Amelia’s Magazine | Tatty Devine launch new central London store in style

The ExtInked project dreamt up by the Ultimate Holding Company to mark Charles Darwin’s bicentennial birthday is no doubt one of the most unique and amazing projects I’ve heard about in a long time. Along with an exhibition illustrating 100 of the most endangered animals in the British Isles, viagra 40mg sick the event came to an astounding conclusion with the tattooing of 100 volunteers who then became ambassadors for their animal. So as the exhibition closed yesterday, pilule what is to become of the ambassadors, now back in their natural habitats?

A friend of mine was lucky to be involved in the project and here he shares his experiences with me.

So why did you take part in the ExtInked Project?

Since getting involved with UHC sometime last winter, I’ve been a part of a number of really interesting projects with them. ExtInked was something they have been talking about for a long time and the idea always really appealed to me. I think it’s a really great thing to be a part of, people have learned so much about which animals are endangered and hopefully will think about why that is, and what can be done about it. For me, I try to make a lot of environmental decisions in my life and feel extremely passionate about the use of animals and our finite natural resources for human gain.

Wildlife conservation and the environment are extremely important, in our relatively short time on this earth we have managed to destroy so much. Positive and big things are happening from the ground up. There is a fast growing environmental movement, but the important decisions need to be made from the top, which, unfortunately is not happening nearly enough.

It seems easier for leaders of governments and corporations to pretend they are doing something, rather than making an important change, that could make a really big difference.

Ext Inked was a great way to be involved in one of the most creative bottom-up environmental actions I know of, I now have a species permanently on my body, which throughout my life no doubt, hundreds of people will ask about, and I will be able to tell them the information I learned about that particular species, the project, the movement, and, in my case, the RSPB and other organisations helping to protect birds in the UK.

Which animal did you get? Tell me about the tattoo!

I went for the Black Grouse; I love birds, so for me it had to be a bird. The black grouse is found in the north of England, much of Wales and Scotland. I think to me, it was important to get something that I would be likely to come into contact with, I love golden eagles and leatherback turtles, but I’ve never seen either unfortunately! I don’t think it really matters too much which species I had tattooed though, as it’s more about the project and the issues as a whole than one particular species.

Tell me about the experience! What happened when you went to Manchester?

We went along on the last day around lunch time, which was bit quieter than when I visited on the Thursday night. I was quite pleased about that as all the tattooing happened much like a tattoo convention. There were barriers up at the front, and a stage with the three tattooists from Ink vs. Steel in Leeds, tattooing live in front of whoever was there to watch. As it was my first tattoo, and I didn’t know how much it would hurt, I was a bit nervous about being watched!

I thought I was being tattooed at 1 o clock, but somebody was running late, and I was early, so they switched our places, I didn’t really have any time to feel too nervous, before I knew it I was laid face down, being tattooed. I’d be lying if I said it didn’t hurt, because it did, but the mix of the atmosphere, and the rush of adrenaline you get puts you in a really strange place. I just laid their trying to work out how much it hurt and which bit he was doing, it was actually a pretty good feeling! Having had the tattoo a couple of days now, the pain seems totally insignificant.

Your girlfriend was part of the project too wasn’t she?

My girlfriend Sally got involved too; she got the Rampion Bellflower on her inner arm. She has a lot of tattoos already, so I think she probably had a different experience to me, although she was still a bit nervous. She was really excited to be a part of the project and has already done some good work telling people about the project and spreading the word! Sally is a very creative person, but isn’t able to be too involved in art, so I think it’s great that she really connected with this project and was really receptive to the ideas artists had on conservation.

What about the future? How do you think you’ll feel about the tattoo in 20 years time?

In twenty years time I have no idea how I will feel about the tattoo, but the more I live, the more I learn, and the more I learn, the more passionate I become.

Climate change and human activity is affecting our wildlife, and that’s only going to get worse unless we act quickly and dramatically. If we act now, while we still have a bit of a chance, I will be able to look at my tattoo and think, I’m glad we did something, and If not, I don’t think anybody will see it because my leg will probably be under water!

DSC_0608All imagery throughout courtesy of Natalia Kneen.

The recent grand opening of Tatty Devine’s new Covent Garden boutique was an affair to remember. A mini marching band led an excited crowd from Tatty Devine’s Soho shop to the new boutique in Covent Garden’s Seven Dials. Wearing giant Tatty Devine jewellery pieces and holding banners, web balloons and streamers the crowd ascended on to the brand’s new central London home on Monmouth Street. Guests enjoyed mulled cider and cupcakes as they celebrated the momentous occasion for the ‘plastic fantastic’, rx cult jewellery brand. Everyone who attended was treated to a lovely gift bag containing, among other treats, a beautiful pendant necklace from the ‘Button Up’ range.

DSC_0676Tatty Devine founders Rosie and Harriet pictured in the new store.

Tatty Devine founders, Rosie Wolfenden and Harriet Vine will, next year, celebrate the 10th birthday of the company they started together way back in 2000. Since their humble beginning the brand has released well over 20 Collections and has collaborated with a wealth of creatives such as Rob Ryan, Ashish, Peter Jensen, Gilbert and George, Peaches, Bernstock Speirs and the V+A to name but a few. In addition to their stand alone stores Tatty Devine now have over 100 stockists worldwide including MOMA, Selfridges, Tate and Urban Outfitters. With such an established position within London’s fashion scene makes the brand an ideal addition to the exclusive Seven Dials location.  “Monmouth Street has a tradition of independent British fashion boutiques, which suits us perfectly. We’re bringing the spirit of our Soho shop to a new space where we can celebrate our 10th birthday next year in style!”

DSC_0604

The boutique will sell all the current collections, the Best of Tatty Devine range featuring the 50 most popular pieces, and of course their famous name necklaces. Also in stock will be; knitwear by KIND, sunglasses by Jeremy Scott and Alexander Wong, bags by Mimi, and excitingly they will be the exclusive UK stockist of Eley Kishimoto’s flash print purses.

DSC_0599

The Autumn/Winter 2009 ‘Button Up’ collection, inspired by the classic iconography of London’s Pearly Kings and Queens brings out a sense of London pride (and when you buy the Pearly King Brooch or Necklace, £1 from every sale will be donated to charity through the Pearly Kings and Queens Association). For the Tatty Devine aficionados out there you can also see Tatty Devine at Bust’s Craftacular event on December 12th, from 12-7pm, at York Hall in Bethnal Green.  Tatty Devine, 44 Monmouth Street, London WC2H 9EP.

Categories ,Alexander Wong, ,Ashish, ,Bernstock Speirs, ,Bust Magazine, ,Covent Garden, ,Crafacular, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Ester Kneen, ,Gilbert and George, ,Harriet Vine, ,Jeremy Scott, ,KIND, ,London’s Pearly Kings and Queens, ,Mimi, ,MOMA, ,Peaches, ,Peter Jensen, ,rob ryan, ,Rosie Wolfenden, ,Selfridges, ,Seven Dials, ,Tate, ,Tatty Devine, ,Urban Outfitters, ,va

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Amelia’s Magazine | We Are All In One: The return of the jumpsuit

FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, find which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, sales and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, hospital which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, visit and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, approved which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, clinic and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, buy information pills which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, website and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, sale or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.

Yeti Lane rAll Photos Couresy of Sonic Cathedral

Yeti Lane should know what they doing; with three quarters of now defunct band Cyann and Ben making up the ranks they have all the experience and credentials for making reflective, healing dreamy music. But Yeti Lane are no limp reincarnation, online instead they’ve taken on a new challenge in their self titled debut to produce a light yet layered sound, sale driven by an unavoidable love affair with the playful elements of pop and rock.

You’re more likely to see members Ben Pleng, Charlie Boyer and LoAc poring over their menagerie of synths, organs and drum machines than smashing guitars in a new found cliché rock madness but nevertheless Yeti Lane place their emphasis on the dazzling relationship between rumbling drumbeats and soaring guitars.

YETI_LANE_LJ2

Yeti Lane never insists on your attention, instead drawing you in slowly, hypnotized by a galaxy of layered electronic waves and hushes, but can at times appear in the wider context like a supporting cast to The Flaming Lips’ Oscar winning performance.

A naturally quiet subtlety runs through the songs of Yeti Lane but unless you can apply your full attention span to the task, the album sometimes slips away from your consciousness, an unfairly forgettable face in a crowd. First-Rate Pretender opens the album heralding the positives of Yeti Lane, all soft vocals that lead you by the hand into their world of delicate anti-romance.

first rate

The band are clearly eager to experiment with different avenues of sound and songs such as Only One Look and Lucky Bag catch glimpses of an interest in glitchy loops and synthesizers but they never truly announce themselves in the foreground. An indulgence in a fresh direction stirs an excitement for the record that is never quite satiated until standout track Lonesome George. The haunting echoes permeating previous tracks have momentarily disappeared as Yeti Lane indulge in a poignant dedication to youthful resilience and unfazed anticipation, led by stirring organs, xylophones and horns.

YETI_LANE_LJ1

The trio aren’t giving much away about their French origins and lean towards an unavoidable American sensibility, though Pleng’s sweet Parisian lilt adds a bonbon charm to darker edges. A contention with stereotypes doesn’t stop there as home for Yeti Lane is the traditionally shoegaze associated label Sonic Cathedral, though the band seem to have enough ideas to distance themselves from being pigeonholed too easily, even if these adventures can come across a little diluted. They bend and navigate the framework of a pop sound, but often this meandering leads to some indulgent deviations.

And so it seems Yeti Lane, overflowing with ideas in the second phase of their musical careers, aren’t quite sure where exactly they’re heading but are taking the road travelled more confidently by stalwarts of the New York scene of decades before. Plaudits for their own ability in melding the vast array of instruments with each other to a pleasant and intriguing effect should not be denied them, though perhaps in time Yeti Lane can mature this sound to a more arresting result.

Yeti Lane rAll Photos Couresy of Sonic Cathedral

Yeti Lane should know what they doing; with three quarters of now defunct band Cyann and Ben making up the ranks they have all the experience and credentials for making reflective, cialis 40mg dreamy music. But Yeti Lane are no limp reincarnation, instead they’ve taken on a new challenge in their self titled debut to produce a light yet layered sound, driven by an unavoidable love affair with the playful elements of pop and rock.

You’re more likely to see members Ben Pleng, Charlie Boyer and LoAc poring over their menagerie of synths, organs and drum machines than smashing guitars in a new found cliché rock madness but nevertheless Yeti Lane place their emphasis on the dazzling relationship between rumbling drumbeats and soaring guitars.

YETI_LANE_LJ2

Yeti Lane never insists on your attention, instead drawing you in slowly, hypnotized by a galaxy of layered electronic waves and hushes, but can at times appear in the wider context like a supporting cast to The Flaming Lips’ Oscar winning performance.

A naturally quiet subtlety runs through the songs of Yeti Lane but unless you can apply your full attention span to the task, the album sometimes slips away from your consciousness, an unfairly forgettable face in a crowd. First-Rate Pretender opens the album heralding the positives of Yeti Lane, all soft vocals that lead you by the hand into their world of delicate anti-romance.

first rate

The band are clearly eager to experiment with different avenues of sound and songs such as Only One Look and Lucky Bag catch glimpses of an interest in glitchy loops and synthesizers but they never truly announce themselves in the foreground. An indulgence in a fresh direction stirs an excitement for the record that is never quite satiated until standout track Lonesome George. The haunting echoes permeating previous tracks have momentarily disappeared as Yeti Lane indulge in a poignant dedication to youthful resilience and unfazed anticipation, led by stirring organs, xylophones and horns.

YETI_LANE_LJ1

The trio aren’t giving much away about their French origins and lean towards an unavoidable American sensibility, though Pleng’s sweet Parisian lilt adds a bonbon charm to darker edges. A contention with stereotypes doesn’t stop there as home for Yeti Lane is the traditionally shoegaze associated label Sonic Cathedral, though the band seem to have enough ideas to distance themselves from being pigeonholed too easily, even if these adventures can come across a little diluted. They bend and navigate the framework of a pop sound, but often this meandering leads to some indulgent deviations.

And so it seems Yeti Lane, overflowing with ideas in the second phase of their musical careers, aren’t quite sure where exactly they’re heading but are taking the road travelled more confidently by stalwarts of the New York scene of decades before. Plaudits for their own ability in melding the vast array of instruments with each other to a pleasant and intriguing effect should not be denied them, though perhaps in time Yeti Lane can mature this sound to a more arresting result.
FAK 2

Since hearing First Aid Kits debut album The Big Black and The Blue we’ve been incredibly impressed with the sibling duo. The album is full of lush harmonies, about it moody melodies and lyrical narratives. I was able to catch up with Klara and Johanna before their gig at Rough Trade East. The girls were eating dinner at a curry house on Brick Lane with their father Benkt before the gig and I dropped in afterwards to ask them a few questions.

Andy Devine. How’re you finding England?

Klara. Oh we just got here but we’re already enjoying it. It’s like coming home because we spent so much time here last year when we were on tour.

AD. You have a three month tour coming up. Is that something you ever imagined doing when you first started recording songs?

Klara. I guess, search we imagined it, but not so soon. It was definitely in the plan, but we thought it’d be in about five year’s time. It’s happened really fast, but we’ve always wanted to make music.

AD. On the Whichita site it says that you were finishing school while you were recording your debut album. How did you manage to find the time to do both.

Johanna. We recorded it during weekends and holidays and at night when we were finished with homework.  It was really stressful.

hardbelieverpackshot

AD. How long did it take you to finish recording it?

Klara. From November 2008 to the summer 2009. It was because we were at school that we couldn’t do it quickly.

Johanna. Yeah we didn’t have all the songs; they were finished gradually.

Klara. Yeah, along the way.

AD. How do you approach your song writing?

Joanna. Well they all just pop out eventually

Klara. Yeah

AD. You’re both from Sweden but all of your songs are sung in English. Is there any particular reason why?

K. We both went to English school

J. Yeah, for four years

K. So it made sense. We’re also really into American and English culture and almost all the music we listen to is in English so when we make songs that’s the way they come out.

firstaidkitsinglepackshot

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and your songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 1

AD. OK, you’ve said that you’re interested in Folk music, but is there anything else which inspires you to write the music that you do?

K. Sure, like films and books we read.

AD. Anything particularly or are you just absorbing it from everywhere?

K. Well I mean some songs have direct songs which we’ve been inspired by. Like, the movie Into The Wild, I was really inspired by it. I wrote a song that’s on our album called ‘Wills of the River’ which I literally wrote while I was watching the movie. I wrote a poem and then we made a song about it. That’s one quite extreme example of how we’re inspired.

