Amelia’s Magazine | Teatum Jones: London Fashion Week A/W 2012 Catwalk Review

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Anna Higgie

Away from the busy rush of Somerset House, away from the mobs of photographers, willing subjects and flashing lights, Teatum Jones chose to retreat to a secret room behind large wood-panelled doors. This wasn’t any room, but the official personal office of Arthur Liberty himself, which still retains the charm of it’s original design. Completely hidden away from the public in the Mock Tudor labyrinth that is Liberty, I was directed down a panelled hall before reaching the beautiful presentation Teatum Jones had prepared.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum_88
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

One thing I have loved doing this London Fashion Week is talking to design duos. There is something incredibly sweet about how each designer will talk about the other when you interview them, complimenting them endlessly. As soon as I entered the room, I was introduced to Rob Jones, who immediately beamed when he heard I was reviewing the presentation for Amelia’s Magazine. After giving his thanks to the Amelia’s Magazine team for all the continued support and gorgeous illustrations from the last review, he began to talk me through the intriguing collection.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

These Ravensbourne College of Design and Central Saint Martin’s graduates began to work together due to their mutual love for escapism and the power of a story, which is how this collection began. Rob Jones described how they start with a ‘screenplay’ when working on a collection, and this one began from looking at the menacing and dark qualities to fairytales. ‘I found it interesting that stories we read to children deal with such dark and frightening themes. It made me think about how I’d react if a fairytale was re-told in a newspaper today, would I see it differently?Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum were drawn to the mix of innocence and frighteningly dark folklore, wanting to explore the underlying beauty in something considered traditionally sinister.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

I was immediately drawn to the intricate prints, swirling with dark reds, bright pinks and forest greens, highlighted with touches of neon. Rob Jones and Catherine Teatum pointed out how these beautiful floral-like patterns were actually cut-up crime scene photography from the 1940’s. I was immediately surprised, which I couldn’t hide. Really? But they were such beautiful prints… suddenly I saw the numbered markers police use for blood spatters, dropped weapons, or worse. The thought sunk in…and it made sense. In a strange way, it felt nice to know, like being let in on a secret or the thrill of when the murderer almost catches someone in a horror movie. In order to place such a dark theme on clothing in a lighter way, a harlequin diamond pattern was used instead of simply overlaying the imagery.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Andy Bumpus

Other items of clothes glittered and shimmered, almost like childhood dress-up clothes, or to mimic the magic of fairytales and shining sweets like that shown in the film created for the collection, currently showing on the Teatum Jones website. Although several mannequins displayed the collection in the centre of the room, it wasn’t until I saw the models that I noticed that most of the clothing had large pockets, even in the more formal dresses. One of the models commented on how relaxed she felt, resting her hands in the silk pockets of her neon yellow dress.

Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum
Teatum Jones A/W 2012 by Alia Gargum

This team have found a perfect niche for womenswear that is considered and subtle, yet attention-grabbing. Alluring without being obvious. The midi length of the dresses and nipped-in light fabrics allow the wearer to be feminine in a relaxed way. It’s clear that the Teatum Jones woman is at ease with herself, a modern-day enchantress with a penchant for neon, skilled design and something a little wickedly different. The warm and positive outlook of these designers created an unforgettable London Fashion Week presentation experience; a drop of magical escapism from the busy London Fashion Week storm.

All photography by Alia Gargum

Categories ,Alia Gargum, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Anna Higgie, ,Catherine Teatum, ,Duo, ,Fairytale, ,Fashion films, ,Forests, ,graduates, ,Horror Films, ,Innocence, ,Liberty of London, ,London Fashion Week A/W 2012, ,mock tudor, ,Neon, ,photography, ,print, ,Rob Jones, ,Silks, ,sinister, ,Teatum Jones, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Bunmi Koko

irrespressibles by daria h
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Bunmi Koko was undoubtedly one of my best new discoveries of last season, troche so it was with great anticipation that I sat down for this show next to Lucy Jones – director of Fashion Textiles at the University of East London – who I recognised from the FAD awards last year. Designer Bunmi Olaye is one of her star pupils and in fact still operates out of a studio that the university provides for her. Definitely a big boon for a young designer.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus.

