Amelia’s Magazine | Mich Dulce launches her new Saints and Sinners S/S 2012 hat collection at No-One

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce S/S 2012 Saints and Sinners. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Last night I went to the launch of Mich Dulce‘s new hat collection, side effects Saints and Sinners, which was held at No-One in Shoreditch.

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce has trained long and hard in the art of millinery, with stints at Central Saint Martins, London College of Fashion and at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. She has also been apprenticed to designers Marjan Pejoski and Jessica Ogden but more recently she has branched out on her own, receiving accolades as the winner of the International Creative Fashion Entrepreneur in 2010 at LFW.

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Her beautiful creations have been worn by Anna Dello Russo and Adam Ant also sports her designs on his current tour. In fact, Adam Ant was at the launch, looking relatively normal apart from fantastic multicoloured nails and many jewelled fingers (unfortunately not visible in this photo).

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce‘s new collection features amazing curvaceous designs in spiralled, budding, winged, rosette shapes. Options are available in elegant greys and blacks or vibrant yellow and pink, some with netting or on headbands, all of which guests were encouraged to try on.

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory
Her gorgeous hats are highly desirable but that’s not all that makes Mich Dulce special: coming from the Philippines she has made it her mission to celebrate traditional Filipino crafts through her choice of materials. All the hats are handmade from T’nalck, which is woven with abaca fibre by the women of the T’Boli peoples of Lake Sebu in South Cotobato in the Philippines. The craft is an essential part of their heritage which Mich is proud to support and promote to a wider international audience. The final headpieces are also ethically made by the Gawad Kalinga Community Development Foundation, with all craftspeople personally trained by Mich.

Mich Dulce SS 2012 hat launch 2011-Saints and Sinners photo by Amelia Gregory Rob Lucas and Adam Ant
Rob Lucas and Adam Ant.

It was great to finally meet Mich since we’ve been conversing on twitter for some time. I also spent a long time chatting to a very interesting chap called Rob Lucas, who works as a antique arms and military specialist for Bonhams and in his spare time creates revolutionary inspired menswear for his Pimpernel label. Next year Rob is launching a brand new military inspired label with Adam Ant: Blueblack Hussar, and Mich Dulce will be designing the headwear. I can’t wait!

Also check out Mich Dulce’s own blog about the event… featuring myself with bike!

Categories ,2010, ,Adam Ant, ,Anna Dello Russo, ,Antique Arms and Militaria, ,Blueblack Hussar, ,Bonhams, ,Central Saint Martins, ,craft, ,ethical, ,Fashion Institute of Technology, ,Filipino, ,Gawad Kalinga Community Development Foundation, ,handmade, ,hats, ,International Creative Fashion Entrepreneur, ,Jessica Ogden, ,Lake Sebu, ,London College of Fashion, ,Marjan Pejoski, ,Mich Dulce, ,military, ,millinery, ,new york, ,No-One, ,Philippines, ,Pimpernel, ,Revolutionary, ,Rob Lucas, ,shoreditch, ,South Cotabato, ,T’Boli, ,T’nalck, ,Woven

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lazy Summer Days with Handmade Ethical Clothing from Lowie

Lowie by Emma Jardine
Lowie by Emma Jardine.

Lowie was set up by Bronwyn Lowenthal – born in the UK, site raised in Tanzania, with Jewish roots and a Welsh name. She was trained in marketing and went on to become brand manager for Ben Sherman before setting up Lowie nine years ago, which she started by importing Turkish made hats and socks to sell in Portobello Market. She quickly realised that there was a niche for brightly coloured handmade knitwear and found a supplier to produce larger quantities for her in Hong Kong.

I Love Lowie handmade ethical clothing, Kathryn Edwards
I Love Lowie handmade ethical clothing by Kathryn Edwards.

Lowie Playsuit by Alejandra Espino
Lowie Playsuit by Alejandra Espino.

Lowie Parlour Dress
The Lowie Parlour Dress.

Lowie has now expanded into ‘wovens’ – pretty cotton fabrics that feature darling floral sprig prints, all printed in a fair-trade factory in India. These are made into flirty dresses with full skirts and nipped in waists and cute little playsuits. The brand is sold in Heals, Anthropologie and ASOS to name but a few.

Lowie by Avril Kelly
Lowie by Avril Kelly.

Lowie Crochet Bow Dress by Michalis Christodoulou
Lowie Crochet Bow Dress by Michalis Christodoulou.

Lowie didn’t start life as a specifically eco brand but has gradually moved in that direction over the years. At one point Lowie was the only brand producing eco knitwear in jewel bright colours, so they have helped to lead the market away from boring ethical neutrals, opening the door for some of the much more exciting eco fashions that are around today.

Lowie by Jane Young
Lowie by Jane Young.

Lowie culotte playsuit
The Lowie Culotte Playsuit.

All wool jumpers and accessories are now made in China from wool that is produced in Australia. Although all Lowie cotton products are organic the wool is not, so they are currently looking into new types of eco yarns, for example those made from bamboo, which can feel as good or even nicer than wool.

Press Days March 2011-Lowie red bow
A close up of the bow detailing at press days.

Press Days March 2011-Lowie
A couple of the Lowie girls looking pretty in Lowie dresses. Hannah on the left manages the studio.

In the meantime Bronwyn travels overseas a few times a year to overlook factories and ensure production fits ethical fair-trade standards – all clothes are manufactured by home workers who run small domestic workshops in their living space.

Press Days March 2011-cupcakes Forward PR
A totally self indulgent photo of cupcakes at the Lowie press day. Just because they were so pretty.

You can find the new Lowie collection on their website. I absolutely adore the breezy Lowie style, especially for summer.

