Amelia’s Magazine | Ekaterina Kukhareva: London Fashion Week S/S 2013 Catwalk Review

Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 by Shy Illustrations
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 by Sheilagh Tighe aka Shy Illustrations.

Ukranian born Ekaterina Kukhareva is a Central Saint Martins knitwear graduate, about whom I knew nothing before this show, staged on Sunday at Freemasons’ Hall. Her psychedelic take on St Tropez high style was inspired by Brigitte Bardot, with geometric patterns gleaned from Egyptian hieroglyphs and applied to complex woven jacquards and intarsias in a range of light weight resortwear.

Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
The designs took on a retro 60s feel in sugary shades of pink and lilac teamed with a lovely denim indigo blue. Acidic purple and orange made for a particularly eye catching combination when used for a trouser set, worn with swinging beaded earrings and contrasting blue and orange platform sandals. Somehow the briefcase that the model swung at her side seemed out of place: I can’t imagine many people wearing this to the office. Even more stunning was the knitted maxi dress that featured a huge intarsia pattern: a bright fuchsia cross across the bodice and a bold zig zag design down the centre of the skirt. The American stars and stripes appeared to have influenced the pattern on a cutout pink white and blue swimsuit and the matching beach cardigan that it was worn with. It’s not often that you see an entire range of outfits created from scratch using home spun fabrics: there were some stunning designs to be found within this aspirational collection.

Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 by Shy Illustrations
Ekaterina Kukhareva by S/S 2013 by Sheilagh Tighe aka Shy Illustrations.

Categories ,Brigitte Bardot, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Ekaterina Kukhareva, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Goddess in St. Tropez, ,Intarsia, ,Jacquard, ,knitwear, ,lfw, ,S/S 2013, ,Sheilagh Tighe, ,Shy Illustrations, ,Ukranian

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with photographer Amy Gwatkin

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, cialis 40mg about it receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, see consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, tadalafil receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, troche consisting of six looks, was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Knitwear design student Phoebe Thirlwall was an unquestionable highlight of Graduate Fashion Week 2010. Her work demonstrated an impressive level of craftsmanship, information pills receiving recognition even before the shows when one of her dresses was photographed by Rankin. Phoebe’s final collection, sales consisting of six looks, viagra dosage was a feast of beautiful and intricate knitwear. I caught up with Phoebe to learn a little more about the work that went into her final collection, and after the chaos of that week, what she plans to do next!

Graduate Fashion Week is a fantastic opportunity for students. How did it feel to have your work selected for the show?
It was really exciting because I had never expected to be selected, and when I found out I was obviously over the moon. It made such a difference to see my work on a raised catwalk, it felt so professional, and although I was really nervous when it went out, it was a great feeling to see it up there and being photographed. It is an amazing opportunity for students and it is a shame that everyone doesn’t get to go.

Why did you choose to study Knitwear Design over a general Fashion degree?
The Knitwear course at Nottingham Trent University involves a sandwich year in industry, which was one of the reasons I chose to study the course. Employers always want experience, so I felt that a year in the industry would be attractive to potential employers. I never particularly preferred knitwear over wovens, but when you are designing knitwear you have so much more freedom to create exactly what you want. If you are making an outfit from woven fabrics, although you can print on them etc, you are still limited by the fabric itself. When you knit an outfit, you can control the whole thing. You can knit the fabric however you want it and create different textures and patterns. Also, I like knitwear because you can knit the pieces of fabric to size. You can approach the whole outfit in a different way.

Where did you complete your work experience and how valuable was it to you?
My year in industry was spent in a family run knitwear factory called GH Hurt and Sons in Chilwel, Nottingham. It is a fairly small factory where lace knit is designed, made and constructed into various pieces. They create baby shawls and christening blankets sold in high end department stores and items of clothing for a number of luxury catalogue retailers. We also produced a lot of items for retailers overseas, such as the USA and Hong Kong. I was able to learn about the first steps of the process – receiving yarns on cones and in big hanks, to designing and knitting the pieces and finally how each item is made and finished to a high standard. It was also nice to see the items for sale and being worn because I always thought -’I made that!’ – which is a great feeling.

Can you explain a little about the techniques that you used? Did you have a lot to learn in terms of advanced skills?
The outfits I made are knitted mostly in silk and bamboo, with an elastic yarn that I used to create the patterns. I developed the technique by experimenting on a knitting machine to see what types of fabric I could create. I knew that I wanted to use elastic because it developed from my concept of skin, and also that I wanted to work with luxury fibres such as silk. I used a combination of rippled stitches, stripes and transferred needles on the front of the bed of the knitting machine to create the fabrics that I made my collection from. These are all techniques that I had learned in previous years, but putting them together required a lot of experimentation, and luck.

Was there much change in your work from the conception of the idea to the work we saw on the catwalk?
Yes. I had worked on the project since Christmas, so there was a lot of time for ideas and concepts to change. Initially, I had no idea what my collection was going to look like and I still didn’t until a few weeks before the show. I had no idea what type of fabric I would use, or what techniques. It wasn’t until I developed a fabric that I was happy with that the collection began to come together. At the beginning, I was thinking about the concept of shedding skin, more than the skin itself. This gradually changed throughout my research and development, into a more specialised study of the skin. I know that if I had stuck with my original thoughts, then the collection would look a lot different. It would probably be a bit more structured, rather than the more subtle and slim-line way it is turned out.

Which of the other graduate collections were you impressed by?
There were so many great collections. It’s good to see other peoples work because it is all brilliant. I loved all of the collections from Nottingham (slightly biased obviously), but there were many other Universities that I liked aswell. I was backstage when the De Montford show was going on, and some of those were amazing!

Nottingham has made a bit of a name for itself as a hub of creativity. What it has it been like for you?
I like Nottingham because it is a small city. It’s more like a town and everything’s quite compact. There are a lot of creative people who come to study here, but everywhere is quite laid back, which I like. It’s not over crowded with arty types. There are lots of students with different interests, and there are good places to go to eat, drink or shop. I suppose it has got a bit of a name for itself, but it’s a fairly down to earth city to live in. I’ve lived just outside the city centre for 2 years, and I’m going to be sad to leave.

