Amelia’s Magazine | S/S 2011 Press Days – An illustrated round-up


Ada Zanditon, website like this illustrated by Sara Chew

Wahoooo! Summer is finally here. No really, dosage it is. Seriously I don’t care how damp and dreary it is outside that office window, summer is most definitely here. I’m toasty warm and looking at shorts, t-shirts and dresses ranging from ethereal to barely there. Skipping round London in the increasingly cold weather this can be hard to believe, but that’s how it goes. Here’s a little look at some of the summer outfits I’ve been looking at…

Ada Zanditon
Held eight stories up in Holborn with a stunning view out over the Thames to the Oxo Tower, Ada showed her latest collection. A quick chat with the designer revealed a charming, intelligent woman and in her own words ‘geeky’. Who else would be so inspired by maths and formulas that they borrow text books from libraries? Well if that’s where inspiration comes from, long may it last. Ada is not just a lovely person but also incredibly talented. Three dimensional sculptural pyramids burst forth from the intelligently structured garments.

Even the prints were inspired by fractal geometry and swept across many garments from a particularly stunning floor length bias cut 1930s dress with backless detail to a leather minidress complete with a chiffon front panel. Hard seaming was juxtaposed with soft fabrics and details. The jewellery carried the same prints as the dress and were another hard counterpoint to some of the softness. Look out for more on Ada’s ethical collection in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Giorgio Armani

Armani called and off to Bond Street I went. Giorgio showed some great pieces with open weave jackets and low-breaking double-breasted jackets for the men, soft and light in beige, grey and smoke. T-shirts emphasised the lightness with sheer elements. Maybe this is a way to get the ‘heavage’ out without looking like a modern day medallion man. The shoes and accessories were simple and classic, from a soft leather briefcase to a brown woven leather shoe catching my eye in particular. Suede and salmon skin belts helped to further soften the tone. All very simple and invoking a cool Italian summers evening.

On the far side of the partition was the womenswear. Strong tailoring was paired with sheer blouses in varying shades of blue and deep purple. Skirts were long and flared slightly to the hem, though I will admit it was the shoes and accessories that stood out. High perspex wedges with wooden platforms excuded both freshness and class. Chunky cuffs, twisted silver necklaces and amulets of large dark blue/black stones hung on leather and fabric. Powerful, yet clean and sophisticated.

Emporio Armani

Illustration by Stéphanie Thieullent
Emporio, the delinquent nephew of Giorgio, was my next visit. There may have been a similar colour palette across the brands, but that’s pretty much where the similarities ended. No Giorgio man is ever going to be seen in a chainlink bondage harness. The use of sheer panels as highlights was also shared, this time showing off what one imagines will be gym-honed biceps. The highlight for me was a double-fronted crock effect suit. Hiding underneath the croc, a layer of leather gave the hint of something more to come.

Draping and ruffles were mixed with simple clean lines in womenswear. A grey and purple halterneck knee length dress particularly appealed, not to mention vertiginous heels. A dainty black chiffon bow, gave the vampiest pieces a demure side. Combining both the soft and the sharp, a draped jersey dress was teamed with a pale grey cap sleeve tailored jacket. It’s youthful and energetic but with a business edge.

Paul Costelloe

Illustration by Karolina Burdon

Showing menswear for the third season Paul opened London Fashion Week with a strong summer collection including short suits, lightweight long coats, and intricate print details. The menswear of this brand is growing on a season by season basis and whilst the formalwear is available in stockists such as John Lewis and Austin Reed, it’s hoped the casualwear and the odd catwalk piece should start hitting the shops soon.


Illustration by Natsuki Otani

You can see reviews of Paul’s collections by Matt and Amelia here and here.

Snake & Dagger

This London based denim company are growing stronger and stronger. Having trained in Japan, they hope to bring a more traditional feel to the denim market. The quality of the denim and the range of finishes are exquisite and the designers behind the brand bring together the best of their training and the city of London to create a unique look.

Aqua

Illustration by Joana Faria

Wherever you thought you were going to buy your Christmas party dress, forget it. Scrub that idea now. Go straight to Aqua and get yourself sorted. This Christmas’ collection ‘Out to Sleigh’ is affordable glamour at its best.

The pieces are daringly cut but clever and in no way trashy. More importantly, whilst you’ve been eyeing up that dress on the high street for the last three weeks so has every other girl in your office, but it’s unlikely you’ll be in the same number if you visit Aqua.

Morphe

Illustration by Gareth A Hopkins

Having previously shown in India, Morphe is thankfully launching in the UK. Playing with shape and form, the pieces are both dramatic and cutting edge. Born from countless hours of work, the statement pieces are surprisingly easy to wear, if somewhat out there.

However, the true gems in the collection include a one shoulder dress with silver trim along the neckline. Creating more than a simple point of interest this is a brand to watch as they develop their continued success in India.

Asher Levine

This was a fantastic collection from a burgeoning menswear designer. In particular, the asymmetric leather biker jackets were right on trend. Using differing leathers as well as digital printing, Asher showed a dynamic and contemporary collection.

Eleanor Amoroso

Most certainly one to watch. Eleanor graduated this summer from the University of Westminster. Her work with fringing has to be seen to be believed. Genuinely unique and fresh, I can only hope the future holds big things for Amoroso. This is one young designer who definitely needs to be nourished.

There were more…far more people that I saw during the press days. From the sublime to the ridiculous and everything inbetween. Trying to contain yourself when browsing all these wonders is a challenge, as is trying to get enough photos and remember everything. But I can safely say S/S 2011 is going to be a very, very good season.

All photography by Nick Bain

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustratio, ,Aqua by Aqua, ,Asher Levine, ,Blow PR, ,Bond Street, ,Eleanor Amoroso, ,Emporio Armani, ,Gareth A Hopkins, ,Giorgio Armani, ,Joana Faria, ,Karolina Burdon, ,london, ,menswear, ,Morphe, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Paul Costelloe, ,Press days, ,S/S 2011, ,Sara Chew, ,Snake & Dagger, ,Spring Summer, ,Stéphanie Thieullent, ,Womenswear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Think Act Vote Interview Part Two


Photography by Dominic Clarke.

It’s the day before the general election and the concluding part of Amelia’s Magazine interview with Think Act Vote’s Amisha Ghadiali. Tomorrow you have a chance to vote. Use it.

Why do you think if “politics were a brand, visit this online no one would wear it!”?

This statement is about Westminster politics, capsule in many ways the system we have is out of date for the world we are living in now. I don’t see people wanting to “wear” it as it is. This is why I really support the work of campaigns like Vote for a Change that focus their around how we can make the system work better for us.

How can fashion be used to engage people in Politics?

I think that fashion plays a key role in how we express ourselves and we use it to communicate things about ourselves or messages that we care about. The campaign t-shirt has become iconic as a phenomenon. At the beginning of the campaign, we ran a competition to design the perfect campaign t-shirt, which was a great opportunity for up and coming illustrators to showcase their work. The winning design by Jesson Yip was selected by a judging panel that included Katharine Hamnett and Daisy de Villeneuve. The symbols represent each word, with different fonts to represent different people’s voices. The design was then printed onto Earth Positive Eco T-shirts and is now on sale.