Categories ,Alejandra Espino, ,Anthropologie, ,ASOS, ,australia, ,Avril Kelly, ,Bamboo, ,Ben Sherman, ,China, ,cotton, ,cupcakes, ,Dresses, ,eco, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Jardine, ,ethical, ,fairtrade, ,florals, ,Forward PR, ,handmade, ,Hannah, ,Heals, ,Hong Kong, ,India, ,Jane Young, ,Kathryn Edwards, ,knitwear, ,London Kills Me, ,Lowie, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Playsuits, ,Portobello Market, ,Press days, ,print, ,Turkey, ,Welsh, ,wool

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lace – Grandma’s Curtains or Fabulous Fashion?

large_Caitlin_Rose

Illustrations by Emma Black

In a genre steeped in tradition, seek Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, information pills Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, pills her voice rings clear and true, viagra 60mg especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, “Own Side Now” has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, thumb Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, see her voice rings clear and true, viagra especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt’s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville (if you would have us!), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, viagra approved Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. I hate a lot of words, but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Illustrations by Emma Block

In a genre steeped in tradition, doctor Caitlin Rose springs forth like a breath of fresh air. Stripped down to the sweetest bare essentials, sildenafil her voice rings clear and true, especially when she sings (at times wistfully, often defiantly) about heartbreak and failed relationships. Case in point: Learning To Ride, the opening track of her new album Own Side Now paints a painfully raw snapshot of a first love; “When I was young I used to ride the wild ones, they were lots of fun but they almost took my life. Now all I need is a simple steed, to take me where I need without putting up a fight.”

But while she is a very much a modern girl; smart, opinionated and droll, she is never mocking of her beloved Country music. “I hate a lot of words” she declares in a short video bio of her; eyes shaded by Ray Bans as she stands in front of her place of work, Bobby’s Dairy Dip. She runs through the words in question…. I hate the word “Indie”, and I hate the word ‘Contemporary’…. but ‘Country’s’ a word that I actually really like”.

The popularity of her debut album, Own Side Now has meant that a few one off dates have morphed into a full European tour and she draws her summer of English festival appearances to a close with a performance at The End Of The Road Festival on September 11th. Recently we emailed Caitlin a bunch of questions, to find out a little bit more about the twenty-three year old girl who is already drawing comparisons to Patsy Cline.

What can we expect from your new album, Own Side Now? Am I right in thinking that it is going to be less acoustic than your debut EP?
It’s a full band record. There’s a pretty stripped down cut of Sinful Wishing Well though.

How did you make your first start into the Nashville music scene? Can you remember your first gig?
My first show was at a pool party and I was 16. I was too nervous to finish any of the songs.
For a time after that I opened shows for my then-boyfriend’s angry suburban punk band. We broke up and he got all the friends so I had to make new ones. Luckily I met some cool people and a few thought I was a decent songwriter. I used to play a dive called the Springwater and whatever anyone else would throw at me. I wasn’t 21 so I took what I could get.

Country music has passed so much of Britian by, it’s almost criminal. If you were to hand pick a record collection for someone who knew nothing about country music, what records would you put in?
How big? I’d suggest a Merle Haggard Greatest Hits album, some Loretta Lynn, John Prine’s first two albums. Marty Robbin’s Gunfighter Ballads. “Our Mother the Mountain” by Townes Van Zandt.
Guy Clark’s “Old No 1″. As much George Jones as possible. Gram Parsons “GP”. Any of Dolly’s old records. Some essential Patsy Cline. “Hank Williams sings Kaw-Liga and other Funny Songs” is a good one too. Some Carter Family. The Louvin Brother’s “Satan is Real” and throw in a couple of Linda Ronstadt‘s early records for appropriate country rock measure. Early Tanya Tucker is good too.
I could go on, but that’s already a lot. Country music’s all about the song. If you see a record and you think you might like it, buy it (especially if it’s cheap) and figure out your favorite song. That’s the funnest part.

Can you tell us 5 things that we don’t know about Caitlin Rose?
I sleep on cowboy sheets.

I collect talismans and other people’s I.D.’s.

I’m no good with numbers.

I’m a terrible cook.

I’ve had 5 cavities.

Your songs are already known for being pretty straight talking; are you as straight talking in your day to day life?
Not as much as I would like to be.

If Amelia’s Magazine were to come visit you in Nashville ( if you would have us! ), what would we get up to?
I’d show you the Country Music Hall of Fame, Webb Pierce’s guitar shaped swimming pool and Dino’s Bar & Grill on Gallatin Road. I’ve also been hearing a lot about amateur wrestling matches held at a hotel downtown, that sound pretty intriguing.

You have already had some pretty major accomplishments in your career; what have been some of the highlights so far for you?
Bonnaroo and the review in German Rolling Stone were both exciting.

I loved the YouTube video of you by Seth Graves; do you still work at Bobbys Dairy Dip? It would be so cool if you do, but I’m thinking that with your music career going stratospheric it’s left little time for anything else.
No, but I miss it a lot, especially the sweet potato fries.

What would you like to have achieved by the time you are 30? (professionally, and personally)?
A few really good albums, a solid band and the cover of the Rolling Stone.
Also, to be completely free of anything resembling a zit or a pimple for the rest of my life. Kids are cool too.

Am I the first person to tell you that your songs give me goose bumps? (I write this in a non-creepy way, I promise you!)
If you’re worried about sounding creepy then I’m worried about sounding arrogant by saying that you’re not the first.


