Amelia’s Magazine | Ziad Ghanem: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Helena Maratheftis

Ziad Ghanem‘s catwalk shows are always momentous: massively oversubscribed, a cat-fight to get into and an array of weird and wonderful creatures desperate to get a glimpse of what the ‘cult couturier’ has delivered this season.


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Michael Arnold

So imagine my surprise when I arrived a mere fifteen minutes late to find that the show had already started. I darted up the Freemasons’ Hall‘s stairs and the vivacious models were already wowing the crowds. It was a struggle to take pictures between the illustrious millinery of Ziad‘s fans; the pictures that feature here aren’t amazing, particularly since you can’t actually see much of the clothes…


All photography by Matt Bramford

As always, it’s impossible to define this collection in terms of trends or style. It would perhaps be easier to talk about what didn’t appear – you won’t find any tailored trenches or wearable basics here. Instead, Ziad is notorious, infamous and celebrated for frocks that defy seasonality. His blend of couture is one of the rare displays of truly unique craftsmanship at fashion week.

To describe the music as eclectic would be a massive understatement. Munroe Bergdorf had put together a mammoth mixtape of hits across the decades, most of which I now can’t remember so I’ve made a note to make more notes next season. I do remember David Bowie‘s Fashion, George Michael‘s Too Funky and Duran Duran‘s Notorious, tracks synonymous with the catwalk but given a different feel in the majestic setting of the Freemasons’ Hall.


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Helena Maratheftis

Effervescent models strode one after the other to rapturous applause and deafening whoops. This particular collection had been inspired by Andy Warhol‘s superstar transvestite Candy Darling, star of Flesh and muse of The Velvet Underground. Lavish make-up featured on every model, with Ziad‘s boys wearing as much as his girls. There were hints of the 1980s with Boy George-esque layering and vibrant African patterns.

Some dresses fitted so tightly that some models were forced to walk more slowly than others, while other pieces nipped at the waist but flourished at the hips. A completely diverse selection of fabrics were on offer – couture lace, organza, translucent contrasts and painted cottons. A terrifying model came out waving feathers… with her knockers out and doing a bird impression. Christ, this is hard work. Maybe just look at the pictures. Not that they do this collection any justice.

Monty Python‘s Always Look on the Bright Side of Life accompanied the finale, another unexpected twist as if we needed any more, but an uplifting statement and a glorious finish to this fashion week spectacle.

Categories ,A/W’13, ,boy george, ,couture, ,David Bowie, ,Duran Duran, ,fashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,Feathers, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,George Michael, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Michael Arnold, ,Monty Python, ,Munroe Bergdorf, ,Tits, ,Womenswear, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | Ziad Ghanem: London Fashion Week A/W 2013 Catwalk Review


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Helena Maratheftis

Ziad Ghanem‘s catwalk shows are always momentous: massively oversubscribed, a cat-fight to get into and an array of weird and wonderful creatures desperate to get a glimpse of what the ‘cult couturier’ has delivered this season.


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Michael Arnold

So imagine my surprise when I arrived a mere fifteen minutes late to find that the show had already started. I darted up the Freemasons’ Hall‘s stairs and the vivacious models were already wowing the crowds. It was a struggle to take pictures between the illustrious millinery of Ziad‘s fans; the pictures that feature here aren’t amazing, particularly since you can’t actually see much of the clothes…


All photography by Matt Bramford

As always, it’s impossible to define this collection in terms of trends or style. It would perhaps be easier to talk about what didn’t appear – you won’t find any tailored trenches or wearable basics here. Instead, Ziad is notorious, infamous and celebrated for frocks that defy seasonality. His blend of couture is one of the rare displays of truly unique craftsmanship at fashion week.

To describe the music as eclectic would be a massive understatement. Munroe Bergdorf had put together a mammoth mixtape of hits across the decades, most of which I now can’t remember so I’ve made a note to make more notes next season. I do remember David Bowie‘s Fashion, George Michael‘s Too Funky and Duran Duran‘s Notorious, tracks synonymous with the catwalk but given a different feel in the majestic setting of the Freemasons’ Hall.