AD. What do you think of the British folk scene, and is it similar at all to Sweden’s.

K. We love it, and we’re inspired by it.

J. There’s no such thing in Sweden at all.

K. No

J. I mean we’re the only band really doing this. I think.

AD. Do you play much at all in Sweden then?

K. Yeah.

J. We did at the beginning, we played in Stockholm for a year, or something like that but now we only really play over here.

firstaidkiteppackshot

AD. Do you find that being siblings makes it easier to write songs together.

J & K. Yep

(laughter)

K. Yeah, I mean we haven’t really recorded with anyone else, but definitely. It might just be us, I don’t know if every sibling would be able to but we’re on the same page almost all of the time, and we get along most of the time. I think.

AD. When you met Amelia at Glastonbury you had your parents with you, and obviously your dads along with you this time. How do you find that, does it mean you can’t get up to any classic touring antics?

K. We get a little annoyed I guess

J. But I don’t think it’s because he’s a family member, it’s just being with someone all the time.

K. Yeah, all bands become a family eventually. I mean our dad, it feels a bit weird talking with him sat there.

(Benkt puts his hands up in mock surrender)

K. But he does a lot. He’s our sound technician on the tour as well so we really need him.

J. He’s been doing it too, in the 80’s, he had his own band for a few years. He’s very experienced. So it’s very good for us to talk to him about these things.

(At this point Benkt brings out a copy of Mick Jaggers autobiography and points at it knowingly)

AD. You played on the Climate Camp stage at Glastonbury last year. Is that something that’s quite important to you?

K. Yeah sure

J. We think about it alot. I don’t know if it shows in our songs but it’s important to us. We have this thing in Stockholm now which is called No More Lullabies.

K. There were 24 Swedish artists all playing together.

J. Yeah, we all played 10 minutes each. There’s a film on the website where you can watch it and that was to get awareness to the issue.

K. It was really nice.

J. We love to do those kind of things. We’re not afraid of it and talking about it with people.

AD. OK, finally, what is it you’re most looking forward to doing this year?

J. Touring

K. What we’re doing

J. Yeah, we want to go the US and try to make some new songs.

K. And just enjoy ourselves.

The Big Black and the Blue was releasd on Monday and can be found in all decent record stores.

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and you’re songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 2

Since hearing First Aid Kits debut album The Big Black and The Blue we’ve been incredibly impressed with the sibling duo. The album is full of lush harmonies, troche moody melodies and lyrical narratives. I was able to catch up with Klara and Johanna before their gig at Rough Trade East. The girls were eating dinner at a curry house on Brick Lane with their father Benkt before the gig and I dropped in afterwards to ask them a few questions.

Andy Devine. How’re you finding England?

Klara. Oh we just got here but we’re already enjoying it. It’s like coming home because we spent so much time here last year when we were on tour.

AD. You have a three month tour coming up. Is that something you ever imagined doing when you first started recording songs?

Klara. I guess, dosage we imagined it, but not so soon. It was definitely in the plan, but we thought it’d be in about five year’s time. It’s happened really fast, but we’ve always wanted to make music.

AD. On the Whichita site it says that you were finishing school while you were recording your debut album. How did you manage to find the time to do both.

Johanna. We recorded it during weekends and holidays and at night when we were finished with homework.  It was really stressful.

hardbelieverpackshot

AD. How long did it take you to finish recording it?

Klara. From November 2008 to the summer 2009. It was because we were at school that we couldn’t do it quickly.

Johanna. Yeah we didn’t have all the songs; they were finished gradually.

Klara. Yeah, along the way.

AD. How do you approach your song writing?

Joanna. Well they all just pop out eventually

Klara. Yeah

AD. You’re both from Sweden but all of your songs are sung in English. Is there any particular reason why?

K. We both went to English school

J. Yeah, for four years

K. So it made sense. We’re also really into American and English culture and almost all the music we listen to is in English so when we make songs that’s the way they come out.

firstaidkitsinglepackshot

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and your songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Club. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 1

AD. OK, you’ve said that you’re interested in Folk music, but is there anything else which inspires you to write the music that you do?

K. Sure, like films and books we read.

AD. Anything particularly or are you just absorbing it from everywhere?

K. Well I mean some songs have direct songs which we’ve been inspired by. Like, the movie Into The Wild, I was really inspired by it. I wrote a song that’s on our album called ‘Wills of the River’ which I literally wrote while I was watching the movie. I wrote a poem and then we made a song about it. That’s one quite extreme example of how we’re inspired.

AD. What do you think of the British folk scene, and is it similar at all to Sweden’s.

K. We love it, and we’re inspired by it.

J. There’s no such thing in Sweden at all.

K. No

J. I mean we’re the only band really doing this. I think.

AD. Do you play much at all in Sweden then?

K. Yeah.

J. We did at the beginning, we played in Stockholm for a year, or something like that but now we only really play over here.

firstaidkiteppackshot

AD. Do you find that being siblings makes it easier to write songs together.

J & K. Yep

(laughter)

K. Yeah, I mean we haven’t really recorded with anyone else, but definitely. It might just be us, I don’t know if every sibling would be able to but we’re on the same page almost all of the time, and we get along most of the time. I think.

AD. When you met Amelia at Glastonbury you had your parents with you, and obviously your dads along with you this time. How do you find that, does it mean you can’t get up to any classic touring antics?

K. We get a little annoyed I guess

J. But I don’t think it’s because he’s a family member, it’s just being with someone all the time.

K. Yeah, all bands become a family eventually. I mean our dad, it feels a bit weird talking with him sat there.

(Benkt puts his hands up in mock surrender)

K. But he does a lot. He’s our sound technician on the tour as well so we really need him.

J. He’s been doing it too, in the 80’s, he had his own band for a few years. He’s very experienced. So it’s very good for us to talk to him about these things.

(At this point Benkt brings out a copy of Mick Jaggers autobiography and points at it knowingly)

AD. You played on the Climate Camp stage at Glastonbury last year. Is that something that’s quite important to you?

K. Yeah sure

J. We think about it alot. I don’t know if it shows in our songs but it’s important to us. We have this thing in Stockholm now which is called No More Lullabies.

K. There were 24 Swedish artists all playing together.

J. Yeah, we all played 10 minutes each. There’s a film on the website where you can watch it and that was to get awareness to the issue.

K. It was really nice.

J. We love to do those kind of things. We’re not afraid of it and talking about it with people.

AD. OK, finally, what is it you’re most looking forward to doing this year?

J. Touring

K. What we’re doing

J. Yeah, we want to go the US and try to make some new songs.

K. And just enjoy ourselves.

The Big Black and the Blue was releasd on Monday and can be found in all decent record stores.

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and you’re songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, viagra which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, cost and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, buy information pills or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, cost which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, try and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, for sale or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
Polka Lace copy Image courtesy of All In One, this photographed by Stephanie Sian Smith.

What attracts you to the idea of the onesie jumpsuit / all in one?
I just think they’re pretty unusual and fun to wear – and when you find an amazing one you just look mega cool.

How did you develop your idea into a business? From your blog you’ve sold to a variety of people from Burning Man and bankers to vitamin water and a variety of performers including Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs.
A friend of mine had a blue jellyfish sting protection suit that she’d nicked when she went diving in Australia. When I saw it I instantly fell in love and commandeered it as my festival outfit for the next few years! I soon built up a collection of these suits and got a bit of a reputation as being ‘the onesie girl’ – when the festivals finished I realised that there were hardly any all-in-one’s out there that I could just wear normally. So I started making my own – it kind of seemed natural for me to just start my own business making things which I love. Now, page I sell a mixture of my own work and custom costume designs.

African One copyAbove and all images below courtesy of All In One, information pills photographed by Dan Wilton.

What would you say is Nina Ribena’s design aesthetic?
Massive hoods.

Who or what are your design inspirations?
I’m hugely inspired by the circus. I just got a massive book of old circus photos for Christmas, which is a great reference for one-piece related costumes. I really love bright, crazy, repeat patterns. I love Brian Lichtenberg, Cassette Playa, JCDC and Jeremy Scott’s work…and I would say M.I.A is quite a big inspiration (probably because she wears quite a lot of the aforementioned designer’s clothes!). I love the whole 90′s revival that’s happening at the moment as well, I can’t get enough of tacky gold jewellery and R Kelly.

originals3 copyWhat materials do you particularly like to work in/with?
The majority of my designs are in cotton jersey or anything with a bit of stretch to it. I’ve also been working with PVC quite a lot recently – I quite like the sculptural qualities it can have.

What do onesie’s make you think of?
Fun. Stretching. A good night out. Grace Jones.

all in one .01 (5 of 1) copyHow would you describe your creative process?
I am super organised in some ways and a complete mess in others. So, I usually spend my time trawling the Internet looking through fashion blogs and pulling out anything that catches my eye – this can be anything from London Fashion Week to Where the Wild Things Are to Cheryl Cole. Then I go through them all and decide the themes, that I want to work within – which usually end up being about 7 or 8 different things. I’ll draw some ideas and designs down and then just make the ones I like the most. I’ve never studied fashion – I’m completely self-taught, so I don’t have the ‘correct’ way of designing a collection mastered, at all.

What’s been your favourite appearance of your onesie so far?
I think it has to be the one I made for Fred Butler recently. I.D Magazine are running a feature of 100 portraits of creative/influential people – Fred Butler being one of them – and she asked me to make her an amazing holographic inspired all in one for the shoot. The photos were taken by Nick Knight for his SHOWstudio project so you could watch the whole shoot live on their website. So yeah, my design will be in I.D Magazine, shot by a famous photographer and worn by a really talented designer. Definitely my favourite onesie appearance!

blue african trim copyWith Fashion Week slowly creeping up on us which designers will you be watching out for?
I’ve always been really interested in Gareth Pugh’s work – especially his last collection – I thought everything from the clothes to the lighting and feel of the catwalk just looked amazing. I always like to check out the new designers supported by Fashion East/ Vauxhall Fashion Scout etc…it’s always good to study the sort of designers who win these opportunities.
Aside from that – House of Holland, Ashish, Givenchy, Pam Hogg, Viktor & Rolf, Mark Fast and Jeremy Scott, of course. He always make things a bit more interesting!

As a holder of a blog – what are your thoughts on the blogging ‘sphere’?
I think it’s really important to have a blog if you’re a designer. Just having an online shop or website doesn’t really cut it these days. I think the people who buy your clothes (and are ultimately fans of your work) want to have more of an insight into your creative processes and the things that inspire you. Plus it’s a brilliant way to network with people and get your work out into the open. I wouldn’t have had half of the opportunities or ideas I’ve had without having access to all the blogs out there.

all in one .01 (3 of 5) copyWhat’s next for Nina Ribena?
Lots. I’m really enjoying printing my own fabric at the moment so you can expect to see a lot of zebras, puffins and multi-coloured leopard skin prints making appearances on my designs soon! I want to bring out my own line of leggings and a friend and me have just started our own dance/club night collective.
I’m also planning an exhibition of all my designs to be shown at the end of the year, which is going to involve a mixture of fashion, art and theatrics – all in onesies, of course. It’s going to be a busy year!

Categories ,Ashish, ,Brian Lichtenberg, ,Burning Man, ,Cassette Playa, ,Cheryl Cole, ,Fashion East, ,Fred Butler, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Givenchy, ,Grace Jones, ,House of Holland, ,I.D Magazine, ,JCDC, ,Jeremy Scott, ,London Fashion Week, ,M.I.A, ,Mark Fast, ,Nick Knight, ,Nina Ribena, ,Pam Hogg, ,R Kelly, ,Stephanie Sian Smith, ,Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Viktor & Rolf, ,We Are All In One, ,Where the Wild Things Are

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Amelia’s Magazine | We Are All In One: The return of the jumpsuit

FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, find which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, sales and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, hospital which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, visit and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, approved which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, clinic and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, buy information pills which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, website and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, sale or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.

Yeti Lane rAll Photos Couresy of Sonic Cathedral

Yeti Lane should know what they doing; with three quarters of now defunct band Cyann and Ben making up the ranks they have all the experience and credentials for making reflective, healing dreamy music. But Yeti Lane are no limp reincarnation, online instead they’ve taken on a new challenge in their self titled debut to produce a light yet layered sound, sale driven by an unavoidable love affair with the playful elements of pop and rock.

You’re more likely to see members Ben Pleng, Charlie Boyer and LoAc poring over their menagerie of synths, organs and drum machines than smashing guitars in a new found cliché rock madness but nevertheless Yeti Lane place their emphasis on the dazzling relationship between rumbling drumbeats and soaring guitars.

YETI_LANE_LJ2

Yeti Lane never insists on your attention, instead drawing you in slowly, hypnotized by a galaxy of layered electronic waves and hushes, but can at times appear in the wider context like a supporting cast to The Flaming Lips’ Oscar winning performance.

A naturally quiet subtlety runs through the songs of Yeti Lane but unless you can apply your full attention span to the task, the album sometimes slips away from your consciousness, an unfairly forgettable face in a crowd. First-Rate Pretender opens the album heralding the positives of Yeti Lane, all soft vocals that lead you by the hand into their world of delicate anti-romance.

first rate

The band are clearly eager to experiment with different avenues of sound and songs such as Only One Look and Lucky Bag catch glimpses of an interest in glitchy loops and synthesizers but they never truly announce themselves in the foreground. An indulgence in a fresh direction stirs an excitement for the record that is never quite satiated until standout track Lonesome George. The haunting echoes permeating previous tracks have momentarily disappeared as Yeti Lane indulge in a poignant dedication to youthful resilience and unfazed anticipation, led by stirring organs, xylophones and horns.

YETI_LANE_LJ1

The trio aren’t giving much away about their French origins and lean towards an unavoidable American sensibility, though Pleng’s sweet Parisian lilt adds a bonbon charm to darker edges. A contention with stereotypes doesn’t stop there as home for Yeti Lane is the traditionally shoegaze associated label Sonic Cathedral, though the band seem to have enough ideas to distance themselves from being pigeonholed too easily, even if these adventures can come across a little diluted. They bend and navigate the framework of a pop sound, but often this meandering leads to some indulgent deviations.

And so it seems Yeti Lane, overflowing with ideas in the second phase of their musical careers, aren’t quite sure where exactly they’re heading but are taking the road travelled more confidently by stalwarts of the New York scene of decades before. Plaudits for their own ability in melding the vast array of instruments with each other to a pleasant and intriguing effect should not be denied them, though perhaps in time Yeti Lane can mature this sound to a more arresting result.

