Amelia’s Magazine | Spijkers en Spijkers: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Cristian Grossi
Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Cristian Grossi

From the looks of the feminine and pretty invite (which was beautifully illustrated by Dutch artist Martine Johanna) I didn’t expect anything too shocking from this A/W 2012 collection by Spijkers en Spijkers.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

The mood music as we sat down consisted of haunting, screeching quotes, so I suspected that we were in for something dark, haunting, and a little different. The quotes were from the original 1975 Grey Gardens documentary depicting the life of Big Edie and Little Edie, the aunt and first cousin of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. It is a real-life tale of a mother and a daughter driven to an eccentric state of solitude, after falling from the grace of high-society New York when Edie’s father left them penniless. Little Edie, in the eyes of Spijkers en Spijkers, was a colourful ‘Bird of Paradise‘ and served as a muse for the collection.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

All photography by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Sam Mardon

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Sam Mardon

The music set the tone perfectly; the despair, drama, and frailty in the voices echoed the strong yet feminine use of colour and 1940′s silhouettes. Lyrics about houses being set on fire and Edie Bouvier Beale’s mother telling her what to do sent chills down my spine as I simultaneously warmed to the mixed-up styling by Karen Binns. It was well documented that these two women had to make do with what they had, forcing them to mix clothes up in new ways. ‘Never throw anything old away‘ the music boomed, echoing dresses paired with clashing tops or fluorescent jewellery.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

spijkers en spijkers A/W 2012 by anna higgie

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

There was some of Spijkers en Spijkers unmistakable graphic detailing in the accessories and makeup, too. Little birds adorned shoulders and dresses in the form of a print or a brooch, hair was finger-waved and set into strong curves, set off with sweet but modern-day plastic headbands. The make-up was fresh, reminding me of when you first start to try wearing makeup as a teenager, sticking to bold lines and bright colours and not really knowing how to do subtle looks just yet.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Silks, satins, wool and prints were in a gorgeously covetable range of vintage-looking colours. Lime green and yellows reminded me of old stained-glass windows, while the rich purples and oranges referenced faded but no less opulent interiors.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Rebecca Hendin

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Rebecca Hendin

Something I’ve noticed this London Fashion Week is that while a lot of designers are referencing the dark and frightening for A/W 2012, they’re doing so in an unexpected way: making a conscious effort to hint at the macabre, court the morbid and inject collections with a touch of despair in beautiful and new ways. Even though the inspiration for this collection was part tragedy, the result was charming. The strong tailoring, warmer colours for winter and underlying tale of two women – all make you want to engage with this story.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Yasmin Mason

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Yasmin Mason

The catwalk show itself was a little bit like the thrill you feel when watching a scary movie; dark and even a little disturbing, but you can’t look away, making it all the more appealing. Spijkers and Spijkers have found a way to make you want the collection even more, delivering a desirable collection for those who like clothes that tell a story, especially if it’s as lavishly haunting as this one.

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory
Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Cristian Grossi
Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Cristian Grossi

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Amelia Gregory

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Zulekha lakeca

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Zulekha lakeca

Spijkers en Spijkers A/W 2012 by Zulek Halakeca

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Anna Higgie, ,birds, ,Claire Kearns, ,Cristian Grossi, ,Edie Bouvier Beale, ,Fluorescent, ,Grey Gardens, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,new york, ,Rebecca Hendin, ,Sam Mardon, ,Silk, ,Spijkers en Spijkers, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,vintage, ,wool, ,Yasmin Mason, ,Zulek Halakeca

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Amelia’s Magazine | Teatum Jones: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Away from the busy rush of Somerset House, away from the mobs of photographers, willing subjects and flashing lights, Teatum Jones chose to retreat to a secret room behind large wood-panelled doors. This wasn’t any room, but the official personal office of Arthur Liberty himself, which still retains the charm of it’s original design. Completely hidden away from the public in the Mock Tudor labyrinth that is Liberty, I was directed down a panelled hall before reaching the beautiful presentation Teatum Jones had prepared.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum_88
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

One thing I have loved doing this London Fashion Week is talking to design duos. There is something incredibly sweet about how each designer will talk about the other when you interview them, complimenting them endlessly. As soon as I entered the room, I was introduced to Rob Jones, who immediately beamed when he heard I was reviewing the presentation for Amelia’s Magazine. After giving his thanks to the Amelia’s Magazine team for all the continued support and gorgeous illustrations from the last review, he began to talk me through the intriguing collection.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

These Ravensbourne College of Design and Central Saint Martin’s graduates began to work together due to their mutual love for escapism and the power of a story, which is how this collection began. Rob Jones described how they start with a ‘screenplay’ when working on a collection, and this one began from looking at the menacing and dark qualities to fairytales. ‘I found it interesting that stories we read to children deal with such dark and frightening themes. It made me think about how I’d react if a fairytale was re-told in a newspaper today, would I see it differently?Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum were drawn to the mix of innocence and frighteningly dark folklore, wanting to explore the underlying beauty in something considered traditionally sinister.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

