joining them as a freelancer this summer. What a great part time job – where can I sign up?! In the meantime Biscuiteers will be helping out with the Letter Lounge event at Tatty Devine Covent Garden on Wednesday 6th July, a result of meeting up on the ACOFI Book Tour.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Sonja
Sonja from Tatty Devine welcomes a visitor to the shop.

It was also lovely to meet Richard Watson, who is the maestro behind Juiceology, the new juice brand that has been supporting all ACOFI Book Tour dates. He’d brought along some updated flavours for us to try in slightly bigger bottles of the type preferred by bars. I really couldn’t have hoped for a better sponsor, and it’s nice to know that the ACOFI Book Tour has enabled yet more introductions – Juiceology recently sponsored the Andy Smith solo show at Soma Gallery, which I visited a month ago.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Richard Watson Juiceology
Richard Watson of Juiceology.

I’ve started to see Juiceology for sale in boutique sandwich shops, so make sure you check them out next time you see them on the shelf – I can’t recommend them highly enough. Richard has some other flavours in the pipeline and I’m looking forward to trying his next flavour soon.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Lahloo TeaACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Lahloo Tea
Lahloo Tea once again provided some delicious peppermint and earl grey tea for the event, which was served to guests in dainty china cups.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Heather Stanton
And of course no event would be complete without some samples of Dr. Hauschka products. This time Heather Stanton of Dr.Hauschka was actually able to make it along and join in the fun with her hubby Will. It was lovely to catch up with her.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011
ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011

Once everyone had had ample time to meet, mingle, share work and decorate a Biscuiteers biscuit I invited everyone to gather around and stood with my computer held aloft on my shoulder to give the talk. Having done the spiel five times already I raced through it even faster than I have done in the past – mostly because I was aware that everyone was squished into the shop, all standing, and I felt pretty bad about that. I think everyone enjoyed it though.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Amelia Gregory

Amongst the many Amelia’s Magazine contributors who came along to the event were these lovely illustrators:

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Kristina Vasiljeva
Kristina Vasiljeva has just finished her FdA illustration course at Camberwell. She has been contributing some wonderful fashion illustrations to the magazine.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Biscuiteers
Hannah Simpson was recently awarded a prize at the V&A illustration awards. Here she is icing biscuits with Kristina.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Helena Maratheftis
Illustrator Helena Maratheftis also posted some photos of the event.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Naomi Law and Matt Bramford
Naomi Law is of course featured in ACOFI, here with her old chum, my ex fashion editor Matt Bramford.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Soni Speight, aka IcklesonACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Soni Speight, aka Ickleson
Soni Speight, aka Ickleson showed us her wonderful business cards.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Lou Cloud
Lou Cloud and her boyfriend.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Katie Byrne Emma Block
Other guests included Katie Byrne of The Young Creatives with her friend Emma Block, who showed us through some loose collage bits in her portfolio.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma BlockACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Emma Block
Emma Block’s delicate collage work.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Alia Gargum
Alia Gargum and a friend enjoy a nice cup of Lahloo tea.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-plastic seconds
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Maria Gareth and Alia
Maria Papadimitriou of Slowly the Eggs came along again (she also came to the first Tatty Devine event) this time sporting yet another amazing Plastic Seconds necklace (here with Gareth and Alia). Maria even went to the trouble of doing another write up on her blog. What a star!

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Gareth a Hopkins
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-The Intercorstal: Valentine
New work by Gareth A Hopkins – The Intercorstal: Valentine.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Karen
I first met Karen from Stepney City Farm on my twitter feed. Since meeting Gareth and Alia at my event they have helped to create artwork for the Paul Foot Farm Favourite Jigsaw Puzzle East End Weekend which is taking place at the farm on the 9th-10th July to raise much needed funds. You can see their wonderful artwork on Paul Foot’s website.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Agnes Bataclan Melinda Barbi
Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011- Melinda Barbi Sara Lofwander
Other attendees included Melinda Barbi, an LCF Fashion Photography student who came along with Sara Lofwander and Agnes Bataclan in advance of my lecturing visit to the London College of Fashion. Inspired by the ACOFI event they made me cookies and cake for my visit, which was MUCH appreciated.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Siobhan of Flamingo Magazine
It was nice to see Siobhan Leddy of Flamingo Magazine – with whom I did an interview awhile back.

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Susannah Cartwright
Susannah Cartwright is a textile designer who is taking part in The Stinging Netil Art Mart on Sunday 10th July in the Netil House car park. Why not check it out?

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011-Harriet Vine
Tatty Devine’s Harriet Vine.

ACOFI Tour Tatty Devine Brick Lane 2011-Cari Steel Emma Crosby
My former music editor Cari Steel popped in briefly and I made her pose with sales agent Emma Crosby like they’ve known each other forever. Convincing no?

