Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Presentation Review: Christopher Raeburn

Christopher Raeburn S/S 2012 by Alison Day
Christopher Raeburn S/S 2012 by Alison Day.

On arrival at the beautiful newly renovated Museum of London we were greeted by a phalanx of inflatable squirrels – a typical Christopher Raeburn touch.

Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn S/S 2011. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Downstairs the presentation was split between the Sackler Hall and the Linbury Gallery, abortion with a presentation cum catwalk show in one exhibition space and a musical garment installation in the other. Christopher Raeburn has never done things traditionally and his first major London Fashion Week presentation was no exception.

Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn_by_Natalie Horsman
Christopher Raeburn S/S 2012 by Natalie Horsman.

Using colourful parachute material the space had been divided into colourful strips against which the models, sickness both male and female, information pills posed in a series of outfits from the new collection. Although he has branched out into ready-to-wear, his mainstay remains the outerwear for which he is famed and the overall feel was definitively outdoorsy but luxe. The audience were given just enough time to photograph models before they returned backstage and changed into different outfits.

Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory
Back in the installation area we were able to create intriguing sounds by touching the garments that were hanging in colour coded areas. Christopher Raeburn has once again managed to capture the attention of fashion lovers with his clever use of environmentally friendly materials and tactile presentation skills.

Christopher Raeburn SS 2011 review-photography by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Alison Day, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,Ecofashion, ,ethical, ,lfw, ,Linbury Gallery, ,London Fashion Week, ,museum of london, ,Natalie Horsman, ,Outerwear, ,Parachute, ,Sackler Hall, ,Squirrels

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Amelia’s Magazine | Renli Su: Fashion Scout Ones to Watch, London Fashion Week S/S 2014 Catwalk Review

Renli Su S/S 2014 by Claire Kearns
Renli Su S/S 2014 by Claire Kearns.

Coming up last but by no means least, Chinese designer Renli Su took a very different approach to fashion as one of Ones to Watch. With high aims to create ‘garments that retain physical traces of their past in order to form an intrinsic bond with the wearer‘ her new season collection examined the connection between the lives of working class women in the Victorian era, and the clothes they wore. This translated into a series of earthy toned garments that had more than a touch of the peasant in their boxy shapes, bunched hems, and trailing ribbon ties. The collection was made from a selection of entirely organic fibres, with purposefully loosened hems and distressed seams designed to age appealingly when worn with love over many years. Bonnet inspired headwear, detachable hoods and light weight leg warmers were hand crafted in crochet and knit. This was a sweet collection with some appealing ideas and a big heart at the centre of it all.

Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Ones to Watch Renli Su SS 2014-photography by Amelia Gregory
Renli Su with her fellow Ones to Watch. All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Chinese, ,Claire Kearns, ,Ecofashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Ones To Watch, ,organic, ,Renli Su

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Esthetica Review


Illustration by Annejkh Carson
Partimi Dress by Joana Faria
Partimi by Joana Faria.

I probably shouldn’t do this because I actually don’t believe the ghettoisation of ethical designers is a particularly good thing, more about but for ease of storytelling in the grand scheme of things it makes sense to cover the interesting stuff I came across at Esthetica altogether. This is by no means all the stuff I loved, purchase but I’ll be covering others in my upcoming book Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration (with an ethical bent) so for now I’ll just stick to a few that may not have been covered on this blog before….

Martina Spetlova
The Centre for Sustainable Fashion were promoting the work of Martina Spetlova, prescription another MA graduate of Central Saint Martins who has a first degree in chemistry and has set up a fair trade embroidery network between women in Pakistan and designers in the UK. She creates clothes made of interchangeable panels and her recent collection features some interesting garments sponsored by waste from the YKK zip company. She is currently building relationships with mills to use more end of line products that are well suited to the small runs of high end designers, but I do wonder what happens once all that waste has been scooped up.

Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Octavi Navarro - Martina Spetlova
Martina Spetlova by Octavi Navarro.

Little Glass Clementine
I was really pleased to see my friend Clemmie from Little Glass Clementine exhibiting at Esthetica for the first time. We’ve covered Clemmie before, both for her work drawing attention to the imperilled island of Tuvalu and for her beautifully made jewellery.

LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine

I feel quite proud that her necklaces, constructed from found objects and lovingly sourced vintage items, are now finding a much wider audience. Read an interview with her here.

LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine
LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Sägen
Over in the Scandinavian corner I was most intrigued to discover the finely detailed work of Sägen, also showing at Esthetica for the first time. This is upcycling at it’s best – taking shards of old porcelain and reinvigorating them for a new life as a piece of delightful one off jewellery.

Somerset House SS2011 Sagen

Choose from twee rose patterns or more modern classic Scandinavian leaf designs, all set in nickel free silver. One massive downside: the website does not seem to cater to the English speaking customer, so one can only hope some UK based buyers have bought into the range.

sagen-katie-harnett
Sägen by Katie Harnett.