Minna S/S 2010, here illustrated by Yelena Bryksenkova

Ever uttered the words “I’d love to make my own clothes” but then never actually got round to it? Well you wouldn’t be alone, ampoule myself included. I have the basic skills and desire to want to make my own clothes but find it so easy not to do when you succumb to the call of vintage and second hand shops. The impulse and excitement of rummaging makes you forget your previous desire to be your own individual stylist. But moving into the world of creator actually has massive satisfaction and many bragging benefits.  

There have been so many beautiful trends this summer to inspire us but the one that stood out the most to anyone who is thinking of making their own clothing is lace.

Lace is everywhere, on the catwalks, on the high street, and even on our net curtains! Grannies worldwide will have a stash of vintage lace table cloths and curtains prime for the picking to create beautiful one off designs (Which your friends will never be able to copy), and will please your eco-conscience. 


Illustration by Naomi Law

The high street is a great start for inspiration for design, but there are also some amazing individual finds on the internet too. Check out eco-designer Minna Hepburn; her ‘Minna Classics’ collection is a treasure trove of gorgeous lace designs, feminine and playful, and all manufactured in the UK to help support local businesses. If you’re thinking of starting small, Minna offers inspiration not only in clothing but jewellery too, her ‘Kristiina‘ necklace is entirely hand made and created using recycled fabrics including lace and decorated with buttons and beads, something we could all aspire to do. 

When your creativity has peaked and your fingers are itching with excitement for what your about make, head over to www.instructables.com. this website has pretty much anything you could hope to make on it. Blog updates allow you to fill your days by becoming a crafty expert – not only with lace, you can expand your skills to run on for seasons with the amount of ideas and tutorials.

If your still needing that shopping fix, though – as so many of us do, head down to your local second hand book shop where your most likely to find some great new and old pattern books, where you can cut out the patterns and follow the instructions in detail. 


Illustration by Faye West

Whatever you decide to make enjoy the pleasure of creating your own one off, hand made pieces of clothing. It’s time to start paying visits to your friends and families, wardrobes, cupboards, lofts, and basements, for the treasures you never knew you had. Just remember though, – wait until your grannies have finished with their lace net curtains before you start cutting holes in them and fashioning them into on-trend emsembles!  


Lace detail (and one above) by Yelena Bryksenkova

Look out for an interview with Minna soon… but for now, check out our previous chat with her here.

Categories ,Curtains, ,Do It Yourself, ,fashion, ,Faye West, ,Grannies, ,handmade, ,lace, ,make and do, ,Minna, ,Naomi Law, ,Net, ,Stephanie Ellis, ,Yelena Brykensova

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Amelia’s Magazine | Lazy Summer Days with Handmade Ethical Clothing from Lowie

Lowie by Emma Jardine
Lowie by Emma Jardine.

Lowie was set up by Bronwyn Lowenthal – born in the UK, site raised in Tanzania, with Jewish roots and a Welsh name. She was trained in marketing and went on to become brand manager for Ben Sherman before setting up Lowie nine years ago, which she started by importing Turkish made hats and socks to sell in Portobello Market. She quickly realised that there was a niche for brightly coloured handmade knitwear and found a supplier to produce larger quantities for her in Hong Kong.

I Love Lowie handmade ethical clothing, Kathryn Edwards
I Love Lowie handmade ethical clothing by Kathryn Edwards.

Lowie Playsuit by Alejandra Espino
Lowie Playsuit by Alejandra Espino.

Lowie Parlour Dress
The Lowie Parlour Dress.

Lowie has now expanded into ‘wovens’ – pretty cotton fabrics that feature darling floral sprig prints, all printed in a fair-trade factory in India. These are made into flirty dresses with full skirts and nipped in waists and cute little playsuits. The brand is sold in Heals, Anthropologie and ASOS to name but a few.

Lowie by Avril Kelly
Lowie by Avril Kelly.

Lowie Crochet Bow Dress by Michalis Christodoulou
Lowie Crochet Bow Dress by Michalis Christodoulou.

Lowie didn’t start life as a specifically eco brand but has gradually moved in that direction over the years. At one point Lowie was the only brand producing eco knitwear in jewel bright colours, so they have helped to lead the market away from boring ethical neutrals, opening the door for some of the much more exciting eco fashions that are around today.

Lowie by Jane Young
Lowie by Jane Young.

Lowie culotte playsuit
The Lowie Culotte Playsuit.

All wool jumpers and accessories are now made in China from wool that is produced in Australia. Although all Lowie cotton products are organic the wool is not, so they are currently looking into new types of eco yarns, for example those made from bamboo, which can feel as good or even nicer than wool.

Press Days March 2011-Lowie red bow
A close up of the bow detailing at press days.

Press Days March 2011-Lowie
A couple of the Lowie girls looking pretty in Lowie dresses. Hannah on the left manages the studio.

In the meantime Bronwyn travels overseas a few times a year to overlook factories and ensure production fits ethical fair-trade standards – all clothes are manufactured by home workers who run small domestic workshops in their living space.

Press Days March 2011-cupcakes Forward PR
A totally self indulgent photo of cupcakes at the Lowie press day. Just because they were so pretty.

You can find the new Lowie collection on their website. I absolutely adore the breezy Lowie style, especially for summer.

Categories ,Alejandra Espino, ,Anthropologie, ,ASOS, ,australia, ,Avril Kelly, ,Bamboo, ,Ben Sherman, ,China, ,cotton, ,cupcakes, ,Dresses, ,eco, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Jardine, ,ethical, ,fairtrade, ,florals, ,Forward PR, ,handmade, ,Hannah, ,Heals, ,Hong Kong, ,India, ,Jane Young, ,Kathryn Edwards, ,knitwear, ,London Kills Me, ,Lowie, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Playsuits, ,Portobello Market, ,Press days, ,print, ,Turkey, ,Welsh, ,wool

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with photographer Amy Gwatkin

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, cialis 40mg about it receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, see consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, tadalafil receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, troche consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, information pills receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, sales consisting of six looks, viagra dosage was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Photography preseves a moment forever – it marks and preserves time as it has been spent. It is, and to draw Barthes into the conversation, purchase a memento mori. Amy Gwatkin’s photographs (BA Editorial Photography, Brighton) blur the boundaries between fashion, editorial and fine art. Amy’s frequently updated blog documents shoots, time spent in the studio with models or other-sometimes-coffee-relative-activities, and has an incredible talent for turning personal adventures into moments representing a snapshop of a life.