Yeti Lane rAll Photos Couresy of Sonic Cathedral

Yeti Lane should know what they doing; with three quarters of now defunct band Cyann and Ben making up the ranks they have all the experience and credentials for making reflective, cialis 40mg dreamy music. But Yeti Lane are no limp reincarnation, instead they’ve taken on a new challenge in their self titled debut to produce a light yet layered sound, driven by an unavoidable love affair with the playful elements of pop and rock.

You’re more likely to see members Ben Pleng, Charlie Boyer and LoAc poring over their menagerie of synths, organs and drum machines than smashing guitars in a new found cliché rock madness but nevertheless Yeti Lane place their emphasis on the dazzling relationship between rumbling drumbeats and soaring guitars.

YETI_LANE_LJ2

Yeti Lane never insists on your attention, instead drawing you in slowly, hypnotized by a galaxy of layered electronic waves and hushes, but can at times appear in the wider context like a supporting cast to The Flaming Lips’ Oscar winning performance.

A naturally quiet subtlety runs through the songs of Yeti Lane but unless you can apply your full attention span to the task, the album sometimes slips away from your consciousness, an unfairly forgettable face in a crowd. First-Rate Pretender opens the album heralding the positives of Yeti Lane, all soft vocals that lead you by the hand into their world of delicate anti-romance.

first rate

The band are clearly eager to experiment with different avenues of sound and songs such as Only One Look and Lucky Bag catch glimpses of an interest in glitchy loops and synthesizers but they never truly announce themselves in the foreground. An indulgence in a fresh direction stirs an excitement for the record that is never quite satiated until standout track Lonesome George. The haunting echoes permeating previous tracks have momentarily disappeared as Yeti Lane indulge in a poignant dedication to youthful resilience and unfazed anticipation, led by stirring organs, xylophones and horns.

YETI_LANE_LJ1

The trio aren’t giving much away about their French origins and lean towards an unavoidable American sensibility, though Pleng’s sweet Parisian lilt adds a bonbon charm to darker edges. A contention with stereotypes doesn’t stop there as home for Yeti Lane is the traditionally shoegaze associated label Sonic Cathedral, though the band seem to have enough ideas to distance themselves from being pigeonholed too easily, even if these adventures can come across a little diluted. They bend and navigate the framework of a pop sound, but often this meandering leads to some indulgent deviations.

And so it seems Yeti Lane, overflowing with ideas in the second phase of their musical careers, aren’t quite sure where exactly they’re heading but are taking the road travelled more confidently by stalwarts of the New York scene of decades before. Plaudits for their own ability in melding the vast array of instruments with each other to a pleasant and intriguing effect should not be denied them, though perhaps in time Yeti Lane can mature this sound to a more arresting result.
FAK 2

Since hearing First Aid Kits debut album The Big Black and The Blue we’ve been incredibly impressed with the sibling duo. The album is full of lush harmonies, about it moody melodies and lyrical narratives. I was able to catch up with Klara and Johanna before their gig at Rough Trade East. The girls were eating dinner at a curry house on Brick Lane with their father Benkt before the gig and I dropped in afterwards to ask them a few questions.

Andy Devine. How’re you finding England?

Klara. Oh we just got here but we’re already enjoying it. It’s like coming home because we spent so much time here last year when we were on tour.

AD. You have a three month tour coming up. Is that something you ever imagined doing when you first started recording songs?

Klara. I guess, search we imagined it, but not so soon. It was definitely in the plan, but we thought it’d be in about five year’s time. It’s happened really fast, but we’ve always wanted to make music.

AD. On the Whichita site it says that you were finishing school while you were recording your debut album. How did you manage to find the time to do both.

Johanna. We recorded it during weekends and holidays and at night when we were finished with homework.  It was really stressful.

hardbelieverpackshot

AD. How long did it take you to finish recording it?

Klara. From November 2008 to the summer 2009. It was because we were at school that we couldn’t do it quickly.

Johanna. Yeah we didn’t have all the songs; they were finished gradually.

Klara. Yeah, along the way.

AD. How do you approach your song writing?

Joanna. Well they all just pop out eventually

Klara. Yeah

AD. You’re both from Sweden but all of your songs are sung in English. Is there any particular reason why?

K. We both went to English school

J. Yeah, for four years

K. So it made sense. We’re also really into American and English culture and almost all the music we listen to is in English so when we make songs that’s the way they come out.

firstaidkitsinglepackshot

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and your songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 1

AD. OK, you’ve said that you’re interested in Folk music, but is there anything else which inspires you to write the music that you do?

K. Sure, like films and books we read.

AD. Anything particularly or are you just absorbing it from everywhere?

K. Well I mean some songs have direct songs which we’ve been inspired by. Like, the movie Into The Wild, I was really inspired by it. I wrote a song that’s on our album called ‘Wills of the River’ which I literally wrote while I was watching the movie. I wrote a poem and then we made a song about it. That’s one quite extreme example of how we’re inspired.

AD. What do you think of the British folk scene, and is it similar at all to Sweden’s.

K. We love it, and we’re inspired by it.

J. There’s no such thing in Sweden at all.

K. No

J. I mean we’re the only band really doing this. I think.

AD. Do you play much at all in Sweden then?

K. Yeah.

J. We did at the beginning, we played in Stockholm for a year, or something like that but now we only really play over here.

firstaidkiteppackshot

AD. Do you find that being siblings makes it easier to write songs together.

J & K. Yep

(laughter)

K. Yeah, I mean we haven’t really recorded with anyone else, but definitely. It might just be us, I don’t know if every sibling would be able to but we’re on the same page almost all of the time, and we get along most of the time. I think.

AD. When you met Amelia at Glastonbury you had your parents with you, and obviously your dads along with you this time. How do you find that, does it mean you can’t get up to any classic touring antics?

K. We get a little annoyed I guess

J. But I don’t think it’s because he’s a family member, it’s just being with someone all the time.

K. Yeah, all bands become a family eventually. I mean our dad, it feels a bit weird talking with him sat there.

(Benkt puts his hands up in mock surrender)

K. But he does a lot. He’s our sound technician on the tour as well so we really need him.

J. He’s been doing it too, in the 80’s, he had his own band for a few years. He’s very experienced. So it’s very good for us to talk to him about these things.

(At this point Benkt brings out a copy of Mick Jaggers autobiography and points at it knowingly)

AD. You played on the Climate Camp stage at Glastonbury last year. Is that something that’s quite important to you?

K. Yeah sure

J. We think about it alot. I don’t know if it shows in our songs but it’s important to us. We have this thing in Stockholm now which is called No More Lullabies.

K. There were 24 Swedish artists all playing together.

J. Yeah, we all played 10 minutes each. There’s a film on the website where you can watch it and that was to get awareness to the issue.

K. It was really nice.

J. We love to do those kind of things. We’re not afraid of it and talking about it with people.

AD. OK, finally, what is it you’re most looking forward to doing this year?

J. Touring

K. What we’re doing

J. Yeah, we want to go the US and try to make some new songs.

K. And just enjoy ourselves.

The Big Black and the Blue was releasd on Monday and can be found in all decent record stores.

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and you’re songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 2

Since hearing First Aid Kits debut album The Big Black and The Blue we’ve been incredibly impressed with the sibling duo. The album is full of lush harmonies, troche moody melodies and lyrical narratives. I was able to catch up with Klara and Johanna before their gig at Rough Trade East. The girls were eating dinner at a curry house on Brick Lane with their father Benkt before the gig and I dropped in afterwards to ask them a few questions.

Andy Devine. How’re you finding England?

Klara. Oh we just got here but we’re already enjoying it. It’s like coming home because we spent so much time here last year when we were on tour.

AD. You have a three month tour coming up. Is that something you ever imagined doing when you first started recording songs?

Klara. I guess, dosage we imagined it, but not so soon. It was definitely in the plan, but we thought it’d be in about five year’s time. It’s happened really fast, but we’ve always wanted to make music.

AD. On the Whichita site it says that you were finishing school while you were recording your debut album. How did you manage to find the time to do both.

Johanna. We recorded it during weekends and holidays and at night when we were finished with homework.  It was really stressful.

hardbelieverpackshot

AD. How long did it take you to finish recording it?

Klara. From November 2008 to the summer 2009. It was because we were at school that we couldn’t do it quickly.

Johanna. Yeah we didn’t have all the songs; they were finished gradually.

Klara. Yeah, along the way.

AD. How do you approach your song writing?

Joanna. Well they all just pop out eventually

Klara. Yeah

AD. You’re both from Sweden but all of your songs are sung in English. Is there any particular reason why?

K. We both went to English school

J. Yeah, for four years

K. So it made sense. We’re also really into American and English culture and almost all the music we listen to is in English so when we make songs that’s the way they come out.

firstaidkitsinglepackshot

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and your songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Club. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK 1

AD. OK, you’ve said that you’re interested in Folk music, but is there anything else which inspires you to write the music that you do?

K. Sure, like films and books we read.

AD. Anything particularly or are you just absorbing it from everywhere?

K. Well I mean some songs have direct songs which we’ve been inspired by. Like, the movie Into The Wild, I was really inspired by it. I wrote a song that’s on our album called ‘Wills of the River’ which I literally wrote while I was watching the movie. I wrote a poem and then we made a song about it. That’s one quite extreme example of how we’re inspired.

AD. What do you think of the British folk scene, and is it similar at all to Sweden’s.

K. We love it, and we’re inspired by it.

J. There’s no such thing in Sweden at all.

K. No

J. I mean we’re the only band really doing this. I think.

AD. Do you play much at all in Sweden then?

K. Yeah.

J. We did at the beginning, we played in Stockholm for a year, or something like that but now we only really play over here.

firstaidkiteppackshot

AD. Do you find that being siblings makes it easier to write songs together.

J & K. Yep

(laughter)

K. Yeah, I mean we haven’t really recorded with anyone else, but definitely. It might just be us, I don’t know if every sibling would be able to but we’re on the same page almost all of the time, and we get along most of the time. I think.

AD. When you met Amelia at Glastonbury you had your parents with you, and obviously your dads along with you this time. How do you find that, does it mean you can’t get up to any classic touring antics?

K. We get a little annoyed I guess

J. But I don’t think it’s because he’s a family member, it’s just being with someone all the time.

K. Yeah, all bands become a family eventually. I mean our dad, it feels a bit weird talking with him sat there.

(Benkt puts his hands up in mock surrender)

K. But he does a lot. He’s our sound technician on the tour as well so we really need him.

J. He’s been doing it too, in the 80’s, he had his own band for a few years. He’s very experienced. So it’s very good for us to talk to him about these things.

(At this point Benkt brings out a copy of Mick Jaggers autobiography and points at it knowingly)

AD. You played on the Climate Camp stage at Glastonbury last year. Is that something that’s quite important to you?

K. Yeah sure

J. We think about it alot. I don’t know if it shows in our songs but it’s important to us. We have this thing in Stockholm now which is called No More Lullabies.

K. There were 24 Swedish artists all playing together.

J. Yeah, we all played 10 minutes each. There’s a film on the website where you can watch it and that was to get awareness to the issue.

K. It was really nice.

J. We love to do those kind of things. We’re not afraid of it and talking about it with people.

AD. OK, finally, what is it you’re most looking forward to doing this year?

J. Touring

K. What we’re doing

J. Yeah, we want to go the US and try to make some new songs.

K. And just enjoy ourselves.

The Big Black and the Blue was releasd on Monday and can be found in all decent record stores.

AD. Ok, you’ve probably heard this one quite alot, but, you’re still quite young and you’re songs show a lot of maturity

K. (smiling) Oh really

(Laughter)

AD. Sorry

K. Oh no no

AD. You show a lot of maturity, especially in the lyrics. Do these come from your own experiences or are they just stories?

K. We are young, and we haven’t experienced that much. We haven’t run away from our husbands after long marriages. We just like the tradition of telling stories in the country/folk scene. I mean if you go way back to The Carter Family and all of those guys and they all tell these sad stories about outlaws and things.

AD. Last year you were over here supporting Fanfarlo and Slow Dive. How does it feel this year to be coming back and you’ll be headlining your own gigs?

K. Well the Fanfarlo tour was meant to be a double headline

AD. Oh Really?

J. But it didn’t quite work like that, for some reason.

K. I mean they’re six and we’re only two so …

J. Yeah, it’s new and exciting and we’re both a little nervous.

FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, viagra which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, cost and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, buy information pills or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
FAK_BBB_packshot

The first time I heard First Aid Kit was when they supported Slow Club during their tour last year. They were kicking around the empty venue watching Slow Club’s sound check.

The Swedish sisters looked so young that I thought someone had snuck their daughters into the venue before the doors opened.

I have been a massive fan of First Aid Kit since that gig in October. I listened obsessively to their Drunken Trees E.P and I’ve been counting down the days til their release of their debut album The Big Black and The Blue.

It was completely worth the wait; the album sounds fantastic from the get go. The Big Black and The Blue opens with the stunning ‘In The Morning’; it starts with an acappella harmony, cost which leads into the quietest and gentle strums of an acoustic guitar, try and instantly grabs your attention and steals your heart.

FAK 1

The interesting thing about First Aid Kit is the contradiction in two young girls writing the occasional song about middle-aged women, for sale or tackling stories that seem beyond their teenage years. Just like You’re Not Coming Home Tonight from their E.P, ‘In The Morning’ is just one of the songs about a life the musicians are too young to lead themselves.

It sounds patronising, but there really aren’t any other musicians as young as these girls writing lyrics of this depth or maturity.

The Big Black and The Blue alternates between acappella styled harmonies and country tinged guitars to create 11 beautifully crafted songs that you won’t get bored of. Hard Believer is the standout song of the album; it’s another track that shows off the maturity and wisdom in the lyrics.

On first listen this isn’t in the same league as their Drunken Trees E.P, but if you give it enough time, it’ll grow on you. I think there’s a space in everyone’s music collections for this stunning release. I shall be upgrading my press CD for a vinyl version next week.
Polka Lace copy Image courtesy of All In One, this photographed by Stephanie Sian Smith.

What attracts you to the idea of the onesie jumpsuit / all in one?
I just think they’re pretty unusual and fun to wear – and when you find an amazing one you just look mega cool.