Bunmi prides herself on her business acumen, which was thoroughly present and correct with the large fabric goodie bag stashed under front row seats. Inside mine was a beautifully presented cupcake (soon to be thoughtlessly squashed) as well as an incredibly thorough press pack that included a lovely set of postcards with fashion illustrations of her S/S collection, an explanatory foldout detailing Bunmi’s achievements and inspirations behind Kaleidoscopia, and then to top it all off a mini newspaper: The Bunmi Koko Times. This girl sure knows how to market herself!

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Bunmi’s show began with a short movie – a great idea in theory but a bit odd in practice – involving as it did some clubby graphics and James Bond-ish silhouettes. I wasn’t really sure what it contributed to the whole. Then the show was off with a run – and when I say run I really do mean run. The models were moving quickly at most shows, but at Bunmi’s they were moving at such a lick that it was nigh on impossible to capture them through a lens.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

It’s a good thing I like to capture models on the hop rather than front on like the paps. The clubby graphics – inspired by rainbows, supernovas and mirages – splashed across wide tutus, wrap dresses and clutch bags. I particularly liked the clever of use of futuristic ruching over shoulders and across breastbones.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I loved the elegant purple suit and an eye-popping orange woolly dress, which bounced down the catwalk in a spray of moth-orgasmic fluff. I wasn’t so keen on the metallic leather pieces, which looked cheap by comparison.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus.

Despite the clever styling with diamante encrusted visors, Kaleidoscopia felt far less cohesive than her last collection and left me wondering what exactly the Bunmi aesthetic is. It was all over so quickly that I hardly had time to digest it before Bunmi herself spilled out onto the catwalk, grinning broadly and sporting a t-shirt for Fill The Cup – a fashion range that will send profits to feed hungry children across the world. The conclusion? Good work from a promising young designer, but needs refining.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Andrew Bumpus, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Bunmi Koko, ,Bunmi Olaye, ,FAD Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Fashion Textiles, ,Fill The Cup, ,James Bond, ,Kaleidoscopia, ,lfw, ,Liam McMahon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,The Bunmi Koko Times, ,Toni Bowater, ,University of East London

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Bunmi Koko

irrespressibles by daria h
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Bunmi Koko was undoubtedly one of my best new discoveries of last season, troche so it was with great anticipation that I sat down for this show next to Lucy Jones – director of Fashion Textiles at the University of East London – who I recognised from the FAD awards last year. Designer Bunmi Olaye is one of her star pupils and in fact still operates out of a studio that the university provides for her. Definitely a big boon for a young designer.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus.

Bunmi prides herself on her business acumen, which was thoroughly present and correct with the large fabric goodie bag stashed under front row seats. Inside mine was a beautifully presented cupcake (soon to be thoughtlessly squashed) as well as an incredibly thorough press pack that included a lovely set of postcards with fashion illustrations of her S/S collection, an explanatory foldout detailing Bunmi’s achievements and inspirations behind Kaleidoscopia, and then to top it all off a mini newspaper: The Bunmi Koko Times. This girl sure knows how to market herself!

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Toni Bowater.

Bunmi’s show began with a short movie – a great idea in theory but a bit odd in practice – involving as it did some clubby graphics and James Bond-ish silhouettes. I wasn’t really sure what it contributed to the whole. Then the show was off with a run – and when I say run I really do mean run. The models were moving quickly at most shows, but at Bunmi’s they were moving at such a lick that it was nigh on impossible to capture them through a lens.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

It’s a good thing I like to capture models on the hop rather than front on like the paps. The clubby graphics – inspired by rainbows, supernovas and mirages – splashed across wide tutus, wrap dresses and clutch bags. I particularly liked the clever of use of futuristic ruching over shoulders and across breastbones.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Liam McMahon.

I loved the elegant purple suit and an eye-popping orange woolly dress, which bounced down the catwalk in a spray of moth-orgasmic fluff. I wasn’t so keen on the metallic leather pieces, which looked cheap by comparison.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011 by Andy Bumpus.

Despite the clever styling with diamante encrusted visors, Kaleidoscopia felt far less cohesive than her last collection and left me wondering what exactly the Bunmi aesthetic is. It was all over so quickly that I hardly had time to digest it before Bunmi herself spilled out onto the catwalk, grinning broadly and sporting a t-shirt for Fill The Cup – a fashion range that will send profits to feed hungry children across the world. The conclusion? Good work from a promising young designer, but needs refining.

Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryBunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Bunmi Koko A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Andrew Bumpus, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Bunmi Koko, ,Bunmi Olaye, ,FAD Awards, ,Fashion Scout, ,Fashion Textiles, ,Fill The Cup, ,James Bond, ,Kaleidoscopia, ,lfw, ,Liam McMahon, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lucy Jones, ,The Bunmi Koko Times, ,Toni Bowater, ,University of East London

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011, Catwalk Review: Eudon Choi (by Helen)

Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, cheap buy more about illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, more about no, buy ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34650″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_081CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_037CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_030CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_008CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_126

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD. It was fantastic.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, visit this illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, cheap no, order ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_116″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34650″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_081CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_037CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_030CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_008CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_126

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD. It was fantastic.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, ask illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, ailment no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_040″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34647″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_037CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_030CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_008CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_126content/uploads/2011/02/CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091.jpg” alt=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091″ title=”CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_091″ width=”480″ height=”320″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-34649″ />CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_081Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, order illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic.

Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, this illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stoppers came out. One pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With bare feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, and illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, healing illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, cheapest no, cialis 40mg ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, viagra 60mg illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, price no, search ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know. Or – perhaps a, thrown out of her castle, princess.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself mixed with Queen Elizabeth I, then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, treatment illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, stuff no, viagra ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence. Although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this for me was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story. One that I would love to know. Or – perhaps a, thrown out of her castle, princess.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress that came out reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then adding Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. And wearing the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN. It was as black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, health illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, check no, cialis 40mg ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Corrie_Nielsen_Abby_Wright_LFW

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, pill illustration by Abby Wright

The BFC Tent is massive. Or a lot bigger than the other show spaces. But the benches are the same; white and hard. I went to where I was supposed to be seated and realised it was smack bang in the middle of an already super full bench. I went to the end of the bench; “Any…? No, sickness no, ok then. Thanks.” Luckily a man on the bench behind saved me by shifting up a bit and motioning towards the space he’d made. “Ah wonderful, thanks!” I sort of wanted to chat with him, but found the non-moving up people – now before me- much more interesting. Yabbering and air kissing their faces off with some other people in another row. They went from exceptionally animated and friendly to bored and motionless in second. They reminded me of whippets. The BFC was packed, rammed, up to the brim. Before long, it went dark. The wall of photographers were in their pyramid, like hyeneas, eyes blazing, they were poised…some of them taking shots for no apparent reason. Or, just in case something ridiculous happens.

Corrie_Nielsen_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Big shoulders, high necklines, victoriana, huge circle skirts, sashes over shoulders, trouser suits with extra long legs and short jackets, balooning at the middle slightly, and beautiful midi length skirt suits with puffed shoulders. The shoes were angular or strappy, and the hair either blown up, or short and sharply pointed. But as the show continued, the more dramatic it became. The start featured outfits you could happily wear to a whole host of occasions, all fitted, 60s shapes with Victorian influences, in reds, black, grey and teal, but then it went MAD.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_020CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_019CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_016CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_014 Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

It was fantastic. Everything got extremely vulumnious. Enormous jackets, enveloping the models in shells of silky, padded looking fabrics. Deep purples, teals and bold reds came streaming out. Waist and neck detailing included ruffles, pleats and knots. Skirts were bubbled and swathing. Some were paired with sheer, ruffling tops, others; tight corsets. Many of the models also wore wide headbands, which added to the historic, modern twist charm, mixing modern design with 60s and the late 1800s. And making it work surprising well.

Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-1Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-2Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-3Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-4Corrie_Nielson_AW_2011-5
Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Amelia Gregory

Then two show stopper dresses came out. One nearly pure, off white with a hooped top skirt, corseted top, long train and beautiful headpiece, wrapped around the model’s blonde hair. With ballet satin encased feet, this was ghostly, heavenly and adventurous in one. It appealed to me through its theatre, gracefulness and just off purity. The dress had character, frivolity and fantasy wrapped up. Spiced up innocence, a thrown out of her castle, princess. What did she do to be ejected? For me, although more Elizabethan perhaps in design than Victorian, this was Hardy’s; Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Walking over the hills, her boots worn through, her daze; a story.

CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_137CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_136CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_129CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_150CorrieNielsen_LFW_MattBramford_166

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W 2011 Collection: Photography by Matt Bramford

In contrast, the next dress was BLACK. It reminded me of Queen Victoria herself, mixed with Queen Elizabeth I. Then with the addition of Helena Bonham-Carter and Tilda Swinton. Exploded hair, Elnett insanity, all rough, a bit haphazard and COOL. Together with the most over-ruffled, incredible dress, fit for a QUEEN, it was an explosion. Black as the darkest night, but with a slight shine, like the moon reflecting, the material was reminiscent of a glassy ocean at night. The neck was high, ruffled, starched and stretched down to the waist. The sleeves puffed at the top, then tightened to the wrists. Then the skirt was full and glorious, with a train behind. It was like watching the night fairy, or a stunning, black widow spider move along the catwalk. Deadly. She would have destroyed the off white, semi angel in seconds. It was the ‘other’ side of our heroine, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, downbeat on the moors. Or indeed, 19th century’s; Emily Brontë’s, Wuthering Heights. With Cathy, depressed at the Wuthering Heights estate, angered and serious, yet of course, utterly beautiful. I wish the show had been on the Yorkshire Moors (I don’t), as the dress would have looked sensational, with the wind whipping about and the layers of fabric billowing. The semi angel would have been on a deserted beach in Scotland, or a corn field. I wonder where Corrie would have placed them.

Corrie_Nielsen_2_-_lfw_aw_2011_-_jenny_robins

Corrie Nielsen LFW A/W Collection, illustration by Jenny Robins

Dear Wuthering Heights, I quote thou: ‘Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!’

I hope you see what I mean.
Eugon_Choi2_by_Karolina_Burdon
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, click illustration by Karolina Burdon

I’m going to say saddles. And horses. It’s not just because there was a saddle on the invite to the show. You couldn’t escape the leather straps at Eudon Choi. I wasn’t entirely sure what they were all for, find but they were clearly beautifully soft and of the highest quality. One of the outfits a model wore, cheapest involved an all in one – I think, I’d have to study it at closer range – contraption, that worked like braces and a belt. The braces went down to the top of the thighs and featured gold loops and studs. Worn with a white shirt and beige skirt, it was very old English, equestrian. Open toe wedge boots were worn with short black dresses. Navy, orangey browns, tans, greys and rusty colours were prominent. Nothing too artificial, or over the top. You could imagine wearing these to work. The funnel neck coats, a line skirts, three quarter length sleeves and loose shouldered pieces, were all positively clean and sharp. I personally liked a long sleeved floaty dress, with a wide diagonal off white stripe across the body, from the neck to the hemline. It had a very high waisted leather belt, almost making it empire lined, and looked feminine and understated.

Eudon_Choi_BY_Avril_Kelly
Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, illustration by Avril Kelly

The skirts got shorter and then wider as the show continued. A wide grey/cream, short coat, made an appearance. It featured two strips of brown leather towards its hem, and was tailored to perfection. The floatier dressses hit midi length and full length, with slits to the thigh. These were looser, most strapless or with a single knotted strap, over the shoulder. The look was very together. Like the women who carry small tubes of expensive moisturiser and have ipad covers made from baby goat leather. And an actual ipad, or four.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1575
Andy Bumpus sketching in his ACOFI Moleskine notebook for Fashion Scout.

Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1574Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1637Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1597
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1631Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1625Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1607Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1585Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1643
Eudon_Choi_AW_2011-W_2011-IMG_1640

Eudon Choi LFW A/W 2011 Collection, photography by Amelia Gregory

Everything felt very structured, slightly confined and purposeful. Asked how he would describe an Eudon Choi woman, the designer said: “She likes to stand out from the crowd yet look stylish and sophisticated. She looks individual, with an edge.” That’s perfectly achieved. Organised and controlled, a wearer of Chanel’s Red No.5 lipstick. She positively thrives over a bit of hard business with her espresso. Not a second to spare, she doesn’t even have time to look you up and down darling. Too busy looking ahead. Nice show.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,All Saints, ,Andy Bumpus, ,Avril Kelly, ,chanel, ,Chanel Red No. 5, ,Eudon Choi, ,Fashion Scout, ,Helen Martin, ,ipad, ,Karolina Burdon, ,leather, ,lfw, ,LFW A/W 2011, ,Mascluine, ,Moleskine, ,sleek, ,tailoring, ,Twenty8Twelve

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Amelia’s Magazine | London College of Fashion – Fashion Illustration Graduate Show 2011

Viet Tran dog LCF Showtime
Fashion illustration by Viet Tran.