Through working in the ethical fashion industry I see fashion as a key way to think about sustainability. We all wear clothes, and the fashion industry affects so many people across the world as well as the environment. I work closely with Ethical Fashion designers at EFF and am one myself with my jewellery label. As an ethical designer, you don’t just have to make sure that your collection looks and fits great, but you spend a huge amount of time researching new fabrics, new technologies and finding out who is telling the truth about their labour standards or production methods. You need to be pioneering and inquisitive as you think through your entire collection and its impact on the environment and people at every stage.

Ethical Fashion designers are always pushing boundaries and are extremely passionate about what they do. I wanted to include this talent in the campaign and asked leading ethical fashion designers to create a show piece or an easy DIY customisation using a Think Act Vote t-shirt and off cuts from their collections. The designers that took part included Ada Zanditon, Junky Styling, Traid Remade, Tara Starlet and Beautiful Soul. The pieces that they created in just a week are stunning.


Photography by Ben Gold

Think Act Vote discusses the negativity imbedded in modern politics – Were there any particular examples that spurred you into action?

There are loads of examples, just try and think when the last time you heard something positive about politicians or about changes in our communities. We are always focusing on people’s failings and the ‘fear’ out there. Just last week the country spent two days focusing on the story about Gordon Brown saying a woman was a bigot.

Is this negativity the reason, do you think, for the decline in the number of votes?

Not the only reason. Things have changed a lot over the last few decades. I think two features of the neo-liberal British political landscape are related: the rise of consumerism and the demise of traditional participation. I think that the way we express who we are is different now, not that many people are lifetime members of political parties. Political identity is no longer inherited.

As mentioned before I don’t think the political system reflects who we are, which makes us lose interest.

Have you been watching the Leader’s Debate?

I have seen bit of them, but not all the way through as have been doing talks and events most evenings in the past few weeks. I think it is great to have the leaders on TV, as it has really helped getting people talking about the election. I am not sure how much of their personalities and policies we are really seeing as the whole things does feel a little over polished. I think it would mean more if we had a vote on who was PM as well as on our local MP. I would also like to see some of the smaller parties be given this platform too.

Will you be voting this election?

Yes I will be voting, I think this is vital. I haven’t decided who for yet. I will decide on election day. I am deciding between three parties but then I went on Voter Power and saw that my voter power in my constituency is only 0.039. It is an ultra safe seat. So I am thinking about voting through Give Your Vote. It is a fantastic campaign about Global Democracy which allows you to give your vote to somebody in Afghanistan, Ghana or Bangladesh. It is an act of solidarity with those who do not have a say in the decisions that affect them.

Join Amisha tonight at: The Future I Choose with Live Music, Poetry, Fashion, Photography
The City and Arts Music Project, 70-74 City Road, London, EC1Y 2BJ
5.30pm til 9pm

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amisha Ghadiali, ,Beautiful Soul, ,environment, ,Ethical Fashion, ,fashion, ,Gordon Brown, ,Junky Styling, ,Leaders’ Debate, ,politics, ,Think Act Vote, ,TraidRemade

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Amelia’s Magazine | Think Act Vote Interview Part Two


Photography by Dominic Clarke.

It’s the day before the general election and the concluding part of Amelia’s Magazine interview with Think Act Vote’s Amisha Ghadiali. Tomorrow you have a chance to vote. Use it.

Why do you think if “politics were a brand, visit this online no one would wear it!”?

This statement is about Westminster politics, capsule in many ways the system we have is out of date for the world we are living in now. I don’t see people wanting to “wear” it as it is. This is why I really support the work of campaigns like Vote for a Change that focus their around how we can make the system work better for us.

How can fashion be used to engage people in Politics?

I think that fashion plays a key role in how we express ourselves and we use it to communicate things about ourselves or messages that we care about. The campaign t-shirt has become iconic as a phenomenon. At the beginning of the campaign, we ran a competition to design the perfect campaign t-shirt, which was a great opportunity for up and coming illustrators to showcase their work. The winning design by Jesson Yip was selected by a judging panel that included Katharine Hamnett and Daisy de Villeneuve. The symbols represent each word, with different fonts to represent different people’s voices. The design was then printed onto Earth Positive Eco T-shirts and is now on sale.

Through working in the ethical fashion industry I see fashion as a key way to think about sustainability. We all wear clothes, and the fashion industry affects so many people across the world as well as the environment. I work closely with Ethical Fashion designers at EFF and am one myself with my jewellery label. As an ethical designer, you don’t just have to make sure that your collection looks and fits great, but you spend a huge amount of time researching new fabrics, new technologies and finding out who is telling the truth about their labour standards or production methods. You need to be pioneering and inquisitive as you think through your entire collection and its impact on the environment and people at every stage.

Ethical Fashion designers are always pushing boundaries and are extremely passionate about what they do. I wanted to include this talent in the campaign and asked leading ethical fashion designers to create a show piece or an easy DIY customisation using a Think Act Vote t-shirt and off cuts from their collections. The designers that took part included Ada Zanditon, Junky Styling, Traid Remade, Tara Starlet and Beautiful Soul. The pieces that they created in just a week are stunning.


Photography by Ben Gold

Think Act Vote discusses the negativity imbedded in modern politics – Were there any particular examples that spurred you into action?

There are loads of examples, just try and think when the last time you heard something positive about politicians or about changes in our communities. We are always focusing on people’s failings and the ‘fear’ out there. Just last week the country spent two days focusing on the story about Gordon Brown saying a woman was a bigot.

Is this negativity the reason, do you think, for the decline in the number of votes?

Not the only reason. Things have changed a lot over the last few decades. I think two features of the neo-liberal British political landscape are related: the rise of consumerism and the demise of traditional participation. I think that the way we express who we are is different now, not that many people are lifetime members of political parties. Political identity is no longer inherited.

As mentioned before I don’t think the political system reflects who we are, which makes us lose interest.

Have you been watching the Leader’s Debate?

I have seen bit of them, but not all the way through as have been doing talks and events most evenings in the past few weeks. I think it is great to have the leaders on TV, as it has really helped getting people talking about the election. I am not sure how much of their personalities and policies we are really seeing as the whole things does feel a little over polished. I think it would mean more if we had a vote on who was PM as well as on our local MP. I would also like to see some of the smaller parties be given this platform too.

Will you be voting this election?

Yes I will be voting, I think this is vital. I haven’t decided who for yet. I will decide on election day. I am deciding between three parties but then I went on Voter Power and saw that my voter power in my constituency is only 0.039. It is an ultra safe seat. So I am thinking about voting through Give Your Vote. It is a fantastic campaign about Global Democracy which allows you to give your vote to somebody in Afghanistan, Ghana or Bangladesh. It is an act of solidarity with those who do not have a say in the decisions that affect them.

Join Amisha tonight at: The Future I Choose with Live Music, Poetry, Fashion, Photography
The City and Arts Music Project, 70-74 City Road, London, EC1Y 2BJ
5.30pm til 9pm

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amisha Ghadiali, ,Beautiful Soul, ,environment, ,Ethical Fashion, ,fashion, ,Gordon Brown, ,Junky Styling, ,Leaders’ Debate, ,politics, ,Think Act Vote, ,TraidRemade

Similar Posts:






Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-LFW interview: Ada Zanditon

9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, sale stomach past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, malady patient Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, ed romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, approved past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, this web Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, viagra 40mg past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, information pills Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, visit this romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, see past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, remedy Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter for real time catwalk tweets!
9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, find past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter for real time catwalk tweets!
9Images throughout courtesy of Satu Fox

Up a winding staircase, visit web past the lingerie gallery and through the double doors is a little haven of peace amid all the Fashion Week bustle – the deafening sounds of heels on cobbles and people falling off heels onto cobbles. A far cry from the edgier delights of On|Off or even the main tent, Orla Kiely’s presentation promises a cosy, romantic alternative world, with clothes you might want to wear despite not being Lady Gaga.

orla kiely image 1

In a 70s suburbia-inspired set of mini rooms, some rather desperate-looking housewives/models show off the super-pretty clothes and bags that are Kiely’s forte, but recently the collections have been becoming a little more interesting and a lot more covetable. I used to consider Orla Kiely to be in the Boden stable of clothes; nice enough, but more what you’d wear for a country walk with your granny than for any normal, civilised activity.

orla kiely image 6What is this item of furniture? I want one!

