Amelia’s Magazine | The Stellar Boutique

At Amelia, order we thought you should know about these before you go out and brave the cold for that all important shopping trip! From limited edition prints to games and furniture, symptoms there is something here for all pockets deep to not so deep. But always for the art connoisseur that you are.

The-Weather-Outside

Jess Smart Smiley – The Weather Outside Is Frightful

The Weather Outside Is Frightful is a 2×3 foot winter-themed “look-and-find coloring poster”. Find the evil Ice Wizard and his mischievous bat brigade before they destroy winter cheer! The poster comes with a pack of crayons and a list of items to find and color. Get your own for just $12 + shipping by sending your address and dollars via PayPal to jess.smiley@gmail.com. Orders of 2 or more posters get a free original drawing of a snow creature. Check the Iphone Wallpaper too!

Book

Jean-Claude Mattrat – Le Reste Offense
2008, thumb
limited edition of 25 copies at £95

Jean-Claude Mattrat’s self-published book is full of beutiful original screenprints all nicely clothbound in slipcase. Rocket Gallery offers this and other interesting prints, books and objects from an affordable £50 to £650. Martin Parr’ s enamel tray or Tomoko Azumi ‘s Hexad [stacking table] can be viewed at the gallery or shipped in time for Christmas. Don’t wait!

WWP

WWP – Originals by Artists

From £100

This new series of originals by leading artists is the perfect last minute Christmas gift. These are ‘one-off’ items and exclusively available through the WIWP site. They will be sold on a first come, first served basis, so be quick if you are genuinely interested in purchasing one. Series One Includes Seb Lester, Dan Baldwin, Wilfrid Wood, David Bray, Kristian Hammerstad, Hellovon, Mr Bingo and Pomme Chan. The selection of Sculptures, Drawings, Sketches and Ceramics are with prices starting as low as £100+PP

Rob Ryan

Rob Ryan – You Can Still do a lot with a Small Brain

Published by Yorkshire Sculpture Park £24.99

Rob Ryan is a renowned artist of many achievements. He is a magician at paper cutting and his intricate screen prints are unmistakably romantic and always appealing. The likes of Elle and Vogue magazines, Liberty’s of London, Fortnum and Mason and our favorite designer here at Amelia, Sir Paul Smith, have all been seduced by his wonderfully detailed and delicate work. This hardback is a glossy and classy affair in which trees stand taller than buildings, leaves have faces and birds speak with more wisdom than humans. Published to accompany the exhibition of the same title, Ryan’s first at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, You Can Still do a lot with a Small Brain includes an interview with the artist and stunning photographs of Ryan’s work.

Anthology

Amelia’s House – Amelia ‘s Anthology of Illustration

Published by Amelia’s House £25

Talking of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, they stock our homegrown Anthology of Illustration. This 265-page long colourful and exquisitely designed page-turner has garnered rave reviews from the Guardian, Creative Review and many others. It is also available to order from Concrete Hermit over the Christmas vacation while Amelia is away helping to make this world a better place!

Eco-houses

Etsy – Monaw

From $11.50 USD

Handmade with love and care, Monaw‘s handbags and other items such as pouches and accessoires are decorated with lovely designs. What’s more, they have a lovely eco theme to them, with the organic handpicked lavender filled houses or the cute zippeed pouches made of cotton fabrics. Etsy is a brilliant shop for one of a kind art gifts and many are also ecologically sound- as you know, we care about that at Amelia! Elsewhere on Etsy, the Sparrow Coffee Cozy is a treat, Slidesideways’ Screenprinted poster are environmentally friendly and woolandwater‘s doll sets are just show stopping!

Paul-Davis

The Planets of Unfailure – Paul Davis

A2 (420 x 594mm), digital print on archive paper with archive inks, edition of 50, £300.00 UK, £320.00 overseas, p+p inclusive

The Drawbridge – One Year Subscription

4 issues for £12.00

Paul Davis‘s fantastic satirical drawing “The planets of un-failure” (first published in The Drawbridge issue 4, 2007) is now available as a limited edition print signed and numbered by the artist. The Drawbridge is a quirky and innovative independent quarterly delivering thought, wit and reflection through words, photography and drawing. It is in turn critically nonsensical and radically serious. With each issue, authors and artists cast an unflinching look at a selected theme. Why not offer a gift subscription of one year and 4 issues? Passionately written, elegantly designed and intelligently illuminated, full-colour newspaper is the perfect gift for the the progressive reader in search of  surprising combinations of views, insights and visual wit!

Articulado---Sanserif-Creat

Articulado’s Book – Sanserif

At first sight, this book looks like one of a kind and it is undeniably so;  this limited edition portable book-product is more sculpture for your mantelpiece than mere reading material .A not-for-profit publication featuring opinions and reflections from leading names in international design —Erwan Bouroullec, Ana Yago, Karim Rashid, Milton Glaser…— and other experts —Alice Rawsthorn, Covadonga Pendones…— on the relationship between design, the environment and the economy. Conceived to transmit values like sustainable growth, recycling, low impact production processes… printed in one colour on ecological paper without varnishes or special treatments.  Coordinated by José Antonio Giménez & Designed by Ana Yago (Sanserif Creatius), with the support of ADCV and Impiva. More info at prensa@sanserif.es. The book is available to buy online or at prensa@adcv.com.

SonnyMe

Sonny McCartney – T-Shirts

From £20

SonnyMe is a very talented photographer and designer. His T-shirts are sticking black and white designs that reflect his off-beat sense of humor. Buy this T-shirt on his website.


Cotton monster

Jennifer Strunge – Cotton Monsters

From $35.00 USD

Maryland Institute College of Art graduate Jennifer Strunge makes fantastic creatures out of recycled fabrics that she culls from old garments and linens. The one she has for sale via her website have pockets in their mouths, making them comforting hand-warmers.