Touring the fashion illustration talent exhibition at the London College of Fashion Showtime degree show necessitated a bit of a cat and mouse chase in order to take photos without detection by the overzealous security guards who were convinced I was up to no good. I have no idea why… I just want to introduce the world to some great new fashion illustration talents.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Rachel Wilkinson
London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Rachel Wilkinson
Rachel Wilkinson‘s decorative symmetrical illustrations were beautifully imagined… I just wish I could find her online!

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Deborah Jameson
Deborah Jameson had painted a large sheet with a characterful beauty portrait.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Emma Layland
Emma Layland had used some interesting print effects to create simple images with great hair/hat detailing.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Alison Naomi Tullett
For Alison Naomi Tullett it was all about the flamingos… painted on to a big banner. A quick glance at her website reveals that she is as enamoured of animals as she is of humans.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Philip Dunn
London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Philip Dunn
Philip Dunn used minimal brush strokes to idiosyncratic effect, advice creating individual and engaging fashion portraits. I do believe that second one is Maggie!

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Jingwen Sun
Jingwen Sun used simple swathes of watercolour to create a bold beauty portrait.

Cheryl Windahl LCF graduate showtime
Cheryl Windahl is a girl after my own heart – I loved her two decorative artworks, displayed opposite each other – each tiny detail covered in swathes of colour and pattern.

Kelly Anne Sheppard LCF Showtime
Kelly Anne Sheppard produced a diptych of fineline menswear. I thought I recognised her – she was one of the illustrators in residence for Fashion Scout last season alongside Amelia’s Magazine contributor Andy Bumpus.

Viet Tran LCF Showtime
Viet Tran favours the surreal – loved the dapper animals in costume and flying donkey surrounded by flowers, kittens and bunnies. Why not check out Viet Tran’s blog and Twitter feed?

And over here you can find my Fashion Photography and Styling review.

Categories ,2011, ,Ali Tullett, ,Alison Naomi Tullett, ,Andy Bumpus, ,animals, ,Cheryl Windahl, ,Deborah Jameson, ,Decorative, ,Degree Show, ,Emma Layland, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Fashion Scout, ,Flamingos, ,Graduate Shows, ,Jingwen Sun, ,Kelly Anne Sheppard, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Maggie Thatcher, ,pattern, ,Philip Dunn, ,Rachel Wilkinson, ,Showtime, ,Victoria House, ,Viet Tran, ,watercolour

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Amelia’s Magazine | London College of Fashion – Fashion Illustration Graduate Show 2011

Viet Tran dog LCF Showtime
Fashion illustration by Viet Tran.

Touring the fashion illustration talent exhibition at the London College of Fashion Showtime degree show necessitated a bit of a cat and mouse chase in order to take photos without detection by the overzealous security guards who were convinced I was up to no good. I have no idea why… I just want to introduce the world to some great new fashion illustration talents.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Rachel Wilkinson
London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Rachel Wilkinson
Rachel Wilkinson‘s decorative symmetrical illustrations were beautifully imagined… I just wish I could find her online!

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Deborah Jameson
Deborah Jameson had painted a large sheet with a characterful beauty portrait.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Emma Layland
Emma Layland had used some interesting print effects to create simple images with great hair/hat detailing.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Alison Naomi Tullett
For Alison Naomi Tullett it was all about the flamingos… painted on to a big banner. A quick glance at her website reveals that she is as enamoured of animals as she is of humans.

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Philip Dunn
London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Philip Dunn
Philip Dunn used minimal brush strokes to idiosyncratic effect, creating individual and engaging fashion portraits. I do believe that second one is Maggie!

London College of Fashion degree show review 2011-Jingwen Sun
Jingwen Sun used simple swathes of watercolour to create a bold beauty portrait.

Cheryl Windahl LCF graduate showtime
Cheryl Windahl is a girl after my own heart – I loved her two decorative artworks, displayed opposite each other – each tiny detail covered in swathes of colour and pattern.

Kelly Anne Sheppard LCF Showtime
Kelly Anne Sheppard produced a diptych of fineline menswear. I thought I recognised her – she was one of the illustrators in residence for Fashion Scout last season alongside Amelia’s Magazine contributor Andy Bumpus.

Viet Tran LCF Showtime
Viet Tran favours the surreal – loved the dapper animals in costume and flying donkey surrounded by flowers, kittens and bunnies. Why not check out Viet Tran’s blog and Twitter feed?