My ears pricked up a little when I saw last year’s crop of mustard-yellow duffle coats and colourful dresses, and things have only got better it seems. Fashion is on the lookout for a crown princess to replace Luella’s deposed Queen of Sweetness, and maybe with a little bit more playfulness, this could be the label for the job. There was also a hint of a nod in Luella’s direction in the velvet-trimmed checked suit. Again, it straighter down the line than Luella would have made it, but if you miss her so much already you feel you want to cry, this could be a place to start drying those tears.

orla kiely image 7

Behind the scenes, the label’s employees, who darted in and out, tweaking things, also looked yummy and I noticed the girls were all in mid-heel strappy wedges in red or tan leather. A bit more manageable than the platforms on the models as the mega-high-heel is one trend that just won’t die (unlike the shoulder trend, which seems to have crawled under a rock somewhere).

P2192453

My approval is not easy to buy but fresh pastries and the offer of a coffee did butter me up a bit, as these items were in short supply elsewhere at Somerset House. Drinks that were available included this ‘pre-tox drink’, which sounds distinctly unhealthy. I’m wondering who I can fob this off onto now as I foolishly carried it all the way home.

orla kiely image 3

Full disclosure: they also gave me some chocolates, some coasters and a nice bag. Orla Kiely World is a very pleasant place to be, unless you are pretending to be a valium-soaked 70s housewife. That doesn’t look very fun. Admittedly, I’d feel a bit awkward if my job was to stand incredibly still while burly men photographed me from surprising angles and random girls munched pastries while staring at my feet. Oh, fashion world!

orla kiely image 4

8
Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter for real time catwalk tweets!
As you know Amelia’s magazine love to champion ethical designers, price so with this in mind we wondered if you could tell us why you’re compelled to design ethical fashion as opposed to disposable clothing you might find on the high street?
I don’t like the word opposed. It suggests being against something. I hope that the fashion industry collectively can all create and inspire positive evolutions in design at every level of the market.

Ada Zanditon SS10 CREDIT photographer Paul Persky 00653Images throughout courtesy of Ada Zanditon, shop photographed by Paul Persky

You’re well known within the industry for your fashion designs, site but you’re a great illustrator too. Is this something you’d like to push forward and be known for in conjunction with your self named brand?
For Sure! It would be great to raise awareness of my illustrations. I would love to do a feature or collaboration. Let’s do one with one with Amelia’s Magazine!

Ada Zanditon Show PosterIllustration by Ada Zanditon

Your designs are always so beautifully sculptural yet are easily wearable and super-chic showing your ability to marry different style aesthetics. What kind of woman do you feel embodies your brand?
It could be anyone from Rihanna to Tilda Swinton! But I think strength and elegance combined is the common denominator. When I design a dress, I want the woman who wears it to feel strong, sexy and elegant.

Ada Zanditon SS10 CREDIT photographer Paul Persky 00662

Do you have any fashion heroes, if so who?
The fabulous and bearded Andre J.

Ada Zanditon SS10 Red Dress Look Book Image

What is your inspiration for FW10, and what can we expect from your upcoming LFW fashion show?
Beautifully blended with a bruised colour palette of the low set winter sky, the structured silhouettes of webbed bare branches and beating wings, presents a collection versatile in wear from day to evening. The collection is titled ‘echolocation’ inspired by the perception of the nocturnal landscape.

Ada Zanditon SS10 CREDIT photographer Paul Persky 00677

How do you unwind after the stresses of LFW?
I prefer to start work on the next collection. I only believe in fast forward.

Ada Zanditon SS10 CREDIT photographer Paul Persky 00745

What has been your career’s biggest highlight to date?
It is going to be on this day: Tuesday 23rd February! My first solo show at London Fashion Week, with Vauxhall Fashion Scout. Following on from success of the Ones To Watch show with Vauxhall Fashion Scout ( in Sept 09) we’re very proud to be doing our first solo show, proudly sponsored by Gleeds (one of the world’s leading construction and management consultants)!

For a relatively new designer you’ve already achieved a lot! Is there anything in particular that you are looking forward to accomplishing this decade?
To grow and develop the brand and create a strong international business that operates on the principle that people, planet and profit are of equal importance and value.

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Andre J, ,lfw, ,Paul Persky, ,Rihanna, ,Tilda, ,Tuesday 23rd February!, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,‘echolocation’

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Ada Zanditon and ADZ


ADZ, pilule information pills illustrated by Jess Stokes

Whilst eco-couture has always been ahead of the times in terms of sustainability, it’s often been left behind in the style stakes, unable to compete with mainstream, high fashion. Gradually though, a new breed of designer has emerged who is equally concerned with creating a cutting edge aesthetic as they are utilising sustainable and organic materials.

At the forefront of this movement is Ada Zanditon, whose designs experiment with shape and texture in a way that is unsurprising once you learn that she originally interned with Alexander McQueen and Gareth Pugh. After establishing her own eco-luxury womenswear line in March 2008, Ada has gone on to raise awareness of everything from eco fashion to politics through the likes of the Think Act Vote campaign. Ada took the time to answer a few questions for us about the inspiration behind her new range ADZ, and the future of eco fashion. ? 


ADZ S/S 2011

You’ve really established yourself as a pioneer of eco-fashion, giving the movement a younger, sexier image than it had in the past. How did you go about this?  
I think that I had two very strong passions that I was determined to make work together – fashion and sustainability. I enjoy the innovative aspect that comes into every part of the process, my main how-to part of it I think comes from a basic viewpoint that anything is possible. It’s equally possible to make a beautiful fashionable dress from an ecological material as it is from one that is not. It’s equally possible to create fashion that considers its full life span and even decay as it is to create something that does not. It’s a question of awareness, choice and aesthetics. 

Tell us about your new collection, ADZ?  
ADZ by Ada Zanditon is the bridging line to my main collection, it’s contemporary, resort urban wear that combines strikingly unique prints with casual yet sophisticated pieces that are focussed around bold geometric detailing in fluid soft fabrics such as tencel, silk jersey and chiffon. The SS 2011 debut collection of ADZ is titled Nebulayan. My inspiration came from creating illustrations of satellite images of the Himalayas mountain range which I then layered with Hubble telescope imagery of deep space nebulae. We now have achieved the technology to see the Earth from space and also to see deep into outer space. I like the idea of contrasting these perspectives with each other. 


ADZ, illustrated by Aniela Murphy

How do you cope with the volume of work and your nerves in the build up to London Fashion Week? Any trade secrets?
I am always aware that I am so fortunate to be in the position to be running my own label, I don’t really want to complain. Everyday always has its challenges, but I try to see that as opportunity. I think gratitude is vastly underrated these days…. don’t you? 