How did you develop your idea into a business? From your blog you’ve sold to a variety of people from Burning Man and bankers to vitamin water and a variety of performers including Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs.
A friend of mine had a blue jellyfish sting protection suit that she’d nicked when she went diving in Australia. When I saw it I instantly fell in love and commandeered it as my festival outfit for the next few years! I soon built up a collection of these suits and got a bit of a reputation as being ‘the onesie girl’ – when the festivals finished I realised that there were hardly any all-in-one’s out there that I could just wear normally. So I started making my own – it kind of seemed natural for me to just start my own business making things which I love. Now, page I sell a mixture of my own work and custom costume designs.

African One copyAbove and all images below courtesy of All In One, information pills photographed by Dan Wilton.

What would you say is Nina Ribena’s design aesthetic?
Massive hoods.

Who or what are your design inspirations?
I’m hugely inspired by the circus. I just got a massive book of old circus photos for Christmas, which is a great reference for one-piece related costumes. I really love bright, crazy, repeat patterns. I love Brian Lichtenberg, Cassette Playa, JCDC and Jeremy Scott’s work…and I would say M.I.A is quite a big inspiration (probably because she wears quite a lot of the aforementioned designer’s clothes!). I love the whole 90′s revival that’s happening at the moment as well, I can’t get enough of tacky gold jewellery and R Kelly.

originals3 copyWhat materials do you particularly like to work in/with?
The majority of my designs are in cotton jersey or anything with a bit of stretch to it. I’ve also been working with PVC quite a lot recently – I quite like the sculptural qualities it can have.

What do onesie’s make you think of?
Fun. Stretching. A good night out. Grace Jones.

all in one .01 (5 of 1) copyHow would you describe your creative process?
I am super organised in some ways and a complete mess in others. So, I usually spend my time trawling the Internet looking through fashion blogs and pulling out anything that catches my eye – this can be anything from London Fashion Week to Where the Wild Things Are to Cheryl Cole. Then I go through them all and decide the themes, that I want to work within – which usually end up being about 7 or 8 different things. I’ll draw some ideas and designs down and then just make the ones I like the most. I’ve never studied fashion – I’m completely self-taught, so I don’t have the ‘correct’ way of designing a collection mastered, at all.

What’s been your favourite appearance of your onesie so far?
I think it has to be the one I made for Fred Butler recently. I.D Magazine are running a feature of 100 portraits of creative/influential people – Fred Butler being one of them – and she asked me to make her an amazing holographic inspired all in one for the shoot. The photos were taken by Nick Knight for his SHOWstudio project so you could watch the whole shoot live on their website. So yeah, my design will be in I.D Magazine, shot by a famous photographer and worn by a really talented designer. Definitely my favourite onesie appearance!

blue african trim copyWith Fashion Week slowly creeping up on us which designers will you be watching out for?
I’ve always been really interested in Gareth Pugh’s work – especially his last collection – I thought everything from the clothes to the lighting and feel of the catwalk just looked amazing. I always like to check out the new designers supported by Fashion East/ Vauxhall Fashion Scout etc…it’s always good to study the sort of designers who win these opportunities.
Aside from that – House of Holland, Ashish, Givenchy, Pam Hogg, Viktor & Rolf, Mark Fast and Jeremy Scott, of course. He always make things a bit more interesting!

As a holder of a blog – what are your thoughts on the blogging ‘sphere’?
I think it’s really important to have a blog if you’re a designer. Just having an online shop or website doesn’t really cut it these days. I think the people who buy your clothes (and are ultimately fans of your work) want to have more of an insight into your creative processes and the things that inspire you. Plus it’s a brilliant way to network with people and get your work out into the open. I wouldn’t have had half of the opportunities or ideas I’ve had without having access to all the blogs out there.

all in one .01 (3 of 5) copyWhat’s next for Nina Ribena?
Lots. I’m really enjoying printing my own fabric at the moment so you can expect to see a lot of zebras, puffins and multi-coloured leopard skin prints making appearances on my designs soon! I want to bring out my own line of leggings and a friend and me have just started our own dance/club night collective.
I’m also planning an exhibition of all my designs to be shown at the end of the year, which is going to involve a mixture of fashion, art and theatrics – all in onesies, of course. It’s going to be a busy year!

Categories ,Ashish, ,Brian Lichtenberg, ,Burning Man, ,Cassette Playa, ,Cheryl Cole, ,Fashion East, ,Fred Butler, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Givenchy, ,Grace Jones, ,House of Holland, ,I.D Magazine, ,JCDC, ,Jeremy Scott, ,London Fashion Week, ,M.I.A, ,Mark Fast, ,Nick Knight, ,Nina Ribena, ,Pam Hogg, ,R Kelly, ,Stephanie Sian Smith, ,Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Viktor & Rolf, ,We Are All In One, ,Where the Wild Things Are

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Amelia’s Magazine | Scandinavian womenswear designer Eyglo: New S/S 2012 Season Presentation Preview and Interview

Eyglo S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc.



Eyglo Magret has been designing clothes since the age of 17. Graduating from the Iceland Academy of Arts in 2005 with a degree in Fashion Design, artistic Eyglo went on to intern with a number of highly respected fashion houses including Bernhard Willhelm, threeAsFOUR and Jeremy Scott – an impressive start, not to mention formidable resume for a first time graduate.


I first met Eyglo during Paris Fashion Week and instantly decided that I liked both her and her small, but expertly designed collection. Following our conversation, I discovered the thinking and creative process behind her refreshingly original concepts: talk dinosaur themes and sea-green hair and you’ve got my attention. 


Eyglo by Aysim Genc
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc.


Eyglo’s collections are often described as feminine and timeless with a signature nudge nudge, wink wink thrown in for added humour. I was drawn to the architectural simplicity of each piece for S/S 2012, particularly the sporty, easy to wear shapes found on funnel neck coats and wide fitting dresses; a big trend for next year if Paris’s spring/summer trade shows are anything to go by. Always one for working with natural fabrics, Eylgo is continuously reinventing her approach towards detail and pattern cutting, often giving a slight futuristic feel to her impishly charming creations that wouldn’t be out of place in a Tim Burton-esque fantasy.

Eyglo S/S 2012
Eyglo S/S 2012
Not only is 28-year-old Eylgo Magret a creative soul, but she also has one heck of a business orientated head on her shoulders. In 2010, she and nine other designers set up Icelandic-based boutique collective, Kiosk. The store pulls together a group of young designers under one roof offering something new and original to the fashion conscious youth of Reykjavik, Iceland.


Parallel to that of the Icelandic fashion scene itself, Eyglo has slowly but surely been creeping into the world’s international fashion radar over the past few years. Following our brief chat in Paris, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to speak to the Scandinavian designer in more depth about the direction for S/S 2012 and what the future holds for Icelandic brainchild, Kiosk.

Eyglo S/S 2012
Eyglo S/S 2012
After graduating from the Iceland Academy of Arts you interned with Jeremy Scott. How was it working with him, and what did you take away from the experience?

It was great! But the best part was probably the people that were there at the same time – Gerlan from Gerlan Jeans and Ingrid Gutto who is now the head designer for Alexander Wang Menswear. It was also amazing staying in the Hollywood hills with small deer, raccoons, skunks and other funny little animals running around outside the studio. I was mainly involved in pattern cutting and costume making, but I also got to design a dress for Madonna and Fischerspooner whilst I was there. I was also lucky enough to intern with ThreeASFOUR and Bernhard Willhelm. Each experience was completely different to the next. I’m really into experimental pattern making and I was lucky enough to be involved with different ways of acting out this process at three different companies.


Eyglo by Katie Gill
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Katie Gill.

You designed a dress for Madonna! Did you get to meet the lady herself?

No, I didn’t get to meet Madonna unfortunately; she had an assistant running around for her. I just got hold of the measurements and a reference picture and did my thing, but she did wear the dress in one of her music videos so I guess I fulfilled my duty! 
 
Which other designers do you look to for direction?
It can vary from season to season, but usually Givenchy, Lanvin, Mary Karantzou and many more. It’s always nice to look to the graduation collections from Central Saint Martins as well.



 
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Grace Duignan-Pearson
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Grace Duignan-Pearson.
 
What’s the inspiration behind your S/S 2012 collection?
It all stems from when my son came home from the library with a dinosaur book one day. That’s where I got the idea for the pattern and pleats, and I also scanned my own hair onto silk satin dresses. The collection has a bit of a sporty, animalistic vibe to it I guess.  
 
You and nine other designers co-own the Icelandic boutique store, Kiosk. Where did the idea behind the venture come from?
I’d originally been selling in KronKron and Liborius here in Reykjavik for some time; they’re both really nice boutiques so I had nothing to complain about. The whole idea for Kiosk came from my friend and we grouped together. Now it’s possible for me to sell my products cheaper, and I get more in my pocket at the end of the day. The nicest thing is that you get to stay in much better contact with your customers, for special orders and so on. We work one day a week each, split the rent and have a lot of fun being a group. We’re taking in three new brands at the beginning of November, whilst two of the original owners take a break to work on other things. I’d recommend this way of doing business for all young designers, it takes up a lot of time but pays back in so many ways in the end.

Eyglo S/S 2012 by Katie Gill
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Katie Gill.

Iceland is becoming more and more known for its emerging talent. Recession aside, what do you think the future holds for the Icelandic fashion scene?
It’s slowly growing. I remember when I was a teenager there was only mall shops and one second hand store – that was it! I guess that was the reason why I went into fashion design. I couldn’t find any clothes that were interesting enough for me. I graduated in 2005, and that was only the second year of graduates studying fashion in Iceland. Just 10-20% of each year’s graduates go on to actually do their own thing. We’ve held Reykjavik Fashion Festival twice now and hopefully it will be held again early next year. The event managed to get a lot of press here last time and I wouldn’t hesitate in taking part again.

Eyglo S/S 2012
Eyglo S/S 2012
When did you first decide that you wanted to be a fashion designer?
I was 17 and studying at business school – ha! It almost happened over a night and I’ve never looked back since. Not once. There’s nothing else that I would like to do, this is it. 
 
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Grace Duignan-Pearson
Eyglo S/S 2012 by Grace Duignan-Pearson.

How would you describe the typical Eyglo girl?
Clothing wise, I would say playful and classic but a total nerd! Though a happy and a confident nerd at that.  

What’s next for Eyglo?
I’m currently working on my designs for A/W 2012. I’m looking into crop circles; clearly I’ve been watching too many ancient aliens programs. I wouldn’t be surprised if I started a cult before the collection is actually shown, ha!

Categories ,Alexander Wang, ,AsFour, ,Aysim Genc, ,Bernhard Willhelm, ,Central Saint Martins, ,Eyglo, ,fischerspooner, ,Gerlan Jeans, ,Givenchy, ,Grace Duignan-Pearson, ,Hollywood, ,iceland, ,Iceland Academy of Arts, ,Jeremy Scott, ,Kate Rose Gill, ,Kiosk, ,KronKron, ,Lanvin, ,Liborius, ,Madonna, ,Mary Karantzou, ,Paris Fashion Week, ,Reykjavik, ,Reykjavik Fashion Festival, ,S/S 2012

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Amelia’s Magazine | MOSCHINO: London Collections: Men S/S 2015 Catwalk Review

MOSCHINO_SS15_2_by_Krister Selin
Moschino S/S 2015 by Krister Selin

Moschino was the hottest ticket during London Collections: Men, and the 300-strong queue outside Lindley Hall was testament to that. Inside, the wall had been branded with a huge Moschino decal; cameras whirled above our heads on enormous tripods. The noise was deafening. Everybody seemed a bit sexier and they all had Moschino french fries iPhone cases.

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_126

My naivety, and inability to attend fashion weeks other than London-based ones, meant that I felt like I had been transported to a Versace show in Milan in the 1990s. My absolute favourite kind of fashion is trashy Italian fashion – the style of unashamed glamour that the Italians do so well, introduced in the 1980s and infamous in the 1990s. It brought us supermodels, leather chaps on the runway and more ghetto gold than you can shake a stick at. So when I found out that Moschino were to show at London Collections: Men, in our great city for the first time, I knew I’d bend over backwards to get in. Luckily I didn’t have to do that.

MOSCHINO_SS15_1_by_Krister Selin
Moschino S/S 2015 by Krister Selin

Nobody seemed to be getting in from outside, and as I stood next to a woman dressed head-to-toe in that ridiculous, brilliant McDonald’s inspired ensemble, I envisaged a mass scrum and hours of waiting. I was surprised the show began a mere 20 minutes late. What happened after this is a bit of a blur, the atmosphere was so electric that I think I may have blacked out from excitement at one point.

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All photography by Matt Bramford

Dishy models that must have been shipped in from Italy, or perhaps paradise, strode out to the sounds of a 1990s playlist. The first section turned soft drinks and pop culture into suits, t-shirts and swimwear. Then came brightly coloured tops, sweatshirts and bikinis emblazoned with enormous Moschino type.

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Chanel 2.55 knock offs with gold Moschino letters replacing the interlocking C’s eveloped one model (above), one of my favourite looks from this show.

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Next, on the World Cup bandwagon and a 1990s tip, models wore prints that were happy hardcore smiley faces featuring international flags. More 90s ephemera came in the form of oversized sweatshirts, nylon bomber jackets and black mesh pieces, with a yellow tailcoat tuxedo thrown in for good measure, naturally.

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_059

Then came a sort of homage to a range of luxury fashion houses – a mock Louis Vuitton monogram print appeared on jackets and trousers, the LVs replaced with serif Ms. A ‘Fauxchino‘ motif, added to my wishlist, looked so trashy that it could have been bought from a seaside market.

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MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_088

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Want to dress like an Hermès carrier bag? Well now you can with Moschino‘s bright orange denim jacket and jeans with black Moschino logo strips. If Hermès isn’t your bag, perhaps a Versace-esque black and gold suit will suffice?

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_102

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_106

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Rhinestone dollar signs and logo sweaters completed this collection:

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_116

MattBramford_LondonCollectionsMen_SS15_MOSCHINO_117

I love the shocking, shameless abuse of other designer brands to glorious end. That’s a somewhat difficult sentence to type amidst outrageous alleged cases of high street copycats and even fashion powerhouses ripping off London designers, but Jeremy Scott and the label pull off the plagiarism with such panache that nobody seems to bat an eyelid. This blatant disregard for intellectual property has been at the heart of the brand since Franco Moschino launched his eponymous label in 1983. And, if this collection is anything to go by, Scott is without doubt the best person to take the Moschino crown. I’m praying he brings his army of merry men and women back next year.