Haunch

Haunch of Venison – Limited Edition Prints

Books from £12 and prints from £100

Haunch of Venison has published a number of new books and editions over the past year and their series of prints are particularly noteworthy! Polly Morgan’s etching ‘Blackbird with Maggots‘, produced for ‘Mythologies’, depicts a rotten blackbird that has become a nesting site for flies. Morgan, an artist who incorporates highly skilled taxidermy in her work, has talked of a ‘desire to celebrate the corpse as a thing of beauty and significance’. Published to accompany ‘Mythologies’, Haunch of Venison London, 12 March – 25 April 2009, this etching on Somerset textured paper is an edition of 100 priced at £100.00. Or what about Mark Alexander’s ‘Via Negativa or Hew Locke’s striking ‘Chariots of the Gods‘. Have a look at the Haunch of Venison website; it is a treasure trove of gorgeous books and editions.

Paper-circus

V&A – Press-Out and Stand-Up Paper Circus

Price £5.00

Created exclusively for the V&A, this delightful press-out and stand-up circus is adapted from an early twentieth century paper circus in the museum’s collection. Each pack includes 2 sheets with a press out, slot together and stand up circus tent and crowd; now all you have to do is press out, fold and stand circus performers and animals! Great price for even greater fun and playful idea!

PhotoPYMCA – Richard Braine and Sky Sheldon

From £30.00

This limited edition from the PYMCA archive is the perfect last-minute Christmas gift.The archive contains over 80,000 classic and contemporary images from Mods, Two-Tone, Madchester, Acid House, Swinging London, Punks, Skins…and every subculture and youth movement in-between. The archive also features famous faces from the music world such as The Clash, The Stone Roses, Madness, The Beat, Faithless and many more. Featuring the work of such fantastic photographers as Richard Braine, Ted Polhemus, Paul Hartnett, Toni Tye, Janette Beckman, Syd Shelton, Dean Chalkley, David Swindells, Normski, Eddie Otchere, to name but a few, a PYMCA Limited Edition Print would make a stunning addition to every living room wall. Each print is strictly limited edition, coming with a certificate of authenticity and can be framed or unframed in many sizes up to 50 x 70cm. Prices range from £35 for a small print up to £150 for a signed, 50 x 70cm.

Chris-Martin

Chris Martin – T-shirt Designs

Chris Martin is one busy illustrator as his blog will demonstrate. At Amelia, we like original illustrators and Matin’s work is quirky, colorful and wonderfully detailed! This design and many more are available to buy. Contact the artist to find out more: Chris@mrchrismartin.co.uk

Calendar

Jan von Holleben – Journey to Everywhere Calendar

Large 2010 Wall Calendar, 47×45cm, 13 Pages, Published by Chrismon Edition 2009, Price: £15.00

‘Its great to come back to a place and continue where things were left in the past’. It’s seven years ago since Jan von Holleben started to put his kids and childhood dreams into photographs. Since then trees have grown and new houses have been built in the little village in Sasbach at the Kaiserstuhl, in the South West of Germany. The kids he works with have grown too, but are still keen on playing along with him. ‘It’s just that demands from the kids are much higher now and that I can confront them with more complex ideas than in the past. We still meet in front of my mother’s house, discuss the photographic ideas and collect the props we need for the images”. Perspectives are closely defined for everything needs to be perfect for an illusion that needs no digital postproduction. See for yourself and buy here!
home pageAll imagery throughout courtesy of The Stellar Boutique

Stella McCartney and Kate Moss know a thing or two about good style. Both are fans of Stella McClure, prescription owner of newly opened internet shop, view The Stellar Boutique. Previously running a vintage-customised stall at Portobello Market, McClure packed up shop in 2004 to travel the world in a campervan. Now settled in the Spanish countryside, she has decided to give it another go. This time though from the comfort of her own home via the power of the internet.

80s vintage tiger topThe Stellar Boutique is a great concept. McClure travels the hippy-luxe trail across Europe to Marrakech in order to bring you vintage treasures. Everybody loves a one-off, and that is certainly what The Stellar Boutique provides. Featuring vintage bags, designer garments, customised pieces and exquisitely exotic homeware, there’s something for everyone.

squareingtrq231Unlike many other fashion businesses at the moment, McClure is keen to promote new designers and ethnic artisans. (Instead of ‘Marc Jacobs’ think ‘Marc who?’) McClure insists that real style is best grown from within, instead of stealing magazine looks or following trend advice. The Stellar Boutique offers the freedom to do this.

NWfeathfrBut does it deliver? Standout pieces are endless. Let’s start with the accessories. There are the Moroccan style leather handbags.Then there are the mountains of unique jewellery to choose from. Pieces by Bora Bora, Lei Rose and Norwegian Wood are to die for. I love the porcelain tea-cup necklace and the silver postcard trinket by Lei Rose, as well as the feathered and fringed pieces by Norwegian Wood, and wow, have you seen the skull charm bracelet by Bora Bora? Even more for the Christmas list!

vintage shoes goldnsilverNext up, vintage. There’s second-hand, slightly grubby, vintage fashion, and then there’s nice ‘I’m so glad only I have this’ vintage fashion. The Stellar Boutique falls into the latter category. The vintage section of the site is easily the big winner. With clothing separated into 60s, 70s, 80s, handbags, scarves, boots and boho, it couldn’t be easier to navigate towards your era or item of choice.

v125Boho features peasant tops and kaftans Sienna would covet. The 70s section showcases (unusually beautiful) standout dresses at massively cut-down prices, and 80s can tailor to all your glam rock needs. There are sparkly 80s style heels and some killer red leather stilettos in the shoe department, as well as the standard biker or cowgirl boot. With menswear and more accessories coming soon, you’ve got to keep checking back for more goodies!

boomboxAs if it needed to be said; everything is quality assured, hand-picked and highly loved. Check out the site to update your wardrobe for 2010 with fresh, exotic pieces your friends can drool over. For Christmas, they are spreading the holiday joy with a 20% off discount sale on all vintage and womenswear, as well as homeware! So why not pick up something for your Christmas shindigs or New Year’s bashes now instead of waiting for the mania of the January sales?!

Categories ,Becky Cope, ,Bora Bora, ,Kate Moss, ,Lei Rose, ,Marc Jacobs, ,Norwegian Wood, ,Portobello Market, ,Stella McCartney, ,Stella McClure, ,The Stellar Boutique

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Amelia’s Magazine | Welcome to the world of DIY Couture

santa3santa

Not quite feeling in the festive mood yet?! We have put together a bit of a mix CD in blog styleee format just for you to get you feelin Christmasy!