Absolutely! Amelia’s magazine have always been a big fan of your illustrations, any plans to design your own prints based on your work?
Actually, all my prints are based on my illustration work and photography and as well as that I use watercolour then layer all these elements together. ? 


ADZ, illustrated by Natsuki Otani

Musician Viktoria Modesta is your muse; how did you end up working together? You’ll be contributing to her showcase next month; what will that involve?
Soon after we first met we found we had a good creative rapport. I think Viktoria has incredible elegance and style with a real sense of grace. As for the showcase – I don’t want to give to much away but it will be a great evening. 

How do you think the public can be convinced of the importance of sustainability? Do you think there is more designers, magazine editors and celebrities could be doing to highlight its significance?
I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change. However, I think that people can encourage and inspire, and have a really good try at convincing. What worries me, though, is that catastrophic events only really shake people into action. I think everyone in every walk of life can do more, no matter what you do.

To see the entire ADZ S/S 2011 collection, visit Ada’s website.
To read more about Think Act Vote, see our interview with Amisha Ghadiali here.

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,ADZ, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Aniela Murphy, ,Bangladesh, ,estethica, ,ethical, ,fashion, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Himalayas, ,interview, ,Jess Stokes, ,London Fashion Week, ,Natsuki Otani, ,Nebulayan, ,S/S 2011, ,sustainability, ,Think Act Vote, ,Viktoria Modesta

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Ada Zanditon (reprise)

Lu-Flux-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

The Lu Flux presentation was one that suffered slightly from inexperience. On arrival at an upmarket Soho members’ club on Greek Street we were ushered into the back garden where we were left twiddling our thumbs until the presentation started. Fortunately I didn’t accept the offer of an expensive members’ drink from a loitering waitress, malady hospital and a short time later we were shown into the darkened arches of the chapel.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As we walked through the doorway we remained uncertain of what to do until Lu eagerly ushered everyone into the darkened recesses of the church, tea served in one corner, and delightful miniature home made fairy cakes in another, all served by ladies in last season’s applique lion dress. I’m not usually a fan of cupcakes but hunger persuaded me to try these ones and they were very yummy and nice, made by Yummy Nice in fact.

LFW-LUFLUX-JOCHEUNG Rob Logan
Rob Logan models Lu Flux, by Jo Cheung.

In the corner I immediately spotted my friend Rob, who had been asked to model at the last minute and clearly thought he would get away with it unnoticed by pesky mates such as me who are bound to take the piss (just a tiny bit). He should have known better with me loitering around the fashion world.

Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Rob chats with some of the other models and takes a look through the charming illustrated look book.

It was a wonderful setting to show a collection but my heart sank almost immediately. No decent lighting. How then to take good photos? Flash simply never looks as nice in a setting such as this. It’s so so important to consider what you want to achieve from a show or presentation, but aside from introducing buyers and press to your collection it must surely be to ensure that fabulous images find their way out into the universe. It’s not that much to hire decent studio lights and they are a massive boon.

Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory

Lu had staged a delightful little scenario, whereby the models were able to move about and take their turn to be drawn by one of the illustrators who has contributed a wonderful modern update of a china plate pattern to her latest collection. Lu described how it features not only herself and her boyfriend but also their dog and various other assorted friends – I thought it found a particularly fetching home on a shorts suit for men. As the live sketches were finished they were hung from a clothes line to be admired by the visitors.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory

Lu Flux creations are wonderfully playful without being too childish and I love the way that she makes the most of the smallest of details. This colourful collection featured gorgeous embroidered pockets, origami inspired folds, looped ribbons and one off appliqued shoes done in collaboration with Green Shoes of Devon.

Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux in collaboration with Green Shoes.

Lu-Flux-shoes-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

Despite a few teething problems it’s great to see that a few ethical designers are making a real effort to present their collections in an inspiring way that sets them alongside the bigger names of LFW. For it is only when ethical thinking starts to permeate the more mainstream byways of fashion as standard practice that things will really start to change for the better.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
A close up of the china plate pattern.

You can read Sally Mumby-Croft’s review of the same presentation here.

Lu-Flux-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

The Lu Flux presentation was one that suffered slightly from inexperience. On arrival at an upmarket Soho members’ club on Greek Street we were ushered into the back garden where we were left twiddling our thumbs until the presentation started. Fortunately I didn’t accept the offer of an expensive members’ drink from a loitering waitress, viagra buy and a short time later we were shown into the darkened arches of the chapel.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As we walked through the doorway we remained uncertain of what to do until Lu eagerly ushered everyone into the darkened recesses of the church, buy information pills tea served in one corner, and delightful miniature home made fairy cakes in another, all served by ladies in last season’s applique lion dress. I’m not usually a fan of cupcakes but hunger persuaded me to try these ones and they were very yummy and nice, made by Yummy Nice in fact.

LFW-LUFLUX-JOCHEUNG Rob Logan
Rob Logan models Lu Flux, by Jo Cheung.

I immediately spotted my friend Rob, who had been asked to model a very fetching outfit of navy polka dot shirt, green trousers, yellow socks and blue shoes and clearly thought he would get away with it unnoticed by pesky mates such as me who are bound to take the piss (just a tiny bit). He should have known better with me loitering around the fashion world.

Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Rob chats with some of the other models and takes a look through the charming illustrated look book.

It was a wonderful setting to show a collection but my heart sank almost immediately. No decent lighting. How then to take good photos? Flash simply never looks as nice in a setting such as this. It’s so so important to consider what you want to achieve from a show or presentation, but aside from introducing buyers and press to your collection it must surely be to ensure that fabulous images find their way out into the universe. It’s not that much to hire decent studio lights and they are a massive boon.

Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory

Lu had staged a delightful little scenario, whereby the models were able to move about and take their turn to be drawn by one of the illustrators who has contributed a wonderful modern update of a china plate pattern to her latest collection. Lu described how it features not only herself and her boyfriend but also their dog and various other assorted friends – I thought it found a particularly fetching home on a shorts suit for men. As the live sketches were finished they were hung from a clothes line to be admired by the visitors.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory

Lu Flux creations are wonderfully playful without being too childish and I love the way that she makes the most of the smallest of details. This colourful collection featured gorgeous embroidered pockets, origami inspired folds, looped ribbons and one off appliqued shoes done in collaboration with Green Shoes of Devon.

Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux in collaboration with Green Shoes.

Lu-Flux-shoes-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

Despite a few teething problems it’s great to see that a few ethical designers are making a real effort to present their collections in an inspiring way that sets them alongside the bigger names of LFW. For it is only when ethical thinking starts to permeate the more mainstream byways of fashion as standard practice that things will really start to change for the better.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
A close up of the china plate pattern.

You can read Sally Mumby-Croft’s review of the same presentation here.

Lu-Flux-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

The Lu Flux presentation was one that suffered slightly from inexperience. On arrival at an upmarket Soho members’ club on Greek Street we were ushered into the back garden where we were left twiddling our thumbs until the presentation started. Fortunately I didn’t accept the offer of an expensive members’ drink from a loitering waitress, this and a short time later we were shown into the darkened arches of the chapel.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

As we walked through the doorway we remained uncertain of what to do until Lu eagerly ushered everyone into the darkened recesses of the church, mind tea served in one corner, cheapest and delightful miniature home made fairy cakes in another, all served by ladies in last season’s applique lion dress. I’m not usually a fan of cupcakes but hunger persuaded me to try these ones and they were very yummy and nice, made by Yummy Nice in fact.