Nina Dolcetti
I tried on a pair of Nina Dolcetti bouncy platform shoes at Esthetica, and instantly fell in love… perhaps I could even ride a bike in a pair of these?? Inexplicably the head designer is not called Nina Dolcetti. Elisalex de Castro Peake is a Cordwainers graduate who launched her first upcycled shoe in September 2008 and the brand name Nina Dolcetti – meaning Little Sweets – comes from a combination of her nickname and her grandmother’s maiden name.

Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti
Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti
Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti

All shoes are made in a small factory run factory in East London from off cuts and pre-consumer waste, and she utilises only vegetable tanned leather and sustainably sourced cork and wood. So want a pair to bounce around in, but they’re a leetle bit pricey for me. Well worth it if you earn a decent wage though: I urge you to check them out.

LFW-Nina Dolcetti by Chris Morris
Nina Dolcetti by Chris Morris.

Partimi and Joanna Cave
I love Partimi‘s clean simple designs. Designer Eleanor Dorrien-Smith named her label after the architectural term parti, meaning the conceptual starting point for a project, and she makes beautiful wearable dresses adorned with simple graphic prints.

emma_block_partimi
Partimi by Emma Block.

This season she paid homage to costumes from Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes that her mother had collected at auction. I particularly loved her collaboration with ethical jewellery designer Joanna Cave, and am lusting after a pair of graphic cut out dangly earrings.

LFW SS2011 Partimi
Partimi Long dress by Joana Faria
Partimi earing by Joana Faria
Partimi by Joana Faria.

Oria
This jewellery range is the baby of creative duo Tania Kowalski and Synnove Saelthun, who have worked in the jewellery industry for a combined 25 years. Increasingly concerned wih the social and environmental impact of mining they created Oria in 2007 with an intention to make the supply chain transparent.

Somerset House SS2011 Oria

They source from fair-trade companies, all materials are traceable to point of origin and then the jewellery is made in their London studio. I love the delicate dangly cutout earrings featuring bees and birds.

Oria by Faye West
Oria by Faye West.

Michelle Lowe-Holder
I knew Michelle Lowe-Holder as a clothing designer, but after a break from the industry she’s decided to make a come back as an accessory designer. This was prompted by the realisation that she was always most interested in the details so she decided to be more sustainable and make use of the oodles of waste fabric from old collections – that she still has lying around in her studio – to create some stunning accessories: giant arm, neck and leg pieces are stacked to create dramatic silhouettes.

LFW SS2011 Michelle Lowe-Holder
LFW SS2011 Michelle Lowe-Holder
Michelle Lowe by Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Michelle Lowe-Holder by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

From Somewhere
From Somewhere has been upcycling waste luxury materials since 1997, and as a bastion of sustainable fashion it was to designer Orsola de Castro that the BFC came when they wanted to set up Esthetica in 2006.

LFW SS2011 Orsola From Somewhere
Orsola de Castro.

This season she has been working with offcuts from Speedo to create a lovely limited edition capsule collection.

speedo_by Alia Gargum
Speedo From Somewhere collaboration by Alia Gargum.

Made
Having just returned from a Fashion Business Club get together with the unexpectedly lucid Laura Bailey I thought I would also mention Made, a jewellery brand “by the people for the people” that is reasonably well known thanks to some high profile branding and wide distribution. They are big on their “designer” collaborations, though not designers I’ve ever heard of: since when was Laura Bailey a jewellery designer anyway? Boy do I want her job. I’m not a massive fan of a lot of their stuff (looks wise), but they do undeniably good things by providing trade for impoverished communities in Africa.

made by natsuki otani
Made by Natsuki Otani.

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Centre for Sustainable Fashion, ,Cordwainers, ,Ecofashion, ,Elisalex de Castro Peake, ,Emma Block, ,esthetica, ,ethical design, ,Fashion Business Club, ,Faye West, ,From Somewhere, ,jewellery, ,Joanna Cave, ,Katie Harnett, ,Laura Bailey, ,Little Glass Clementine, ,MADE, ,Martina Spetlova, ,Michelle Lowe-Holder, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Octavi Navarro, ,Oria, ,Orsola De Castro, ,Partimi, ,recycling, ,Sägen Butik, ,scandinavia, ,shoes, ,Speedo, ,sustainability, ,Synnove Saelthun, ,Tania Kowalski, ,Tuvalu, ,Upcycling, ,YKK

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

It wasn’t until the Jena.Theo show that I got my first hit of fashion adrenaline this LFW. The design duo Jenny Holmes and Dimitris Theocharidis have created a Spring Summer 2011 collection that combines both the theatrical and the wearable in draped layers of silk and jersey, information pills more about shot through with the Midas Touch. Gold leaf was applied not only to models’ eyelids and nails, but also to wrists, ankles, collarbones and occasionally a breast or belly button that happened to be exposed.