And over here you can find my Fashion Photography and Styling review.

Categories ,2011, ,Ali Tullett, ,Alison Naomi Tullett, ,Andy Bumpus, ,animals, ,Cheryl Windahl, ,Deborah Jameson, ,Decorative, ,Degree Show, ,Emma Layland, ,Fashion Illustration, ,Fashion Scout, ,Flamingos, ,Graduate Shows, ,Jingwen Sun, ,Kelly Anne Sheppard, ,LCF, ,London College of Fashion, ,Maggie Thatcher, ,pattern, ,Philip Dunn, ,Rachel Wilkinson, ,Showtime, ,Victoria House, ,Viet Tran, ,watercolour

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Amelia’s Magazine | Graduate Fashion Week 2011 Gala Awards Show: Menswear

Andy_Bumpus_Carl_James_Illingworth
Carl James Illingworth by Andy Bumpus.

In some ways the menswear at the Graduate Fashion Week Gala Awards was more fun than the womenswear… particularly with the addition of a whacky white haired older male model who clearly thought the show was all about him. His over the top posing was certainly entertaining to photograph.

Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Carl James Illingworth 2011-photo Amelia GregoryGraduate Fashion Week Gala show Carl James Illingworth 2011-photo Amelia GregoryGraduate Fashion Week Gala show Carl James Illingworth 2011-photo Amelia Gregory
Carl James Illingworth of Northumbria University showed a great collection in black and grey with metallic highlights – studs, cure a crown and plenty of sequins giving a sparkly royal feel. Follow Carl James Illingworth on twitter.

Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Felix Wolodymyr ChablukSmith 2011--photo Amelia GregoryGraduate Fashion Week Gala show Felix Wolodymyr ChablukSmith 2011--photo Amelia GregoryGraduate Fashion Week Gala show Felix Wolodymyr ChablukSmith 2011--photo Amelia Gregory
Felix Wolodymyr Chabluk Smith from Edinburgh College of Art showed a very confident tailored collection. It was definitely the most obviously commercial collection: he won the menswear award.

Andy_Bumpus_Genevieve_Davroy
Genevieve Davroy by Andy Bumpus.

Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Genevieve Davroy 2011-Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Genevieve Davroy 2011-Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Genevieve Davroy 2011-Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Genevieve Davroy 2011-Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Genevieve Davroy 2011-
Genevieve Davroy of Kingston University showed brightly coloured felted shorts and interesting textured knitwear. I liked the combination of primary colours with muted grey.

Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Rose Dent 2011
From University of Manchester Rose Dent took inspiration from sportswear style – sending her models out with mesh bags of balls and big DENT branding brandished across chests and backs. There was lots of clashing coloured print on shirts and on tracksuits. Follow Rose Dent on twitter.

Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Wang Li Xuang 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Wang Li Xuang 2011Graduate Fashion Week Gala show Wang Li Xuang 2011
Lastly Wang Li Xuang of Istituto Marangoni Milan went back to a more sombre colourway with oversized knitted capes and cowls – lovely stuff but the devil to photograph on such a dark catwalk.

It’s great to see some of those fashion designers above are on twitter, prescription but just one last word to graduating designers everywhere, both those who made it to the Gala Awards and those who didn’t or who are pursuing another creative avenue: make sure you use twitter to promote yourself! It’s such a valuable networking tool, and you’re wasting its potential if you just use it to gossip with friends. Leave that to your personal facebook profile – the whole world can see you on twitter, and you should be using it to present a professional image. Talk about your achievements, link to your website and make the most of its powerful ranking in search engines.

If you’d like to know more about how to make the best of social networking I’ll be teaching on the Fashion Bootcamp from the Centre for Fashion Enterprise on 9th-10th July. Find out more here and here.

Categories ,Andy Bumpus, ,Carl James Illingworth, ,Centre for Fashion Enterprise, ,Earls Court, ,Edinburgh College of Art, ,Facebook, ,Fashion Bootcamp, ,Felix Wolodymyr Chabluk Smith, ,Gala Awards, ,Genevieve Davroy, ,GFW, ,Graduate Fashion Week, ,Istituto Marangoni Milan, ,Kingston University, ,knitwear, ,Manchester School of Art, ,menswear, ,Northumbria University, ,Rose Dent, ,twitter, ,University of Manchester, ,Wang Li Xuang

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