Categories ,1990s, ,catwalk, ,fashion, ,Gucci, ,Hermés, ,Italian, ,Jeremy Scott, ,LCM, ,LCMSS2015, ,Lindley Hall, ,London Collections Men, ,Louis Vuitton, ,menswear, ,Monogram, ,Moschino, ,pop culture, ,review, ,SS15, ,Swimwear, ,Versace, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Jeremy Scott S/S2010: YABBA-DABBA-DOO!

jscott1

Man hunt. Man kill. Man make fire. Man make… mankinis?

Well Jeremy Scott does at any rate. The pounding drums that blared out of the speakers at Scott’s S/S10 show at Somerset House got me some pounding blood in my ears– so epic, mind so primal, so dramatic, I marvelled! Then as the first model turned the corner, these epic and primal drums transpired to be the introduction to the Flintstones soundtrack.

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Thanks to crimped, streaked and backbrushed wigs painted with cartoon bones and eyes smeared with red paint, Pixie Geldof and Daisy Lowe’s celebrity mugs were barely visible under the guise of the punk cavewoman. While Christopher Kane yesterday cut his hemlines below the knee, this was yet another collection that was all about the legs, with teeny tiny minidresses, bustier dresses, swimsuits and hotpants all on show. Pairing cave prints with an acid rainbow colour palette of neon greens, oranges and yellows, the hems were cartoonishly jagged, with the brilliant shoes decorated with tiny dinosaur bones instead of bows – a motif that extended to brooches that held together printed sarongs and shrugs.

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So let’s talk prehistoric fashion: the idea of roughly pinning together a cut of fabric was OBVIOUSLY pioneered by those fashion-savvy Neanderthals who donned the latest mammoth/gazelle/other prehistoric mammal skin (delete as applicable) in order to keep toasty in those chilly caves. Westwood was doing the same last season with big rough cuts of fabric and safety pins last season. DIY fashion is never going to go away!

Seeing some menswear on show for the first time was also a treat, although the male model who had the misfortune to be wearing a pair of miniature printed speedos bolted so fast off the catwalk that you practically could have blinked and missed him (the chap in the one-shoulder mankini fared a little better).

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A particularly fabulous piece was the pink bone-speckled biker jacket, and following look incorporated a t-shirt emblazoned with the words ‘Your Cave or Mine?’ accompanied by a green and black hooded shirt.

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However Darwin was at work even on the catwalk, as the designs evolved before our very eyes, with the hem and necklines evening out to reveal some finely cut cartoon leopard print leggings. And finally, the triumph of the chic, streamlined little party dress.

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A typically zany and enjoyable collection from Mr Scott – who normally shows in Paris, hence my insane and irrational fervour upon hearing that I would be seeing him in little old London. The only thing about leaving a Jeremy Scott show, it would seem, is looking down at your own outfit and feeling like the drabbest thing in existence. If you’re not an acid bright caveman next season, life is hardly worth living, is it? Nope.

Categories ,Flintstones, ,Jeremy Scott, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Man, ,Mankini’s, ,Pixie, ,Somerset House, ,Vivienne Westwood

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Danielle Scutt – Big Fun

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I’ll put up my hands and admit that as a girl, health medications not yet a quarter of a century old, remedy talking about music is utterly intimidating. Yet I try. At some point in my life I’ll make a concerted effort to dance about architecture too. There is an endless wealth of information on bands that have already been, that I am never, ever going to be able to catch up on. Yet I try. As a music fan (enough to write about it), I’m embarrassed to admit that I only really discovered my, now, all time favourite band, Talking Heads within the last five years. I know, shoot me down. My convoluted point is that, as much as I try and piece it together, I can only imagine what The Slits releasing ‘Cut’ meant to the females and general youth and music fans of 1979. Yes there was a sex bomb fronted Blondie, intriguingly androgynous Patti Smith and unconventional Kate Bush, but an all female, punk rock band that posed naked on their album sleeve and generally didn’t give a f***. No one saw that coming and their influence has reverberated ever since.

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Fast forward then 30 years and their new album, Trapped Animal, has been unleashed to a society that is certainly far from sorted. But can the music still have the same punch? The garage approach of Cut has inevitably given way to a slicker product all round. That same mixture of reggae rhythms, scratchy guitars, anger and mischief abounds. Rather than sounding like a band thirty years past their prime, as could be said of many a reunion album, there is a freshness that means you could be mistaken for thinking you’re hearing the latest South London council estate collective. This could be explained by the new multi-generational line-up that features Sex Pistol Paul Cook’s daughter, Hollie. You also get the impression that frontwoman Ari Up has as much energy as her fourteen year old self that met original member, Palmolive, at a Patti Smith gig.

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Lyrically, the album doesn’t stretch the boundaries of the concept of rhyming but you wouldn’t hear Girls Aloud bemoaning of “Men who want us to be their mother/Men who hate us because of their mother.” Where the Pop Idol-ers are concerned with their “cappuccinos to go-o”, Up and her girls are hollering about ‘Peer Pressure’, “issues with child abuse” and eschewing the shackles of a nine to five: “We don’t pay rent with a passion, and we don’t wanna follow fashion.”

The fact that foul-mouthed Lily Allen launched her career on the wave of reggae-tinged pop is no accident. The Slits invented the model for anti-establishment, men-bashing, unselfconscious pop and even though this new offering will never live up to Cut standards, it’s a welcome return of punk’s finest.

Helping to keep the pressure on governments across the world, health activists in Australia held a mass action last week against Hazelwood Coal Power Station, erectile one of the dirtiest in the world. The climate camp held a day of planning and workshops, nurse followed by the day of action where a group of over 500 people placed a ‘Community Decommission Order’ on Hazelwood to switch on the renewable energy transition.

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Images from Hazelwood Flickr

Twenty-two people were arrested on the day and, with the Governments lack of conviction, it seems many more are ready for the same sacrifice. As one secondary school teacher put it, “not such a big sacrifice in the scheme of things.” Looking at pictures and reports as well as listening to the radio report, it looks like a well planned day of disobedience. Affinity groups such as the Wombat Warriors, Radical Cheerleaders and Climate Clowns show great initiative. Apparently the police wouldn’t let “bikezilla”, a massive 8-person bike, join the protest though. Shame.

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I caught up with Louise Morris, one of the organisers of the action to get her account of the action and see what’s in store for climate action in Australia.

How long have you been involved in the protest movement in Australia and was there a catalyst for getting involved?

I’ve been involved in campaigning in Australia for over a decade, starting off with the campaign to stop the Jabiluka Uranium mine in Kakadu National park and spending many years as a forest activist and blockader in Tasmania (as a result now one of the Gunns 20) and Western Australia.

I decided to devote my time to climate campaigning in 2006, as the realisation set in that no matter how many pieces of forest we saved through campaigning and blockades etc – if climate change is not dealt with, the climatic conditions forecast will spell the end for all the places we have campaigned for and protected over the years.

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I grew up in mining towns in Western Australia, so am very aware of the sort of environmental and social scars the mining and logging industry inflict. My decision to work on climate issues has been heavily based on the mitigation angle. I am a strong believer in trying to solve a problem, rather than trying cope with the problem as best we can through adaptation measures. This has led me to focus strongly on coal issues and to work within the grassroots realm of climate campaigning. I really do think it’s in the grassroots community movement that we have the most power.

What was your personal experience on last weeks action?

I was one of the key organisers of the Switch off Hazelwood – Switch on Renewables weekend. My experience ranged from having to deal with the police in the lead up to the event and during the event with their complete over-reaction to the whole affair, talking with people who were prepared to be arrested and acting as media spokesperson for the group.

My experience of the action and watching other peoples reaction to the day was extremely positive.

This action was the first of it’s type for the Victorian Climate Movement. For the past few years people have lobbied, rallied in cities etc but never actually taken action at the site of the pollution and been prepared to be arrested.

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We had 500-plus people from all possible walks of life turn up. A lot of families, older folk and a massive representation from the quite mainstream ‘Climate Action Group’ demographic that is strong in Australia. We had 22 people manage to scale the security fences and police lines that were put up prior to our action. In that list of arrestees are doctors, teachers, electricians, stay at home mums… the list goes on.

Our state government tried to label us as eco-terrorists in the lead up to the event. This failed dismally, as our lead up media campaign was very solutions focused (just transition to renewable energy) and we were very open in our aim of civil disobedience… this combined with images of the people who were at the action, got out to the wider world of so many kids, families, professionals and respected members of the community were taking action. We have had a lot of support from the public and arms of the mainstream media.

The feeling post this action is that people are ready for more peaceful community driven direct action, and more people are prepared to get arrested to push the government into some real action on climate change.

How did the mainstream media and the public react?

There has been a noticeable shift in public and media attitudes to people taking action on climate change, post our federal Government’s pathetic announcement of 5% emission reduction by 2020.

In the lead up to this event we put a lot of thought and energy into talking about our message of switching on a transition to renewable energy and switching off coal. Part of this outreach included a public meeting at the town of Morwell, which is the heart of coal country in our state. This was a ‘robust’ meeting but we got great feedback from everyone who came about the transition message and we were supported by unions representing coal workers that we were pushing for a just transition to renewable energy.

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In terms of media – we ran a pretty tight messaging strategy around the fact that this is a community driven event that is calling for a switch from renewable energy and this requires that we switch off coal.

At first we got very little interest, but as the word that people were going to partake in peaceful mass civil disobedience got out, the interest grew. On the whole, we got a pretty fair run in the media in the lead up to the event. A lot of time was spent explaining what civil disobedience was, as Australia has not had a strong activist culture in recent years. Once again the core message that we were calling for a switch from coal to renewables, with a just transition was central in a lot of the willingness of commercial media to hear us out.

Obviously on the day of the action some of the conservative media ran the ‘rowdy protester’ line and showed the fence shaking but considering the sort of coverage we usually get in the mainstream Australian press, I think we have seen a shift in how community protest and civil disobedience is being covered. That said, the large representation of families and ‘ordinary looking folk’ really did help that.

Do you think Australia is ready for a broader movement relating to climate change and what do you think the comparison is to movements across the world?

Yes. We had our first climate camp last year in Newcastle [NSW] and from this it was decided that in 2009 we would have state based events, of which the Switch off Hazelwood event was one. The reasons for this were many, including the fact that Australia is so geographically large that it’s not feasible (financially or environmentally) for people to trek across the country to come to a single climate camp.

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For the next 3 months there will be Climate Camp style events across the country from South Australia, New South Wales to Western Australia. The interest and willingness is there for a movement that is prepared to take action at the site of the big polluters and put some targeted pressure on government and the big polluters who are shaping the climate policy.

In terms of the broader movement relating to climate change there is definitely a lot more scope for more varied forms of action and campaigning. We are currently organising a bunch of movement building events and workshops using the lessons learnt from many countries and campaigns, including elements of the Obama community mobilisation strategy.

Comparisons are hard to make as we live in a massive continent with quite a sparse population, in comparison to many other countries who have strong climate movements. We also have a populace that has been alienated from the concepts of protest, civil disobedience and strong social movements from previous (and still current) governments who have demonised such things as ‘Anti-Australian.’

As one of the organisers of the action, what have you learnt from the process?

Honestly, the importance of networks, community and talking to people face-to-face to get them involved and part of creating the event they want to be a part of. Another lesson we always learn from these events is that people need to have fun organising and being part of events like this – best way to keep them coming back and get more people involved.

The Affinity Group and Working Group model was central in making a lot of elements of this event work. From the public meeting, the promotions, independent media to the action itself.

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What’s next for Climate Camp in Australia?

There are still a number of state based Climate Camps to come in the next few months across Australia after the ‘Switch off Hazelwood – Switch on Renewables’ event. The next immediate one is in South Australia and after that is the one at the Helensbugh coal mine in NSW. So much more Climate Camp action is on the cards. And here in Victoria we are looking ahead to what is next in the lead up to Copenhagen as a national climate event.

Looks like a lot going on in Australia, shame it would have to be a carbon intensive flight away, that or a 6 month cycle mission, hmmm.. now thats an idea.
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MATT AND KIM are a destructive dance duo hailing from Brooklyn, pilule NYC. There are very few bands that can always guarantee you a real good time with one single push of a button, but Matt & Kim never let me down. Ever. We caught this Brooklyn duo live back in June and they knocked our socks off.

Yeah, there are tons of happy-go-lucky bands with that high-energy, high-on-life exuberance, throwing shapes and keeping their toothy smiles fixed, verging on the robotic and the slightly scary. But there’s always the inevitable grating after a few listens as the cheer morphs into a cheesy mess of slobbery, over-enthusiastic group hugs and high-fives that leave you backing away into the safety of Morrissey‘s comforting drones, vowing never to venture away again. Promise.

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The weird thing is, Matt & Kim are super cheesy, but they seem so genuinely fun and unaffected that it’s tough not to abandon any self-concious hang-ups and just leap along with their carefree charm. And if their new tracks are anything to go by, they show no sign of quietening down and getting all mature on us.

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As the jaunty keys and sharp, tapping sticks that start ‘Daylight”s introduction trip and pop, the call and response of “We cut the legs off of our pants/Threw our shoes into the ocean/Sit back and wave through the daylight/Sit back and wave through the daylight” gets louder and fuller, there an immediate hit of teenage nostalgia. It’s a reminder to never grow up too much and when that alarm rings to get you out of bed in the morning – it’s time to wake up.

Watch the duo having fun in their DIY-esque video here:

‘Daylight’ is out on 28th September on Fader Label/Nettwerk.
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Obstinately avoiding the typical artistic “nude” and the potential sexist connotations of the form, medicine Sheila Wallis’s Threadneedle Prize-winning “Self-portrait” does feature the artist without clothes, medical but avoids rendering herself as a sexual object. Instead the artist describes herself as appearing to be a “small, look naked creature” rather than a coquette.

The painting feels very real as opposed to a being a fantasy of female sexiness. She gazes back at the onlooker with a slightly knotted brow but, despite being aware of the attention, doesn’t seem either to play up to it or to be exploited by it. She is vulnerable but remains in control through the action of painting herself. Perhaps a deciding factor in seeing the painting without sexual connotations as a female viewer is knowledge of the gender of the artist and that she is also the subject of the painting; it’s easier to enjoy a nude for what it is without the overtones of an artist/muse relationship.

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The prize is voted for online by visitors to the exhibition, at the Mall Galleries. This year’s exhibition was strong and there was a theme of interaction between man-made structures and nature. For example, Jennifer Godlieb’s eerie “Lurker” (below) seems to depict a gasometer set in a future time when cities are devoid of people and all is overgrown and transformed into a spookily beautiful Scandinavian forest. The message could be an environmentalist one: despite the messages about “saving our world” from climate change, eventually Mother Nature will reclaim all our efforts.