Though this would undoubtedly not go down well in the Muslim world today, culturally the show was a mix of the old Arabian Nights- or Prince of Persia to the computer game generation- meets 19th century British colonialism; models’ heads swathed in oversized turbans or hair backcombed into huge Victorian updos.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The winners of Fashion Fringe 2009 struck a perfect balance between catwalk creativity and clothes with the potential to actually be worn in real life; with a wonderful take on a Victorian hoop skirt to finish the show. This is what I want from an LFW show; something fun and inventive as well as wearable clothes.

I sat with the team behind the new Young British Designers website, which champions the likes of Jena.Theo; keep an eye out on Amelia’s for an interview with them coming soon. Adriana was in fact loyally wearing an outfit by the design duo.

We were in the second row but got bumped forward into the front row when there were a few spaces at the last minute; which meant I managed to get a really good, close up look at the raw painted gold leaf stiletto platform shoes.

It also of course, meant goody bag ahoy!Ironically, for a fashion gift, this included one of the best brownies I’ve ever eaten; in fact many of the stalls in the LFW exhibitions have sweets or cakes on their stands, though you never see anyone eating them. Except me.Which is why you won’t see me bearing my gilded navel in an Aladdin-esque ensemble anytime soon.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

Illustration by Andrea Peterson

It wasn’t until the Jena.Theo show that I got my first hit of fashion adrenaline this LFW. The design duo Jenny Holmes and Dimitris Theocharidis have created a Spring Summer 2011 collection that combines both the theatrical and the wearable in draped layers of silk and jersey, pharm shot through with the Midas Touch. Gold leaf was applied not only to models’ eyelids and nails, but also to wrists, ankles, collarbones and occasionally a breast or belly button that happened to be exposed.

Though this would undoubtedly not go down well in the Muslim world today, culturally the show was a mix of the old Arabian Nights- or Prince of Persia to the computer game generation- meets 19th century British colonialism; models’ heads swathed in oversized turbans or hair backcombed into huge Victorian updos.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson

The winners of Fashion Fringe 2009 struck a perfect balance between catwalk creativity and clothes with the potential to actually be worn in real life; with a wonderful take on a Victorian hoop skirt to finish the show. This is what I want from an LFW show; something fun and inventive as well as wearable clothes.

I sat with the team behind the new Young British Designers website, which champions the likes of Jena.Theo; keep an eye out on Amelia’s for an interview with them coming soon. Adriana was in fact loyally wearing an outfit by the design duo.

We were in the second row but got bumped forward into the front row when there were a few spaces at the last minute; which meant I managed to get a really good, close up look at the raw painted gold leaf stiletto platform shoes.

It also of course, meant goody bag ahoy!Ironically, for a fashion gift, this included one of the best brownies I’ve ever eaten; in fact many of the stalls in the LFW exhibitions have sweets or cakes on their stands, though you never see anyone eating them. Except me.Which is why you won’t see me bearing my gilded navel in an Aladdin-esque ensemble anytime soon.


Illustration by Andrea Peterson
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Opposite me on the front row the great and the good of sustainable fashion gathered for the opening show at the Freemasons’ Hall: Nicola Woods of Beautiful Soul, ambulance Safia Minney of People Tree, viagra order Joe Oliver of Bash. It could only be Prophetik.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

Last season it was a rock ‘n’ roll band, sickness this time we got pure bluegrass from the Hogslops of Leipers Fork, Tennessee.
Prophetik-by suzie winsor hogslops
The Hogslops by Suzie Winsor.

A hooded girl stood bathed in the glow of the spotlight, gazing demurely into the distance as a series of models took to the grassy turf of the catwalk in a collection of beautiful dip dyed gowns and bloomers made from sustainable fabrics. All were dyed with natural plant and earth based dyes made from the likes of indigo, madder root, marigold and cochineal. The men followed in sweet little waistcoats decorated with antique buttons, ruffled shirts and jaunty neckerchiefs.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

This was a far more coherent collection than last season’s, and I liked it very much this time around. You’ve got to admire Jeff Garner‘s dedication to sustainability – which undoubtedly goes above and beyond the average fashion designer… but I still feel somewhat uncomfortable that this is all we have in terms of a radical rethinking of fashion. Once again we were given copious gifts; a glass bangle made from a bottle by Smart Glass (love their chandeliers!), some products by Burt’s Bees, seeds, hand balm from Pat&Rub (quite happy about all that), and an Envirosax bag “Encourage impulse purchases by placing the bags as close to the register as possible.” Much as I love them my house is going under in a sea of fabric bags right now – how many more do we need before they themselves become a problem?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

We were also given an iphone case made in association with Griffin, admirably made by artisans in Jeff’s native Tennessee, but from “reclaimed leather, taken as byproduct from existing manufacturing processes and upcycled for use in the case.” Really?? And how is a lifestyle that gleefully spans two continents sustainable? Jeff Garner is described as “surfing from his second home in Malibu California, and horse-riding in London’s Hyde Park.”