I was immediately drawn to the intricate prints, swirling with dark reds, bright pinks and forest greens, highlighted with touches of neon. Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum pointed out how these beautiful floral-like patterns were actually cut-up crime scene photography from the 1940’s. I was immediately surprised, which I couldn’t hide. Really? But they were such beautiful prints… suddenly I saw the numbered markers police use for blood spatters, dropped weapons, or worse. The thought sunk in…and it made sense. In a strange way, it felt nice to know, like being let in on a secret or the thrill of when the murderer almost catches someone in a horror movie. In order to place such a dark theme on clothing in a lighter way, a harlequin diamond pattern was used instead of simply overlaying the imagery.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Other items of clothes glittered and shimmered, almost like childhood dress-up clothes, or to mimic the magic of fairytales and shining sweets like that shown in the film created for the collection, currently showing on the Teatum Jones website. Although several mannequins displayed the collection in the centre of the room, it wasn’t until I saw the models that I noticed that most of the clothing had large pockets, even in the more formal dresses. One of the models commented on how relaxed she felt, resting her hands in the silk pockets of her neon yellow dress.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

This team have found a perfect niche for womenswear that is considered and subtle, yet attention-grabbing. Alluring without being obvious. The midi length of the dresses and nipped-in light fabrics allow the wearer to be feminine in a relaxed way. It’s clear that the Teatum Jones woman is at ease with herself, a modern-day enchantress with a penchant for neon, skilled design and something a little wickedly different. The warm and positive outlook of these designers created an unforgettable London Fashion Week presentation experience; a drop of magical escapism from the busy London Fashion Week storm.

All photography by Alia Gargum

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Anna Higgie, ,Catherine Teatum, ,Duo, ,Fairytale, ,Fashion films, ,Forests, ,graduates, ,Horror Films, ,Innocence, ,Liberty of London, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,mock tudor, ,Neon, ,photography, ,print, ,Rob Jones, ,Silks, ,sinister, ,Teatum Jones, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Mark Fast: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

As I squeezed myself onto the end of a bench, it was impossible to ignore that the hundreds of people inside the space were very, very excited. Besides the increasing numbers of editors, bloggers, and Mark Fast fans, a scrum of photographers were going a bit mad trying to get a picture of front-row attendees. Ten minutes later, after security forced them to disperse, it became clear what the fuss was all about. None other than Mr Kanye West was in the centre of the front row, engaged in conversation but stopping to pose for photographs like he was born doing it. As he is due to show his second collection at Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday the 6th of March, I couldn’t help but wonder if this was like revision for his big fashion exam.

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou

This collection was called Questions in a World of Blue, inspired by a scene from the David Lynch film, Fire Walk with Me, promising to deliver ‘a collection of sophisticated grunge’. I still had Mark Fast’s current S/S 2012 collection in my head; sexy, light and inspired by a sand storm. I loved this interpretation of Mark Fast’s signature feminine silhouettes, the review of which can be read here. Mark Fast doing modern-day grunge sounded interesting.

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Claire Kearns

I think this theme turned out to be exactly where this brand needed to go next. Although beautiful, most of Mark Fast’s previous collections have been extremely body-con, and mostly consisting of dresses. This collection saw the knitwear designer take the casual, layered, easy-going elements of grunge and re-invent them as luxury pieces. Striped crop-tops, wool coats and long knitted skirts in a range of textures added accessible separates to the collection. Anyone would feel comfortable throwing on a luxurious but slouchy cardigan, and feel just as at ease in the more dramatic full-length gowns.

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou

Mark Fast makes knitwear so exciting; all you’d want to wear with his pieces are a pair of heels. This designer is in the habit of using Christian Louboutin shoes for catwalk shows, making the ‘effortless and strong’ Mark Fast woman look complete. Hair was erratically plaited, mimicking the intertwined knitwear. Greys, deep blues, and pink-nudes set against black made up a simple colour palette that wouldn’t look out of place on any self-respecting grunger.

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Gaarte

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Gabriel Ayala

I really like what Mark Fast has come with for next season; but what I love even more is seeing him develop as a designer. He’s definitely gotten to a place where he doesn’t have to prove himself through show-stopping pieces that only work on the catwalk and celebrities. I found this collection his most complete in terms of a range of pieces, which no doubt will worn by many a lady come winter. Mark Fast only needs to change one thing for his next collection; get a bigger venue. He’s outgrowing the BFC Showspace.

Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou
Mark Fast A/W 2012 by Maria Papadimitriou

All photography by Maria Papadimitriou

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Anna Higgie, ,BFC Showspace, ,Christian Louboutin, ,Claire Kearns, ,David Lynch, ,Feminine, ,Fire Walk with Me, ,Gabriel Ayala, ,Grey, ,grunge, ,Kanye West, ,knitwear, ,Layered, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,Make-up, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Paris Fashion Week, ,plaits, ,Questions in a World of Blue

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