Tatty Devine Brick Lane ACOFI 2011

Don’t forget that you can buy Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration on my website or from all good retailers (including Amazon) – please do buy the book and support the wealth of talent within. And that, my friends, is the ACOFI Book Tour done and dusted…

Categories ,ACOFI, ,ACOFI Book Tour, ,Agnes Bataclan, ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andy Smith, ,Biscuiteers, ,Book Tour, ,Cari Steel, ,Cassie Merrick, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Emma Block, ,Emma Crosby, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Flamingo Magazine, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Hannah Simpson, ,Harriet Vine, ,Heather Stanton, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Ickleson, ,Juiceology, ,Katie Byrne, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Letter Lounge, ,London College of Fashion, ,Lou Cloud, ,Lou Newton, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Matt Bramford, ,Melinda Barbi, ,Naomi Law, ,Netil House, ,Paul Foot, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Richard Watson, ,Sara Lofwander, ,Siobhan Leddy, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Soma Gallery, ,Soni Speight, ,Stepney City Farm, ,Susannah Cartwright, ,Tatty Devine, ,The Stinging Netil Art Mart, ,The Young Creatives

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration Launch Party: The Movie

Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani.

Last season I was incredibly gutted to miss the Cooperative Designs presentation – such were the glowing reports on our website. But in my enthusiasm I actually turned up too early this time, viagra buy got turned away, buy ate a Pret sandwich… and then missed most of what turned out to actually be a catwalk show on repeat.


Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Descending some stairs we were asked to sit in a darkened vault but my photographer’s sixth sense directed me instead to stand in a separate photographers box, where the models paused for a few seconds in somewhat brighter conditions.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

This was a collection inspired by 90s rave culture, Drum n Bass and the contemplative industrial photography of Thomas Struth, which meant that the oversized silhouette of Cooperative Designs came in industrial tones of grey and beige stripes combined with fluoro highlights in tie detailing, visors and threaded hair accessories.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was lots of asymmetrical patterning, floppy hooded jumpers, boxy baggy tops and knit dresses tiered with baggy pouches. Lacy see through knitwear recalled the combat trouser shapes so beloved of 90s dancers. Hats by Noel Stewart were tall and floppy like a gnome’s or featured ear flaps and visors – questionable styles that were somehow rendered infinitely desirable. A wide knitted skirt was particularly cute, and were the little boots by Flip Flop, customised by Cooperative Designs with extravagant orange soles.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of any designers that I love I can actually imagine myself wearing Cooperative Designs. Their clever knitwear by it’s very nature being supremely flattering to the shape of a real women. Thankfully, they make a point of picking their models to reflect their customer.

On my way out I was given a brilliant press release: informative, well written and protected in a cardboard envelope that even I would struggle to lose. Best of all, it came with my very own piece of painted plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson, as featured in the collection. More designers could learn from such professionalism on the press release frontier.

You can read Naomi Law’s excellent review here.

I totally missed out the East 17 reference…
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani.

Last season I was incredibly gutted to miss the Cooperative Designs presentation – such were the glowing reports on our website. But in my enthusiasm I actually turned up too early this time, mind got turned away, ate a Pret sandwich… and then missed most of what turned out to actually be a catwalk show on repeat.


Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Descending some stairs we were asked to sit in a darkened vault but my photographer’s sixth sense directed me instead to stand in a separate photographers box, where the models paused for a few seconds in somewhat brighter conditions.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

This was a collection inspired by 90s rave culture, Drum n Bass and the contemplative industrial photography of Thomas Struth, which meant that the oversized silhouette of Cooperative Designs came in industrial tones of grey and beige stripes combined with fluoro highlights in tie detailing, visors and threaded hair accessories.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was lots of asymmetrical patterning, floppy hooded jumpers, boxy baggy tops and knit dresses tiered with baggy pouches. Lacy see through knitwear recalled the combat trouser shapes so beloved of 90s dancers. Hats by Noel Stewart were tall and floppy like a gnome’s or featured ear flaps and visors – questionable styles that were somehow rendered infinitely desirable. A wide knitted skirt was particularly cute, and were the little boots by Flip Flop, customised by Cooperative Designs with extravagant orange soles.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of any designers that I love I can actually imagine myself wearing Cooperative Designs. Their clever knitwear by it’s very nature being supremely flattering to the shape of a real women. Thankfully, they make a point of picking their models to reflect their customer.

Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson for Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

On my way out I was given a brilliant press release: informative, well written and protected in a cardboard envelope that even I would struggle to lose. Best of all, it came with my very own piece of painted plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson, as featured in the collection. More designers could learn from such professionalism on the press release frontier.

You can read Naomi Law’s excellent review here. You can see more of Natsuki Otani’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani.