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

There’s a fine line between trying to create a truly sustainable world and encouraging the consumption of “ecojunk” by creating more products than we actually need. It’s a problem that I struggle with constantly as I try to bridge the worlds of fashion and sustainability. I have so many questions to ask… I really do think that a proper interview is in order soon. Are you up for it Jeff?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

Categories ,Burts Bees, ,Chris Morris, ,Ecofashion, ,Ecojunk, ,Envirosax, ,Jeff Garner, ,Pat&Rub, ,Prophetik, ,Smart Glass, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Tennessee, ,The Hogslops

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Catwalk Review: Prophetik

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Opposite me on the front row the great and the good of sustainable fashion gathered for the opening show at the Freemasons’ Hall: Nicola Woods of Beautiful Soul, Safia Minney of People Tree, Joe Oliver of Bash. It could only be Prophetik.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

Last season it was a rock ‘n’ roll band, this time we got pure bluegrass from the Hogslops of Leipers Fork, Tennessee.
Prophetik-by suzie winsor hogslops
The Hogslops by Suzie Winsor.

A hooded girl stood bathed in the glow of the spotlight, gazing demurely into the distance as a series of models took to the grassy turf of the catwalk in a collection of beautiful dip dyed gowns and bloomers made from sustainable fabrics. All were dyed with natural plant and earth based dyes made from the likes of indigo, madder root, marigold and cochineal. The men followed in sweet little waistcoats decorated with antique buttons, ruffled shirts and jaunty neckerchiefs.

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

This was a far more coherent collection than last season’s, and I liked it very much this time around. You’ve got to admire Jeff Garner’s dedication to sustainability – which undoubtedly goes above and beyond the average fashion designer… but I still feel somewhat uncomfortable that this is all we have in terms of a radical rethinking of fashion. Once again we were given copious gifts; a glass bangle made from a bottle by Smart Glass (love their chandeliers!), some products by Burt’s Bees, seeds, hand balm from Pat&Rub (quite happy about all that), and an Envirosax bag “Encourage impulse purchases by placing the bags as close to the register as possible.” Much as I love them my house is going under in a sea of fabric bags right now – how many more do we need before they themselves become a problem?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
LFW-Prophetik by Chris Morris
Prophetik by Chris Morris.

We were also given an iphone case made in association with Griffin, admirably made by artisans in Jeff’s native Tennessee, but from “reclaimed leather, taken as byproduct from existing manufacturing processes and upcycled for use in the case.” Really?? And how is a lifestyle that gleefully spans two continents sustainable? Jeff Garner is described as “surfing from his second home in Malibu California, and horse-riding in London’s Hyde Park.”

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory

There’s a fine line between trying to create a truly sustainable world and encouraging the consumption of “ecojunk” by creating more products than we actually need. It’s a problem that I struggle with constantly as I try to bridge the worlds of fashion and sustainability. I have so many questions to ask… I really do think that a proper interview is in order soon. Are you up for it Jeff?

Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Prophetik-S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory



Categories ,Burts Bees, ,Chris Morris, ,Ecofashion, ,Ecojunk, ,Envirosax, ,Jeff Garner, ,Pat&Rub, ,Prophetik, ,Smart Glass, ,Suzie Winsor, ,Tennessee, ,The Hogslops

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Esthetica Review


Illustration by Annejkh Carson
Partimi Dress by Joana Faria
Partimi by Joana Faria.

I probably shouldn’t do this because I actually don’t believe the ghettoisation of ethical designers is a particularly good thing, more about but for ease of storytelling in the grand scheme of things it makes sense to cover the interesting stuff I came across at Esthetica altogether. This is by no means all the stuff I loved, purchase but I’ll be covering others in my upcoming book Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration (with an ethical bent) so for now I’ll just stick to a few that may not have been covered on this blog before….

Martina Spetlova
The Centre for Sustainable Fashion were promoting the work of Martina Spetlova, prescription another MA graduate of Central Saint Martins who has a first degree in chemistry and has set up a fair trade embroidery network between women in Pakistan and designers in the UK. She creates clothes made of interchangeable panels and her recent collection features some interesting garments sponsored by waste from the YKK zip company. She is currently building relationships with mills to use more end of line products that are well suited to the small runs of high end designers, but I do wonder what happens once all that waste has been scooped up.

Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Somerset House SS2011 Martina Spetlova
Octavi Navarro - Martina Spetlova
Martina Spetlova by Octavi Navarro.

Little Glass Clementine
I was really pleased to see my friend Clemmie from Little Glass Clementine exhibiting at Esthetica for the first time. We’ve covered Clemmie before, both for her work drawing attention to the imperilled island of Tuvalu and for her beautifully made jewellery.

LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine

I feel quite proud that her necklaces, constructed from found objects and lovingly sourced vintage items, are now finding a much wider audience. Read an interview with her here.

LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine
LFW SS2011 Little Glass Clementine
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Sägen
Over in the Scandinavian corner I was most intrigued to discover the finely detailed work of Sägen, also showing at Esthetica for the first time. This is upcycling at it’s best – taking shards of old porcelain and reinvigorating them for a new life as a piece of delightful one off jewellery.

Somerset House SS2011 Sagen

Choose from twee rose patterns or more modern classic Scandinavian leaf designs, all set in nickel free silver. One massive downside: the website does not seem to cater to the English speaking customer, so one can only hope some UK based buyers have bought into the range.

sagen-katie-harnett
Sägen by Katie Harnett.

Nina Dolcetti
I tried on a pair of Nina Dolcetti bouncy platform shoes at Esthetica, and instantly fell in love… perhaps I could even ride a bike in a pair of these?? Inexplicably the head designer is not called Nina Dolcetti. Elisalex de Castro Peake is a Cordwainers graduate who launched her first upcycled shoe in September 2008 and the brand name Nina Dolcetti – meaning Little Sweets – comes from a combination of her nickname and her grandmother’s maiden name.

Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti
Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti
Somerset House SS2011 nina dolcetti

All shoes are made in a small factory run factory in East London from off cuts and pre-consumer waste, and she utilises only vegetable tanned leather and sustainably sourced cork and wood. So want a pair to bounce around in, but they’re a leetle bit pricey for me. Well worth it if you earn a decent wage though: I urge you to check them out.

LFW-Nina Dolcetti by Chris Morris
Nina Dolcetti by Chris Morris.

Partimi and Joanna Cave
I love Partimi‘s clean simple designs. Designer Eleanor Dorrien-Smith named her label after the architectural term parti, meaning the conceptual starting point for a project, and she makes beautiful wearable dresses adorned with simple graphic prints.

emma_block_partimi
Partimi by Emma Block.

This season she paid homage to costumes from Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes that her mother had collected at auction. I particularly loved her collaboration with ethical jewellery designer Joanna Cave, and am lusting after a pair of graphic cut out dangly earrings.

LFW SS2011 Partimi
Partimi Long dress by Joana Faria
Partimi earing by Joana Faria
Partimi by Joana Faria.

Oria
This jewellery range is the baby of creative duo Tania Kowalski and Synnove Saelthun, who have worked in the jewellery industry for a combined 25 years. Increasingly concerned wih the social and environmental impact of mining they created Oria in 2007 with an intention to make the supply chain transparent.

Somerset House SS2011 Oria

They source from fair-trade companies, all materials are traceable to point of origin and then the jewellery is made in their London studio. I love the delicate dangly cutout earrings featuring bees and birds.

Oria by Faye West
Oria by Faye West.

Michelle Lowe-Holder
I knew Michelle Lowe-Holder as a clothing designer, but after a break from the industry she’s decided to make a come back as an accessory designer. This was prompted by the realisation that she was always most interested in the details so she decided to be more sustainable and make use of the oodles of waste fabric from old collections – that she still has lying around in her studio – to create some stunning accessories: giant arm, neck and leg pieces are stacked to create dramatic silhouettes.

LFW SS2011 Michelle Lowe-Holder
LFW SS2011 Michelle Lowe-Holder
Michelle Lowe by Michelle Urvall Nyrén
Michelle Lowe-Holder by Michelle Urvall Nyrén.

From Somewhere
From Somewhere has been upcycling waste luxury materials since 1997, and as a bastion of sustainable fashion it was to designer Orsola de Castro that the BFC came when they wanted to set up Esthetica in 2006.

LFW SS2011 Orsola From Somewhere
Orsola de Castro.

This season she has been working with offcuts from Speedo to create a lovely limited edition capsule collection.

speedo_by Alia Gargum
Speedo From Somewhere collaboration by Alia Gargum.

Made
Having just returned from a Fashion Business Club get together with the unexpectedly lucid Laura Bailey I thought I would also mention Made, a jewellery brand “by the people for the people” that is reasonably well known thanks to some high profile branding and wide distribution. They are big on their “designer” collaborations, though not designers I’ve ever heard of: since when was Laura Bailey a jewellery designer anyway? Boy do I want her job. I’m not a massive fan of a lot of their stuff (looks wise), but they do undeniably good things by providing trade for impoverished communities in Africa.

made by natsuki otani
Made by Natsuki Otani.