LFW-LUFLUX-JOCHEUNG Rob Logan
Rob Logan models Lu Flux, by Jo Cheung.

I immediately spotted my friend Rob, who had been asked to model a very fetching outfit of navy polka dot shirt, green trousers, yellow socks and blue shoes and clearly thought he would get away with it unnoticed by pesky mates such as me who are bound to take the piss (just a tiny bit). He should have known better with me loitering around the fashion world.

Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Rob Logan photo by Amelia Gregory
Rob chats with some of the other models and takes a look through the charming illustrated look book.

It was a wonderful setting to show a collection but my heart sank almost immediately. No decent lighting. How then to take good photos? Flash simply never looks as nice in a setting such as this. It’s so so important to consider what you want to achieve from a show or presentation, but aside from introducing buyers and press to your collection it must surely be to ensure that fabulous images find their way out into the universe. It’s not that much to hire decent studio lights and they are a massive boon.

Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux photo by Amelia gregory

Lu had staged a delightful little scenario, whereby the models were able to move about and take their turn to be drawn by one of the illustrators who has contributed a lovely updated china plate pattern to her latest collection. Lu described how it features not only herself and her boyfriend but also their dog and various other assorted friends – I thought it found a particularly fetching home on a shorts suit for men. As the live sketches were finished they were hung from a clothes line to be admired by the visitors.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory

Lu Flux creations are wonderfully playful without being too childish and I love the way that she makes the most of the smallest of details. This colourful collection featured gorgeous embroidered pockets, origami inspired folds, looped ribbons and one off appliqued shoes done in collaboration with Green Shoes of Devon.

Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux SS2011 Green Shoes photo by Amelia Gregory
Lu Flux in collaboration with Green Shoes.

Lu-Flux-shoes-by-David-Merta
Lu Flux by David Merta.

Despite a few teething problems it’s great to see that a few ethical designers are making a real effort to present their collections in an inspiring way that sets them alongside the bigger names of LFW. For it is only when ethical thinking starts to permeate the more mainstream byways of fashion, as standard practice, that things will really start to change for the better.

Lu Flux SS2011 photo by Amelia gregory
A close up of the china plate pattern.

You can read Sally Mumby-Croft’s review of the same presentation here.

Abby_Wright_Ada_Zanditon_LFW
Ada Zanditon by Abigail Wright.

As one of the most interesting ethical designers around Ada Zanditon has naturally been a popular designer to feature on this blog (read a pre-fashion week interview with her here). It is therefore really heartening to see her with a serious slot on the schedule. It was a fight to get past the terrier-like press girls who had been given queue duty, clinic but we managed to get a pole spot from which to watch Ada’s presentation in the hallway at Victoria House, link all lubricated by some nice drinks sponsorship from Vita Coco, which is obviously aimed at an excitable pre-Olympics market.

ada zandition - abi daker - ss11
ada zandition - abi daker - ss11
Ada Zanditon by Abigail Daker.

Ada showed a confident collection of pyramid and coral reef inspired dresses that utilised every last scrap of fabric. Autumnal colours continued a slightly strange trend, with models posing at a series of Olympic flame inspired sculptures. Special mention has to go to the hair, which was superbly quaffed into triangular styles by Christian Landon to echo the sculptural dresses. If I had one quibble it was that the models did not make enough use of the props, which could have made for even more interesting photo opportunities.

Abby_Wright_Ada_Zanditon_LFW
Ada Zanditon by Abigail Wright.

On our way out I spotted Ada’s partner Philip Levine, aka Lazy Gramophone, aka the man with the decorated head. For this occasion he had smothered his bounce in gold leaf, surely a very time consuming exercise. As we left he could be seen ferociously guarding a pile of goodie bags in the corner. To whom were these to go? Several people in front of me were turned away, but since I wanted information for this blog I pressed forward. For one moment I thought it might be a bit of a Computer Says No situation but some sixth sense clearly told Philip otherwise. I’m not sure that he wanted to hear that his gold leaf was falling off though.

Guarding-the-Giftbags-Philip Levine by Kellie-Black
“Guarding the Giftbags” by Kellie Black.

The bag was very heavy but it was just as well I picked one up, for I’ve since been deluged with emails by sponsor Ecover, who were responsible for the aforementioned weight. But enough of my griping for Ada Zanditon put on fantastic presentation, and I look forward to a full catwalk show next season. Now click on over and read Sally Mumby-Croft’s fab review of this very same presentation here.

Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 photo by Amelia Gregory
All photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Abigail Daker, ,Abigail Wright, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Ecover, ,Kellie Black, ,Lazy Gramophone, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Philip Levine, ,Vita Coco

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Presentation Review: Ada Zanditon

Illustration by Kellie Black

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

Illustration by Kellie Black

The Headonsim exhibition is hidden in the Embankment Galleries on the lower ground floor of Somerset house, medicine behind the BFC tent. I’ve been down there twice, once on Thursday and once yesterday – and both times it seemed very under attended. Actually, all the exhibitions around the scrum of the registration area seem very quiet but they are all well worth a look, even if it is just to take a closer look at some of the collections as I did upstairs for Louise Amstrup.

Curated by milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones, the Headonism exhibition is all about the hats and is the only section of London Fashion Week to do so. There are only five exhibitors: J Smith, Little Shilpa, Noel Stewart, Piers Atkinson and Soren Bach, but the difference between the stands is remarkable. The xxxxx has no one manning it, nor does Little Shilpa – merely a book to leave details in and the only exhibitor to have put any real effort into their display is Piers Atkinson but more on him later. The importance of showcasing your wares appropriately at London Fashion Week is shockingly something that many have left to the last minute. Read xxx post on the displays upstairs to find out who did it well.

We were lucky enough to interview two of the exhibitors prior to the show, the first was J Smith Esquire. His exhibit is immediately to your right as you enter the exhibition, displaying his most recent foray into the high street market with a Mister Smith display of flat pack hats in colourful cut out leather. He told us about the collection: ‘Mister Smith is designed to be robust, accessible, affordable millinery with high design values, so everyone can have a J Smith Esquire hat’.

Illustration of J Smith Esquire by Kellie Black

Mixing together the ready-to-wear and couture, J Smiths talent shines with his main collections. Illuminated promises to be VERY eclectic, ‘(it’s) inspired by vintage Italian fashion papers to create a modern-day Edwardian couture, and yes, expect a very colourful collection!’

Illustration of Little Shilpa by Yelena Bryksenkova

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Monday saw the fourth day dawn on London Fashion Week and delightfully my first day of intriguing ethical fashion presentations. First up on No. 1 Greek Street was the delightful Lu Flux, try followed in the afternoon by – congratulations! – the Ethical Fashion Forum’s Innovation Award winner Ada Zanditon. –

All photographs by Sally Mumby-Croft

In the run up to London Fashion Week, stomach Katie Antoniou interviewed Ada Zanditon about the trials, tribulations and positive rewards of producing innovative ethical fashion. Often the problem lies in the assumption that ethical fashion is boring and unfashionable – that most heinous of sins! – a situation being speedily rectified with the continuing presence of Estethica’s exhibition and support of young designers exploring the possibility of sustainable fashion at London Fashion Week Exhibition.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

Starting at 2pm, Ada Zanditon’s presentation – which in the grand scheme of things was more of catwalk – displayed the designer’s incredible 3D textiles used to embellish the collection of pretty dresses. Utilising her presence at On|Off, Ada showcased the delectability of clothes made through using up-cycled materials. The outcome of which had the group of ladies behind me swooning.

