Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Caroline Charles


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

It was Day 1 at Somerset House and I was surrounded by all those fashion bigwigs at Caroline Charles; sure to have just flown in first-class from the closing New York Fashion Week and before that whichever glamorous corner of the Earth they resided. The BFC Catwalk space, page therefore, kicked off with a sure-fire reminder of where we were; London. Just in case anyone forgot.


Illustration by Maria Papadimitriou

??It was all about the classic, home-comfort elements of good-old British style. You had your checks, your lace, your chiffon, your wool winter coats that your mother forced you in when you were young and now just can’t get out of.??

Most garments were intrinsically minimalistic. There was very little print. The fabric palette didn’t stretch too far and no real attempt towards a-symmetric cuts or daring features was made. Despite such profuse amounts of plain-Jane style, however, a subtle sexiness arose from those full-sequined dresses in bright red and sultry black as well as the odd combination of tiger and leopard print. It was bad taste turned classy.??


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

The collection’s silhouette held a strong focus on the waist with delicate belts cinching-in wool shift dresses and chiffon floaty creations. There was a barely a bold moment throughout the entire show but one thing was for sure: everything had style.
Furthermore (as has been featured countless times this season), bows were a primary focus for Charles. She placed them on bowler hats, made them out of black ribbon tied around the neck and pulled them round to the rear of high-waisted trousers.


Illustrations by Maria Papadimitriou

Some of the combinations of textures, however, were a little iffy for me. Black leather pencil skirts with brown lady-like jackets? It just didn’t click. I also wasn’t keen on the injection of equestrian riding hats and low pony-tails. It was oh-so-boring and that kind of look, for me anyway, completely lacks any sort of style or attitude. Perhaps a ploy made my yet-another designer to turn the head of Kate Middleton as the Royal Wedding approaches? Maybe so.


Photographs by Georgia Takacs

Amidst the elegant and some-what calming classical music, however, I was agitated by lady-with-hideous-hat who was inconveniently featured in most of my photographs. There was a bit of a frenzy around her and THE HAT after the show. I couldn’t begin to understand why and marched past indifferent and utterly confused.??

All in all, a largely predictable and collection from a classic London dress-maker. It’s endearing, however, to see a leading designer of 47 years to continue delivering a fail-safe iconic style which will forever be appreciated. And with so much sophisticated femininity around this Autumn/Winter season, it certainly set the scene for what was to come and offers a solid reference to anyone embracing ‘The Woman’ next season.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,Autumn/Winter, ,Bows, ,british, ,Caroline Charles, ,catwalk, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Kate Middleton, ,ladylike, ,London Fashion Week, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,review, ,Royal Wedding, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Style, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2010: Streetstyle: Womenswear

NB: At Amelia’s Magazine, cheap we do not promote real fur of any kind. We hope all of these looks use only faux fur, remedy but there are still some people who think it’s acceptable. It’s the 21st century, and it really isn’t. Please don’t wear fur.

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Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Bows, ,Faux Fur, ,Legs, ,London Fashion Week, ,Street Style, ,Tartan

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Amelia’s Magazine | Emma Ware: the sustainable designer who makes jewellery from tyres

Lisa Stannard, diagnosis cheapest Emesha S/S 2010
Emesha is created by Emese Nagy, look who was named after the lead lady in a myth about the creation of the Hungarian kingdom. She grew up between Hungary and the United States before moving to London, for sale all of which has made her very open-minded and observant. My travels have been a great inspiration to me as a designer. She particularly likes the quirky style of places such as Shoreditch in east London.

Being a socially sensitive type who wants to help others it was natural that she took an ethical stance for her brand especially as she began to understand more about the origins and manufacturing of clothing. As a strict vegetarian she doesn’t use fur or leather in her designs, case and only natural materials. An internship at Vivienne Westwood taught her about precision in complicated patterns, and at Jasper Conran she was given the confidence to create a collection from start to finish. I was involved in all the stages of production which gave me a good insight into how the final garment comes together…

Read the rest of this interview with Emesha in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Emesha is created by Emese Nagy, erectile who was named after the lead lady in a myth about the creation of the Hungarian kingdom. She grew up between Hungary and the United States before moving to London, troche all of which has made her very open-minded and observant. My travels have been a great inspiration to me as a designer. She particularly likes the quirky style of places such as Shoreditch in east London.