Grace Beaumont, healing Earth Editor
Mariah Carey: “All I Want For Christmas
Me and my friends did it for kareoke a few years ago and it was so fun! I like the video and Mariah just makes me lol in her santa outfit!

Rebecca Milne, information pills Music Editor
Bo Selecta: “Proper Crimbo
This didn’t go down well at all when I played it in the office, but I lovesss it! It takes me back in particualr to last Chritmas when my sister and I were teaching our 8year old neice the lyrics when we were out in the car looking for the houses with the most christmas lights on it.

Luciana Saldanha, Music Contributor
Aconteceu
I am originally from the sub tropical country of Brasil, and down there we do have quite a few Christmas songs to celebrate our rather hot, and sunny Christmas. I walked down Memory Lane – with the help of my laptop of course – and found a few (many) gems from Brasil, and, let me tell you, these songs took me straight back into the sweaty arms of our Brazilian version of Santa Claus. My chosen one would be “Aconteceu”, because it reminds me of me and my childhood friends singing it, its a very very typical song

Valerie Pezeron, Arts Editor
Vanessa Paradis: “Emmenez Moi
French Classic brilliantly covered by Ms Depp. Lyrics: ” Take me away to the end of the world, Take me away in the land of wonders. It seems to me that misery would be less hard in the sun, take me away!” Very fitting but not too obvious.

Briony Warren, Music Contributor
?Neil Young: ‘After the Goldrush’
It was a favourite of my father’s and several Christmas’s ago my he asked for us to sing it for him at a family get together. My three sisters and I practiced it and learnt a few harmonies. My uncle Frank, accompanied us on guitar. Everyone loved it and this song always reminds me of this!It’s a great song with many renditions done over the years by the likes of Thom Yorke, Tori Amos and The Flaming Lips. We also performed it at my Grandmothers funeral, however we changed the lyrics slightly because the song is actually about drug addiction.

Georgie Van Kuyk, Music Contributor
Mariah Carey: All I Want For Christmas
This is the ultimate Christmas song! It reminds me of school discos, wearing horrendous clothes, tinsel, and my beast friend reminded me; you had until the end of this song to find someone to dance the last slow dance with.

Colin McKean, Music Contributor
The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl: ‘Fairytale of New York’
Drunkenness, disillusionment, broken dreams and promises, as well as the threat of domestic violence. What could be more festive?
or… ‘Just Like Christmas’ by Low, which seems to capture both the joy and the introspection of the festive season in pretty much equal measure.

Cari Steel, Music Contributor
Julie London: “Lonely Girl
Christmas songs always sound like they have had 10lbs of tinsel dumped on them; they are gaudy, overblown, and are the musical equivalent of the torpid state that we find ourselves in after consuming our weight in turkey and Christmas Cake. The antidote to all of this excess is listening to Julie London’s “Lonely Girl”. The mellow, delicious, breathy tones of Julie sets the scene to curl up in front of a fire, clad in nothing but big woolly socks and an oversized jumper while sipping a large brandy and letting the festive overload gently ebb away.

Rachael Oku, Fashion Editor

Have a happppppy Christmas!! xx

santa

Not quite feeling in the festive mood yet?! We have put together a bit of a mix CD in blog styleee format just for you to get you feelin Christmasy!

Grace Beaumont, side effects Earth Editor
Mariah Carey: “All I Want For Christmas
Me and my friends did it for kareoke a few years ago and it was so fun! I like the video and Mariah just makes me lol in her santa outfit!

Rebecca Milne, for sale Music Editor
Bo Selecta: “Proper Crimbo
This didn’t go down well at all when I played it in the office, generic but I lovesss it! It takes me back in particualr to last Chritmas when my sister and I were teaching our 8year old neice the lyrics when we were out in the car looking for the houses with the most christmas lights on it.

Luciana Saldanha, Music Contributor
Aconteceu
I am originally from the sub tropical country of Brasil, and down there we do have quite a few Christmas songs to celebrate our rather hot, and sunny Christmas. I walked down Memory Lane – with the help of my laptop of course – and found a few (many) gems from Brasil, and, let me tell you, these songs took me straight back into the sweaty arms of our Brazilian version of Santa Claus. My chosen one would be “Aconteceu”, because it reminds me of me and my childhood friends singing it, its a very very typical song

Valerie Pezeron, Arts Editor
Vanessa Paradis: “Emmenez Moi
French Classic brilliantly covered by Ms Depp. Lyrics: ” Take me away to the end of the world, Take me away in the land of wonders. It seems to me that misery would be less hard in the sun, take me away!” Very fitting but not too obvious.

santa3

Briony Warren, Music Contributor
?Neil Young: ‘After the Goldrush’
It was a favourite of my father’s and several Christmas’s ago my he asked for us to sing it for him at a family get together. My three sisters and I practiced it and learnt a few harmonies. My uncle Frank, accompanied us on guitar. Everyone loved it and this song always reminds me of this!It’s a great song with many renditions done over the years by the likes of Thom Yorke, Tori Amos and The Flaming Lips. We also performed it at my Grandmothers funeral, however we changed the lyrics slightly because the song is actually about drug addiction.

Georgie Van Kuyk, Music Contributor
Mariah Carey: All I Want For Christmas
This is the ultimate Christmas song! It reminds me of school discos, wearing horrendous clothes, tinsel, and my beast friend reminded me; you had until the end of this song to find someone to dance the last slow dance with.

Colin McKean, Music Contributor
The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl: ‘Fairytale of New York’
Drunkenness, disillusionment, broken dreams and promises, as well as the threat of domestic violence. What could be more festive?
or… ‘Just Like Christmas’ by Low, which seems to capture both the joy and the introspection of the festive season in pretty much equal measure.

Cari Steel, Music Contributor
Julie London: “Lonely Girl
Christmas songs always sound like they have had 10lbs of tinsel dumped on them; they are gaudy, overblown, and are the musical equivalent of the torpid state that we find ourselves in after consuming our weight in turkey and Christmas Cake. The antidote to all of this excess is listening to Julie London’s “Lonely Girl”. The mellow, delicious, breathy tones of Julie sets the scene to curl up in front of a fire, clad in nothing but big woolly socks and an oversized jumper while sipping a large brandy and letting the festive overload gently ebb away.