Christopher Raeburn and Lu Flux, (whose review will be appearing later on today…) are but two of Ada Zanditon’s trailblazing contemporaries in the field of ethical fashion. All three designers are successfully proving there need be no distinction between ‘fashion’ and ‘ethical fashion.’

Surely it is time for all designers to take the ethics of their production lines into consideration: namely where the fabrics originate and who is physically making the clothes for commercial consumption.

Illustrations by Paolo Caravello

When answering Amelia’s Magazine’s final question , Zanditon touched upon the difficult reality of encouraging people to achieve not only sustainable fashion, but sustainable lives; “I only think the planet can truly convince people of the importance of sustainability. I’m sure most people living on the coast of Bangladesh are highly convinced that we need to live in a more sustainable way as they are effected daily by climate change.”

A common fault in humanities mentality is our failure to project successfully beyond today, nurtured as we are on natural resources being infinite. It is incredibly hard to convince worldwide populations’ materials are and will become finite, whilst items still appear in their thousands on shop floors. Perhaps it will take empty shelves to convince us of the perils of fast fashion.

Intriguingly Ada Zanditon uses geometric cutting to produce zero waste. Tell us how you do it Ada!

Categories ,Ada Zanditon, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Amelia Gregory, ,Amelia’s Magazine, ,Bloomsbury, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,Ecover, ,estethica, ,Ethical Fashion, ,Ethical Fashion Forum, ,Gareth Pugh, ,Innovative Design Awards, ,Katie Antoniou, ,London Fashion Week, ,Lu Flux, ,onoff, ,Somerset House, ,SS11, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Preview: Ada Zanditon on Sustainability

Oscars – Georgia Coote thumb
Oscars - Georgia Coote
Illustration by Georgia Coote

So Colin and Helena have already won their BAFTA awards. Now all eyes are on them for the Oscars. Particularly Colin Firth, approved who has been vigorously doing the rounds as it were, cialis 40mg on chat shows such as Ellen. I believe in the aforementioned show, abortion Colin was given some Oscar worthy tuxedo pants. Personally I think Colin should have got an Oscar for A Single Man, one of my favourite films…in the world ever. This article is a small run down of 13 films nominated in the Oscars. Lucky 13…

Abby_Wright_Oscars_Natalie_Portman
Natalie Portman Illustration by Abby Wright

Black Swan revolves around Nataliie Portman’s character winning the lead to Swan Lake, leading to madness and obsession. Driven by perfection, she loses grip of reality entirely as you are taken on a heady journey. I accept it is a genre piece, thus obvious and over the top for a reason, but controversially I didn’t love it. Natalie Portman has been nominated for Best Actress, among five other nominations for the film.

Inception is a fantasy thriller with Leo at the forefront. Christopher Nolan produced some incedible scenes for our eyes to devour and the twists and turns were a thrill to behold. It has eight nominations, including Leonardo DiCaprio for Best Actor.

Helena Bonham Carter by Matilde Sazio
Helena Bonham Carter Illustration by Matilde Sazio

The King’s Speech had people applauding in the cinemas. Everyone has gone mad for this film. And what with Will and Kate getting hitched this year, the Royal family are enjoying a thrust of positive publicity. Colin Firth’s character is a George VI and Helena Bonham Carter, his wife, the Queen Mother have both been nominated for their performances. The film has been nominated for 12 in total.

Colin Firth by Karina Yarv
Colin Firth Illustration by Karina Yarv

Rabbit Hole is about a couple’s life is affected after their young son dies in an accident. Nicole Kidman has been nominated for Best Actress for her role.

The Social Network
David Fincher’s account on the origins of Facebook…

The Kids Are All Right is the story of a lesbian couple whose sperm donor returns into their lives, has four nominations and stars Annette Bening and Julianne Moore.

Toy Story 3 was a sad film in many ways, because it reflected time’s passing and the end of childhood. But Toy Story (1) brings back wonderful memories and has been overplayed to death without inducing even the remotest hatred. Same with Toy Story 2. Toy Story 3 was held in high hopes and it delivered. The film has five nominations, including Best Picture.

Gemma Milly-True Grit
True Grit Illustration by Gemma Milly

True Grit
Joel and Ethan Coen make quite scary, but brilliant films. This remake of the 1969 John Wayne western has received ten nominations in total, these include Jeff Bridges for Best Actor and Hailee Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress.

Alice In Wonderland sees Alice return to the world of magic and chattering objects, as a 19 year old. She learns of her destiny and meets her old chums. The film, which stars Johnny Depp, has been nominated for three Oscars.

Exit Through the Gift Shop saw Bristol’s Banksy nominated for Best Documenary Feature. The story is about an eccentric French amateur film maker and shop owner trying to befriend Banksy.

127 Hours
Ewww. But also amazing story of overcoming the odds, directed by Danny Boyle. This is a real life story about a climber forced to take extreme action to survive. You all know what I’m talking about I’m sure. James Franco has been nominated for his role as the protagonist and indeed, only character in the film. The film has also been nominated for Best Picture.

Michelle Williams by Russty Brazil
Michelle Williams Illustration by Russty Brazil

Blue Valentine is a stunning and devastating film about falling out of love. Michelle Williams has become numb to her life and husband, whilst Ryan Gosling flails around, trying to save the marriage. Making it all worse. The flashbacks to their falling in love are touching, and the soundtrack by Grizzly Bear made me cry. Michelle Williams has been nominated for Best Actress.

Winter’s Bone
An independent film, Debra Granik’s tale is about a young woman living in a rural community, trying to find her missing father. The film has been nominated for three awards.

Now bring on the pizazz and dresses, quaff, quaff!
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 Preview by Rebecca Strickson
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 Preview by Rebecca Strickson.

For Ada process is everything. “I don’t want to sit at a desk using Illustrator to design clothes that will be made many miles away. I love the hands on process of choosing the fabrics and creating the clothes.” But she does want to conquer the luxury goods market. “I want to make clothes that are desirable and exciting but also ecological.” The luxury goods market is one that is saturated with leathers and furs, ed but Ada will only use leather by products that have been vegetable tanned. “It’s very hard to find good enough quality fake leather and the biggest crime is waste, approved so it is better that skin is used. Things are getting better but we still have a long way to go.” She describes a trip to the Wastesavers deep in Huddersfield as part of an initiative with Jane Shepherdson and Oxfam. There was such a huge amount of waste that it boggled her mind. She dreads to think how much more goes into landfill every day.

Ada Zanditon comission by The Lovely Wars
Ada Zanditon (commission) by The Lovely Wars.

We ponder the ethics of sustainably produced fur where the animals are treated well, but she’s not really interested in fur from a aesthetic point of view, and worries too much about the air miles and poor conditions of most farmed animals.

Ada Zanditon SS 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Ada tries to fly as little as possible – preferring instead to find inspiration in the English countryside when she goes on holiday. “My favourite way to travel is by Eurostar!” She is not interested in the idea of being against things, and would rather look at the relevant alternatives and ways in which to do things with purpose.

Ada Zanditon by Avril Kelly
Ada Zanditon by Avril Kelly.