You described your collection as ‘based on skin and flesh on the human body’. Where did this inspiration come from, and what else inspires you?
The inspiration for my collection came originally from a general interest in the skin and flesh. I think that this comes from being a vegetarian since I was 11. I have a strange relationship with food. I like things that are untouched. I won’t eat meat. I took this fascination with meat and flesh and developed it into a concept which I could look into for my collection. I get inspired by anything and everything really, usually something small and ordinary because you can look at it in more detail. I think that even something small and boring to others can become inspiring if you look at it enough.

New designers such as Mark Fast have shown us some other unique techniques with knitwear. Have you thought about how you could further your own skills?
It’s strange to think that a technique can be what ‘makes’ a designer. To me, Mark Fast developed this brilliant technique and ran with it. That’s great because I had never thought about design from that angle before. I always thought you had to constantly create different pieces all the time. Designers like Mark Fast are inspirational because they open your eyes to the possibilities of what can be done on a knitting machine. Missoni also creates such beautiful and unique knitwear. In a way, I would like develop my technique further, but I also would like to focus on new tasks and new direction.


Phoebe Thirwall, photographed by Rankin

One of your dresses was photographed by Rankin. How did it feel to learn that your dress was selected?
Amazing. It was sent down to London, but I never expected it to be photographed. Apparently the university sends items down every year and they rarely get selected to be photographed. When I found out that it had been chosen to be photographed I was really happy, by Rankin especially! The fact that Kate Shillingford from Dazed and Confused actually chose the pieces is overwhelming. It was about 2 months later that the pictures were released. Seeing my work on the Vogue website was mental!

You also received praise from the fashion bloggers. How have you found the attention?
It’s been completely surreal having people like Susie Bubble write about my work. She said it was one of her favourites from the photos, and so did Lucy Wood. I used to read about fashion graduates and imagined they had such exciting lives, but I’m just in my room with my cat and not really doing anything. It’s really strange seeing photos and articles about my work. I feel now like it isn’t even mine and I’m looking at someone else’s. It doesn’t seem real.

It has been two weeks since the show. What’s the plan now?
Is that all? It feels like a lot longer ago than 2 weeks. My collection is being sent over to Shanghai in September for Spin Expo, and a few of the outfits are being used in a photo shoot in July. My plans now involve finding a job, going to interviews and hopefully being hired. I want to move down to London to be nearer to my boyfriend. Ideally, I want to see clothes that I have designed, being made. I also really want a long holiday, somewhere nice and hot, where I don’t have to think about knitting!

Photography preseves a moment forever – it marks and preserves time as it has been spent. It is, and to draw Barthes into the conversation, purchase a memento mori. Amy Gwatkin’s photographs (BA Editorial Photography, Brighton) blur the boundaries between fashion, editorial and fine art. Amy’s frequently updated blog documents shoots, time spent in the studio with models or other-sometimes-coffee-relative-activities, and has an incredible talent for turning personal adventures into moments representing a snapshop of a life.

An exhibition late last year – Interior Politics – and the launch of a new website introduced me to Amy’s exploration into the minuite obsqure moments that life has to offer. More recently Amy has been experimenting with film, and has kindly taken the time to answer questions for Amelia’s Magazines.

Amy! When and why did you first pick up a stills camera?

Because using the film camera involved waiting on unrealiable people! And I instantly loved it. I was supposed to do something more bookish at uni, but the minute I found a camera I was smitten. I had been obsessed with fashion since I could toddle into my grandma’s/mum’s wardrobes; suddenly I had found a way that I could make imagery without having any drawing ability!

LIGHT from Amy Gwatkin on Vimeo.

Recently you’ve been experimenting with video: debuting with a video of the Cooperative Designs S/S 2010 Collection at London Fashion Week to the recent Light submitted as part of the Shaded View of Fashion, Fashion Film Festival – What inspired the expansion from static to moving?

I always wanted to make films…. Photography offered a way of making images that wasn’t reliant on other people. I’m still a total megalomaniac though! Very often it’s literally just me and a camera.

Showstudio have been attempting to develop the moving fashion photograph since the inception of their website, I love both the static and the moving – What are your favourite fashion videos?

I loved Ruth Hogben’s spanking movie. Sunshowers by Elisha Smith-Leverock. Chris Cunningham’s Flora film for Gucci. Gwendoline by Jez Tozer. And the men’s Dior one in a corridor, was it Dior? It was on Nowness and it was lush. I find at lot of fashion films very hit or miss though – the best were the re-edited Guy Bourdin footage that was on SHOWstudio, that I could, and do, watch over and over and over….

What made you decide to set up your blog? What do you think the advantages are of a blog vs a website?

Originally it was to give me some online presence as my old website was out of date and my new one was being built…then I just really got into it. I like that the blog can have more laidback images, where I have less of a professional front to put up. But I love how clean and tidy the site is.

Collage for the Cooperative Design Zine produced as part of London Fashion Week February 2010

You appear to be quite involved with the internet from your great twitter feed to your blog – what advantages do you think the system of blogs and twitter has created for photographers and fellow creatives?

Well, I guess it opens up little internet wormholes you wouldn’t have known about before…although I can follow a link and find myself, 2 hours later, marvelling at how many photographers there are doing the same sort of thing.

It’s a good platform for self promotion, though it does blur the line between business and pleasure a little uncomfortably at times

Do you streetcast your models?

I often see people on the street that I’m too nervous to ask! But sometimes I overcome my nerves long enough to street cast. I think I have a few characteristics I like, though its hard to nail them in words. A certain bad-temperedness maybe.

Your photograph reflects both fine art and fashion photographic interests – could you tell Amelia’s readers more about the photographs recently exhibited? (I’m thinking of the Familiarity breeds contempt and Modern Miniture series)

Familiarity Breeds Contempt is an extension of my long term project tentatively titled The Housewife – it’s hopefully the start of a longer project exploring sexuality, fantasy and what goes on behind closed doors. Which is also what Modern Miniatures was about in a way – only without the overt sexuality. I have a interest in the domestic, with other people’s domestic/private space, putting myself in them, and also, if I’m honest, with the risk involved in contacting strange men on the internet, asking them to get naked, and them taking pictures of me standing on them etc…

With fashion how do you make the decision between colour or black and white? Does it Matter?