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Centre for Sustainable Fashion, ,Cordwainers, ,Ecofashion, ,Elisalex de Castro Peake, ,Emma Block, ,esthetica, ,ethical design, ,Fashion Business Club, ,Faye West, ,From Somewhere, ,jewellery, ,Joanna Cave, ,Katie Harnett, ,Laura Bailey, ,Little Glass Clementine, ,MADE, ,Martina Spetlova, ,Michelle Lowe-Holder, ,Michelle Urvall Nyrén, ,Nina Dolcetti, ,Octavi Navarro, ,Oria, ,Orsola De Castro, ,Partimi, ,recycling, ,Sägen Butik, ,scandinavia, ,shoes, ,Speedo, ,sustainability, ,Synnove Saelthun, ,Tania Kowalski, ,Tuvalu, ,Upcycling, ,YKK

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2014: Off Strand exhibition at Hoxton Gallery

Mury print scarves

During London Fashion Week I popped in to the off schedule Off Strand presentation at Hoxton Gallery in East London, a well curated and beautifully presented show organised by Anna of the Pitchouguina label. First discovery: the beautiful abstract print scarves above, by ethical accessories brand Mury.

Niza Huang ring

I have previously admired jewellery by Niza Huang at Somerset House, but her new range looks even better: riffing on the ever popular roughly hewn look. I was very sad to hear that someone had stolen one of her pieces shortly before my visit (what a bastard, but small comfort that at least he had good taste). I am sure she will do well, especially with a number of delicate new pieces currently in the pipeline.

Arlette Ess scarves

Arlette Ess is a former model, graphic designer and mother who is now applying her illustrative skills to a range of gorgeous scarves.

Alexa de Castilho necklaces

Pineapple and palm tree spinning disc pendants have a definite 80s vibe, designed by Alexa De Castilho. Her display featured a pair of gold ceramic prancing horses, found for a song in a car boot sale. Jealous, moi?

goodone bomber knit

I was really happy to discover that Goodone (who vanished for a year or so) is back again, this time with a range of brilliant jumpers, dresses and bomber jackets that feature remnants of upcycled aran jumpers. These are manufactured in their Bulgarian factory, which also offers sustainable manufacturing to other brands. Designer Nin Castle is currently pregnant and now living in Spain but her collection looked better than ever. Amazing stuff. And I so want one of those knitted bomber jackets.

Gina Melosi jewels

I loved the use of fair trade raw gems and recycled metals in elegantly displayed jewellery by Gina Melosi.

pitchouguina bryksenkova collaboration

Finally, but of course by no means least, it was ace to see the last two Pitchouguina collections, which combine unusual colours and fabrics to create unique but highly wearable garments. I immediately homed in on a new piece that featured a beautiful and instantly recognisable illustration, by none other than our much loved Yelena Bryksenkova, who has of course worked with Amelia’s Magazine for many years. You can read my recent interview with Anna here.

You can read my review of the exhibition stands at Somerset House here.

Categories ,A/W 2014, ,Alexa De Castilho, ,Arlette Ess, ,Ecofashion, ,ethical, ,Gina Melosi, ,goodone, ,Hoxton Gallery, ,London Fashion Week, ,Mury, ,Nin Castle, ,Niza Huang, ,Off Strand, ,Pitchouguina, ,Report, ,review, ,Yelena Bryksenkova

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Amelia’s Magazine | Little Women AW15: an interview with Renli Su

Renli Su by Bonaramis
Renli Su AW15 by Bonaramis.

Chinese born designer Renli Su first caught my eye when her collection appeared on the catwalk as one of the Fashion Scout Ones to Watch crew in 2013. The designer explores the idea of Time and Memory, with each season expanding and developing on this theme. For SS15 and AW15 she has been inspired by the tale of Little Women, resulting in two ‘strong yet feminine’ collections that reflect the typical dress sense of elegant and charming girls living in the mid-late 19th century.

Renli Su AW15
Renli Su AW15
Where did you train in fashion design and what was your biggest design inspiration growing up?
I began studying painting and then completed BA Fashion Design at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. Being surrounded by artists I found an appreciation for fabric as a material for my work, which is where my fashion education began. After my BA, I came to London to study MA Fashion Design and Technology Women’s wear at London College of Fashion, and I’ve been based in London ever since.

Renli Su AW15
Renli Su AW15
How did you first start researching the Little Women collections?
The most part of my research came from my travels. The materials used were Chinese Summer Fabric, Indian hand-woven cotton, Indian black print cotton and Irish innovative cotton linen, so this meant I spent time in all of these countries, finding the fabrics and exploring the traditional techniques used to create them.

Renli Su AW15
I source fabrics from all over the world. For AW15, again I used the four materials that made up the SS15 collection, but I also added Tibetan Yak Wool and Chinese Silk. I am passionate about sourcing and reviving traditional techniques from different parts of the world as each of the materials are made in a different way and I meet interesting people who have dedicated their lives to creating these fabrics, it’s something I want to explore further.