Being a socially sensitive type who wants to help others it was natural that she took an ethical stance for her brand especially as she began to understand more about the origins and manufacturing of clothing. As a strict vegetarian she doesn’t use fur or leather in her designs, seek and only natural materials. An internship at Vivienne Westwood taught her about precision in complicated patterns, and at Jasper Conran she was given the confidence to create a collection from start to finish. I was involved in all the stages of production which gave me a good insight into how the final garment comes together…

Read the rest of this interview with Emesha in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Lisa Stannard, <a target=adiposity Emesha S/S 2010″ title=”Lisa Stannard, online Emesha S/S 2010″ width=”480″ height=”576″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-32247″ />
Emesha S/S 2010 by Lisa Stannard.

Emesha is created by Emese Nagy, approved who was named after the lead lady in a myth about the creation of the Hungarian kingdom. She grew up between Hungary and the United States before moving to London, all of which has made her very open-minded and observant. My travels have been a great inspiration to me as a designer. She particularly likes the quirky style of places such as Shoreditch in east London.

Being a socially sensitive type who wants to help others it was natural that she took an ethical stance for her brand especially as she began to understand more about the origins and manufacturing of clothing. As a strict vegetarian she doesn’t use fur or leather in her designs, and only natural materials. An internship at Vivienne Westwood taught her about precision in complicated patterns, and at Jasper Conran she was given the confidence to create a collection from start to finish. I was involved in all the stages of production which gave me a good insight into how the final garment comes together…

Read the rest of this interview with Emesha in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Lisa Stannard, <a target=rx Emesha S/S 2010″ title=”Lisa Stannard, buy Emesha S/S 2010″ width=”480″ height=”576″ class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-32247″ />
Emesha S/S 2010 by Lisa Stannard.

Emesha is created by Emese Nagy, pill who was named after the lead lady in a myth about the creation of the Hungarian kingdom. She grew up between Hungary and the United States before moving to London, all of which has made her very open-minded and observant. My travels have been a great inspiration to me as a designer. She particularly likes the quirky style of places such as Shoreditch in east London.

Being a socially sensitive type who wants to help others it was natural that she took an ethical stance for her brand especially as she began to understand more about the origins and manufacturing of clothing. As a strict vegetarian she doesn’t use fur or leather in her designs, and only natural materials. An internship at Vivienne Westwood taught her about precision in complicated patterns, and at Jasper Conran she was given the confidence to create a collection from start to finish. I was involved in all the stages of production which gave me a good insight into how the final garment comes together…

Read the rest of this interview with Emesha in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Joana Faria_Emma Ware_S-S 2011
Emma Ware by Joana Faria.

Jewellery from tyres.
I have always been attracted to colourful, sildenafil shiny, fun pieces of old broken jewellery, toys and bottle tops; stuff that others would consider rubbish or of no use. It doesn’t make ecological or economic sense to manufacture new materials when there is so much out there already. Reusing materials changes the way you design because it forces you to work within the limits of the material you have and I am constantly on the lookout for new waste materials to use. One day my friend had a puncture, and seeing potential in the rubber ring of the inner tube I had a go at chopping it up and immediately knew I was onto something.

Elegance in rubber.
I create designs based on what the rubber wants me to do, playing with the natural shapes when it is cut up in different ways. Making repetitive cuts in graduated sizes of inner tubes rings seems to result in designs that imitate naturally occurring organic patterns; similar to those found in wings, feathers, leaves, shells or even waves. My signature pieces are based on cutting the tube in a specific way, from which I figure out how I can make something to complement the human form…

Read the rest of this interview with Emma Ware in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Ware, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Feathers, ,Joana Faria, ,leaves, ,organic, ,recycling, ,Rubber, ,shells, ,wings

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with Kelly Goss, aka Rock ‘n’ Needle


Illustration by Pieter de Groot

When did you found Rock ‘n’ Needle and why? 
It was in 2008. I started designing and making clothes alongside studying at The Fashion Retail Academy. Although I was studying fashion retailing I still had a passion for making clothes. I wanted to design under a name and came up with Rock ‘n’ Needle. I started organising photoshoots in London through Model Mayhem and received a great response. This inspired me to develop the clothing into a brand. I took part in a fashion show in Mayfair which led to exhibiting at FaCshion exhibition. I really enjoyed taking part in these events and decided to set up the brand full time once I’d finished my course.  


What insires you, then?
I love tattoos, although I don’t have any! Tattoo designs work really well with embroidery and there’s so much inspiration from different styles. I am also inspired by music- I’m a huge rock fan, my favourite band being Motley Crue. I love musicians who have an extravagant and iconic image. I also enjoy seeing what’s happening on the streets. To me this is the biggest inspiration – to see what people are wearing now.