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In contrast to the fairy-castle appearance of Godlieb’s post-human architecture, Zachary Peirce’s painting of “Pripyat, Chernobyl Exclusion Zone 1” bleaches the colours out of the natural landscape, leaving washed-out pinks, bruise purples and a colour the same yellow tone as human skin. A slight touch of green appears murky and poisonous. In the background there is a building that appears to be melting: the black outlines drip down the canvas into the overgrowth. Here the impact of humanity’s failings on nature has created a dirty, deserted area without any of the peace of Godlieb’s twilight scene.

Peter Wylie’s brutalist tower block “Goldfinger four (with Le Corbusier flaking paint from Villa La Roche)” is actually still occupied but the exterior of the worn old concrete monster offers little comfort. The golden windows that presumably inspired the title do seem to imply little pockets of cosy humanity lurking within.

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Dotted across the image are pieces of flaking paint taken from a Le Corbusier building – perhaps the remains of a previous, shining image, gradually chipped away to reveal the reality of high-rise communal living? Le Corbusier’s use of concrete has led to some grim surroundings for those living there and it has been noted that as a material it wears much worse in the wet conditions of Britain compared to the sunnier climes of the South of France.

The buildings in “Goldfinger” block out any glimpse of sky and look like they belong in the pages of “1984”; but it’s unclear what commentary Wylie is making beyond the appearance of the building. How do these designs impact of the lifestyle of those who live in them? As in the other works, people are invisible but here they are not absent. I didn’t feel comfortable making assumptions about whether this represented a dystopian future or present because of the possibly classist assumptions – these buildings are usually destined for lower-income people. Can high-density urban estates ever live up to the utopian dreams of those who design them?

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The exhibition overall was extremely thought-provoking and varied, from the landscapes to the portraiture. A large-scale religious painting of the crucifixion of Saint Peter, by Louis Smith, was among the most physically imposing of the works on display along with a knitted bear and a huge photo-real “forensic examination” of a bespectacled man, painted in minute gory detail by Oliver Jones.
The Ethical Fashion Forum has been popping up all over the place at here at Amelia’s Magazine. Back in June we covered the first section of their biannual competition established to reward good deeds regarding sustainability in Fashion. Titled PURE, cialis 40mg the winners – South African designer Lalesso and Malawi designer MIA– would display their designs at the PURE tradeshow. Yesterday in the rather lovely setting of the Hospital Club, the EFF announced the second half of their competition, the Esthetica awards. Judged by Dolly Jones from vogue.com.

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MIA

As the crowd waited perched on sofas, leaning against walls as we huddled round the catwalk Dolly Jones announced the winners: Mark Liu, Henrietta Ludgate (who was championed by Amelia’s Magazine earlier this year as a one to watch), MIA and Lalesso (both of whom you will have noticed were mentioned earlier in reference to winning the PURE awards in June).

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MIA

After the announcements, the catwalk begin to sounds of bouncing pop and the models began to work the room. Each designer sent two designs down the catwalk, as teasers for their entire line. I would have loved to have seen more of the collections. Especially as the majority, if not the entirety, of what was sent down the Innovation catwalk was jump-off-the-catwalk-and-onto-my-back wearable.

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Lalesso

To accompany the catwalk, the Ethical Fashion Forum provided recycled cardboard handouts detailing the reasons behind each designer’s selection. Mark Liu for developing a pattern cutting process that minimizes the amount of waste material produced by each garment, helping to “pioneering Zero Waste Fashion”. This made me think instantly of the “A-POC” line by Issey Miyake or taking it out of the acronym; the A piece of cloth project. From which the wearer is able to create endless items out of a single well-cut piece of fabric. Myakke is said to be continuing to develop this idea after becoming concerned about the impact of textile waste on the environment. It’s great to see young and established designers tackling the industry’s waste problem and turning it into a conceptual wearable idea. To compliment Liu’s pattern cutting he uses organic fabrics, low impact dyes and water based pigments. The two dresses, sent down the catwalk, were reminiscent of Peter Pan or an elfish child as they hung playfully off the models. Perfect for a summer’s day in the park.

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Lalesso

Henrietta Ludgate worked with Osman Yousefzada after graduating from St. Martins and is now starting her own label. Ludgate’s philosophy lies in the maintenance of British craftsmanship. All the materials are sourced from British Mills and the collection is made entirely in a traditional Scottish crofting village. Her dresses really intrigue me being a combination of what appears to be felt and fleece. The pieces (not shown on the catwalk, but worn by members of the audience) had a similar feel in their shapes as Matthew Williamson’s graduate collection at St Martins. The new collection contained a wearable jersey dress with interesting piping detail to structure the back. Alongside a maxi dress which appeared to be an extended bankers shirt.

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Henrietta Ludgate

Lalesso creates women’s wear out of traditional East African Fabrics, which translate perfectly for a Saturday spent walking around town and sitting in parks. The bold floral patterns were instantly eye catching.

MIA’s recycled fabrics and traditional Malawain textiles produced a refreshing take on up-cycling old urban sportswear into summer dresses.

The Innovation competition is importantly drawing attention to the numerous ways new designers are tackling challenges of sustainability that the fashion industry faces as a whole.

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Henriette Ludgate

MIA is tackling craftsman’s jobs lost through the abundance of cheap second hand clothes on Malawi’s market stalls by employing local people in the process of up-cycling. All profits are put back into the community support, as well as buying equipment and training to maintain market access and community livelihoods. Furthermore (thanks again to the cards handing out by the Ethical Fashion Industry at the show), Lalesso recently founded SOKO – an ethical and eco fashion production plant in Kenya. Offering opportunities for other design companies to produce collections with the profits and increased job market to benefit communities in Kenya.

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Mark Liu

The Ethical Fashion Forum and Innovation are proving not only that designers are environmentally aware when making their clothes and considering waste. But importantly they are using their businesses to recreate jobs and a skill based workforce in local communities effected by both the waste and desire for Fast Fashion.
The 25th London Fashion Week began yesterday in its new haunt of Somerset House. Turning up to register, stuff there was the expected photo crush as numerous street style photographers selected those most fashionably dressed to stand before their lens. Not surprisingly London Fashion Week has been a lesson on how to be scarily on trend. Leather studded Jackets check. Harem pants in black and multiple prints. Check. Statement shoes check.check.check. Big Power Shoulders. Check. The most amazing outfit –outside the catwalk- was on the front row at Ashley Islam (more to come on this collection later). Sitting next to Michelle Williams from Destiny’s Child immaculat in Vivienne, what is ed was a rather beautiful man with an Anna Wintour bob,
complete with a dress made from nails. This often disregarded material was transformed into the ultimate disco dress, that tinkled out of shows.

On|Off presents their off schedule designers at 180 the Strand. Down in the industrial stylebasement, the catwalk appeared from behind plastic sheets and the ever ready crowd of journalists, photographers and buyers took their seats to view collections from Prose Studio, Yang Du, Michela Carraro and Joanna Vaderpuije.

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The Prose Studio Collection of bold oil slick printed dresses was first down the catwalk. The feminine fluent dresses billowed around the models, falling down from the neck, along the arms and tacking tightly in at the waist to fall once more to the knees.

Remember blowing paint across water’s surface to create marbling patterns when pressed onto paper? Prose Studio’s harem pants felt as if the fabric had been dipped into the solution and hung out to dry. The drapes of the pants were delicately covered leaving the leg fabric bare.

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The collection finished with a free flowing printed white tunic over white marbled dripped leggings.

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Next up were Michela Carraro’s deconstructed geishas complete with rags tied into bondage shoes, big 80′s shoulders remain on the catwalk alongside constructed sheer blouses.

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The shapes and layering were reminiscent of John Galliano’s personal style and diffusion line with an injection of Vivienne Westwood’s pirate’s collection. As the light blue piece sashayed down the catwalk, it suddenly struck.

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What was being offered was a re-invention of a feminine suit, capable of expressing personality rather than smothering it underneath a shapeless blazer. This was a collection representing the intriguing daywear as represented with the gallantly bold, bordering on the garish printed trousers, under tucked beneath the swashbuckling floating blouses held together at the front with delicate stitching. Completed with the bandaged shoes, the piece formed an illustrious silhouette when framed by photographers.

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Third was Joanna Wanderpuije’s elegant collection of modern shapes complete with the return of the perspex stars from the A/W collection, for S/S the stars are attached to the hips of the cotton skirt. Plenty of well cut shorts and printed tanks for effortless lux.

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Leather bra tops – continuing previous seasons’ trends for underwear as outwear- hardened the collection appearing under a cropped print jacket nestling above the high-waisted cream trouser. A splash of colour was provided with the up-pleated tunic dress. The collection was incredible wearable with Wanderpuije’s prints elegant in their application and beautifully sculpted from material.

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Fashion provides the opportunity to dive into new worlds, peer into another’s imagination. It can function similarly to illustration and convey a sense of being in the world and by being idiosyncratic tap into the public consciousness. The last piece from Yang Du‘s collection was one distinctive outfit from the Louis Vitton-esque rabbit ears combined with bold blue and white striped constructed-to-be-slouchy oversized dress.

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The outfit instantly burned into the retina, this was something to wear as unemployment rates soar, it’s warm and it’s bright. This was fun fantastical fashion and I loved the oversized knitted bag that followed the models down the catwalk as if a rather petulant child.

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As with all three previous designers, at Yang Du it was all about the detailing; tunic dresses were altered with cut away bra holes overlaid with fringing. Grinning cartoon faces contrasted wide blue knitted stripes, tight tight dresses were sent down with bold geometric black and white prints. Not forgetting the head adornments.

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A great start to London Fashion Week, a mix of eccentricity and wearable shapes with most importantly the clothes bringing a smile to one’s face.

the depths of 180 The Strand, dosage where this year’s On|Off catwalk be, Bernard Chandran is about to present his S/S2010 collection. I’m excited.

I saw Chandran’s A/W collection back in February. It was incredible, and I was concerned that this season’s couldn’t live up. I need not have worried.

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Yet another diverse and inspired collection, the first model appeared wearing a silk muzzle with a graphic pattern. These unusual face decorations featured prominently in the show. Printed, bejewelled, moulded from the shape of the face – it was clear they were making a statement. “It’s my reaction to climate change,” Bernard told me afterwards. It’s a provoking image we’re accustomed to seeing – during the SARS crisis and more recently with the swine-flu pandemic. Chandran has translated this evocative image and created masks of beauty.

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Dresses were striking, bold statement pieces, in hues ranging from ochre to pewter. Folds and flaps created geometric silhouettes, showcasing Chandran’s skills as a craftsman, and revealing a possible Hussein Chalayan influence.

Other pieces consisted of simple shift dresses enveloped by folded, dynamically-cut fabric, creating exaggerated shoulders and wing-like forms, apposing the contours of the female form.

I loved this glittered interpretation of the bustier. Fashion-forward women only, need apply:

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Patterns on masks and clothing had been translated directly from objects that surround Bernard in his day-to-day life. A stunning linear print in amber and black had been taken directly from “a basket that people give [Bernard} flowers in!” Bernard recalled. Looking again at the print makes sense of it – it appears almost photographic.

Another key look was the Chinese coolie hat, worn by a handful of models. Bernard in interesting in their form. “I like the way they fold, the way they are created – which can be said for a lot of my work,” Bernard told me. “The way an envelope folds, for example – like here,” as he gestured to a photograph on the wall backstage of a structured, geometric dress.

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The more feminine consumer need not worry, as the show also included elegantly draped smock dresses and sumptuous blouson skirts, in chiffon, with organic, natural prints. These pieces were the most surprising considering his A/W 09/10 collection was so bold and striking. “Sometimes you just have to,” Bernard laughed.

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There were so many different looks in this collection. It may sound as if the pieces were too disparate but this was not the case, as one after the other complimented each other, almost magically. Take the structured dress with exaggerated hips, fast becoming Bernard’s signature, juxtaposed with the softer sheer fabric pieces draped effortlessly over the models; juxtaposed with the hooded smock reminiscent, again, of an envelope; the prints and tones of each piece somehow beautifully transforming into the next.

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Soul singer Estelle is a huge fan of Chandran’s work, shunning major fashion houses to wear his looks at awards ceremonies, so it was no surprise to see Destiny’s Child’s Michelle Williams and Beverley Knight wide-eyed on the front row. A Bernard Chandran woman is a glamorous, confident, ostentatious creature. It’s time this design hero took centre stage on-schedule. Sort it out, BFC!

All photographs and text by Matt Bramford
In the uninspiring BFC tent situated in the beautiful Neoclassical courtyard of the totally inspiring Somerset House, click Turkish-born Bora Aksu presented his Spring/Summer 2010 collection yesterday. He drew a huge turn-out, website like this and the buzz surrounding this designer is palpable.

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It’s easy to see why. Bora’s style is elegant meets grunge, viagra buy decorative meets diverse. Inspired by a children’s story, Bora’s was a collection of confident charm. Monochrome, sequinned leggings were semi-concealed by free, floating lace dresses, making use of a pale pink palette. Ostentatious, almost cape like billowing sleeves, complimented basic mini dresses, and garments were accoladed by additional design quirks such as the bow and pussy-bow ties.

Tailored shrunken jackets with exaggerated shoulders (fast becoming a LFW S/S 2010 trend) were embellished with lace and severe gold appliqué, creating mysterious shapes off-set by neutral shirts and tulip skirts in pale tones, bordering on white.

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Bora’s inspiration was most apparent through his use of romantic baroque prints in light pink and black. Used on accessories and corseted belts, these were married with softer fabrics such as organza. Dramatic, high necklines gave a nod to the Victorians whilst the hair was reminiscent of the French Revolution through delicate braiding and extravagant backcombing.

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The collection grew in confidence, beginning with the aforementioned, almost apologetic pale hues and climaxing with more provocative pieces in black and silver. The air sizzled as these structured pieces, with the reappearance of the shoulder-enhancing blazer, had real sex appeal.

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Vests and trousers were teamed for a sharper, masculine look, and featured organic and interesting knitted shapes, as if torn or ripped. These additional adornments hung between the modal’s neck and chest evoked images of the human anatomy. The model and designer laid bare for all to watch.

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Bora Aksu’s signature style is ‘romanticism with a darker edge,’ which pretty much summarises this unique and considered collection.