I’m always trying to make things b/w, without sounding mental/pretentious/partially sighted, I see better in b/w. sometimes there’s someone else’s prerogative to take into account, like a client etc. black and white can sometimes make things instantly nostalgic and a bit too soft or romantic. Depends on the situation, but there are few where b/w doesn’t rock in my opinion!

Photograph for Corrie Williamson

Favourite photographers/people to work with/Set designers/fashion designers?

I rarely DON’T have a wicked time on shoots.

Sets – Alex Cunningham, David White’s sets for Coop a/w10/11 were mint
Designers – Cooperative Designs, Scott Ramsay Kyle, Corrie Williamson, Fred Butler, Atalanta Weller
Photograhers I admire – Wee Gee, Helmut Newton, Collier Schorr, Les Krims, Duane Michals, David Armstrong among MANY others!

What is it like being a london based photographer?

Fun! Busy. Forces you to work a lot to make ends meet, which can wear you down. Over saturated. Very youth orientated

What accompanies you in the studio?

My crappy selection of music! I always download the weirdest selection of stuff. Some proper howlers on there, but sometimes you have to listen to the Outhere Brothers. Also the lovely Anna Leader and Bella Fenning with whom I share my space.

What do you hope your photographs convey?

Tough…. I find it quite hard to look back, to edit etc, but having to do my website forced me to do that, and there is a certain strength in the characters I hope. I know some of the shots are quite moody, or gentle, but I don’t like it when models look too winsome or fashion-fierce or posed. Hopefully somewhere between the two, though I do seem to shout things like ‘you’re at a bus stop!’ or ‘You’re a sexy eel!’

How do your shoots come together?

Mostly ideas from films, dreams, or pacing the streets of London which is my fave thing to do. Or maybe a drunken overenthusiastic chat with friends

What are your plans for the future?

Hmm….more pics. More films, maybe a move to proper films with dialogue and a plot!

Categories ,A Shaded View of Fashion, ,Alex Cunningham, ,Amy Gwatkin, ,Anna Leader, ,Atalanta Weller, ,Bella Fenning, ,Blogging, ,Collier Schorr, ,Cooperative Designs, ,Corrie Williamson, ,David Armstrong, ,David White, ,Duane Michals, ,Fred Butler, ,Helmut Newton, ,Les Krims, ,London Fashion Week, ,Scott Ramsay Kyle, ,Showstudio, ,Spagerdisco, ,twitter, ,Wee Gee

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2014: Lighting, Furniture, Jewellery and Interior Design

melanie porter sheep
Continuing my very late review of the 2014 edition of Tent London, here is some wonderful furniture, lighting, jewellery and other finds.

Melanie Porter
First of all, Snarfle astride a knitted rocking sheep (top) by Melanie Porter, who is also responsible for these sophisticated shadow lights woven with metallic thread.

Haidee Drew
These lovely ceramic ducks are by Haidee Drew.

Sevak Zargarian
Sevak Zargarian made these beautiful porcelain bowls, and has recently completed some awesome pendant lights for Heals.

turner furniture
These stunning inlaid wood cabinets are by Turner Furniture.

Christine Meyer-Eaglestone
More amazing marquetry in a mirror surround by Christine Meyer-Eaglestone.

Dan Heath studio
Daniel Heath created this Memphis inspired printed wood coffee table using a new printing process. I just love the pattern and what an innovative idea!

Nicholas Collins
And now for something pretty unique: Tumbling Blocks glass plates by Nicholas Collins.

Korinna Mei Veropoulou
The London Met University took a stand at Tent, and I particularly liked this fluoro illustration by Korinna Mei Veropoulou.

Melody Rose
Flying acrobats featured on the new range of Melody Rose china mugs.

Chromatic jewellery
Chromatic jewellery by Inca Starzinksy gives a new twist to perspex.

Kolormundo
On a similar tip are these colour wheel balls by Kolormondo, created to help designers.

Summer will be back
I first met the lovely Lisa of Summer Will Be Back when I visited her studio in Copenhagen. These origami mobiles are a beautiful addition to her print based ranges. I am very impressed by how prolific Lisa is.

Manufract
Manufract jewellery from Germany features some unusual broken maple and resin pendants.

Andrew Luddick
At the Irish showcase I was drawn to playful ceramics by Andrew Luddick.

Woodenleg
These fun ‘Chalet’ tables are by Woodenleg.

Louise tucker
Cardiff based Louise Tucker makes gorgeous woven lampshades.

Clare Millard
This geometric optical jewellery is by Clare Willard, currently stocked in the Design Museum.

Claire Loderheads
Humorous ceramics by Claire Loder stood out as hand made craft objects in a more design orientated show.

From Africa
These stylish monochrome woven lampshades (I sense a theme) are From Africa.

Glassmania czech
glassmania
Glassmania was a fun stand featuring unusual and playful designs by students from the Academy of Arts in Prague.

Korean metal gongs
These giant metal gong balls were an eye catcher at the Korean showcase.

Alfred and Wilde
Finally, I absolutely love the Platonic Solids inspired collection by new brand Alfred and Wilde from designer Simon Mitchell. These mugs come in 5 designs and are fired with dishwasher safe 9ct gold. I had a great chat with Simon, who still works two days a week in a marketing job to support his dream to run his own design brand. Simon contributed writing about the Platonic Solids for my 10th anniversary book That Which We Do Not Understand, and I recently interviewed him here.

All of these images were first shared on my instagram feed.