Ziad Ghanem A/W 2013 by Helena Maratheftis

Effervescent models strode one after the other to rapturous applause and deafening whoops. This particular collection had been inspired by Andy Warhol‘s superstar transvestite Candy Darling, star of Flesh and muse of The Velvet Underground. Lavish make-up featured on every model, with Ziad‘s boys wearing as much as his girls. There were hints of the 1980s with Boy George-esque layering and vibrant African patterns.

Some dresses fitted so tightly that some models were forced to walk more slowly than others, while other pieces nipped at the waist but flourished at the hips. A completely diverse selection of fabrics were on offer – couture lace, organza, translucent contrasts and painted cottons. A terrifying model came out waving feathers… with her knockers out and doing a bird impression. Christ, this is hard work. Maybe just look at the pictures. Not that they do this collection any justice.

Monty Python‘s Always Look on the Bright Side of Life accompanied the finale, another unexpected twist as if we needed any more, but an uplifting statement and a glorious finish to this fashion week spectacle.

Categories ,A/W’13, ,boy george, ,couture, ,David Bowie, ,Duran Duran, ,fashion, ,Fashion Scout, ,Feathers, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,George Michael, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Michael Arnold, ,Monty Python, ,Munroe Bergdorf, ,Tits, ,Womenswear, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Preview – A few more favourites…


Mr and Mrs Collingham, case illustrated by Krister Selin

When my oldest pal Lydia announced her engagement and subsequent wedding, I struggled to imagine her having a generic do with a meringue dress and posed pictures. Her list of likes include folk and rock music, vintage fashion and living a sustainable day-to-day life. So it was no surprise when she declared that her wedding would take place in the woods.

I apologise in advance if this article may seem a little self-indulgent, and the truth is, it probably is. Well, sod it.


Lydia and Nathan

Lydia and Nathan’s day began at the local town hall, with a low key ceremony. I had been so nervous about my continous blubbing throughout, but as The Beatles’ Love Me Do skipped on an old portable CD player, my tears turned to laughter. Lydia entered in a floor length Grecian-inspired dress with an artificial pose of sunflowers. Blimey, these civil ceremonies don’t last long do they? Before I knew it, they were Mr and Mrs Collingham and we were ushered outside to pose on the lawn. (Is it a civil ceremony when you get married at a registry office? I hope so).


Camping! Illustrated by Natasha Thompson

Anyway, the festivities began. Car-sharing had been arranged prior to the day (unfortunately there isn’t any easier way of getting around our small network of tiny villages) and guests had been discouraged from travelling from overseas. We arrived at the reception, set in our friend Alice’s beautiful garden. Lydia and Nathan are really fortunate to have such lovely friends who already take sustainability and climate change very seriously. The newlyweds had tried to create a festival vibe, whilst keeping carbon emisions to a minimum. We were all camping! A little camping area had been set up at the entrance to the woods, where tents had been pitched, and for a split second I could have been at any of the summer festivals – coloured tapers adorned the trees and homemade signs with directions had been painted.

Next up – food and booze. The food was incredible, and all locally sourced to reduce environmental impact. Organic elderflower champagne was provided as a reception drink, served with delicious vegan canapés. A delicious hog roast, provided by local butchers, was layed on for the meat eaters, but the menu was, by and large, vegan. Lydia’s mum had made a gorgeous mushroom en croute to accompany Ecoworks’ delicious selection of salads and nut roasts, and some of the vegatables had been sourced right here from the gardens!




The food! Illustrated by Kayleigh Bluck

Ecoworks is a community organisation based in Nottinghamshire with ‘the interests of people and the environment at its heart’. They work on conservation and restoration projects and run the FRESH project, which champions regeneration, education in sustainability and health.

They also run courses that encourage people to grow the good stuff and eat sustainably. Their Harvest Café van (a gorgeous converted vintage Citroën H van, no less) caters at festivals and events and specialises in vegetarian and vegan food, They provided spuds in the evening, with chilli or dahl, and a veggie breakfast the following day. I didn’t manage any of the latter because I had the world’s worst hangover, but I’m told it was a delight…

Lydia and Nathan’s dog Polly even managed to get in on the action, dressed to the nines in a ruffle of sunflowers…

Illustration of Polly by Naomi Law


I’m always hot for a Stella McCartney shoe – especially sourced on eBay at a bargain price. You can put the girl in the woods, but she’ll still wear hot shoes. AND Stella would have been proud. Sorry, I couldn’t resist… arrrrr!