An exhibition late last year – Interior Politics – and the launch of a new website introduced me to Amy’s exploration into the minuite obsqure moments that life has to offer. More recently Amy has been experimenting with film, and has kindly taken the time to answer questions for Amelia’s Magazines.

Amy! When and why did you first pick up a stills camera?

Because using the film camera involved waiting on unrealiable people! And I instantly loved it. I was supposed to do something more bookish at uni, but the minute I found a camera I was smitten. I had been obsessed with fashion since I could toddle into my grandma’s/mum’s wardrobes; suddenly I had found a way that I could make imagery without having any drawing ability!

LIGHT from Amy Gwatkin on Vimeo.

Recently you’ve been experimenting with video: debuting with a video of the Cooperative Designs S/S 2010 Collection at London Fashion Week to the recent Light submitted as part of the Shaded View of Fashion, Fashion Film Festival – What inspired the expansion from static to moving?

I always wanted to make films…. Photography offered a way of making images that wasn’t reliant on other people. I’m still a total megalomaniac though! Very often it’s literally just me and a camera.

Showstudio have been attempting to develop the moving fashion photograph since the inception of their website, I love both the static and the moving – What are your favourite fashion videos?

I loved Ruth Hogben’s spanking movie. Sunshowers by Elisha Smith-Leverock. Chris Cunningham’s Flora film for Gucci. Gwendoline by Jez Tozer. And the men’s Dior one in a corridor, was it Dior? It was on Nowness and it was lush. I find at lot of fashion films very hit or miss though – the best were the re-edited Guy Bourdin footage that was on SHOWstudio, that I could, and do, watch over and over and over….

What made you decide to set up your blog? What do you think the advantages are of a blog vs a website?

Originally it was to give me some online presence as my old website was out of date and my new one was being built…then I just really got into it. I like that the blog can have more laidback images, where I have less of a professional front to put up. But I love how clean and tidy the site is.

Collage for the Cooperative Design Zine produced as part of London Fashion Week February 2010

You appear to be quite involved with the internet from your great twitter feed to your blog – what advantages do you think the system of blogs and twitter has created for photographers and fellow creatives?

Well, I guess it opens up little internet wormholes you wouldn’t have known about before…although I can follow a link and find myself, 2 hours later, marvelling at how many photographers there are doing the same sort of thing.

It’s a good platform for self promotion, though it does blur the line between business and pleasure a little uncomfortably at times

Do you streetcast your models?

I often see people on the street that I’m too nervous to ask! But sometimes I overcome my nerves long enough to street cast. I think I have a few characteristics I like, though its hard to nail them in words. A certain bad-temperedness maybe.

Your photograph reflects both fine art and fashion photographic interests – could you tell Amelia’s readers more about the photographs recently exhibited? (I’m thinking of the Familiarity breeds contempt and Modern Miniture series)

Familiarity Breeds Contempt is an extension of my long term project tentatively titled The Housewife – it’s hopefully the start of a longer project exploring sexuality, fantasy and what goes on behind closed doors. Which is also what Modern Miniatures was about in a way – only without the overt sexuality. I have a interest in the domestic, with other people’s domestic/private space, putting myself in them, and also, if I’m honest, with the risk involved in contacting strange men on the internet, asking them to get naked, and them taking pictures of me standing on them etc…

With fashion how do you make the decision between colour or black and white? Does it Matter?

I’m always trying to make things b/w, without sounding mental/pretentious/partially sighted, I see better in b/w. sometimes there’s someone else’s prerogative to take into account, like a client etc. black and white can sometimes make things instantly nostalgic and a bit too soft or romantic. Depends on the situation, but there are few where b/w doesn’t rock in my opinion!

Photograph for Corrie Williamson

Favourite photographers/people to work with/Set designers/fashion designers?

I rarely DON’T have a wicked time on shoots.

Sets – Alex Cunningham, David White’s sets for Coop a/w10/11 were mint
Designers – Cooperative Designs, Scott Ramsay Kyle, Corrie Williamson, Fred Butler, Atalanta Weller
Photograhers I admire – Wee Gee, Helmut Newton, Collier Schorr, Les Krims, Duane Michals, David Armstrong among MANY others!

What is it like being a london based photographer?

Fun! Busy. Forces you to work a lot to make ends meet, which can wear you down. Over saturated. Very youth orientated

What accompanies you in the studio?

My crappy selection of music! I always download the weirdest selection of stuff. Some proper howlers on there, but sometimes you have to listen to the Outhere Brothers. Also the lovely Anna Leader and Bella Fenning with whom I share my space.

What do you hope your photographs convey?

Tough…. I find it quite hard to look back, to edit etc, but having to do my website forced me to do that, and there is a certain strength in the characters I hope. I know some of the shots are quite moody, or gentle, but I don’t like it when models look too winsome or fashion-fierce or posed. Hopefully somewhere between the two, though I do seem to shout things like ‘you’re at a bus stop!’ or ‘You’re a sexy eel!’

How do your shoots come together?

Mostly ideas from films, dreams, or pacing the streets of London which is my fave thing to do. Or maybe a drunken overenthusiastic chat with friends

What are your plans for the future?