Categories ,2014, ,Academy of Arts, ,Alfred and Wilde, ,Andrew Luddick, ,Christine Meyer-Eaglestone, ,Claire Loder, ,Clare Willard, ,Daniel Heath, ,From Africa, ,Furniture, ,Glassmania, ,Haidee Drew, ,Inca Starzinksy, ,Irish showcase, ,jewellery, ,Kolormondo, ,Korinna Mei Veropoulou, ,Lighting, ,London Met University, ,Louise Tucker, ,Manufract, ,Melanie Porter, ,Melody Rose, ,Nicholas Collins, ,Platonic Solids, ,Prague, ,review, ,Sevak Zargarian, ,Simon Mitchell, ,Summer Will Be Back, ,Tent London, ,That Which We Do Not Understand, ,Truman Brewery, ,Tumbling Blocks, ,Turner Furniture, ,Woodenleg

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2011 Review: Best Furniture Design

Tent London 2012 review -anthony hartley
Furniture by Anthony Hartley.

This year I once again visited Tent London hot on the heels of London Fashion Week. At the end of September the creme de la creme of the product design world held court at the Truman Brewery, look and I’m here to bring you the best of the bunch. First up my favourite bits of furniture design.

Tent London 2012 review -anthony hartley
Beautiful and very unique furniture from Anthony Hartley; waves of colour splashed across drawers and curved around walls in long shelving units.

Tent London 2012 review -jan plechac
Czech designer Jan Plechac showcased versions of his favourite chair designs in wire.

Tent London 2012 review -senufo
The A & Z Design furniture stand was attracting people with a very cute dog. I liked their senUFO side table the most. It would be very cool in a kid’s bedroom.

Tent London 2012 review -squint
Furniture makers Squint were showcasing a collaboration with the London Transport Museum – using classic hardwearing Moquette fabrics (familiar from the tube) within their trademark patchwork upholstery designs.

Tent London 2012 review -nobody and co
What a brilliant idea for a chair cum bookcase from Italian company Nobody&Co. Obviously inspired by the same problems I have: an overwhelming number of books with no home.

Tent London 2012 review -ercol
What a hit: bold 50s influenced textile designs on simple modernist furniture from the well established brand Ercol.

Tent London 2012 review -nobody and co
Tent London 2012 review alex garnett
Oversized household objects become kitsch furniture thanks to Goldsmiths trained Alex Garnett.

Tent London 2012 review -shell thomas
Tetronimoes by Shell Thomas were created by invitation from JJAM Curators’ Collective – what an ace idea for a kids’ playroom. Visitors were encouraged to use the velcro strips to rearrange the cushions and create new shapes of furniture.

Tent London 2012 review -rex chair
My new favourite new chair comes from the Rex range, straight out of Slovenia. So comfortable, I want this rocker now.

Tent London 2012 review -spellner milner
Alison of Speller Milner design is a RCA graduate who makes elegant furniture topped with pretty graphic decoration.

Categories ,2011, ,50s, ,A & Z Design, ,Alex Garnett, ,Alison, ,Anthony Hartley, ,Chair, ,Czech, ,design, ,designer, ,Ercol, ,Furniture, ,goldsmiths, ,Jan Plechac, ,JJAM Curators Collective, ,London Design Festival, ,London Transport Museum, ,Moquette, ,Nobody&Co, ,Oversized, ,Pillhead, ,review, ,Rex, ,Rocking Chair, ,senUFO, ,Shell Thomas, ,Slovenia, ,Speller Milner, ,squint, ,Tent London, ,Tetronimoes, ,textiles, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upholstery

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2013 Preview: Best of Tent London 2012

Tent London Oct 2012
It comes on hard after London Fashion Week, but I always make sure to get along to Tent London at the Truman Brewery: for this huge and sprawling exhibition is a great place to find the best in design, from homeware and lighting to furniture, wall art, rugs and beyond. Even though I have run individual blogs on some of my favourite discoveries I was most remiss in writing up our usual review last year, so as the 2013 edition rolls around I bring you a further selection of the best things I found in 2012. Make sure you check out my listing for more details of this year’s event.

Tent London Oct 2012 Jon Male
Upcycled lights by Studio Jon Male.

Tent London Oct 2012-tamasyn gambell
Cushions by Tamasyn Gambell.

Tent London Oct 2012-rug
Tent London Oct 2012-lights
Fab rug and lights, not sure by whom!

Tent London Oct 2012-Anthony Hartley
Furniture by Anthony Hartley. Read my interview here.

Tent London Oct 2012- Zoe Murphy
Cushions by Zoe Murphy.

Tent London Oct 2012-wallpaper by Rachel Powell
Wallpaper by Rachel Powell.

Tent London Oct 2012-beautiful wooden object
Sadly I don’t have any information for this beautiful wooden object, but I think it could be used as a decorative wall hanging or as a pot mat in the kitchen.

Tent London Oct 2012-Claire Anne O'Brien
Knitted furniture by Claire Anne O’Brien.

Tent London Oct 2012-venus by cupertino
Scott Eaton‘s Venus of Cupertino ipad docking stations.

Tent London Oct 2012-Laszlo Tompa
Sculptural wooden furniture by Laszlo Tompa. Read our interview here.

Tent London Oct 2012-Réka Molnár, Moringa, Hungarian
Heat sensitive mug designs by Hungarian designer Réka Molnár of Moringa.

Tent London Oct 2012-Magnetic rings by Grace Hancock
Magnetic rings by Grace Hancock.

Tent London Oct 2012-Front rug monster
Front rugs: monster.

Tent London Oct 2012-Ginger and Jagger
Stools by Ginger & Jagger.

Tent London Oct 2012-CYMK lamp by Dennis Parren
CYMK lamp by Dennis Parren.

Tent London Oct 2012-Candlesticks by Victoria Delaney
Candlesticks by Victoria Delaney.

Tent London Oct 2012-Architectural miniature by Chisel and Mouse
Architectural miniature by Chisel and Mouse.

Tent London Oct 2012-Milena Kovanovic
Necklace by Milena Kovanovic. Read my interview here.

Tent London Oct 2012-Lars Beller Fjetland for Discipline
Wooden birds by Lars Beller Fjetland for Discipline.

I wonder who I will discover this year? Make sure you follow me on instagram to share in my favourite finds first.