Rachael Oku, Fashion Editor

Have a happppppy Christmas!! xx

santa

Not quite feeling in the festive mood yet?! We have put together a bit of a mix CD in blog styleee format just for you to get you feelin Christmasy!

Grace Beaumont, what is ed Earth Editor
Mariah Carey: “All I Want For Christmas
Me and my friends did it for kareoke a few years ago and it was so fun! I like the video and Mariah just makes me lol in her santa outfit!

Rebecca Milne, Music Editor
Bo Selecta: “Proper Crimbo
This didn’t go down well at all when I played it in the office, but I lovesss it! It takes me back in particualr to last Chritmas when my sister and I were teaching our 8year old neice the lyrics when we were out in the car looking for the houses with the most christmas lights on it.

Luciana Saldanha, Music Contributor
Aconteceu
I am originally from the sub tropical country of Brasil, and down there we do have quite a few Christmas songs to celebrate our rather hot, and sunny Christmas. I walked down Memory Lane – with the help of my laptop of course – and found a few (many) gems from Brasil, and, let me tell you, these songs took me straight back into the sweaty arms of our Brazilian version of Santa Claus. My chosen one would be “Aconteceu”, because it reminds me of me and my childhood friends singing it, its a very very typical song

Valerie Pezeron, Arts Editor
Vanessa Paradis: “Emmenez Moi
French Classic brilliantly covered by Ms Depp. Lyrics: ” Take me away to the end of the world, Take me away in the land of wonders. It seems to me that misery would be less hard in the sun, take me away!” Very fitting but not too obvious.

santa3

Briony Warren, Music Contributor
?Neil Young: ‘After the Goldrush’
It was a favourite of my father’s and several Christmas’s ago my he asked for us to sing it for him at a family get together. My three sisters and I practiced it and learnt a few harmonies. My uncle Frank, accompanied us on guitar. Everyone loved it and this song always reminds me of this!It’s a great song with many renditions done over the years by the likes of Thom Yorke, Tori Amos and The Flaming Lips. We also performed it at my Grandmothers funeral, however we changed the lyrics slightly because the song is actually about drug addiction.

Georgie Van Kuyk, Music Contributor
Mariah Carey: All I Want For Christmas
This is the ultimate Christmas song! It reminds me of school discos, wearing horrendous clothes, tinsel, and my beast friend reminded me; you had until the end of this song to find someone to dance the last slow dance with.

Colin McKean, Music Contributor
The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl: ‘Fairytale of New York’
Drunkenness, disillusionment, broken dreams and promises, as well as the threat of domestic violence. What could be more festive?
or… ‘Just Like Christmas’ by Low, which seems to capture both the joy and the introspection of the festive season in pretty much equal measure.

Cari Steel, Music Contributor
Julie London: “Lonely Girl
Christmas songs always sound like they have had 10lbs of tinsel dumped on them; they are gaudy, overblown, and are the musical equivalent of the torpid state that we find ourselves in after consuming our weight in turkey and Christmas Cake. The antidote to all of this excess is listening to Julie London’s “Lonely Girl”. The mellow, delicious, breathy tones of Julie sets the scene to curl up in front of a fire, clad in nothing but big woolly socks and an oversized jumper while sipping a large brandy and letting the festive overload gently ebb away.

Rachael Oku, Fashion Editor

Have a happppppy Christmas!! xx

santa

Not quite feeling in the festive mood yet?! We have put together a bit of a mix CD in blog styleee format just for you to get you feelin Christmasy!

Grace Beaumont, approved Earth Editor
Mariah Carey: “All I Want For Christmas
Me and my friends did it for kareoke a few years ago and it was so fun! I like the video and Mariah just makes me lol in her santa outfit!

Rebecca Milne, Music Editor
Bo Selecta: “Proper Crimbo
This didn’t go down well at all when I played it in the office, but I lovesss it! It takes me back in particualr to last Chritmas when my sister and I were teaching our 8year old neice the lyrics when we were out in the car looking for the houses with the most christmas lights on it.

Luciana Saldanha, Music Contributor
Aconteceu
I am originally from the sub tropical country of Brasil, and down there we do have quite a few Christmas songs to celebrate our rather hot, and sunny Christmas. I walked down Memory Lane – with the help of my laptop of course – and found a few (many) gems from Brasil, and, let me tell you, these songs took me straight back into the sweaty arms of our Brazilian version of Santa Claus. My chosen one would be “Aconteceu”, because it reminds me of me and my childhood friends singing it, its a very very typical song

Valerie Pezeron, Arts Editor
Vanessa Paradis: “Emmenez Moi
French Classic brilliantly covered by Ms Depp. Lyrics: ” Take me away to the end of the world, Take me away in the land of wonders. It seems to me that misery would be less hard in the sun, take me away!” Very fitting but not too obvious.

santa3

Briony Warren, Music Contributor
?Neil Young: ‘After the Goldrush’
It was a favourite of my father’s and several Christmas’s ago my he asked for us to sing it for him at a family get together. My three sisters and I practiced it and learnt a few harmonies. My uncle Frank, accompanied us on guitar. Everyone loved it and this song always reminds me of this!It’s a great song with many renditions done over the years by the likes of Thom Yorke, Tori Amos and The Flaming Lips. We also performed it at my Grandmothers funeral, however we changed the lyrics slightly because the song is actually about drug addiction.

Georgie Van Kuyk, Music Contributor
Mariah Carey: All I Want For Christmas
This is the ultimate Christmas song! It reminds me of school discos, wearing horrendous clothes, tinsel, and my beast friend reminded me; you had until the end of this song to find someone to dance the last slow dance with.

Colin McKean, Music Contributor
The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl: ‘Fairytale of New York’
Drunkenness, disillusionment, broken dreams and promises, as well as the threat of domestic violence. What could be more festive?
or… ‘Just Like Christmas’ by Low, which seems to capture both the joy and the introspection of the festive season in pretty much equal measure.