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All text and pictures by Matt Bramford
Nova Dando designs are and for theatrical performance – as well as being a DJ, pill stylist to many of music’s finest, ailment including La Roux, order a creative fashion designer and a burgeoning music director. Dando is high achieving at 26.

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So, on the first evening of LFW, we are treated to a peak at her eagerly awaited Rainbow Collection in true party style, away from the confines of a straight and restrictive runway. Fun and frollicks was the theme down at The Hospital Club amongst an audience of the UK’s music glitterati. And for me, the whole evening encapsulated our fashion capital – music, creativity and wanting to be seen or scene in London.

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First off was the video portrait series by music video director, Saam Farahmand, showing an assortment of Boombox types cutting loose to their favourite tracks. Don’t ask me how, but this was mixed live before our very eyes. After that, The House Of Dangerkat sprung onto the stage to liven things up. Wearing items from the Rainbow Collection, that included long tassled pom poms for sleeves and colourfully layered crop tops, the dance collective gratingly displayed the versatility and excitement of Nova’s dramatic garments.

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The aforementioned flame-haired one, all over our fashion pages and radio airwaves, provided the musical entertainment. With a skyscraper quiff, gelled to cartoon proportions, thrusting out of her fedora and technicolour glitter accessorising her eyes, it’s no wonder the synth club kid and Nova have made such a winning team. Shout outs to the designer abound La Roux’s performance and the audience whooped.

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After bouncing to some hits, there was nothing else for it but to view what we were all there for, Nova Dando’s Rainbow Collection. Ever unconventional, the pieces were displayed in a film, directed by Saam Farahmand. With the strobe lighting and the latent sexiness of the short, you could have easily mistaken the model for a gothed up Britney Spears. The downside of a film projection is that, you are left not totally sure what the clothes looked like – there were characteristically big shoulders, theatricality, black, lace and possibly leather. The upside, it leaves you so intrigued yet impressed by the ingenuity of the collection’s presentation. That the name, Nova Dando, will no doubt be reverberated throughout the remainder of London Fashion Week and a few music videos too.

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Nova Dando is currently a Creative In Residence at The Hospital Club. See picture’s of the rainbow collection on Twitter and watch Nova’s designs on film here:


So it’s the first day of London Fashion Week 2009 and beady-eyed Amelia’s Magazine have already spotted Joan Collins at the top of a ramp doing a royal wave, viagra buy Boris Johnson looking a bit shifty, buy more about and various T4 presenters looking undeservedly pleased with themselves. The circus aside, there’s also the opportunity to see some exciting fashion. That’s what we’re here for after all, and this year’s hosting venue is Somerset House, which really is as grand and fabulous as the city itself deserves, especially as last year LFW was nearly munched by the beastly New York fashion week.

My first show of the week was courtesy of London-based Korean designer Eun Jeong, who after completing the MA at Central St Martins went on to win last year’s Fashion Fringe with a collection of draping, tailoring and Grecian gowns. Building on the same aesthetic this year, Jeong’s wholly feminine designs were intricate and weightless, with a cream and ivory colour palette that seemed to be out of somebody’s naughty bedroom up in castle of clouds, and was accompanied by a soundtrack of twisted baroque guitar.

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Treating her fabrics to beading, ruching, pleating, and folding with oodles of lace and delicate foil appliqués, the collection practically had the word bridal scrawled over it in gigantic neon letters. Yet with sharp tailoring and consistently lighter-than-light fabrics it was beautifully modern, with the big-barneted models sporting ankle socks and pairs of bright white trainers with satin bows. Sex (as with any righteous honeymoon) was on the agenda, with the pyjama-esque looks and draping often reminiscent of a girl wrapped in a lover’s bed sheets, making it a collection dressed in intimacy.

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As with last year (and with about a million other designers) some big old power shoulders were on show, with Amelia’s Magazine’s particular favourite a fabulous blazer with a jagged foil print – with Jeong proving that her woman can bloody well be a business-bride if she wants to. Whilst – generally speaking – I enjoy fashion at its biggest and weirdest, Jeong’s dreamy vision was gloriously inviting and is the sort of thing to sell like hot cakes. A great first show, thanks for having us.

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The new collection from Osman Yousefzada (whose label is now called just “Osman”, for sale possibly because the fash industry was incapable of saying his Afghan surname) felt short and sharp, hospital possibly because the clothes were all riffs on the theme of white, viagra approved and although inspirations from around the globe seemed to abound, the supremely restrained colour palette held it together. Against the background of completely pure white, even the patches and splashes of glimmering gold looked muted and discreet.

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In some ways this show felt like a polite refusal to join in with the other children. While fashion gets into its 80s swing and the shoulder becomes king, Osman sent a deeply 90s slinky maxi dress down the catwalk, with one white, square pocket and one gold one. Some garments featured a cut-out where the shoulder should be, which my next-door neighbour at the show, Debbie from Tank magazine, whispered was like the “anti-shoulder”, a snub to Balmainia.

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This was certainly not a blingy collection despite the gold, and the 90s reminders persisted with capri trousers, crinkle blouses and nautical rope details. As for silhouettes, as well as chic Orange County grandma, there were prim Park Avenue princesses in coats and polo shirts, as well as the hint of the Middle East and North Africa in the beaten quality of the gold, in rings around models’ ankles and necks and in the undone shapes of tunics and long dresses.

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Osman’s inspiration was in fact Wallis Simpson, the woman who lured away a king, visiting President Nixon. It’s hard to imagine that meeting in general, let alone occurring in these clothes, but perhaps this is the wardrobe of a worldly American in the Henry James vein, a far cry from the brash stereotype of the American tourist and instead beautiful, charming, interested in the world and yet conservative in comparison to her European cousins.

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The strength of this collection was in its refusal to follow current manias and it felt a step apart from the recent explorations into the dark and the gothic by many designers. Quietly confident shapes and the use of soft but resilient-looking fabrics, which looked much prettier and more wearable away from the harsh flashes of the professional photographers. The fabrics were made possible by Osman’s collaboration with a new Italian fabric company and the quality shows in a collection that resists either sexiness or girly prettiness and instead prefers to be worn by women who make history.
Finally. Finally, viagra sale finally, viagra 100mg finally. I had been gagging for some good ol’ fashion glamour this Fashion Week, viagra dosage with previous shows only dampening the appetite and never satisfying. Thanks be to God for OLANIC – aka Niki Taylor – who served up a plate full of the stuff, with a huge dollop of disco and a side order of sexy.

In the spectacular Freemason’s Hall, the venue for this year’s Vauxhall Fashion Scout and by far the most inspiring venue, the show began. Heaven knows how they managed to squeeze all those models backstage – the hair was so huge and oh so Studio 54. I hope back-combing makes a comeback.

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It’s difficult to do disco that works – it’s a fine line between seductive chic and terrible pantomime. OLANIC hit exactly the right combination of aesthetic materials and design quirks allied with confident cutting and supreme tailoring, making OLANIC’s collection a winner.

Transparent tops were teamed with geometric leggings and cropped jackets. Simple shift dresses were pinched in at the waist with deep belts, enhanced by polka-dot lace sleeves, or given full sleeves for a more masculine look.

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Disco wasn’t the exact influence; more dance as whole (save anything ballroom). Elements of tap and ballet were there, but I don’t expect the overall collection would go down too well with, say, Margot Fonteyn or Debbie Reynolds!
The show featured two fantastic jump-suits – the epitome of the disco era and no mistake. One was a gold lamé number with grey marl jersey sleeves and bat-wing shoulders, creating an almost bionic silhouette.

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The other, a racy little one piece, body-conscious in lace and embellished with jewels from right shoulder to left hip. Hot Stuff.

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Although these pieces stood out as the strongest, delicate florals and bow embellishments should not be overlooked. These were teamed with masculine tailoring, re-working the suit and exaggerating the female form.

Fabulous fringing, inspired by flamenco but re-worked for today, transformed simple yet sassy body-con dresses into outfits fit for the dancefloor…

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…while this beaded sash teamed with lamé, or maybe even leather, completely summarises this sleek collection.

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OLANIC’s show is definitely one of my LFW highlights so far. That’s The Way I Like It.

All photographs by Matt Bramford

Charles Anastase‘s S/S 2010 and tenth collection found it’s setting in the Baroque and slightly sinister surroundings of Finsbury Town Hall. The ever- flashing press light bulbs momentarily brightened the foreboding atmosphere exaggerated by the mysterious classical music pounding through the speakers. The crowd’s excitement was palable and fission sparked across the room.

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The collection was as described a lesson in the “Colour Block – Something more abstract” Garments were constructed from one or two colours, this the structure of which became increasingly abstracted by nurtured theatricality. Dresses and coats became wider and wider as if situated over 17th century hoops whilst muslin dresses were draped over layers and layers of tulle.

lfwcharlesanastase5.jpgviagra buy tunic shifts and “lazy chignons” escorted A-line skirts. The messed out romantic hair encapsulated the naivety of the models roughed faces’. Voluminous fabric encased the models’s body whilst their feet were strapped into Natascha Marrow’s Mary-Jane platforms. An act of dressing that transformed their bodies into a fantasist’s playground.

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Dresses inspired potentially by Balenciaga’s (1940′s) sack dresses were voluminous extensions of wrapped fabric hanging from the models shoulder from thick straps. The fabric was prodded, visit this pleated and ruffled creating a sense of controlled spontaneity. Bold orange glowed in the semi darkness at the same time as tulle sprayed dramatically from the backs of dresses and peeked shyly from underskirts.

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Towards the end of the show, a billowing pink dress materlalised from backstage gliding down the catwalk. Functionally visually as a bed, the creation was incredibly reminiscent of Victor and Rolf’s characteristic anti fashion niche. Where models are weighed down with yard upon yards of fabric drawing attention to the potential circus of fashion week as they walk around to be consumed by press and buyers alike.

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The trench coat added a modern feel, as did the kooky sunglasses of the girl about town. The extensive volume combined with blocked out eyes proposed that the function of clothes is one of disguise and extended personality.

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A rather spectacular splash of colour and extended anatomy on London Fashion Week‘s second day, I’ll be watching future seasons.
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There was a buzz around Hannah Marshall’s tri-cornered catwalk at the Fashion Factory situated in the Old Sorting Office on New Oxford Street yesterday, viagra buy and it wasn’t just the caffeinated drinks talking. Erin O’Connor was the most familiar face walking for the hotly tipped newcomer, click who is known for her black leather creations, but the clothes spoke for themselves, or rather shouted in a rather frightening way.

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There is an aggressive feel to Marshall’s new collection, with pointed bra tops echoing, of course, Madonna’s famous efforts in that department. It generally felt very much the 80s remix, updated with delicate pieces of sculpture at the crucial points of shoulder and hip. Shoulders were augmented with visible padding while hips received spiny or shell-like additions, creating an exaggerated female form.

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Marshall is an expert at working with black and, although the collection is simple and almost monochromatic except for an unexpected shot of purple, the mixture of soft suede, mesh, leather and silk creates texture and depth. The silhouettes are sexy: short and strapless; but the shapes are mostly form-fitting rather than body-con and boxy suits drape over bare skin to get their effect.

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Metal and crystal elements like long curved fangs adorned the models’ arms and jutted from parts of the clothes. Along with the horror-movie-monster rills and black and purple colour palette, there is a seriously sinister edge to Marshall’s vision. But despite this it manages to be wearable and very wantable. After all, Marshall persuaded O’Connor to model for her with ten quid and a cheese Panini, so there must be something rather special about her.

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Having bundled onto the tube being slowly crushed under the weight of my large and ancient laptop, malady water bottles and other accumulated fashion week paraphernalia all piled into a gargantuan bag, I made my way to the Topshop Space off Baker Street to see Danielle Scutt. With a glass thrust into my hand champagne was accidentally propelled down my gullet before I knew what was what, meaning my earnest pledge not to drink during the day had failed just one hundred per cent

The white and sharply minimalist underground catwalk was eventually populated by the fat cats of the industry all keenly anticipating the newest collection from one of fashion’s newest and most exciting stars – we were sat next to Susie Bubble of Style Bubble who was wearing some brilliant spangly leggings, just in case you were interested.

Sticking to last season’s bodycon silhouettes (remember those second skin jumpsuits?) Scutt proved that making a more grown-up looking collection didn’t necessarily mean sacrificing a sense of humour – not with the smorgasbord of bold and retro prints, pom-poms, ra-ra ruffles and bloomers all bobbing down the catwalk. Sending out various minidresses that sometimes appeared to have sourced inspiration in French maid aprons or ice skating costumes, Scutt displayed a capacity to transform marginal icons of feminine style into something both amusing and wearable.

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Having cited 70s souvenir postcards as one of her influences, the show also benefited from strong styling, with the designer reversing back to her preference for smack-bang-statement hair (tiered hair pieces resembling piled up fruit bowls, mmm) after last season’s sleek, unfussy buns.

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Yet it was the prints that proved the trashy heroine of the collection, with yellow polka dot a particular stand out with dresses that managed to strike the difficut balance between elegance and effervescent youthfulness, with the pom-poms and ethnic details on other looks providing even more eclecticness..

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Indeed, a show whose references ranged from 40s housewives to music videos from the 80s, Scutt showed her clear strength was the ability to take an enormous amount of cultural references and pull them together with a single riotous attitude. With the king of trashy aesthetic Jeremy Scott just around the corner – we’re off to see him on Tuesday – this certainly put us in the right mood.

Categories ,40s fashion, ,80s fashion, ,bodycon, ,Danielle Scutt, ,Jeremy Scott, ,London Fashion Week, ,prints, ,retro

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Amelia’s Magazine | I Dream of Wires launch New Clothes Label

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Located on Cheshire Street, information pills I Dream of Wires is an Aladdin’s cave of vintage 80′s and 90′s treasures. Established by Lou Winwood and Pete Voss this gem of a shop recently launched their own clothes line, an eclectic interpretation of the fabrics hoarded within their East London treasure chest. Amelia’s Magazine spoke to Lou, about the development of the new label in the same week that saw the arrival of her new baby, Iggy.

Congratulations! How are you both doing?

All Good.

How has the arrival of Iggy impacted upon your working life?

I sit on the sofa in pjamas with a baby clamped to my gigantic bosom directing other people to run around like maniacs doing all my work for me, including my husband & partner Pete! I am the definition of multi-tasking

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How did the new label develop from the opening of the shop?