Categories ,2012, ,2013, ,Anthony Hartley, ,Chisel and Mouse, ,Claire Anne O’Brien, ,Dennis Parren, ,design, ,Front rugs, ,Furniture, ,Ginger & Jagger, ,Grace Hancock, ,Hungarian, ,Lars-Beller Fjetland, ,Laszlo Tompa, ,Lighting, ,London Design Festival, ,Milena Kovanovic, ,Moringa, ,Rachel Powell, ,Réka Molnár, ,review, ,Scott Eaton, ,Studio Jon Male, ,Tamasyn Gambell, ,Tent London, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upcycled, ,Venus of Cupertino, ,Victoria Delaney, ,Zoe Murphy

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Amelia’s Magazine | Tent London 2013 Review: Best Wall Art, Furniture and Lighting

SPW additions lampshade
Lampshade by Parris Wakefield Additions.

I’ve already brought you the best soft furnishings and homewards from Tent London 2013 at the Truman Brewery, and now here is a round up of wall art, furniture and lighting, with a toy and notebooks thrown in for good measure.

Parris Wakefield Additions sofa
Parris Wakefield Additions is a new brand from husband and wife team Howard Wakefield and Sarah Parris, busy graphic designers once based in central London and now living in rural Norfolk, where they have enough space for an in-house studio. They are inspired by a combination of colour palettes found in the natural world and those of favourite paintings (a huge pastel rug design is based on a famous Hockney painting), resulting in eye catching pattern and colour combinations. Their computer generated abstracts appear on lampshades, wallpaper and fabrics. I love the ethical side to the Parris Wakefield Additions business – this upcycled 20′s armchair (above) was reupholstered by Out of the Dark, a charity that trains youth in new skills.

Rebay lighting installation
This super fun lighting installation by Rebay attracted a great deal of attention on instagram, though I still haven’t figured out it’s purpose since all attempts to Google information bring up ebay.

Geometric prints on lampshades by tamasyn gambell
Cockpit Arts based textile designer Tamasyn Gambell has been busy expanding her decorative offering: her geometric prints now appear on fabulous big hanging lampshades.

Blown glass pendant lights - curiousa and curiousa
Once again I was wowed by blown glass pendant lights from Curiousa and Curiousa.

Tent London Furniture Magpie lighting
The Furniture Magpies breathe new life into discarded items. This year they have turned their attention to old lampshade frames to create these pretty knitted lights that come in a range of jewel colours.

Lizzie mcullen at work on a mural
Illustrator Lizzie Mary Cullen was at work on a chalk mural when I walked past. This prolific artist creates bespoke imagery for many big brands.

Designer KSW studio
Kristjana S Williams has launched a new range of wallpapers featuring her instantly recognisable patterns; combinations of bold natural imagery and stark colourings.

Bear wall art by Kosmos Project from Poland
This 3D bear wall art is by Kosmos Project of Poland, a design studio set up by Ewa Bochen and Maciej Jelski.

Fibre glass stool inspired by an apple juice bottle, by Sit furnishings
Snarfle inspects a fibre glass stool that features tactile nobbles inspired by those on an apple juice bottle. Sit Furnishings is a new brand from Katherine Blamire and established designer Timothy Sheward, creating industrially forged products with a distinctly human touch. I was most impressed by their offering.

wood seat by Ruskasa from Taiwan
At the Taiwanese showcase we both loved this super smooth woven wood seat by Ruskasa.

Wooden magazine stand and stool by Moissue of Taiwan
This tactile wooden magazine stand by Moissue was also a winner: it neatly doubles as a stool.

horse shaped toddler stools by tamasine osher
What a clever idea; I so want one of these ergonomic easy-to-mount horse shaped toddler stools for Snarfle when he gets a bit older. Multi talented designer Tamasine Osher trained in architecture before taking an MA in furniture design whilst also working as an art director at a gallery.

Norwegian wooden toy by Permafrost
On the subject of things for children, this wooden toy by industrial designers Permafrost is utterly Norwegian and bloody brilliant: an oil rig with helipad and detachable helicopter: oil tankers also available in this prototype collection.

Sukie recycled books
Rescued paper notebooks made an attractive wall display at the Sukie stationery stand. The designer behind Sukie is a man, which goes somewhat contrary to expectations. Apparently most people expect him to be female and Japanese.

Next up: my review of the Three Four show further up Brick Lane. Read it here. Follow me on instagram for a first sneak peak at the design discoveries I make.

Categories ,2013, ,Brick Lane, ,Cockpit Arts, ,Curiousa and Curiousa, ,Ewa Bochen, ,Furniture, ,Furniture Magpie, ,Howard Wakefield, ,Katherine Blamire, ,Kosmos Project, ,Kristjana S Williams, ,Lighting, ,Lizzie Mary Cullen, ,Maciej Jelski, ,Moissue, ,Norwegian, ,Out of the Dark, ,Parris Wakefield Additions, ,Permafrost, ,poland, ,Rebay, ,review, ,Ruskasa, ,Sarah Parris, ,Sit Furnishings, ,Snarfle, ,stationery, ,Sukie, ,surface design, ,Taiwan, ,Tamasine Osher, ,Tamasyn Gambell, ,Tent London, ,Timothy Sheward, ,Truman Brewery, ,Upcycled, ,Wall Art

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Amelia’s Magazine | Review: Designs of the Year 2012 at the Design Museum

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Vivienne Westwood
Vivienne Westwood ethically produced bags.

The Design Museum‘s flagship exhibition, Designs of the Year, has returned for 2012. I went along to the preview to check out the experts’ choice of the best from multiple design disciplines; including fashion, architecture, product design, digital and graphics. Here’s my pick:

Design Museum designs of year 2012  noma bar
Design Museum designs of year 2012  noma bar
Outline Editions have brought along designer Noma Bar and his Cut It Out dog machine, which is able to cut through all sorts of materials. His artwork is inspired by negative space – he gleefully told me how he has taken to trawling charity shops for interesting things that the dog can chomp through. As well as the wonderful simplicity of his bold imagery I am particularly attracted to the upcycling side of this clever project.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Photolettering
Photolettering by House Industries allows users to create usable type from vintage American fonts. As something of a font fiend I love this idea!