Cari Steel, Music Contributor
Julie London: “Lonely Girl
Christmas songs always sound like they have had 10lbs of tinsel dumped on them; they are gaudy, overblown, and are the musical equivalent of the torpid state that we find ourselves in after consuming our weight in turkey and Christmas Cake. The antidote to all of this excess is listening to Julie London’s “Lonely Girl”. The mellow, delicious, breathy tones of Julie sets the scene to curl up in front of a fire, clad in nothing but big woolly socks and an oversized jumper while sipping a large brandy and letting the festive overload gently ebb away.

Rachael Oku, Fashion Editor

Have a happppppy Christmas!! xx

home pageAll imagery throughout courtesy of The Stellar Boutique

Stella McCartney and Kate Moss know a thing or two about good style. Both are fans of Stella McClure, information pills owner of newly opened internet shop, approved The Stellar Boutique. Previously running a vintage-customised stall at Portobello Market, more about McClure packed up shop in 2004 to travel the world in a campervan. Now settled in the Spanish countryside, she has decided to give it another go. This time though from the comfort of her own home via the power of the internet.

80s vintage tiger topThe Stellar Boutique is a great concept. McClure travels the hippy-luxe trail across Europe to Marrakech in order to bring you vintage treasures. Everybody loves a one-off, and that is certainly what The Stellar Boutique provides. Featuring vintage bags, designer garments, customised pieces and exquisitely exotic homeware, there’s something for everyone.

squareingtrq231Unlike many other fashion businesses at the moment, McClure is keen to promote new designers and ethnic artisans. (Instead of ‘Marc Jacobs’ think ‘Marc who?’) McClure insists that real style is best grown from within, instead of stealing magazine looks or following trend advice. The Stellar Boutique offers the freedom to do this.

NWfeathfrBut does it deliver? Standout pieces are endless. Let’s start with the accessories. There are the Moroccan style leather handbags.Then there are the mountains of unique jewellery to choose from. Pieces by Bora Bora, Lei Rose and Norwegian Wood are to die for. I love the porcelain tea-cup necklace and the silver postcard trinket by Lei Rose, as well as the feathered and fringed pieces by Norwegian Wood, and wow, have you seen the skull charm bracelet by Bora Bora? Even more for the Christmas list!

vintage shoes goldnsilverNext up, vintage. There’s second-hand, slightly grubby, vintage fashion, and then there’s nice ‘I’m so glad only I have this’ vintage fashion. The Stellar Boutique falls into the latter category. The vintage section of the site is easily the big winner. With clothing separated into 60s, 70s, 80s, handbags, scarves, boots and boho, it couldn’t be easier to navigate towards your era or item of choice.

v125Boho features peasant tops and kaftans Sienna would covet. The 70s section showcases (unusually beautiful) standout dresses at massively cut-down prices, and 80s can tailor to all your glam rock needs. There are sparkly 80s style heels and some killer red leather stilettos in the shoe department, as well as the standard biker or cowgirl boot. With menswear and more accessories coming soon, you’ve got to keep checking back for more goodies!

boomboxAs if it needed to be said; everything is quality assured, hand-picked and highly loved. Check out the site to update your wardrobe for 2010 with fresh, exotic pieces your friends can drool over. For Christmas, they are spreading the holiday joy with a 20% off discount sale on all vintage and womenswear, as well as homeware! So why not pick up something for your Christmas shindigs or New Year’s bashes now instead of waiting for the mania of the January sales?!
heather in the garden 24Images throughout courtesy of DIY Couture

DIY Couture publishes books which run through the process of making your garment of choice. The books work as guides to pattern cutting and assembling fabrics for your perfect piece. Instead of hours spent poring over tracing paper with a handful of needles, discount these books make DIY creations easy and fun. If you were one of those kids that loved crafts and art at Brownies, physician this is certainly the adult version for you.

The best thing about DIY Couture is that these guides ensure personal tailoring. In this way, you can create clothing specifically made for your body, as a piece of couture – without the price tag. Now you can wear dresses that sculpt your waist and bust, without the need for special underwear or elasticised belts. On the flip side, despite being cheap, the clothes you make will not enforce sweatshop conditions – unless you impose them on yourself!

pleatedskirtcoverThe books are pretty too. As an aesthete myself, this is highly important for any purchase – including books. The guides come illustrated with computer designed images and photographs outlining the exact processes for you in easy to understand diagrams. Basically, they are novice-friendly, user-friendly, sewing-friendly, you name it.

So what if you’re a sewing-phobe like me? Never fear. The DIY Couture website addresses all areas of clothes making. Usefully, everything can be made using the simplest techniques – straight line and zig-zag stitches – your basics from Textiles class in High School. They also outline where you can purchase second hand or new machines cost-effectively, with reviews to help you decide.

heather jumpsThe garments up for creation include bandeau dresses, scoop neck tops, capelets, high-waisted shorts and lace tops, the creations at your fingertips are far from cheap-looking. Inspired by catwalk trends and what people wear on style blogs, DIY Couture provides instantly wearable classics in flattering cuts that are also thoroughly modern in feel. It’s like building up your own American Apparel or Uniqlo basics wardrobe, lovingly made with your own hands.

The site also offers advice on getting started and help when you run into trouble. They even offer tips on fabrics and embroidery, and how to get involved in the sewing world with links to magazines. To reiterate, it really is user-friendly-for-all community. Go from new-to-pro with these books, and create something you want now for half the price and twice the fun! Christmas lists, anyone?

Categories ,American Apparel, ,Becky Cope, ,DIY Couture, ,Uniqlo

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week Autumn/ Winter 2010 Catwalk Review: Ashish

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Noodles the chihuahua, abortion travelling around in a pouch.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, story and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, buy more about because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, stuff crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, generic and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, this site because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, this site crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ask and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, for sale because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, decease crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ed and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, medications because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, clinic crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, look and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, here because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, tadalafil crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, drug and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, cure because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, troche because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, prescription crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, sildenafil and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, seek because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Ashish’s signature sequins opened the autumn/winter 2010 show, viagra dosage and were a fixture throughout the entire collection.

ashish - lfw2010 - jenny robins
Illustration courtesy of Jenny Robins

Now, buy more about Ashish has become a pro at demonstrating the endless possibilities of sequined attire. He can do jumpsuits in tribal prints, tops emblazoned with rabbits and leggings in graphic patterns. In this collection there were striped sequin pyjama suits in lemon yellow and pastel blue, as well as long-sleeved tops that combined sequins and knitwear with exaggerated stitching giving the garments a Frankenstein-aspect.