Last season I was incredibly gutted to miss the Cooperative Designs presentation – such were the glowing reports on our website. But in my enthusiasm I actually turned up too early this time, drug got turned away, order ate a Pret sandwich… and then missed most of what turned out to actually be a catwalk show on repeat.


Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Descending some stairs we were asked to sit in a darkened vault but my photographer’s sixth sense directed me instead to stand in a separate photographers box, where the models paused for a few seconds in somewhat brighter conditions.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

This was a collection inspired by 90s rave culture, Drum n Bass and the contemplative industrial photography of Thomas Struth, which meant that the oversized silhouette of Cooperative Designs came in industrial tones of grey and beige stripes combined with fluoro highlights in tie detailing, visors and threaded hair accessories.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was lots of asymmetrical patterning, floppy hooded jumpers, boxy baggy tops and knit dresses tiered with baggy pouches. Lacy see through knitwear recalled the combat trouser shapes so beloved of 90s dancers. Hats by Noel Stewart were tall and floppy like a gnome’s or featured ear flaps and visors – questionable styles that were somehow rendered infinitely desirable. A wide knitted skirt was particularly cute, and were the little boots by Flip Flop, customised by Cooperative Designs with extravagant orange soles.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of any designers that I love I can actually imagine myself wearing Cooperative Designs. Their clever knitwear by it’s very nature being supremely flattering to the shape of a real women. Thankfully, they make a point of picking their models to reflect their customer.

Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson for Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

On my way out I was given a brilliant press release: informative, well written and protected in a cardboard envelope that even I would struggle to lose. Best of all, it came with my very own piece of painted plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson, as featured in the collection. More designers could learn from such professionalism on the press release frontier.

You can read Naomi Law’s excellent review here. You can see more of Natsuki Otani’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Natsuki Otani.

Last season I was incredibly gutted to miss the Cooperative Designs presentation – such were the glowing reports on our website. But in my enthusiasm I actually turned up too early this time, ailment got turned away, ate a Pret sandwich… and then missed most of what turned out to actually be a catwalk show on repeat.


Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Descending some stairs we were asked to sit in a darkened vault but my photographer’s sixth sense directed me instead to stand in a separate photographers box, where the models paused for a few seconds in somewhat brighter conditions.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011 by Jane Young.

This was a collection inspired by 90s rave culture, Drum n Bass and the contemplative industrial photography of Thomas Struth, which meant that the oversized silhouette of Cooperative Designs came in industrial tones of grey and beige stripes combined with fluoro highlights in tie detailing, visors and threaded hair accessories.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Tim Adey.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

There was lots of asymmetrical patterning, floppy hooded jumpers, boxy baggy tops and knit dresses tiered with baggy pouches. Lacy see through knitwear recalled the combat trouser shapes so beloved of 90s dancers. Hats by Noel Stewart were tall and floppy like a gnome’s or featured ear flaps and visors – questionable styles that were somehow rendered infinitely desirable. A wide knitted skirt was particularly cute, as were the little boots by Flip Flop, customised by Cooperative Designs with extravagant orange soles.

Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryCooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Cooperative Designs A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Of any designers that I love I can actually imagine myself wearing Cooperative Designs. Their clever knitwear is by it’s very nature supremely flattering to the shape of a real women. Thankfully, they make a point of picking their models to reflect their customer.

Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson for Cooperative Designs 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

On my way out I was given a brilliant press release: informative, well written and protected in a cardboard envelope that even I would struggle to lose. Best of all, it came with my very own piece of painted plywood jewellery by Corrie Williamson, as featured in the collection. More designers could learn from such professionalism on the press release frontier.

You can read Naomi Law’s excellent review here and you can see more of Natsuki Otani’s work in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.
Sally Mumby-Croft at the ACOFI launch with Jonno and Matt. Illustration by Naomi Law
Sally Mumby-Croft at the ACOFI launch with Jonno and Matt. Illustration by Naomi Law.

Former Amelia’s Magazine art editor Sally Mumby-Croft put together this stunning movie reminder of the launch party for ACOFI with a little help from 6 Day Riot. I hope you enjoy a tour of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, rx as seen at the Bunker Cafe and Scout Hut at 123 Bethnal Green Road on Friday 28th January 2011. It features Susie Bubble, troche cakes by Lily Vanilli, sneak peaks inside the book and lots of sketching by the illustrators who helped out on the day.

YouTube Preview Image

I asked Sally a few questions about how she put the movie together:

What where you looking for when you filmed this?
When filming I’m often looking for the quiet moments in between moments of action, whether this be an illustrator lost in concentration, the movement of a pen, the simple action of making tea or a DJ pressing play. I wanted to capture the moments which were unique to an Amelia’s Magazine book launch.