Hmm….more pics. More films, maybe a move to proper films with dialogue and a plot!

Categories ,A Shaded View of Fashion, ,Alex Cunningham, ,Amy Gwatkin, ,Anna Leader, ,Atalanta Weller, ,Bella Fenning, ,Blogging, ,Collier Schorr, ,Cooperative Designs, ,Corrie Williamson, ,David Armstrong, ,David White, ,Duane Michals, ,Fred Butler, ,Helmut Newton, ,Les Krims, ,London Fashion Week, ,Scott Ramsay Kyle, ,Showstudio, ,Spagerdisco, ,twitter, ,Wee Gee

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Amelia’s Magazine | Potato stamping

Thumbnail potato print Dan Williams
Potato print Andi Farr
Illustration by Andi Farr

After a summer hiatus, visit web and now that Summer has firmly shut the door in our faces, the craft column is back, and what better way to celebrate its return than with a retrolicious project that both kids and adults will love?

Potato stamping is something that many of us experienced at school, complete with plastic apron and poster paints. But it’s also brilliant (and quite addictive) post puberty too.

You’ll need

Large potatoes
A sharp knife
Stuff to stamp onto
Paint – for paper and fabric if you would so desire
Newspaper


Illustration by Daniel Williams

More and more people are choosing to shop online, but packages bought online come with a sometimes ridiculous amount of packaging; padded envelopes, tissue paper, plastic and bubble wrap. Finding ways to reuse this packaging rather than throwing it away cuts down on waste, and saves you a bit of dosh too. If you’ve bought anything online recently, or purchased shoes or anything from a posh-ish shop, it is more than likely that your package came with an abundance of tissue paper. It can be customised using potato stamping, turning it into rather splendid wrapping paper.

To begin, etch the outline of your shape onto the potato using a ballpoint pen.

Then, using a small sharp knife, gently cut down directly around your design. Then cut in from the outside, revealing a relief of your design. WATCH YOUR FINGERS! Apparently,according to the below image, I nearly sliced my thumb off (oops) so be careful!

Set up a couple of trays of paint and some newspaper or a wipeable mat as the paint will leak through the tissue paper. A bowl of water to wash the potato between colours would also be useful (or you’ll end up with brown coloured tissue paper- not a pleasant combination) I found you got a better print if you painted the paint onto the stamp directly.

You can be as elaborate or as simple as you want. I tried both an anchor motif and a triangle. Then go crazy with those potato’s.



If you have a potato on the turn this would be a very good use for it.

Apart from wrapping paper, you could also stamp old envelopes and re use them, or create original home made cards. If you use fabric paint instead of poster paint you could print t- shirts, cushion covers, canvas bags….the list goes on.

Happy stamping campers!

If you come up with something stamptastic (sorry), link below so we can have a nosey.

Categories ,craft, ,earth, ,handmade, ,Potato Stamp, ,Wrapping paper

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Amelia’s Magazine | Potato stamping

Thumbnail potato print Dan Williams
Potato print Andi Farr
Illustration by Andi Farr

After a summer hiatus, visit web and now that Summer has firmly shut the door in our faces, the craft column is back, and what better way to celebrate its return than with a retrolicious project that both kids and adults will love?

Potato stamping is something that many of us experienced at school, complete with plastic apron and poster paints. But it’s also brilliant (and quite addictive) post puberty too.

You’ll need

Large potatoes
A sharp knife
Stuff to stamp onto
Paint – for paper and fabric if you would so desire
Newspaper


Illustration by Daniel Williams

More and more people are choosing to shop online, but packages bought online come with a sometimes ridiculous amount of packaging; padded envelopes, tissue paper, plastic and bubble wrap. Finding ways to reuse this packaging rather than throwing it away cuts down on waste, and saves you a bit of dosh too. If you’ve bought anything online recently, or purchased shoes or anything from a posh-ish shop, it is more than likely that your package came with an abundance of tissue paper. It can be customised using potato stamping, turning it into rather splendid wrapping paper.

To begin, etch the outline of your shape onto the potato using a ballpoint pen.

Then, using a small sharp knife, gently cut down directly around your design. Then cut in from the outside, revealing a relief of your design. WATCH YOUR FINGERS! Apparently,according to the below image, I nearly sliced my thumb off (oops) so be careful!

Set up a couple of trays of paint and some newspaper or a wipeable mat as the paint will leak through the tissue paper. A bowl of water to wash the potato between colours would also be useful (or you’ll end up with brown coloured tissue paper- not a pleasant combination) I found you got a better print if you painted the paint onto the stamp directly.

You can be as elaborate or as simple as you want. I tried both an anchor motif and a triangle. Then go crazy with those potato’s.



If you have a potato on the turn this would be a very good use for it.

Apart from wrapping paper, you could also stamp old envelopes and re use them, or create original home made cards. If you use fabric paint instead of poster paint you could print t- shirts, cushion covers, canvas bags….the list goes on.

Happy stamping campers!

If you come up with something stamptastic (sorry), link below so we can have a nosey.

Categories ,craft, ,earth, ,handmade, ,Potato Stamp, ,Wrapping paper

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentines Day 2013: Jewellery, Handmade Gifts & Discounts on Chocolates

I’ve given you some great ideas for unique handmade Valentines cards, and now I bring you a round up of beautiful and unusual gifts, including, of course, some delightful jewels.

dowse design anatomy brass pendant
Dowse Design don’t pander to the usual romantic image of Valentines, instead they have crafted an unusual gesture of love that is bound to turn heads: the Anatomy etched pendant comes in steel or brass and is made in England.