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -GF Smith
GF Smith create beautiful papers (they were used in the first two issues of Amelia’s Magazine in print) and their colourful display was inspired by the microscopic detail of paper fibres. Designed by SEA Design with Field.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -De Designpolitie
Using bold yellow with red and black typography, De Designpolitie of the Netherlands have created a brand identity for the two day What Design Can Do! conference in May 2012. I love that they are not afraid of making a statement!

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -National Maritime Museum
The National Maritime Museum‘s High Arctic display to highlight the fragility of the environment was represented with a tiny model. This immersive gallery installation must have been quite mesmerising in situ.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Mary Katrantzou
Representing the very best of British fashion was an outfit from Mary Katrantzou‘s seminal A/W 2011 collection: great to see the digital detailing and remarkable cutting up close.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Suno
Suno of New York was a new ethical fashion discovery: they work locally with artisans to create highly desirable collections – the first one used vintage Kenyan textiles but more recently they were inspired by the subtle colours and abstract designs of Art Deco illustrator George Lepape.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Vivienne Westwood
And then there’s Vivienne Westwood grinning gleefully from beneath her bird’s nest hair. Her Ethical Fashion Africa collection is created out of scrap materials by marginalised women in Nairobi. The outcome? Typically colourful designs with outrageous slogans embroidered out of Masai beads.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Bethan Laura Wood
I was most intrigued by Bethan Laura Wood‘s incredible Moon Rock table, made using colourful kitchen laminates. Her Totem lighting was also on display. Miranda Williams previously spotted Bethan‘s beautiful work at London Design Week, for this talented lady also makes jewellery.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Thixotropes by Troika
Thixotropes by Troika are huge spinning LED sculptures that combine art and science. Hypnotic!

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Studio Bertjan Pot
Heracleum is a hanging light by Studio Bertjan Pot – designed to imitate the branching form of a plant.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -The Comedy Carpet
The Comedy Carpet in Blackpool is a huge 2,200 sq metre granite installation designed by Gordon Young with Why Not Associates. It features jokes and catchphrases in glorious decorative fonts of all sizes. I am very impressed that such a thing was commissioned!

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Hovding Invisible Cycle Helmet
Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Hovding Invisible Cycle Helmet
The Hovding Invisible Cycle Helmet is designed for stick in the muds such as me who refuse to wear a bike helmet. It contains an airbag that sits around the neck and is only activated should an accident occur.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Orb-It
The Orb-It is a small hand held rechargeable vacuum hoover by Black & Decker. It looks very cute, but I’d like to see it in action.

Design Museum designs of year 2012 -Kokoro & Moi
Stockmann packaging by Kokoro & Moi has a delightfully playful Finnish quality.

The panel of judges encompasses a diverse range of artistic talent, which explains the chaotically eclectic nature of this exhibition. Despite some arbitrary choices (I mean, there’s so much good design out there, where do you start?!) Designs of the Year offers a great chance to discover some exciting new design from a wide range of fields. My one wish would be that more designers begin to incorporate sustainable practice into their work: one of the wall infographics depressingly stated that only 19% of projects on show have been designed to be sustainable. It will take more than that to sort out this mess we are in.

Find out more information at the Designs of the Year 2012 website.

Categories ,2012, ,Bethan Laura Wood, ,Black & Decker, ,Blackpool, ,Cut It Out, ,De Designpolitie, ,Design Museum, ,Designs of the Year, ,digital, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Ethical Fashion Africa, ,fashion, ,Field, ,Fonts, ,Furniture, ,George Lepape, ,GF Smith, ,Gordon Young, ,Granite, ,Graphics, ,Heracleum, ,High Arctic, ,House Industries, ,Hovding Invisible Cycle Helmet, ,Laminates, ,Lighting, ,Mary Katrantzou, ,Moon Rock, ,National Maritime Museum, ,Noma Bar, ,Orb-It, ,Outline Editions, ,Photolettering, ,Print Design, ,Product Design, ,review, ,SEA Design, ,Stockmann, ,Studio Bertjan Pot, ,Suno, ,The Comedy Carpet, ,Thixotropes, ,Totem, ,Troika, ,typography, ,What Design Can Do!, ,Why Not Associates

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Amelia’s Magazine | Review: London College of Communication Green Week, 6th-10th February 2012

LCC Green Week 'Urban Farming Installation' by Deborah Moon

Urban Farming Installation by second year Interaction & Moving Image students as part of LCC Green Week illustrated by Deborah Moon

Within an atmosphere of playfulness and improvisation the London College of Communication organised a Green Week between the 6th and 10th of February – part of the nation wide People and Planet Green Week. It was packed with workshops, pop-up installations, film screenings and talks aiming to encourage students to share ideas for improving sustainability in their creative practice and at home. Under the motivational general title ‘You Can Make a Difference‘ the week explored the themes of ‘found’, ‘upcycle’, ‘change’, ‘waste’ and ‘activism’. Every day of the week the upper galleries of the college hosted both student led initiatives and the work of invited creatives.

LCC Green Week Sarah Bagner from Supermarket Sarah with plastic bags quilt photo by Maria Papadimitriou

As the designer of Plastic Seconds – a jewellery line that uses recycled plastic and other found materials – I was invited by Sarah Bagner from Supermarket Sarah to make a wall on the first day of the event and talk to the students about the usage of ‘rubbish’ we do not often think to use anew in design… Sarah, even though still jet-lagged from a trip to Tokyo photographing local ‘walls’ for her upcoming book, played a major part in the event making installations and collaborating with the students throughout. On the third day of the week she teamed up with Tiziana Callari and created a quilt made out of discarded plastic bags – seen above.

Supermarket Sarah for London College of Communication Green Week by Jo Ley

Supermarket Sarah for London College of Communication’s Green Week by Jo Ley

Plastic Seconds wall installation at LCC green week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Plastic Seconds display

LCC Green Week Skip Sisters

Sarah Bagner had also invited the super fun Skip SistersJulia Burnett, Edori Fertig, Liz Honeybone, Pia Randall-Goddard and Helen Turner who search the skips of South London for raw materilas and then turn them into sculptural objects, clocks, jewellery and textiles. Apart from the installation above the Skip Sisters also rummaged through the college’s printing studios for discarded paper which they transformed into beads for jewellery making.