She is analytical in her approach to sustainable practise. “A lot of the environmental debate comes from an emotional place,” she says. “I used to be both veggie and vegan but now I just try to buy local, organic and free range… I find that meat answers my needs as an adult who needs a lot of energy.” But then her decision to stop eating meat was never based on the killing of animals in itself – she ponders the irony of vegetarians who wear non organic cotton – the pesticides from which have no doubt adversely affected local wildlife.

Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by Dee Andrews
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by Dee Andrews.

She thinks that there is a lot of fluffy thinking in western culture and much prefers to take a scientific perspective. “It takes emotion out of the equation. Emotion is good when it comes to fashion, but sustainable design needs a common sense approach to see ideas with clarity.” With her analytical mind she looks for ways to reduce environmental impacts and ensure positive outcomes within resource management and production.

Ada Zanditon by Dee Andrews
Ada Zanditon by Dee Andrews.

Even though she is a designer of high fashion she concedes that how to make affordable sustainable clothing is one of the biggest problems that needs tackling. “I have my own part in the wheel, but it would be false for me to design differently than what comes naturally.” Despite the possibility of an adverse “trickle-down effect” whereby her high fashion designs could easily be copied at a cheaper price level without using sustainable materials Ada is hopeful that her values of using sustainable materials and local production will inspire others if she can communicate them strongly and excitingly enough. I am inclined to agree.

Ada Zanditon by Maria del Carmen Smith
Ada Zanditon by Maria del Carmen Smith.

Ada occasionally lectures students, and is about to embark on a project in fashion and sustainability at La Cambre in Brussels. “To teach fashion you have to put a lot in. I love giving one off lectures and working on specific projects but I don’t have time for more.” One of the things she finds most inspiring in ethical fashion is that there are more people who are now coming to ethical fashion from a fashion perspective. “In the past ethical fashion companies were set up by environmentalists, but nowadays designers who come from a fashion background are able to bring a distinct handwriting to their designs.” She classifies herself amongst this new wave of designers, alongside names such as Beautiful Soul, Christopher Raeburn, Goodone, The North Circular and Henrietta Ludgate (all of whom feature in my new book). “We feel supportive of each other and it’s really good to see a relevant aesthetic growing and gaining momentum.”

Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews
Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews.

Most recently Ada has been commissioned for a couple of exciting fair-trade projects: a collective collaboration with ASOS, for which she designed a scarf to coincide with the launch of Fairtrade Fortnight and a project in conjunction with Vogue Magazine to celebrate the release of fair-trade gold. “They rang on Thursday wanting a substantial geometric piece that spoke of luxury: the perfect project for me. And by Saturday it was sorted!” Ada rightly feels that it is really important to show that fine jewellery can be made sustainably and with awareness for the impact of manufacture on human lives.

Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews
Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 Pre-Collection by Sarah Matthews.

Her business partner is entrepreneur Philip Levine, who is good at networking and looking out for opportunities. “There is so much pressure on young brands to build a successful business at the same time as being creative,” she says, “but people spread themselves too thinly and can’t always see the best choices in business. Many fashion brands come and go but I want longevity.” She loves evolving illustrations into prints and hopes to expand her prints onto a wide range of products in the future.

At just 28 years old it looks as though Ada Zanditon is already building a brand to remember, and most importantly of all, it is a fashion brand that has ethics at the very heart of it. I look forward to her LFW presentation this Friday with much anticipation. Read our taster of what to expect right here.

Ada Zanditon features in my new book: Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Ani Saunders, ,ASOS, ,Avril Kelly, ,Beautiful Soul, ,Brussels, ,Christopher Raeburn, ,Dee Andrews, ,Eurostar, ,Fairtrade Fortnight, ,Fur, ,goodone, ,Henrietta Ludgate, ,Jane Shepherdson, ,jewellery, ,La Cambre, ,leather, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,oxfam, ,Philip Levine, ,Rebecca Strickson, ,Sarah Matthews, ,Stylist Magazine, ,sustainability, ,The Lovely Wars, ,The North Circular, ,vegan, ,vegetarian, ,vogue, ,Wastesavers

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Preview: Ada Zanditon

Susan Hiller-Tate-Britain
AmeliasMagazine_LFW_Ada-Zanditon_ArtistAndrea
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 sneak preview by Andrea Peterson. I asked a variety of illustrators to interpret one piece from the new collection… so read on to see what they did!

Ada Zanditon looks somewhat confused as I pile into her live/workspace at the same time as the morning influx of interns – maybe I’m a new, about it rather overgrown one? She is still in her pyjamas, recipe having recently emerged from the space beneath a cutting table that currently serves as her bed.

This season Ada will not be putting on a catwalk show; instead she will show a film presentation alongside the collection on mannequins. “What you can do on a catwalk is dictated by how big your budget is, ailment ” she explains. “Lagerfield puts on amazing shows but the cost of production is huge. One reason why everyone loved McQueen was because he put on an event; a moment that could be referenced from then on.” Ada feels that a film or presentation can offer a much more immersive experience on a tight budget.

Ada Zanditon LFW Preview by Danielle Shepherd
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 LFW Preview by Danielle Shepherd.

Last season’s show at Victoria House was intended to be interactive, with people circulating around the models. In fact it became more like a salon show as soon as the pesky photographers formed a bank across the room that guests were afraid to cross. “But the fact that it wasn’t a normal catwalk set was exciting – now it’s time to go to the next stage.” This season movement will be shown on a screen and the audience will be able to feel the details up close without fear of interaction with any live humans. “I’ve learnt that people won’t walk up to a model when they are in full hair and make up because it is too daunting.”

The night before our interview Ada was filming the A/W 2011 presentation at Netil House just off Broadway Market. On the wall above the table where the interns are busy cutting out invitations there is a model – I correctly deduce that Georgiana from Bulgaria is in fact the star of her new film. “It’s much better to fit a narrative around one person,” she says. Ada was able to exactly fit the garments to Georgiana, chosen because of an active interest in her concept and aesthetic. “She also has ability to act and move elegantly and gracefully. I feel she embodies the aspirations of my customers.”

Ada-Zanditon-AW11-by-Yelena-Bryksenkova
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 by Yelena Bryksenkova.

Ada’s great grandparents were from Ukraine and Lithuania, but her mother was born and grew up in America, with the result that Ada has dual nationality and got to spend holidays in fashionable Martha’s Vineyard, where her parents bought a house before it became popular. “Of course now it’s full of rich yuppies… which in a way is good because they look after the beautiful landscape.” Ada herself was born in Crouch End in north London before the family moved south of the river. Secondary school was by all accounts not a fun experience – even though she knew she wanted to be a fashion designer from the age of 5 her school pushed her in an academic direction that she felt uneasy with. As a result she didn’t do art A-level but instead took photography GCSE and attended life drawing classes.

With the encouragement of an art teacher who spotted her potential she went to Morley College to produce a self generated portfolio which she took to her Art Foundation interview at Kingston University. She was promptly offered an unconditional offer. “They were so warm and impressed that I cried in the interview – I was just so happy that someone finally understood my work.” Afterwards she did a degree at London College of Fashion and then embarked an internship with McQueen where she learnt “a hell of a lot”. She was there for a total of four seasons, working almost all of the time. “It’s a tough industry – you can work 9-5 and achieve something mediocre or you can put 100% in and achieve something beautiful.”

Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 by Dee Andrews
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 by Dee Andrews.