The I Dream of Wires label formed gradually. We had all these great vintage children bed clothes, duvet covers etc, with Batman prints, Edd The Duck, Mickey Mouse & the like that we had picked up when hunting down goodies for our vintage shop. I decided to have them made into harem pants & they sold really well from the shop. Then I began adding other styles adapted from vintage 80s patterns, and creations of my own & soon there was enough to call a label!

Now we have gold bumbags and matching Wren’s hats, oversized dungarees with wild prints, snake-print clown dresses and jumpsuits and playsuits in clashing metallic’s and stripes. It’s playful, bright & shiny, a kind of modern take on 80’s glam trash – a bit Bananarama meets Spinal Tap – or something!

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It’s an exciting time for the label. As well as selling from the shop, we have just got our first stockist in Japan, a really cool little chain of shops called Faline which sells some of my favourite labels; Jeremy Scott & KTZ. Also we are just about to launch I Dream Of Wires on-line. The label and our most favoritest vintage pieces will all be available from our website.

How did you find the timing of the new baby and the launch of the new label? Sounds potentially exhausting, with echos of being a superwoman!

It just so happened I created a baby at the same time – so it’s all go! I’m just a hopeless workaholic I guess. I just never get round to changing my clothes or having a bath and I live in a pigsty! While I’ve been answering these questions I have breast fed twice & changed a shitty nappy. It’s a glamorous life right now!

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What is it about 80′s and 90′s clothing in particular that draws your eye’s attention?

I have always loved the ballsiness of 80’s fashion. I’m a big show off , lashings of big jewellery, shoulder pads & bright clashing colours have been overcrowding my wardrobe for years. I was a teenager in the 80’s & 90’s when I first really discovered dressing up, mostly in my Mum’s glam cast offs mixed with jumble sale finds.

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How was the decision made to set up the shop originally? Where you on a shoot or in a coffee shop or even in a shop thinking you could find more interesting original stock?

I was working as a stylist when I had my first son Gus. I was styling Amy Winehouse, The Manic Street Preachers and some other music artists, as well as various advertising campaigns. The hours were really demanding, I was out all the time & my husband was at home with the baby. He used to be a stylist for ID magazine, so we both had a love of fashion. We are both hoarders of the weird & wonderful. So we decided we could work together doing what we both enjoy most, sourcing the kind of vintage craziness that we could not find anywhere else. So we set up I Dream Of Wires to share it with the world!

Categories ,Aladdin’s Cave, ,Batman, ,Ed the Duck, ,I Dream of Wires, ,Jeremy Scott, ,Lou Winward, ,Pete Voss

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour: the first night at Tatty Devine, Covent Garden

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

On Tuesday evening The ACOFI Book Tour got off to a flying start at the Tatty Devine store in Covent Garden. As people started to arrive Rosie, for sale Sonja and I laid out fragrant pots of Lahloo Tea to be drunk from beautiful retro china mugs and placed the gorgeous Cute as a Cupcake miniature cupcakes on a Tatty Devine laser cut doily: adorable in pink with butterflies on top.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
Sonja serves up some delicious Lahloo Tea.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Cute as a Cupcake. Indeed.

One of the first to arrive was Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration contributor Gemma Milly, visit who was unable to come to my first launch party because she swanned off to Canada for several months, site so it was really wonderful to finally meet her. She wasted no time in grabbing a pen and settling in to some wonderful window painting.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Gemma Milly
Gemma Milly gets down to some serious window painting.

Soon she was joined by ACOFI illustrators Jo Cheung and June Chanpoomidole, also known as June Sees. Both of whom studied at Westminster and are known for their very different but equally colourful illustrations.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-June Chanpoomidole
June Chanpoomidole with cupcake.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung
Jo Cheung painting one of her inimitable feathered friends. Here’s her round up.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly
ACOFI illustrators – Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Ester Kneen
I finally got the chance to meet Esther Kneen, who has been a long term contributor to Amelia’s Magazine. Just check out that stunning sewing machine tattoo! So marvellous. And she’s also written a nice little blog about the event.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Maria Papadimitriou Juiceology
Maria Papadimitriou wearing some of her Plastic Seconds.

Also present was Maria Papadimitriou, who – as well as creating illustrations for Amelia’s Magazine – makes stunning and unusual jewellery from upcycled objects under the name Plastic Seconds, available in the ICA shop. I particularly like her deodorant lid necklace which was hanging from her neck like a giant brightly coloured egg. I’m going to start saving my lids so she can make me something! She’s currently planning a wall for Supermarket Sarah: expect big things from this talented girl.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
I found it most entertaining that so many people were brightly dressed to match the wonderful Juiceology drinks.

Juiceology have kindly offered to donate juice for every single one of my book tour events, so please do come down and take the opportunity to try one of their stunningly flavoured natural juices, Apple, Lime & Mint, Lychee, Berry & Basil or Mandarin, Citrus & Cardamom. Each juice has been created according to the fine art of mixology, most often used to conjure up cocktails: it should therefore come as no surprise that Juiceology juices are so very special. I particularly love the Mojito-like kick of Apple, Lime and Mint, but it’s hard to choose a favourite out of the three. The Lychee, Berry and Basil is a stunning purple colour which in my mind can only mean good things, and all the juices contain a nice dose of very healthy Milk Thistle extract, renowned as a liver detoxicant.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden michalis christodoulou
Also present was new fashion illustration contributor Michalis Christodoulou

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Ursula Gregory
My mother became most enamoured of a wonderful Tatty Devine fireworks necklace, so we persuaded her to buy it, isn’t it amazeballs?

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby Sara Darling Imogen Belfield
Emma Crosby, Sara Darling and Imogen Belfield.

PR and Tribaspace representative Emma Crosby came along with jewellery designer extraordinaire Imogen Belfield and fashion stylist Sara Darling (who I’ve known for over ten years! She was on reception at The Face when I was an intern.)

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Veronica Crespi
It was also a delight to see Veronica Crespi of Rewardrobe, London’s first slow wear consultancy, who I introduced to some new eco fashion friends.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Amelia Rosie
Myself with Rosie of Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly June sees
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

At about 7pm everyone gathered in the store and sat down to listen to the talk, which was a bit strange for me to do in such a relaxed setting as this: I am more used to lecturing at universities. But I tried to keep it as informal as possible and encouraged everyone to ask questions. I talked a little bit about the history of Amelia’s Magazine, how I put together my two books, eco fashion and the importance of social networking for creatives.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
Windows painted!

Afterwards everyone carried on networking and chatting and at the end of the night the atmosphere was so relaxed that no one really wanted to leave. I take this as a good sign! Especially without alcohol! Everyone commented on how nice it was to have a booze free event: a mild sugar high being the only consequence of so much cupcake consumption.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Dr.Hauschka
Dr.Hauschka once again donated some lovely freebie skincare samples for attendees to take away with them. Some of the boys were particularly intrigued to try out the Firming and Rejuvenating Masks, so I look forward to some photos of hairy faces sporting creamy masks very soon.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jeremy Scott sunglasses, Love them
Jeremy Scott sunglasses available at Tatty Devine, love them. My necklace is also Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

In the meantime if you would like to join The ACOFI Book Tour please do make sure you check in with the various places I will be visiting, and book where necessary so we can anticipate numbers. Read all about my future destinations here. I will be back at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane on the last date of my tour on Tuesday 7th June. I look forward to seeing you very soon!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Sara Darling

Our paintings will remain on the window of the Tatty Devine Covent Garden store at 44 Monmouth Street for the next few weeks, and you can buy ACOFI online here. Read Tatty Devine’s blog about the event and Maria Papadimitriou’s lovely blog from the night. Jo Cheung even wrote a synopsis of what I spoke about!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Oh go on then, just one more Cute as a Cupcake

Categories ,ACOFI, ,ACOFI Book Tour, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Apple, ,Apple Lime & Mint, ,cupcakes, ,Cute as a Cupcake, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Crosby, ,Ester Kneen, ,Gemma Milly, ,ica, ,Imogen Belfield, ,Jeremy Scott, ,jewellery, ,Jo Cheung, ,Juiceology, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,June Sees, ,Lahloo, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Lychee, ,Lychee Berry & Basil, ,Mandarin Citrus & Cardamom, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Milk Thistle, ,Mojito, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Rewardrobe, ,Sara Darling, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Sunglasses, ,Tatty Devine, ,Tribaspace, ,Veronica Crespi, ,Westminster

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Amelia’s Magazine | The ACOFI Book Tour: the first night at Tatty Devine, Covent Garden

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

On Tuesday evening The ACOFI Book Tour got off to a flying start at the Tatty Devine store in Covent Garden. As people started to arrive Rosie, Sonja and I laid out fragrant pots of Lahloo Tea to be drunk from beautiful retro china mugs and placed the gorgeous Cute as a Cupcake miniature cupcakes on a Tatty Devine laser cut doily: adorable in pink with butterflies on top.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Lahloo Tea
Sonja serves up some delicious Lahloo Tea.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Cute as a Cupcake. Indeed.

One of the first to arrive was Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration contributor Gemma Milly, who was unable to come to my first launch party because she swanned off to Canada for several months, so it was really wonderful to finally meet her. She wasted no time in grabbing a pen and settling in to some wonderful window painting.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Gemma Milly
Gemma Milly gets down to some serious window painting.

Soon she was joined by ACOFI illustrators Jo Cheung and June Chanpoomidole, also known as June Sees. Both of whom studied at Westminster and are known for their very different but equally colourful illustrations.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-June Chanpoomidole
June Chanpoomidole with cupcake.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung
Jo Cheung painting one of her inimitable feathered friends. Here’s her round up.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly
ACOFI illustrators – Jo Cheung, June and Gemma Milly.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Ester Kneen
I finally got the chance to meet Esther Kneen, who has been a long term contributor to Amelia’s Magazine. Just check out that stunning sewing machine tattoo! So marvellous. And she’s also written a nice little blog about the event.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Maria Papadimitriou Juiceology
Maria Papadimitriou wearing some of her Plastic Seconds.

Also present was Maria Papadimitriou, who – as well as creating illustrations for Amelia’s Magazine – makes stunning and unusual jewellery from upcycled objects under the name Plastic Seconds, available in the ICA shop. I particularly like her deodorant lid necklace which was hanging from her neck like a giant brightly coloured egg. I’m going to start saving my lids so she can make me something! She’s currently planning a wall for Supermarket Sarah: expect big things from this talented girl.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden 2011-Juiceology
I found it most entertaining that so many people were brightly dressed to match the wonderful Juiceology drinks.

Juiceology have kindly offered to donate juice for every single one of my book tour events, so please do come down and take the opportunity to try one of their stunningly flavoured natural juices, Apple, Lime & Mint, Lychee, Berry & Basil or Mandarin, Citrus & Cardamom. Each juice has been created according to the fine art of mixology, most often used to conjure up cocktails: it should therefore come as no surprise that Juiceology juices are so very special. I particularly love the Mojito-like kick of Apple, Lime and Mint, but it’s hard to choose a favourite out of the three. The Lychee, Berry and Basil is a stunning purple colour which in my mind can only mean good things, and all the juices contain a nice dose of very healthy Milk Thistle extract, renowned as a liver detoxicant.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden michalis christodoulou
Also present was new fashion illustration contributor Michalis Christodoulou

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Ursula Gregory
My mother became most enamoured of a wonderful Tatty Devine fireworks necklace, so we persuaded her to buy it, isn’t it amazeballs?

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby Sara Darling Imogen Belfield
Emma Crosby, Sara Darling and Imogen Belfield.

PR and Tribaspace representative Emma Crosby came along with jewellery designer extraordinaire Imogen Belfield and fashion stylist Sara Darling (who I’ve known for over ten years! She was on reception at The Face when I was an intern.)

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Veronica Crespi
It was also a delight to see Veronica Crespi of Rewardrobe, London’s first slow wear consultancy, who I introduced to some new eco fashion friends.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Amelia Rosie
Myself with Rosie of Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Gemma Milly June sees
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

At about 7pm everyone gathered in the store and sat down to listen to the talk, which was a bit strange for me to do in such a relaxed setting as this: I am more used to lecturing at universities. But I tried to keep it as informal as possible and encouraged everyone to ask questions. I talked a little bit about the history of Amelia’s Magazine, how I put together my two books, eco fashion and the importance of social networking for creatives.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-window painting
Windows painted!

Afterwards everyone carried on networking and chatting and at the end of the night the atmosphere was so relaxed that no one really wanted to leave. I take this as a good sign! Especially without alcohol! Everyone commented on how nice it was to have a booze free event: a mild sugar high being the only consequence of so much cupcake consumption.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Dr.Hauschka
Dr.Hauschka once again donated some lovely freebie skincare samples for attendees to take away with them. Some of the boys were particularly intrigued to try out the Firming and Rejuvenating Masks, so I look forward to some photos of hairy faces sporting creamy masks very soon.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Jeremy Scott sunglasses, Love them
Jeremy Scott sunglasses available at Tatty Devine, love them. My necklace is also Tatty Devine.

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden-Emma Crosby
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden

In the meantime if you would like to join The ACOFI Book Tour please do make sure you check in with the various places I will be visiting, and book where necessary so we can anticipate numbers. Read all about my future destinations here. I will be back at Tatty Devine in Brick Lane on the last date of my tour on Tuesday 7th June. I look forward to seeing you very soon!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden
ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Sara Darling

Our paintings will remain on the window of the Tatty Devine Covent Garden store at 44 Monmouth Street for the next few weeks, and you can buy ACOFI online here. Read Tatty Devine’s blog about the event and Maria Papadimitriou’s lovely blog from the night. Jo Cheung even wrote a synopsis of what I spoke about!

ACOFI Book Tour Tatty Devine Covent Garden Cute as a Cupcake
Oh go on then, just one more Cute as a Cupcake

Categories ,ACOFI, ,ACOFI Book Tour, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Apple, ,Apple Lime & Mint, ,cupcakes, ,Cute as a Cupcake, ,Dr.Hauschka, ,Eco fashion, ,Emma Crosby, ,Ester Kneen, ,Gemma Milly, ,ica, ,Imogen Belfield, ,Jeremy Scott, ,jewellery, ,Jo Cheung, ,Juiceology, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,June Sees, ,Lahloo, ,Lahloo Tea, ,Lychee, ,Lychee Berry & Basil, ,Mandarin Citrus & Cardamom, ,Maria Papadimitriou, ,Michalis Christodoulou, ,Milk Thistle, ,Mojito, ,Plastic Seconds, ,Rewardrobe, ,Sara Darling, ,Slowly the Eggs, ,Sunglasses, ,Tatty Devine, ,Tribaspace, ,Veronica Crespi, ,Westminster

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