Renli Su AW15
Renli Su AW15
What have been the biggest hurdles in terms of getting the collections together?
There is a lot of research involved in the early stages and then in the later stages it requires a lot of dedication to create a collection that will stand the test of time in elegance, cut and quality.

Renli Su AW15
Renli Su AW15
Where can your garments be bought?
Young British Designers in the UK, Dongliang in Shanghai, China, Dongliang in Beijing, China and Berween in Changsha, China. And of course online from www.renlisu.com.

Categories ,AW15, ,beijing, ,Berween, ,Bonaramis, ,Central Academy of Fine Arts, ,Dongliang, ,Ecofashion, ,ethical, ,fashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,interview, ,Kristel Pent, ,Little Women, ,London College of Fashion, ,Ones To Watch, ,organic, ,Renli Su, ,SS15, ,Time and Memory, ,young british designers

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Amelia’s Magazine | London College of Fashion MA 2012 Exhibition Review

Hana Cha by Sam Parr
Hana Cha by Sam Parr

Two weeks ago, there was a multicolour explosion deep in the basement of Victoria House, Bloomsbury – it was the MA Graduate Season 2012 show at the London College of Fashion – and it was inspiring.

Hana Cha by Jason Lear
Hana Cha by Jason Lear

The first collection that catches my eye is Carry on Closet, a collaborative project between Renée Lacroix (MA Fashion and the Environment) and Zahra Ash-Harper (MA Entrepreneurship), collectively Antithesis (who Amelia mentored on the CFE Fashion Bootcamp). They’ve created an enviable capsule collection of trans-seasonal, versatile pieces, and it’s the team’s hope that their high quality clothing will result in long-lasting, treasured pieces. I covet the second cloak in their video below, which doubles as a short jacket and vest – it’s one of many thoughtfully-crafted pieces which would slot in well to any contemporary wardrobe.


Next, I meet Daisy Jie Feng (MA Fashion Artefact), who is sporting a delicate silver neckpiece which resembles a set of wings. As we get talking, I understand that this is completely intentional – she was inspired by Kafka’s Metamorphosis to produce a series of necklaces that combine fine jewellery with a story of evolution. Each of her mannequins on display show the pieces becoming progressively more intricate, until we reach the final neckpiece which is made from 265 silver cones wrapped in silver and white gold.

Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Gareth A Hopkins
Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Gareth A Hopkins

Octavia Xiaozi Yang (MA Fashion Artefact) has applied traditional Chinese elements to contemporary jewellery for her Joinery in Jewels project, for me characterised by the enormous resin rubies which can be spied from a distance. No glue or nails are used to create the neck pieces, instead all the materials are constructed to work together, with laser cut perspex, 18 carat gold, and wood.

Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Claire Kearns
Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Claire Kearns

Rounding a corner, everyone stops to gaze at Vivien Ying’s (MA Fashion Footwear) vibrant shoes, which would be perfect come spring. She asks, ‘Is it possible to adapt the aesthetics and principles of Kimono wrapping into the scale and techniques of footwear?’ And indeed it is, as she’s draped the shoes without adding weight to them, and maintained the essence of the Kimono concept by using leathers delicately imprinted with floral patterns.

Vivien Ying by Sam Parr
Vivien Ying by Sam Parr

Ruth Holland’s (MA Fashion Artefact) neck pieces are spectacular. She focuses on reusing materials and wants to make precious pieces from non-precious materials – traditional handmade rope, mixed plastics and resins. This kind of approach makes for pieces obviously steeped in careful craftsmanship, and leaves me wondering why we would ever want to wear anything else – it’s the kind of artwork that is easy to connect with ethically and visually – you just want to reach out and put it on.

Necklace by Ruth Holland
Necklace by Ruth Holland

Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Jason Lear
Tina Elisabeth Reiter by Jason Lear

Charlotte Valkeniers (MA Fashion Artefact) tells me that she isn’t a jewellery person, which is a little bit funny given her enormous neck pieces! Everything is laser cut in to spirals with hand-knitted tubes and hand-forged metal, and her curiosity about the human body and muscle structure is apparent in the shape and weave of the pieces. I like the neutral tones and textures, and come to think of it, their simplicity might be perfect for the person who shies away from decoration.

Neckpiece by Charlotte Valkeniers
Neck piece by Charlotte Valkeniers

Photographs by Rebecca Merrick
Photographs by Rebecca Merrick

After perusing the photography portion of the show (including some beautiful, threaded images from Rebecca Merrick), I witness performances from the students doing their MA in Costume Design for Performance. The audience is captivated, first by Lisa Duncan’s costume for a performance of Orlando, and later, by a very personal work from Lesley Asare, iShape Beauty, which ends in cheers.