With Love Silver Necklace_Nicola Crawford_RRP £135
Jewellery designer Nicola Crawford has based her designs on the lost art of letter writing in a collection entitled With Love. These tumbling letters may well spell out your own feelings.

Georgia Wiseman Sirus Limited Edition pendant
For something more jewel encrusted, Georgia Wiseman has some glamourous earrings. I love the art deco influenced Capella design, but she has also created a special limited edition pendant for Valentines; Sirus, which looks like a modern day flint, is made with a smokey Swarovski crystal set in rose gold. She’s offering free P&P up until February 14th too.

EOTW designs Hand made Solid SIlver Earrings
We profiled Eye of The World Designs back in 2011, and since then designer Hope Von Joel has been busy building the brand, which bridges interior design and jewellery. I love these bold laminated wood and perspex earrings.

Made & Told heart ikat cushion
Moving on to other gift ideas, Made & Told are offering hand woven Ikat cushion covers with a heart pattern. They are handmade in Uzbekistan and come gift wrapped for £30 (including P&P) using the code SAINTVALENTINE. The company promotes traditional crafts from central Asia and you can watch a film about the making of the cushion on their website.

Nichollette Yardley-Moore vintage silk scarf Rose cushion
Designer Nichollette Yardley-Moore collects vintage fabrics, scarves and original flags which she then transforms into beautiful one-of-a-kind cushions. I like her romantic floral cushions, which are made up with vintage silk scarves from the 1960s

MrPS happy hearts Hankies
These pretty hankies by illustrator Robert Shadbolt are covered in smiling hearts. They are screen-printed by hand in the Mr.PS studio and come in double-packs of candy pink & sky blue, and plum & turquoise.

Chloe Cook painted teapot
If you find an overload of hearts a bit saccharine, how about this starry hand painted teapot by Chloe Cook?

M.Hulot Strapped howe red bag
Or how about a beautiful rich red hand made leather Howe clutch from M.Hulot?

London Kills Me Reclaimed slate Heart
Slate hearts from London Kills Me are hand cut from reclaimed roof slate, much of it from the nineteenth century, meaning that each one has a slightly different patina. They can be written on in chalk pen: making them an ideal alternative to a paper card.

sabina savage hummingbird scarf
This wool and silk mix scarf by Sabina Sauvage features four bold hummingbirds and comes with a lovely blood red border.

Charlotte Linton Cove_paisley scarf
There’s something a bit, I don’t know, meaty, about this unusual bright red Cove Paisley scarf by designer Charlotte Linton. It would make an unusual gift, the swirls reminiscent of hearts and body parts.

David Shillinglaw Double Heart painted bottle
Artist David Shillinglaw offers beautiful hand painted bottles, which come with a short personal message: perfect for a beer lover perhaps?

YouTube Preview Image
And: for something a bit different, how about a personalised serenade over the phone from consummate karaoke professionals Hot Breath (above). ‘Intimate, passionate and 100% from the heart. All sung by a professional amateur to the best of their ability.’

To find exclusive handmade designs, go no further than the Love.Make Designs pop up shop at Craft Central’s Corner Shop in Farringdon, London from the 11-17th of February.

Luxury-Valentine-Gifts-My Voucher Codes Chocolates Hotel Chocolat
And don’t forget, chocolates will always go down a treat, so why not take advantage of some great discounts at My Voucher Codes? Get 10% off any purchase from Hotel Chocolat: how about their Sealed With a Kiss selection, which comes in a pretty heart shaped box?

Thorntons Be My Valentine chocolate selection my voucher codes
Or you could really make an impression with this Be My Valentine chocolates selection from Thorntons, with a bespoke message hand iced onto a chocolate tag. Take advantage of My Voucher Codes and get a free box of chocolates when you spend £20 with Thorntons, plus free delivery on orders of £25 or more.

To round off the blog, here’s a clever infographic describing spending patterns on Valentines Day, brought to you by the folks at My Voucher Codes.

Valentines Day spending patterns infographic
Fancy being featured in one of my regular round ups? Make sure you follow me on twitter @ameliagregory: most of these designers responded to open callouts for Valentines ideas.

Categories ,2013, ,anatomy, ,Be My Valentine, ,bespoke, ,Capella, ,Charlotte Linton, ,Chloe Cook, ,chocolate, ,Cove Paisley, ,Craft Central, ,cushions, ,David Shillinglaw, ,discounts, ,Dowse Design, ,Eye of The World Designs, ,Georgia Wiseman, ,gifts, ,handmade, ,Hope Von Joel, ,Hot Breath, ,Hotel Chocolat, ,Howe clutch, ,Infographic, ,jewellery, ,Karaoke, ,London Kills Me, ,Love.Make Designs, ,M.Hulot, ,Made & Told, ,Mr PS, ,My Voucher Codes, ,Nichollette Yardley-Moore, ,Nicola Crawford, ,Robert Shadbolt, ,Sabina Sauvage, ,Sealed With a Kiss, ,Sirus, ,Swarovski, ,The Corner Shop, ,Thorntons, ,Uzbekistan, ,Valentine’s Day, ,Valentines, ,Vouchers, ,With Love

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentines Day 2013: Jewellery, Handmade Gifts & Discounts on Chocolates

I’ve given you some great ideas for unique handmade Valentines cards, and now I bring you a round up of beautiful and unusual gifts, including, of course, some delightful jewels.

dowse design anatomy brass pendant
Dowse Design don’t pander to the usual romantic image of Valentines, instead they have crafted an unusual gesture of love that is bound to turn heads: the Anatomy etched pendant comes in steel or brass and is made in England.

With Love Silver Necklace_Nicola Crawford_RRP £135
Jewellery designer Nicola Crawford has based her designs on the lost art of letter writing in a collection entitled With Love. These tumbling letters may well spell out your own feelings.