LCC Green Week Veja Shoes photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Veja was another sustainable brand Sarah Bagner had invited to the event.

LCC Green Week Face Shields by Jody Boehnert at EcoLabs

Some of the most striking – and possibly emotionally charged – objects on show were these ‘Face Shields‘ from Climate Camp 2007, designed by Jody Boehnert at EcoLabs, which were used as part of a mass action at Heathrow against the proposed third runway.

'Face Shields' Time2Act Climate Camp 2007 Green Week LCC by Lizzy Holbrook

Face Shields by Lizzy Holbrook

Wooden Objects by Gregor Garber LCC Green Weekphoto by Maria Papadimitriou

I was quite taken by these really well made and well presented reclaimed wood toy kits made by the college’s 3D technician Gregor Garber, who salvages good quality wood from shelving or broken easels. He thinks it a shame that maquettes by interior design students can look rather samey because of the standard materials they use, so during his workshops he encourages students to use all sorts of more interesting and varied looking reclaimed materials – as in the examples below.

reclaimed wood interior design models by Gregor Garber LCC green week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

LCC Green Week pop-up bicycle powered cinema by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs

LCC Green Week pop-up bicycle powered cinema by Maria Papadimitriou aka Slowly The Eggs

The collective Magnificent Revolution brought into the college their bicycle powered cinema!

London College of Communication Takeaway LCC Green Week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

During my visit on the last day of the events I was happy to see LCC students’ Azra Bhagat and Laura Carless ‘Green Takeaway’ stall where they displayed tons of reclaimed takeaway coffee cups – along with these ceramic mugs and glasses – which they had turned into tiny city flower pots by adding seeds.

LCC Green Week Furniture Upcycling 1 photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Also on the last day unused and ignored furniture from around the college was given pretty make-overs by the students and the resulting pieces will be auctioned on the Supermarket Sarah website!

Book Swishing at LCC Green Week photo by Maria Papadimitriou

Throughout the week there was a book swishing point, accompannied by this lovely hanging books display, where students could bring a book in and take one away.

LCC Green Week 'my apple is jetlagged' wall painting photo by Maria Papadimitriou

In terms of more student led events this wall painting highlighting the issue of food miles was created by a team of them as the week unfolded.

Other highlights were Garudio Studiage creating a ‘Lucky Skip’ interactive installation where all those unattractive Christmas presents could be put to good use or passed on to someone else, and Food for Good, an initiative by three graphic and media design students who pick up left over food from restaurants, bakeries and supermarkets and trasnport it to charities. Finally there was a lot of extra cycling related activity in the middlele of the week, which I unfortunately missed, including letterpress artist, poet and cyclist Dennis Gould exhibiting his work as featured in Boneshaker Magazine and talking about his love of cycling.

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou.
Skip Sisters photo by London College of Communication.

Categories ,activism, ,bicycle powered cinema, ,books, ,Charities, ,cinema, ,Climate Activism, ,Climate Camp, ,Deborah Moon, ,ecolabs, ,Film Screening, ,Food for Good, ,Food Miles, ,Found, ,Furniture, ,Garudio Studiage, ,Green Week, ,Gregor Garber, ,Heathrow Airport, ,Heathrow third runway, ,installation, ,Interior Design, ,Jet-Lagged, ,jewellery, ,Jo Ley, ,Jody Boehnert, ,LCC, ,Leftovers, ,Lizzy Holbrook, ,London College of Communication, ,Magnificent Revolution, ,Maquettes, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,painting, ,people and planet, ,People and Planet Week, ,plastic bags, ,Plastic Seconds, ,recycling, ,Sarah Bagner, ,Skip Siters, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Supermarket Sarah, ,Swishing, ,talks, ,Tiziana Callari, ,Toys, ,Upcycling, ,Urban Farming, ,Veja, ,Walls, ,Waste, ,wood, ,workshops

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Amelia’s Magazine | An Interview with Designer Laszlo Tompa

Lazlo Tompa

The title of this post is a little misleading as Laszlo Tompa is more than just a Designer. Not just a Ceramist or a Craftsman, he is more like a materials ‘magician’. His creations are half homeware item and half magic trick, and his Spiral Puzzle Box is particularly enchanting.

Having studied at Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design in Budapest, Hungary, Laszlo has a real knack with clay and wood as well as a killer eye for design. Geometric shapes and space are his obsessions, and his wood pieces are all sensually smooth and designed right down to the smallest detail.

Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa

His wooden pieces fall into the following categories: Flower Hanging Lamps, Hydro Lamps, Cube Illusion and Spiral Box. The Flower Hanging Lamps are made from solid cherry wood with hexagonal and pentagonal pyramids forming the main structure. Light only points downwards in these nifty little ceiling lovers. His Hydro Lamps, inspired by ocean creatures that emit light, are made from solid wood, but have more of a deep sea vibe than than their flowery counterparts. These beauties let shards of light out in the main body of the lamp, unlike their floral brothers and sisters.

Cube Illusion is a wooden box with a lid, and looks a bit like a giant Ferrero Rocher (minus the golden foil). It’s a design sculpture and homeware piece made of complex shapes that appears to house a small space, but in actual fact is surprisingly roomy. The Spiral Box is part gargantuan snail, part labyrinth; at first impossible to open, patience and persistence lead to the discovery of a hidden drawer. I spoke to Laszlo about his talent for materials, his amazing creations and how he knew these nifty concepts would work.

Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa

How did you become interested in ceramics?
I had no special influence in my childhood. I encountered clay for the first time in a school workshop and I loved its limitless ductility. At Art High-School I spent time in the Department of Ceramics. After this I learned everything I know about clay at university.

Laszlo Tompa
Laszlo Tompa

You also work with wood, how did you first develop a love for this material?
Both my grandfather and my father were Craftsmen who did a lot of woodwork in their free time. As a child, I was delighted to see them shape wood and create new objects. Through several generations in our family, the wood-turning lathe was as common as a refrigerator in other families. Despite this, I was more attracted to ceramics, though I have enjoyed rediscovering wood during the past two years.