Costume design by Lisa Duncan
Costume design by Lisa Duncan

Oenghus in Love by Lucy Mitchell
Óenghus in Love by Lucy Mitchell

Two nights after I visit, the annual MA Catwalk Show takes place at the V&A: Tina Elisabeth Reiter (MA Fashion Design Technology, Menswear) is announced winner of the Menswear Collection of the Year, and Hana Cha (MA Fashion Design Technology, Womenswear) winner of the Womenswear Collection of the Year. Congratulations to both on creating such rich, innovative collections.

Watch the MA_12 Catwalk Show here

Object by Ana Rajcevic
Object by Ana Rajcevic

If you’re interested in seeing more from this exciting institution, read our London College of Fashion Fashion Illustration and Photography and Styling reviews from 2011.

Categories ,2012, ,Ana Rajcevic, ,Antithesis, ,Bloomsbury, ,Carry on Closet, ,Charlotte Valkeniers, ,Claire Kearns, ,Daisy Jie Feng, ,Ecofashion, ,fashion, ,Fashion Bootcamp, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Hana Cha, ,iShape Beauty, ,Jason Lear, ,jewellery, ,Joinery in Jewels, ,Kafka, ,Lesley Asare, ,Lisa Duncan, ,London College of Fashion, ,Lucy Mitchell, ,ma, ,Menswear Collection of the Year, ,Metamorphosis, ,Octavia Xiaozi Yang, ,Óenghus in Love, ,Rebecca Merrick, ,Renée Lacroix, ,Ruth Holland, ,Sam Parr, ,Tina Elisabeth Reiter, ,Victoria House, ,Vivien Ying, ,Womenswear Collection of the Year, ,Zahra Ash-Harper

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Amelia’s Magazine | Review: Designers Makers Market at Old Spitalfields Market

designers makers market flyer
Following a tip off from fellow mummy Helen of East End Prints, I went along to the first Designers Makers market to be held in Old Spitalfields on Saturday afternoon. It was a hideous day – cold and damp – so hardly ideal conditions to be manning a market stall and I really did feel for the designer makers in attendance, especially since this is a funny time of year to be selling gift wares. Designers Makers was sharing the main hall with a vintage market as well as various other mainstays, so it was hard to locate the right stalls, but I was glad I did find them as there was some wonderful new talent on display: I do however have one major gripe. Promotion! Or lack thereof… Business cards, especially ones with all the necessary information (website, etsy, twitter, facebook, pinterest, ANYTHING but an email) were in very short supply, and only one stall holder I talked to had a mailing list: others seemed befuddled when I asked to sign up for one. Designer makers would do well to read up on how to get the most out of a craft fair before going to so much effort – there are many great resources online, such as this blog from The Design Trust: How to prepare for a Craft Show or Design Trade Fair. It makes me so frustrated when talented artisans are not properly prepared to promote themselves at a market: many people are likely to be window shopping but they are all potential customers who may well buy something online at a later date. Or indeed at another fair, to which they have been alerted by social media (of course). Here were my top finds:

Dionne Sylvester digital print cushions
Psychedelic ink splot cushions were inspired by magic eye patterns and optical illusions. Designer Dionne Sylvester trained in fashion at Falmouth, and is now decorating homewards in imitable style.

lulu and luca cushions
Lulu and Luca: super pretty Art Deco inspired prints on organic & upcycled fabrics.

Jessie G Designs needlepoint cushions
Handmade needlepoint tapestry cushions by Jessie G came in a variety of eye popping colour ways: they represent the most unbelievable amount of work. An absolute steal.

Zinc White upcycled derwent pencils jewellery
Seriously genius: Zinc White husband and wife team had travelled down from Huddersfield to sell their innovative upcycled jewellery made out of waste Derwent pencil stubs, which are set into resin then carved into broaches, rings and cuff links.

Don Manolo jewellery Designers Makers
I couldn’t resist a few pairs of these incredibly well priced laser cut and painted Art Deco inspired jewellery by Don Manolo. Either I am very attracted to Art Deco or I sense a trend emerging.

i am acrylic volcano necklace
Fun volcano necklaces by i am acrylic came in neon brights.

Hazel Nicholls babushka print
Hazel Nicholls: cute slogans on kitchenwares and prints featuring graphic versions of the ever popular Babushka doll. I couldn’t agree more: It’s Whats Inside That Counts.

Categories ,Art Deco, ,Artisan, ,Babushka doll, ,Craft Fair, ,Derwent, ,Designer Makers, ,Designers Makers, ,Dionne Sylvester, ,Don Manolo, ,East End Prints, ,Ecofashion, ,Falmouth, ,Hazel Nicholls, ,How to prepare for a Craft Show or Design Trade Fair, ,Huddersfield, ,i am acrylic, ,It’s Whats Inside That Counts, ,Jessie G, ,Lulu and Luca, ,market, ,Old Spitalfields, ,Promotion, ,Social Media, ,sustainable, ,The Design Trust, ,Upcycled, ,Zinc White

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