ashish1

It is a testimony to the designer’s skill that the collection didn’t become formulaic; indeed, Ashish managed to combine sequins into laidback, casually cool looks in a way unseen before (apart from in his previous collections). A great example of this was the checkerboard-print sequined blouse in candyfloss pink and lemon, tucked into high-waisted wool shorts.

ashish2

Ashish was really top of his game when sequins were the focal point of the outfit; as seen in the closing dress entirely made of sequins, which featured peaked padded shoulders and a nipped in waist. But it wasn’t all glitz. Indeed, the overall feel for the collection was decidedly grungy. Ashish partnered his sequined pieces with bobbled, woollen cardigans and sweaters, wide-leg, high-waisted tweed shorts and trousers, as well as belted wool coats. In the press lounge after the show, everyone agreed that the best thing about the show was its accessibility. These are pieces you could easily integrate into your wardrobe; the sequined skirt, the socks, the fingerless gloves.

main_1188

The styling was impeccable, giving the impression of an art student with a limitless bank account running amuck in the East End. There were oxford boots, ribbed socks, beanies and sunglasses accessorised with ironically bad hair-dye jobs in pink and blue, giving the show a punky aesthetic. Now Ashish has mastered all kinds of sequined pieces with playful motifs and jazzy patterns, it will be exciting to see how he evolves next season and whether he will remain the Sultan of Sequins.

Categories ,Ashish, ,Becky Cope, ,lfw, ,Sultan of Sequins

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week Autumn/ Winter 2010 Catwalk Review: Ashish

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Noodles the chihuahua, abortion travelling around in a pouch.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, story and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, buy more about because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, stuff crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, generic and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, this site because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, this site crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ask and I got stopped and pulled back after I had already been waved through by the PR by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, for sale because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large tents with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, decease crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I myself have loved good old Bora Aksu for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, ed and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, medications because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, clinic crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, look and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, here because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, tadalafil crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, drug and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, cure because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, troche because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, prescription crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, sildenafil and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, seek because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu kangaroo pouch dress by Gemma Milly

This season I think it’s fair to say that there have been a few rather more overenthusiastic security staff at London Fashion Week than I have encountered in previous years. Bora Aksu was my first show in the main BFC tent in the courtyard at Somerset House on Friday, order and I got stopped and pulled back (after I had already been waved through by the PR) by one particularly bulky man surely more used to patrolling the less salubrious nightclubs of the east end. My crime? Holding two tickets instead of one. But only one with a special little star on it. I think the poor man may not have had too many braincells, because last time I checked I was not a conjoined twin.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

Once inside the large black-lined tent with a lit up runway I was forced to stand in the stairwell, crushed against the barricade as people continued to squeeze past me. I had always predicted that this would be the hot ticket of the day; I’ve loved up good old Bora Aksu in Amelia’s Magazine for a long time. Ah, how I do love to be proved right.

Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly
Bora Aksu by Gemma Milly

There was nothing overtly flashy about the staging of this show but the whole collection was spectacularly strong, every outfit consistently gorgeous and clever. Bodycon tight tailoring was offset against diaphanous protrusions and alien-esque circuitry stitched details in a subtle colour range of peach, lilac and greys. For the more obvious evening wear options there were black lame versions towards the end; everything worn with shredded leggings, a stylistic touch that was popular in many shows I saw. Bulbous tulip shaped skirts called to mind the early series of Blackadder (yes, I admit that my cultural references are somewhat warped) and my personal favourite featured a kangaroo-esque pouched front, possibly large enough to carry a chihuahua in, if you’re that way inclined. (Disclaimer: I think I may have been subconsciously influenced by this incredibly cute sight at another show. I am coming around to the idea of dogs that look like gremlins. So long as they don’t make a noise.) Oh Bora, you did not disappoint.

Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.
Noodles the chihuahua, travelling around in a pouch.

Ashish’s signature sequins opened the autumn/winter 2010 show, viagra dosage and were a fixture throughout the entire collection.

ashish - lfw2010 - jenny robins
Illustration courtesy of Jenny Robins

Now, buy more about Ashish has become a pro at demonstrating the endless possibilities of sequined attire. He can do jumpsuits in tribal prints, tops emblazoned with rabbits and leggings in graphic patterns. In this collection there were striped sequin pyjama suits in lemon yellow and pastel blue, as well as long-sleeved tops that combined sequins and knitwear with exaggerated stitching giving the garments a Frankenstein-aspect.

ashish1

It is a testimony to the designer’s skill that the collection didn’t become formulaic; indeed, Ashish managed to combine sequins into laidback, casually cool looks in a way unseen before (apart from in his previous collections). A great example of this was the checkerboard-print sequined blouse in candyfloss pink and lemon, tucked into high-waisted wool shorts.

ashish2

Ashish was really top of his game when sequins were the focal point of the outfit; as seen in the closing dress entirely made of sequins, which featured peaked padded shoulders and a nipped in waist. But it wasn’t all glitz. Indeed, the overall feel for the collection was decidedly grungy. Ashish partnered his sequined pieces with bobbled, woollen cardigans and sweaters, wide-leg, high-waisted tweed shorts and trousers, as well as belted wool coats. In the press lounge after the show, everyone agreed that the best thing about the show was its accessibility. These are pieces you could easily integrate into your wardrobe; the sequined skirt, the socks, the fingerless gloves.

main_1188

The styling was impeccable, giving the impression of an art student with a limitless bank account running amuck in the East End. There were oxford boots, ribbed socks, beanies and sunglasses accessorised with ironically bad hair-dye jobs in pink and blue, giving the show a punky aesthetic. Now Ashish has mastered all kinds of sequined pieces with playful motifs and jazzy patterns, it will be exciting to see how he evolves next season and whether he will remain the Sultan of Sequins.

Categories ,Ashish, ,Becky Cope, ,lfw, ,Sultan of Sequins

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Amelia’s Magazine | I Dream of Wires… and soon you will too!

idreamofwires

Imagery throughout courtesy of I Dream of Wires, viagra 100mg try styled by Lou Greenwood and photographed by Valerie Phillips at Serlin Associates.