Photograph by Marta F. Andrés

How do you create these tattoo-tastic designs?
 I machine embroider all the designs. It starts with a drawing and develops on the computer until it is ready to be embroidered. There is a lot of sampling involved with the imagery. I use pretty basic fabrics for the clothing, using mainly cotton; the fabric needs to be suitable for embroidery. With the bows I can experiment a bit more, adding PVC, denim and all kinds of colours!  


Does your label consider the environment?
 Yes. Any material left over I try and create into the bows and brooches. I hate fabric waste, although it isn’t always easy to incorporate it into something new. I am currently in the process of re-designing the bags, for events such as Clothes Show Live. I’m also designing Rock ‘n’ Needle tote bags which will be available to buy online soon. They will have the embroidered designs on and will use environmentally-friendly cotton.  
 


Photograph by Ryan Bater

Which other designers or creatives do you admire?
My biggest admiration has been for Vivienne Westwood. I was absolutely delighted that Rock ‘n’ Needle’s first stockist was Ad Hoc on the Kings Road, near her iconic shop. The last couple of years I have been inspired by Henry Holland, who has exploded into the fashion industry – it’s really inspiring considering he started with slogan t-shirts and now has concessions Debenhams. To me, these designers have broken so many boundaries and to have such an incredible influence on people’s wardrobes. 


What has been your proudest moment so far?
 Last year I was delighted to win ‘VQ Young Learner of the Year’ for Wales: with over 500 entries it was a tough competition! I was nominated by Swansea College and the event took place at The Senedd in Cardiff with the Welsh Assembly Government. Most recently I was in the top 100 of future fashion retail leaders with Drapers Magazine. I entered the competition online and won a place at their Next Generation Academy in London, which was a one day event with industry experts. I felt honoured to be part of it. 
 

What did you get out of your time at the Next Generation Academy?
It was an invaluable day which covered a variety of topics including e-commerce, new technologies and self promotion. Henry Holland gave an interview which was a great insight for me as a designer. I met some lovely people from Success Appointments, and witnessed inspirational talks from Drapers ‘30 under 30′ feature. There was a lot of networking opportunities which was really useful as you don’t meet people as influential as this every day!


Illustration by Pieter de Groot

How do you see your collections developing in the future?
I will soon be introducing new-style tops comprising of short sleeved t-shirts and vests. I have also designed a couple of cropped tees for Summer. Next month Rock ‘n’ Needle tote bags will be available to buy, and this Winter I am launching Rock ‘n’ Needle hoodies which will carry the signature embroidered motifs. In the future I’d love to create Rock ‘n’ Needle jeans and lingerie, and maybe even menswear!
 


Do you have any other projects on the go?
Currently I am concentrating on developing the Rock ‘n’ Needle product range to expand from t-shirts and sweaters. I would love to collaborate with a fellow designer or musician/artist. I am extremely interested in the environment and animal welfare and I’d like to develop my work with these considerations. In the early stages of Rock ‘n’ Needle I have had to be fully focused on the brand, but I’m excited about broadening my scope in the future.


Photograph by Ryan Bater

What do you do in your spare time?!
 I don’t have much spare time at the moment as I’m exhibiting at Clothes Show Live London in June! There’s so much to prepare and I am launching new products which will be available to buy at the show, and then online on my website afterwards. When I do have spare time I love music and could quite happily spend hours on YouTube! I enjoy going to gigs, reading, going out for coffee and browsing in shops. Most recently I have been reading blogs – and I love Audrey Kitching’s. Her style is awesome and I always feel motivated to create when I have been reading her work!
 

I have to ask – would you ever get a tattoo?
Not in the near future, I love them but I couldn’t imagine picking a design and being happy with it for the rest of my life! I really like Fearne Cottons’ tattoos and I once worked with Ann French, who has some pretty cool ones, which can be seen in some of the Rock ‘n’ Needle pictures. I think you have to be quite a decisive person to have one and when it comes to what I wear or look like I am very indecisive.
  


Categories ,30 under 30, ,Ad Hoc, ,Ann French, ,Bags, ,Bows, ,Brooches, ,Clothes Show Live, ,Drapers, ,embroidery, ,Fearne Cotton, ,Henry Holland, ,Kelly Goss, ,Kings Road, ,london, ,Next Generation Academy, ,PVC, ,Rock ‘n’ Needle, ,Success Appointments, ,Swansea College, ,Tattoos, ,Vivienne Westwood, ,VQ Young Learner of the Year

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