Georgia Wiseman Sirus Limited Edition pendant
For something more jewel encrusted, Georgia Wiseman has some glamourous earrings. I love the art deco influenced Capella design, but she has also created a special limited edition pendant for Valentines; Sirus, which looks like a modern day flint, is made with a smokey Swarovski crystal set in rose gold. She’s offering free P&P up until February 14th too.

EOTW designs Hand made Solid SIlver Earrings
We profiled Eye of The World Designs back in 2011, and since then designer Hope Von Joel has been busy building the brand, which bridges interior design and jewellery. I love these bold laminated wood and perspex earrings.

Made & Told heart ikat cushion
Moving on to other gift ideas, Made & Told are offering hand woven Ikat cushion covers with a heart pattern. They are handmade in Uzbekistan and come gift wrapped for £30 (including P&P) using the code SAINTVALENTINE. The company promotes traditional crafts from central Asia and you can watch a film about the making of the cushion on their website.

Nichollette Yardley-Moore vintage silk scarf Rose cushion
Designer Nichollette Yardley-Moore collects vintage fabrics, scarves and original flags which she then transforms into beautiful one-of-a-kind cushions. I like her romantic floral cushions, which are made up with vintage silk scarves from the 1960s

MrPS happy hearts Hankies
These pretty hankies by illustrator Robert Shadbolt are covered in smiling hearts. They are screen-printed by hand in the Mr.PS studio and come in double-packs of candy pink & sky blue, and plum & turquoise.

Chloe Cook painted teapot
If you find an overload of hearts a bit saccharine, how about this starry hand painted teapot by Chloe Cook?

M.Hulot Strapped howe red bag
Or how about a beautiful rich red hand made leather Howe clutch from M.Hulot?

London Kills Me Reclaimed slate Heart
Slate hearts from London Kills Me are hand cut from reclaimed roof slate, much of it from the nineteenth century, meaning that each one has a slightly different patina. They can be written on in chalk pen: making them an ideal alternative to a paper card.

sabina savage hummingbird scarf
This wool and silk mix scarf by Sabina Sauvage features four bold hummingbirds and comes with a lovely blood red border.

Charlotte Linton Cove_paisley scarf
There’s something a bit, I don’t know, meaty, about this unusual bright red Cove Paisley scarf by designer Charlotte Linton. It would make an unusual gift, the swirls reminiscent of hearts and body parts.

David Shillinglaw Double Heart painted bottle
Artist David Shillinglaw offers beautiful hand painted bottles, which come with a short personal message: perfect for a beer lover perhaps?

YouTube Preview Image
And: for something a bit different, how about a personalised serenade over the phone from consummate karaoke professionals Hot Breath (above). ‘Intimate, passionate and 100% from the heart. All sung by a professional amateur to the best of their ability.’

To find exclusive handmade designs, go no further than the Love.Make Designs pop up shop at Craft Central’s Corner Shop in Farringdon, London from the 11-17th of February.

Luxury-Valentine-Gifts-My Voucher Codes Chocolates Hotel Chocolat
And don’t forget, chocolates will always go down a treat, so why not take advantage of some great discounts at My Voucher Codes? Get 10% off any purchase from Hotel Chocolat: how about their Sealed With a Kiss selection, which comes in a pretty heart shaped box?

Thorntons Be My Valentine chocolate selection my voucher codes
Or you could really make an impression with this Be My Valentine chocolates selection from Thorntons, with a bespoke message hand iced onto a chocolate tag. Take advantage of My Voucher Codes and get a free box of chocolates when you spend £20 with Thorntons, plus free delivery on orders of £25 or more.

To round off the blog, here’s a clever infographic describing spending patterns on Valentines Day, brought to you by the folks at My Voucher Codes.

Valentines Day spending patterns infographic
Fancy being featured in one of my regular round ups? Make sure you follow me on twitter @ameliagregory: most of these designers responded to open callouts for Valentines ideas.

Categories ,2013, ,anatomy, ,Be My Valentine, ,bespoke, ,Capella, ,Charlotte Linton, ,Chloe Cook, ,chocolate, ,Cove Paisley, ,Craft Central, ,cushions, ,David Shillinglaw, ,discounts, ,Dowse Design, ,Eye of The World Designs, ,Georgia Wiseman, ,gifts, ,handmade, ,Hope Von Joel, ,Hot Breath, ,Hotel Chocolat, ,Howe clutch, ,Infographic, ,jewellery, ,Karaoke, ,London Kills Me, ,Love.Make Designs, ,M.Hulot, ,Made & Told, ,Mr PS, ,My Voucher Codes, ,Nichollette Yardley-Moore, ,Nicola Crawford, ,Robert Shadbolt, ,Sabina Sauvage, ,Sealed With a Kiss, ,Sirus, ,Swarovski, ,The Corner Shop, ,Thorntons, ,Uzbekistan, ,Valentine’s Day, ,Valentines, ,Vouchers, ,With Love

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Amelia’s Magazine | Valentine’s Day- Pas Pour Moi?

Abe-penny1Illustration courtesy of Mari Mitsumi

Valentine’s Day is soon to creep upon us and discharge its usual bile inducing or saccharine coated brand of bland commercial overload. What is a uniquely dedicated love-fest can make or break couples… How revealing the choice of a particular date night or specific card can be! Who said Lovers’ Day had to be like everyone else’s? The following suggestions of places to take her or presents to give him are for those who enjoy a good dose of self-parody or do care to treat their special loved one to a rare gift as cute as those lovely dimples!

CrochetdermyPhotograph courtesy of Shauna Richardson.