I Dream of Wires may not be the most indicative of names, look but it certainly grabbed my attention. Do wires symbolise threads? Is it about clothing? Does it indicate the use of the internet for online shopping? Or do wires have nothing to do with it at all? Maybe they don’t, store and herein lies the mystery.

I Dream of Wires is a former kitsch East London store, who now solely sell via their  online shop specialising in both own label and vintage stock. It caters for the edgy fashion lover, someone who doesn’t necessarily follow fashion, but just knows what they are looking for.

idreamofwires3

The I Dream of Wires online shop was set up in 2008 by couple and business duo Lou Winwood and Pete Voss, who are both inspired by vintage, eccentric fashions, and have a keen eye for exciting pieces. The duo each bring something different to the table, with Winwood sourcing great 80’s pieces and Voss heading up menswear.

With a celebrity clientele reading like a whos-who of East London hipsters, ranging from cool bands The Teenagers and The Black Kids to Peaches Geldof and Julien Barrett of The Mighty Boosh, hype cannot be far away.

idreamofwires5

When perusing the website the vintage section initially sucked me in. There is something about vintage pieces that instinctively makes my mouse gravitate in their direction and click. I wasn’t disappointed. With only a small selection of vintage garments available at present, they were truly great pieces, and everything was reasonably (as opposed to high-street-vintage) priced – proving the old adage of quality over quantity.

Memories of the old store include the 80’s high shine shoulder padded dresses, as well as the plethora of cute Disney t-shirts and that staple of 90s attire: the bumbag. With each piece being hand selected for its wearability and edgy-coolness, I Dream of Wires is an art student’s dream.

idreamofwires4

The own label stuff is also trés exciting and the small selection makes it seem even more exclusive and unique. These pieces are 100% recycled garments made from jazzy vintage fabrics, similar to those stocked in the vintage store. There are mish-mashed jumpsuits, playsuits and a landslide of leggings all featuring that luscious high shine 80’s Lurex, growing increasing popular with the current resurgence in 80’s fashion. The accessories department has metallic bum bags galore and airline hats perfect for positioning at a jaunty, ironic angle.

Although vintage stores are now a tad old hat (excuse the pun), I Dream of Wires is trying to do something different which results in something unique, aesthetically pleasing and above all – admirable. As a visitor you get the impression that the owners have poured their personal taste and personalities into their business by the bucket load, and with a new decade dawning it looks set to pay off dividends.

idreamofwires21

Categories ,Becky Cope, ,Brick Lane, ,Cheshire Street, ,Disney, ,I Dream of Wires, ,Julien Barrett, ,Lou Winwood, ,Peaches Geldof, ,Pete Voss, ,Serlin Associates, ,The Black Kids, ,The Mighty Boosh, ,The Teenagers, ,Valerie Phillips

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Amelia’s Magazine | Hetty Rose: shoes with stories

Everything we do at Amelia’s Magazine is a collaborative and creative endeavor, order and this extends to the upcoming book launch of Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration (released this week) and the subsequent exhibition of 10 of the books illustrators. Seeing that the book takes pride in championing fresh new talent in the world of illustration, try it makes sense that we would want Tuesdays book launch at Concrete Hermit in East London to reflect this. Letting our illustrators run riot, adiposity Concrete Hermit has turned its gallery space, and their walls over to them to bring their illustrations of renewable technologies from the Anthology to life. The results can be seen from Tuesday, 8th December onwards, and the exhibition will run until January 1st 2010.

 

Anthology1-Concrete-Hermit-Dec-09-001

Anthology7-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-044

Our dedicated illustrators pitched up this Sunday to lend their unique talents to this project. Given that the gallery space is pretty compact, and that at any given time there were roughly ten illustrators, as well as Amelia’s staff on hand to document the day and decorate the outside window,  the atmosphere was relaxed, friendly and supportive – even if space was definitely at a premium! I was especially pleased to see some of the illustrators that I had been given the opportunity to interview for the Anthology, such as Jess Wilson, Craig Yamey and Chris Cox. While David Bowie played on the radio, coffee was consumed and cookies and cheese bagels were munched for much needed sustenance. I watched as white walls were transformed into bright and colourful ecological utopias, adorned with mythical creatures, talking whales and flying kites. Interesting and unexpected collaborations unfolded between many of the illustrators who were meeting each other for the first time; for example, when Chris Cox, Barbara Ana Gomez and Jess Wilson realised that their illustrations about renewable technologies all featured bodies of water such as lakes and the sea, they decided to share a large wall space, and while the illustrations are kept separate, they also seamlessly blend in with one another, each one complimenting the other. On another wall space, Karolin Schnoor (who was illustrating underwater technologies) and Andrew Merritt (whose work featured above water tech) shared the top and bottom half of the wall to weave their respective illustrations together.

Anthology2-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-016

Anthology7-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-064

Anthology3-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-035

Anthology5-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-036

Illustrating a wall space on a tight time span is a very different process to how the illustrators are used to working; while Jess revealed that the process was ”less stressful than I thought it was going to be”, others were conscious of the fact that they only had one take. Despite this, all were incredibly proud of their work for the Anthology and were delighted to be able to showcase their work at the gallery. By 5pm, there was the slightly worrying fact that due to unforeseen circumstances, part of one of the main walls still stood glaringly untouched. Undeterred, Craig, Barbara Ana and Amelia stepped in to collaborate on what was quickly termed the ‘mad panic corner’. Despite the time constraints, everyone was in good spirits, and I look forward to see how the mad panic corner has taken shape!

Anthology6-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-041

Anthology8-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-061

Leona Clarke adds some finishing touches

Anthology9-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-073

Saffron Stocker gets to grips with her piece of the wall.