The new A/W 2011 collection is called The Cryoflux, embodying in its name frozen landscapes and the idea of change. It was inspired by the polar regions, mainly Antarctica, but also the climatic changes experienced by people living in the Arctic. Ada became fascinated by the ice cores that are pulled up to show our climate history in intimate detail, and extremophiles, mostly microscopic organisms which exist in extreme conditions such as the polar regions. “But I didn’t want to be too literal in my translation – after all we’re experiencing extreme conditions both politically and economically as well.”

For further inspiration she looked at the doomed Robert Scott expedition of the early 1900s, for which the explorers were clothed in heritage clothing from great British brands like Mulberry. “I combined the romantic world of beautiful tailoring with an icy modern aesthetic. For instance I looked at broken ice floes in a constant state of flux.”

Ada Zanditon
Ada Zanditon in her studio in Whitechapel.

I wonder if Ada will model a bit of clothing from the collection so that I can get it illustrated but she baulks at the suggestion because she doesn’t design for herself. “I’m quite scruffy… but my designs always come out elegant and polished,” she says. “I want to create wearable stuff for my customer and not myself because I am quite a specific market of one.” Her collections are instead inspired by an interest in architectural design and illustration. She likens it to the work of Monet. “He doesn’t look like a waterlily. And lots of male designers don’t wear the frocks that they design.” As part of the designing process she loves meeting and learning more about her customers although she’s eager to assure me she’s not a slave to them, and concepts will always be important.

Ada Zanditon by Donya Todd
Ada Zanditon in her studio by Donya Todd, who chose to put her in one of her S/S 2011 designs anyway.

The collection features lots of British wool but the silk is not organic because it is much harder to source than good quality organic fair-trade cotton. “Most silk is Chinese even though it often claims to be Indian. I’ve looked into using Peace Silk [which doesn’t kill the silk worms in the process of manufacture] but the trouble is that you only get a smooth continuous unbroken fibre if the worm is killed. My customers want quality and I don’t want to compromise that.” At present Ada feels it is more important to focus on the bigger picture when it comes to sustainability.

There are only a few print designs in the new collection, which were printed locally in Bermondsey. “I feel that winter is usually more about sculptural details, so I tend to explore the cut. Print tends to be for S/S. But you can get sick of tailoring!” Ada can’t imagine living somewhere where the climate doesn’t change on a regular basis and she is looking forward to designing for the next S/S season: think big and loose, “like a million layers of air”.

Ada-Zanditon-S/S 2011 by-Maria-del-Carmen-Smith
Ada Zanditon S/S 2011 by Maria del Carmen Smith.

This season Ada had her choice of slot at LFW, so naturally she chose to show on the first day. The main theme of her presentation remains firmly under wraps but expect a narrative inspired by the solar system and in particular by Europa, which is a moon of Jupiter that experiences particularly extreme conditions. “I like the outside perspective; seeing things from the viewpoint of the other. So I imagined a superwoman extremophile who evolved under the surface of Europa and goes on an exploration of Antarctica.” The film is directed by twins Andrew and William Ho, who had lots of passion and enthusiasm for her subject. “I love their elegant aesthetic.” As well as an “interesting” soundtrack guests can expect a surprise immediately as they enter the venue between 1-2pm on Friday 18th February. I can’t wait… and I shall report back on my findings.

Ada Zanditon features in my new book: Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration. Part two of this interview will go online tomorrow and digs deeper into Ada’s theories on sustainable practice.

Categories ,A/W 2011, ,ACOFI, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Alexander McQueen, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Andrea Peterson, ,Andrew and William Ho, ,Antarctica, ,British Wool, ,Broadway Market, ,Bulgaria, ,Danielle Shepherd, ,Dee Andrews, ,Donya Todd, ,Europa, ,extremophile, ,Georgiana, ,Ice Core, ,Jupiter, ,Kingston University, ,Lagerfield, ,lfw, ,Lithuania, ,London College of Fashion, ,Maria del Carmen Smith, ,McQueen, ,Morley College, ,Mulberry, ,Netil House, ,peace silk, ,Robert Scott, ,The Cryoflux, ,Ukraine, ,Victoria House, ,whitechapel, ,Yelena Bryksenkova

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Presentation Review: Ada Zanditon’s The Cryoflux

Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 The Cryoflux by Ankolie
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 The Cryoflux by Ankolie.

I cannot tell a lie: I went into Ada Zanditon‘s presentation with high hopes, unhealthy especially after I ran a huge pre LFW interview with her describing what to expect from new collection The Cryoflux.

Ada Zanditon The CryofluxAda Zanditon A-W 2011
Ada Zanditon deep in conversation.

On entry to the On/Off space I was ushered towards already packed seats. Ada was deep in conversation on the front row but it was unclear what was going to happen until she urged those near her to get up and touch the clothes, cheap arranged on a series of awkward mannequins across one half of the room. At which point everybody got out of their seats and descended on the area at the front, immediately blocking the wall just as her short film started playing. I looked at the clothes briefly, then tried in vain to watch The Cryoflux film over a sea of heads before leaving for another show.

Ada Zanditon The Cryoflux film faceAda Zanditon The Cryoflux film

This was a compact collection compared with previous seasons. Taking inspiration from the extreme climate in Antarctica The Cryoflux features plenty of complex pyramidal cutting, a technique for which Ada Zanditon has become well known. We have already run multiple images of the gorgeous orange red ‘flame’ wool coat, which picks up on a key colour theme for the next season, but the dominant colouring of The Cryoflux was icy blues, whites and a deep navy.

Ada_Zanditon CryofluxAda_Zanditon Cryoflux

My favourite piece was the stunning showpiece dress, replete with a layered waterfall of printed silk inspired by frozen ice formations. I was also struck by a particularly beautiful geometric necklace, another collaboration with Luca Romanyi.

Ada Zanditon The Cryoflux jewellery
Ada Zanditon The Cryoflux jewellery in collaboration with Luca Romanyi.

We have been massive supporters of Ada Zanditon for several years now and we were blown away by her show last season. In short I really like Ada’s design aesthetic and ethical outlook… but I’m afraid that this proved to me once and for all that presentations are a difficult beast to get right. She had spoken of her desire for people to get up close and personal with the collection, which is all well and good, but journalists want good images, and it’s very hard for mannequins to provide this – pretty girls in pretty clothes will always win head and shoulders over a bony angled mannequin, however bony said girls are likely themselves to be. It felt as though this presentation was aimed at the needs of buyers rather than press.

Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 The Cryoflux by Ankolie
Ada Zanditon A/W 2011 The Cryoflux by Ankolie.

As for the promise of a surprise when we entered the room, I still have no idea what this was, though other people have assured me that there was an ice sculpture in the room somewhere. I never saw it, thanks to the density of the crowd in attendance. Despite Ada’s protestations that this was the best possible way to showcase her A/W 2011 collection I left feeling sadly underwhelmed. Please bring back live models next season Ada!

Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 EcholocationAda Zanditon A/W 2010 EcholocationAda Zanditon A/W 2010 Echolocation
Previous Ada Zanditon A/W 2010 collection Echolocation. Illustrations by Joana Faria.

You can read more about Ada’s views on sustainability here, and she does of course feature in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Ada Zanditon, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,Ankolie, ,Anne N’Toko, ,Joana Faria, ,lfw, ,Luca Romanyi, ,onoff, ,sustainability, ,The Cryoflux

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