What was your favourite moment of the party?
Apart from assisting Amelia and Matt Bramford with the set up in the morning and watching 123 heave under the number of guests who turned up for the book launch, my favourite moment of the party was when Amelia and Harriet (of Tatty Devine) cut the fantastic cake made by Lily Vanilli and we had a chance to taste the prettiest cake I’ve ever seen!

Sally Mumby-Croft. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.
Sally Mumby-Croft. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

Who else have you made short videos for?
Recently I’ve been really lucky to work with the photographer and filmmaker Ben Toms, over the past three months I’ve worked on videos for JW Anderson, Edun and Craig Lawrence.



Outside of fashion film, I’ve worked with the fantastic team behind the upcoming documentary Just Do It: get off your arse and change the world and assisted on the editing of their Grow Heathrow short:

YouTube Preview Image

What else are you working on at the moment?
I’m thinking about the possibility of expanding upon Edgeland, a short documentary I made with Xavier Zapata in 2009. Edgeland consists of a series of interviews with Hackney residents who have been displaced by the Olympic development site in Stratford. Apart from that I have an idea for a new short film…

There’s a reason why I heart Sally big time. She’s incredibly talented, knowledgeable and she cares about the world around us. You can follow Sally on twitter here, and keep up with her on her Vimeo channel here.

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Ben Toms, ,Bunker Cafe, ,Craig Lawrence, ,Direct Action, ,Edgelands, ,Edun, ,goldsmiths, ,Grow Heathrow, ,hackney, ,Harriet Vine, ,Just Do It, ,JW Anderson, ,launch party, ,Lily Vanilli, ,Liz Johnson-Artur, ,Matt Bramford, ,Naomi Law, ,Olympics, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Scout Hut, ,Stratford, ,Susie Bubble, ,Tatty Devine, ,Xavier Zapata

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Amelia’s Magazine | Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration Launch Party: The Movie

Sally Mumby-Croft at the ACOFI launch with Jonno and Matt. Illustration by Naomi Law
Sally Mumby-Croft at the ACOFI launch with Jonno and Matt. Illustration by Naomi Law.

Former Amelia’s Magazine art editor Sally Mumby-Croft put together this stunning movie reminder of the launch party for ACOFI with a little help from 6 Day Riot. I hope you enjoy a tour of Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, as seen at the Bunker Cafe and Scout Hut at 123 Bethnal Green Road on Friday 28th January 2011. It features Susie Bubble, cakes by Lily Vanilli, sneak peaks inside the book and lots of sketching by the illustrators who helped out on the day.

YouTube Preview Image

I asked Sally a few questions about how she put the movie together:

What where you looking for when you filmed this?
When filming I’m often looking for the quiet moments in between moments of action, whether this be an illustrator lost in concentration, the movement of a pen, the simple action of making tea or a DJ pressing play. I wanted to capture the moments which were unique to an Amelia’s Magazine book launch.

What was your favourite moment of the party?
Apart from assisting Amelia and Matt Bramford with the set up in the morning and watching 123 heave under the number of guests who turned up for the book launch, my favourite moment of the party was when Amelia and Harriet (of Tatty Devine) cut the fantastic cake made by Lily Vanilli and we had a chance to taste the prettiest cake I’ve ever seen!

Sally Mumby-Croft. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.
Sally Mumby-Croft. Photography by Liz Johnson-Artur.

Who else have you made short videos for?
Recently I’ve been really lucky to work with the photographer and filmmaker Ben Toms, over the past three months I’ve worked on videos for JW Anderson, Edun and Craig Lawrence.

http://www.vimeo.com/20191792
http://www.vimeo.com/20191533
http://www.vimeo.com/18878998

Outside of fashion film, I’ve worked with the fantastic team behind the upcoming documentary Just Do It: get off your arse and change the world and assisted on the editing of their Grow Heathrow short:

YouTube Preview Image

What else are you working on at the moment?
I’m thinking about the possibility of expanding upon Edgeland, a short documentary I made with Xavier Zapata in 2009. Edgeland consists of a series of interviews with Hackney residents who have been displaced by the Olympic development site in Stratford. Apart from that I have an idea for a new short film…

http://www.vimeo.com/5191789

There’s a reason why I heart Sally big time. She’s incredibly talented, knowledgeable and she cares about the world around us. You can follow Sally on twitter here, and keep up with her on her Vimeo channel here.

Categories ,123 Bethnal Green Road, ,6 Day Riot, ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Ben Toms, ,Bunker Cafe, ,Craig Lawrence, ,Direct Action, ,Edgelands, ,Edun, ,goldsmiths, ,Grow Heathrow, ,hackney, ,Harriet Vine, ,Just Do It, ,JW Anderson, ,launch party, ,Lily Vanilli, ,Liz Johnson-Artur, ,Matt Bramford, ,Naomi Law, ,Olympics, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Scout Hut, ,Stratford, ,Susie Bubble, ,Tatty Devine, ,Xavier Zapata

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