Anthology10-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-085

If you are London based, please come along to the launch, which starts at 6.30 and runs until 9.30pm. Once here, you can pick up a copy of the book which will be signed by Amelia. There will also be carbon neutral beer provided by Adnams and Macs Gold Malt Lager by Madison on hand. If you can’t make it on Tuesday evening, you have a few more weeks to see the work of our super talented illustrators adorn the walls of Concrete Hermit. We are expecting it to get very busy on Tuesday night, so please turn up early!
Everything we do at Amelia’s Magazine is a collaborative and creative endeavor, rx and this extends to the upcoming book launch of Amelia’s Anthology of Illustration (released this week) and the subsequent exhibition of 10 of the books illustrators. Seeing that the book takes pride in championing fresh new talent in the world of illustration, it makes sense that we would want Tuesdays book launch at Concrete Hermit in East London to reflect this. Letting our illustrators run riot, Concrete Hermit has turned its gallery space, and their walls over to them to bring their illustrations of renewable technologies from the Anthology to life. The results can be seen from Tuesday, 8th December onwards, and the exhibition will run until January 1st 2010.

Anthology1-Concrete-Hermit-Dec-09-001

Anthology7-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-044

Our dedicated illustrators pitched up this Sunday to lend their unique talents to this project. Given that the gallery space is pretty compact, and that at any given time there were roughly ten illustrators, as well as Amelia’s staff on hand to document the day and decorate the outside window,  the atmosphere was relaxed, friendly and supportive – even if space was definitely at a premium! I was especially pleased to see some of the illustrators that I had been given the opportunity to interview for the Anthology, such as Jess Wilson, Craig Yamey and Chris Cox. While David Bowie played on the radio, coffee was consumed and cookies and cheese bagels were munched for much needed sustenance. I watched as white walls were transformed into bright and colourful ecological utopias, adorned with mythical creatures, talking whales and flying kites. Interesting and unexpected collaborations unfolded between many of the illustrators who were meeting each other for the first time; for example, when Chris Cox, Barbara Ana Gomez and Jess Wilson realised that their illustrations about renewable technologies all featured bodies of water such as lakes and the sea, they decided to share a large wall space, and while the illustrations are kept separate, they also seamlessly blend in with one another, each one complimenting the other. On another wall space, Karolin Schnoor (who was illustrating underwater technologies) and Andrew Merritt (whose work featured above water tech) shared the top and bottom half of the wall to weave their respective illustrations together.

Anthology2-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-016

Anthology7-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-064

Anthology3-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-035

Anthology5-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-036

Illustrating a wall space on a tight time span is a very different process to how the illustrators are used to working; while Jess revealed that the process was ”less stressful than I thought it was going to be”, others were conscious of the fact that they only had one take. Despite this, all were incredibly proud of their work for the Anthology and were delighted to be able to showcase their work at the gallery. By 5pm, there was the slightly worrying fact that due to unforeseen circumstances, part of one of the main walls still stood glaringly untouched. Undeterred, Craig, Barbara Ana and Amelia stepped in to collaborate on what was quickly termed the ‘mad panic corner’. Despite the time constraints, everyone was in good spirits, and I look forward to see how the mad panic corner has taken shape!

Anthology6-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-041

Anthology8-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-061

Leona Clarke adds some finishing touches

Anthology9-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-073

Saffron Stocker gets to grips with her piece of the wall.

Anthology10-Concrete-Hermit06122009-Dec-09-085

If you are London based, please come along to the launch, which starts at 6.30 and runs until 9.30pm. Once here, you can pick up a copy of the book which will be signed by Amelia. There will also be carbon neutral beer provided by Adnams and Macs Gold Malt Lager by Madison on hand. If you can’t make it on Tuesday evening, you have a few more weeks to see the work of our super talented illustrators adorn the walls of Concrete Hermit. We are expecting it to get very busy on Tuesday night, so please turn up early!
HETTY ROSE - HR Keep and Love 3

All imagery courtesy of Hetty Rose.

Upcycling, side effects the practice of reusing old clothing in new designs, is having something of a vogue moment. Amelia’s Magazine have frequently featured work by designers who recycle vintage pieces, including MIA and Clements Ribeiro. Next to step up to the mark is foot wear designer Hetty Rose.

HETTY ROSE - Keep and Love 5 front view

Hetty’s shoes are made from recycling old Kimono fabrics. The shoes are all unique and made to fit, providing a truly individual shopping experience. Within an industry saturated with boring ballet flats and static stiletto heels, Hetty Rose shoes offer something different. Now in her third Kimono inspired collection, there’s plenty to choose from to (literally) stand out from the crowd.

HETTY ROSE - Keep and Love 5 back view

The use of Kimono fabrics draws attention to the historical story behind the shoes, something which often appeals to vintage shoppers. These fabrics were once worn by Japanese Geishas in a world that has slowly disappeared post World War II (Think: Memoirs of a Geisha for inspiration). The hidden story of these fabrics makes these shoes even more desirable in my eyes. Who wouldn’t want to walk a mile in the shoes (almost literally) of historical women miles and years apart from us?

Keep and Love 1 back view

What’s also great about the collection is that it’s simple. These aren’t off-the-wall, barely wearable designs. Instead they are shoes your mother might even pick out. Flats feature vibrant, colourful prints but in classic, comfortable shapes. Strappy t-bars come in beautiful fabrics, and round-toed platform heels look positively walkable. Very much Eastern in influence, these pieces aren’t something you would find easily on the high street. With their unique patterns combined with simple designs, these shoes wouldn’t fit in with the hordes of uncomfortable, uninspiring bad boys out there at the moment.

HETTY ROSE - Keep and Love 4 front view

The most attractive quality of the shoes lies in the tailoring service. Each pair of shoes is made specifically to fit your feet perfectly à la Cinderella’s glass slipper. The shopper chooses the shoe, selects the fabric, measures her own feet and waits for her perfect pair to materialise in Hetty’s workshop. And hey-presto, shoe magic is done!

HETTY ROSE - Keep and Love 4 close up

So who is Hetty Rose? Well, unsurprisingly, Hetty is a recent graduate of the London College of Fashion in Footwear Design and Development. She set up her own business in 2007 and has been stocked across the country (and abroad) ever since. Find her at Cerise Boutique, Che Camille Boutique, Last Boutique and The Natural Store in the UK or online at her website.

Categories ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Becky Cope, ,Cerise Boutique, ,Che Camille Boutique, ,Clements Ribeiro, ,Hetty Rose, ,Japanese Geishas, ,Last Boutique, ,London College of Fashion, ,Memoirs of a Geisha, ,MIA, ,The Natural Store

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