Spine-chillingly Cuddly Valentine:

In Shauna Richardson’s Crochetdermy, doctor the Endangered craft of crochet fashions life sized endangered species. Knitting has never looked so eerily attractive! For more information, no rx contact the artist here.

TypePhotograph courtesy of Handmadebymachine

Unleash the Geek in You!:

He or she is a type lover? The Just My Type gift set is a series of postcards that will delight the typography nut in your life. Get them at Handmade By Machine

Abe-pennyIllustration courtesy of Mari Mitsumi

Lovelorn Ones Need not Be Alone!

Resist the Vitamin Love deficiency blues with Abe’s Penny: the one and only postcard magazine. Why pay for martinis at the bar to drown your sorry ass when you can shake or stir at home for (at least $2) less? And send them postcards to all those trusted friends who stuck by you through thick and thin? Subscribe here.

VIM Vancouver Island Marmot print courtesy of Molly Schaffer and Jenny Kendler

And a Big Hug for the Furry Ones:

Warm the heart of your animal lover companion! Molly Schaffer and Jenny Kendler’s latest illustration project plans to raise awareness and funds for critically endangered species. 100% of the proceeds of The Endangered Species Print Project (ESPP)’s limited-edition art prints support the species they depict. Prints are limited to the species’ remaining population count. For example only 37 Seychelles Sheath-tailed bats remain in the wild, recipe so for this edition only 37 prints will ever be made. These two artists desire to operate outside this white-wall system and use their artistic talents to directly support conservation efforts and biodiversity on Planet Earth. They aimed to craft a project that would use drawing (the thing they were best at and most enjoyed doing) to positively impact the natural world (the thing they cared most about and most enjoyed experiencing).

Blockz-bday

Photograph courtesy of Incredible Things

Bilmey! Your Birthday is the 14th!

Well, those Lego Blockz birthday candles are unlike any other and fun! Get them at Incredible Things.

TeresaGreenImage courtesy of  Oriel Myrddin Gallery

Reap and Sew my Heart Stronger:

Twelve makers from a range of craft disciplines have been invited to participate in ‘Reap & Sew’, an exhibition to open on the 27th of February. All use nature as an inspiration for their creative output. In the mid-time, a selection of beautiful craft and design objects influenced by gardens and growth are available to purchase now at the shop. And don’t forget, you and your Nature Lover are invited to join the folks at Oriel Myrddin Gallery for A Garden Party – plants, cakes, beekeeping and bunting…

Saturday 20th March 2-4pmOriel Myrddin Gallery, Church Lane, Carmarthen SA31 1LH/ Lôn Llan, Caerfyrddin SA31 1LH

Stylish-Eve Photograph courtesy of Stylisheve

Love me Tender:

Stylish Eve is an online craft website with wonderful tutorials. Her current selection of Handmade Romantic gift ideas is perfectly suited to those wanting to transform simple and cheap ideas into matchless treats for Valentine! Learn here how to make soap yummy!

Wrong-LovePhotograph courtesy of Wrong Love

Torture me Tender:

WRONG LOVE is a naughty orgy of performances, site-specific installation, video and live music set within A Foundation, Liverpool galleries. Featuring 40 artists who will seduce a Valentine’s night crowd with explorations of romance, sexuality, and unconventional love. WRONG LOVE is the first happening produced by the new live arts event collective LAND and aims to showcase thought-provoking works from local, national and international artists. The night will include a bespoke hour filled with ‘wrong’ love poetry and short story readings from BRICKFACE press, a team of young, independent writers and self-publishers as well as performances and installations by Samantha Sweeting, Kimbal Bumstead, Shelly Nadashi, Baptiste Croze, Unit 4, Fools Proof Theatre and many more.

For a full listing of the artists involved visit the WRONG LOVE website. Tickets £10/ £6 concession on sale here. ?Saturday 13 February 2010 ?9pm-3am

Flowers2 FlowersPhotograph courtesy of Mossonline

Flowers are Nasty:

…When they are polluted with insecticides and other repellent things! You should know already because you’ve read the Earth article today! Well, these ones are handmade and good for your heart. Nymphenburg Treasure Box of 7 unique handmade and hand painted flowers by designer Franz Joseph Ess available here

School-of-LifeIllustrations courtesy of The School of Life

Learn to love life:

At the The School of Life Love Week End , be guided through love’s joys and pitfalls. You will explore some essential questions: How can lovers have better conversations? How important is sex? How can love be made to last? What can science usefully tell us about love? You’ll draw on ideas from philosophy, psychoanalysis, literature and art and discover what Plato, Shakespeare, Freud and others had to say about compassion, empathy and self. How institutions of love, such as courtship and marriage, have changed over the centuries and where that legacy leaves us now?

For further details and to book your place on the Love Weekend please click here.

Price: £125.00

Rob-RyanIllustration courtesy of Rob Ryan

I think you are Lovely:

Loveliness has never been so artily crafted! Get Rob Ryan’ s hand printed silk screens and say it with a “Leaf Kiss”.

Categories ,A Foundation, ,Abe’s Penny, ,art, ,Biodiversity, ,conservation, ,craft, ,design, ,ecology, ,events, ,Franz Joseph Ess, ,Hand Painted, ,handmade, ,illustration, ,knitting, ,Lego Blockz birthday candles, ,Liverpool galleries, ,magazine, ,Mari Mitsumi, ,Molly Schaffer and Jenny Kendler, ,Oriel Myrddin Gallery, ,Postcard Art, ,print, ,rob ryan, ,screen-printing, ,Stylisheve, ,Taxidermy, ,The Endangered Species Print Project, ,The School of Life, ,tutorials, ,Valentine’s Day, ,Wrong Love

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