Laszlo Tompa

Do you find you find switching between materials difficult?
My starting point is the form, and I choose the material based on that. I think all Designers have to know the properties of the materials. I have no problem with changing materials.

Geometric shapes are a big feature of your work, have you always been interested in space and shape?
I’ve always liked Maths. While studying Ceramics I realised that tile geometry and tessellation is really interesting. After I realised this, I spend years studying it, and later I turned to designing 3D tiles.

Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa

Your work is really well thought out, what process do you go through to get to a finished piece?
Luckily I have a lot of ideas. Out of these I choose some that are worth pursuing. I make several 3D models on computer. When they are good enough I produce a prototype and I refine the ratios. For example this is how the computer version of Cube Illusion was created.

Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa

What kind of furniture is your own home filled with?
I prefer Scandinavian-style furniture.

How did you get the idea for Spiral Box?
I was interested in spiral forms at university and I studied all kinds of twisted plant shapes. Spiral Box was designed long after these. The idea came to my mind after studying the form of a worm. Preparation of the prototype was very difficult and complicated.

Lazlo Tompa
Lazlo Tompa

What have you got lined up for the year ahead?
I would like to return to tile geometry and make wooden wall tiles. I plan to exhibit them at the end of the summer and I have confidence that they will have similar success to my former works.

Lazlo Tompa

To see more of Laszlo‘s work check out his site www.tompakeramia.hu. All photos were provided by Laszlo Tompa.

Categories ,ceramics, ,Clay, ,copying lathe, ,craft, ,design, ,form, ,Furniture, ,geometry, ,jessicasrcook, ,Lazlo-Tompa, ,Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, ,shapes, ,Space, ,Spiral box, ,tile, ,wood, ,Woodcraft, ,woodturner

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Amelia’s Magazine | Fine Craft Textiles with Japanese Flair: An interview with designer Nazanin Kamali

Cushion Collection, Nazanin Kamali
Furniture and Interiors designer Nazanin Kamali introduced her debut textiles collection at the Home London show in January – here she explains the reasons why she has turned to fine craft and what inspired the designs of her new range of cushions, embroideries and wallhangings.

Nazanin Kamali 2010
Chrysanthemum 2 (Styled), Nazanin Kamali
I recently discovered your debut textiles collection at Home London earlier this year – what was the reception like at this show?
It was the first time I had shown my textile designs so it was great to receive feedback on the range, particularly from bloggers and stylists who were very complimentary.

Hexagon Cushion (styled), Nazanin Kamali
You originally trained as a furniture designer, receiving an MA from the RCA, what prompted the move into textile design in more recent years?
I’ve always been more interested in craft than commercial design, even though my career path initially led me down that route. I’m drawn to the storytelling aspect of crafting and when my mother passed away in 2006 shortly before I fell pregnant, I found myself turning to the therapeutic craft processes of embroidery to help me work things through. I was inspired by Isabel Allende’s familial novel The House of the Spirits, which I first read as a teenager, and began to create a vast patchwork blanket constructed from seventy-seven hand-sewn squares, each one reflective of a different aspect of my life. The blanket took two and a half years to complete but the process helped to focus and heal my mind, and led me down the path I’m on today.

Crane Cushion (styled), Nazanin Kamali
Chrysanthemum 1 (Styled), Nazanin Kamali
How does this textile interiors brand sit alongside your other design work?
As a founding designer for Case Furniture my furniture designs reflected the attention to precision detail and intricate repetitive forms found in Japanese arts, which have long fascinated me. But whereas my previous furniture designs have always fit within specific design parameters, my textile collections are deeply rooted in my own personal fascination with cultural mythology, with an underlying melancholia and hint of the macabre.

Shrimps Cushion (styled), Nazanin Kamali
The cushion designs which form the backbone of the brand feature embroidered designs inspired by Japanese heraldic symbols: how did you choose the designs and what do they mean?
My interest in Japanese Kamons stems from work I did on the interior of Brighton-based restaurant Oki-Nami back in 1994. The six Mon designs – Chicken, Crane, Shrimp, Hexagon and Chrysanthemum (1 & 2) – were mostly chosen for their beauty, but a unifying mythological undercurrent runs through all the designs. The Crane symbolises 1,000 years while the Shrimp, with its resemblance to an old man hunched over with a beard, represents longevity. The Hexagon, resembling the shell of a wise tortoise, represents good luck.

Wedding Vows Runner (styled), Nazanin Kamali
Suicide Suitcase, Bespoke Commission by Nazanin Kamali
Why did you decide to concentrate on embroidery techniques and where do you get your products made?
My mother was a dressmaker and had taught me when I was younger, so I returned back to the craft after she passed away as a way of feeling closer to her. All my original prototypes and bespoke pieces I make by hand myself, while my collection pieces are produced in India. It was very important to me to find a manufacturer that offered a high quality of material and the production methods they use have allowed me to offer much more intricate embroidery details than I could ever have produced by hand.

Patchwork Tapestry, Bespoke Commission, Nazanin Kamali
Your height chart and advent calendar are based on original designs made for your son: how do you scale these into mass production?
I work very closely with my manufacturers to ensure their capabilities in turning my prototypes into high quality production pieces and consulted on all steps of the process. It was really fascinating to see the evolution of the project through, and I am delighted with the final results.

Chicken Cushion (styled), Nazanin Kamali
Do you have any other exciting projects in the pipeline that you can share with us?
I have a number of exciting things in the pipeline and, amongst others, am beginning work on a project involving giant embroidered buttons for an upholstered headboard, as well as designs for felt doll chess pieces.

Categories ,Case Furniture, ,Chicken, ,Chrysanthemum, ,craft, ,Crane, ,embroidery, ,Furniture, ,Hexagon, ,Home London, ,India, ,Interior Design, ,Interiors, ,interview, ,Isabel Allende, ,Japanese Kamons, ,Mon, ,Nazanin Kamali, ,Oki-Nami, ,rca, ,Shrimp, ,textiles, ,The House of the Spirits

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