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

And so, very quickly, the afternoon turned to the evening and it was time to party, after taking a visit to one of the garden’s many eco loos. A total shock for many, this was. Wails of ‘Is that really where I go to the bloody lav?’ could be heard in the camping area, but just about everybody got used to it pretty quickly. One guest, who shall remain nameless, was even caught photographing down one…

Hay bales covered in vintage blankets created space for guests to mingle, while the epicentre was The Dome.

This recycled space appeared like a vision of the future from the 1960s, and Alice’s mum kindly informed me that it used to operate as a swimming pool cover. It was in here that local live bands played, including the wonderful 10 O’clock Horses – a suitable blend of folk, rock, roots and punk. Lydia and Nathan had their first dance to this band’s first song (as I stood aghast) and then we all had a good ol’ jig.


10 O’clock Horses, illustrated by Jaymie O’Callaghan

Candles lit the gardens, which was a bit of a struggle to begin with but we all soon got used to it and danced into the small hours. And so after a few too many organic beers and far too much shameful dancing on my behalf, it was time for bed. What a fabulous, fabulous day.

We retired to our tents, and Lydia and Nathan skipped off to their tepee to consumate their marriage…


Lydia and Nathan in front of their teepee, photographed by Paul Saxby

I have no idea if they did or not.
David Longshaw

For Spring Summer 2011, seek David Longshaw says he was inspired by ‘chav dogs, information pills feathers and a ruffle or two and a story I wrote’. The tale apparently describes the outcome when some hoodies break into a stately home and end up dressing up in period clothing. I am waiting with baited breath to see the results! Don’t miss David’s upcoming round up of London Fashion Week exclusively for Amelia’s Magazine.

Eudon Choi

A/W 2010, photographed by Matt Bramford

Eudon Choi has been much talked-about over the six months that have passed since the last London Fashion Week. As well as being awarded Vauxhall Fashion Scout’s Merit Award, he was named as a winner of the BFC Elle Talent Launch Pad. His Merit Award collection has been greatly anticipated; expect industrial references, masculine tailoring and military embellishments, cutting an edgy yet sophisticated silhouette.

Bernard Chandran


A/W 2010, photographed by Matt Bramford

Malaysia’s Prince of Fashion, Bernard Chandran, continued to impress with his powerful, glimmering A/W 2010 collection. Glamour prevailed; power shoulders were paired with luxe beading, sequins, feathers and exposed backs, providing the ultimate in wearable opulence. Look out for Lady Gaga and Florence Welch queuing up for his fresh flamboyance.

Eley Kishimoto

A/W 2010, photographed by Matt Bramford

Eley Kishimoto never fail to impress with their unmistakable graphic prints. Expect another eclectic mix for S/S 2011, with inspiration cited as “imitation, 3D on 2D and clothes drying on a rack”. After a notably scaled-down, pop-up shop presence last Fashion Week, it will be interesting to see what they show this time at Shoreditch Studios.

Ziad Ghanem

Ziad Ghanem couture, illustrated by Joana Faria

When Matt Bramford recently interviewed couturier Ziad Ghanem for Amelia’s Magazine, he revealed that he has been making a film for his new collection. After February’s show-stopping runway performance from Immodesty Blaize, the onscreen unveiling of his latest collection is eagerly anticipated.

Categories ,A/W 2010, ,Bernard Chandran, ,BFC, ,british fashion council, ,David Longshaw, ,Eley Kishimoto, ,Elle Magazine, ,Eudon Choi, ,illustrations, ,Joana Faria, ,lfw, ,London Fashion Week, ,Matt Bramford, ,Naomi Law, ,preview, ,S/S 2011, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc

In the hotbox that is Vauxhall Fashion Scout‘s Freemasons Hall venue, approved Ziad Ghanem was about to return to the catwalk in dramatic fashion, symptoms and we would not expect anything less. He’d already tweeted that he’d received up to 3000 ticket requests for his show, about it and while I’m not sure there were that many there, it was bloody packed. We were asked to make more and more room for new guests, to the point where I was almost spooning the girl sitting next to me. And it was SO HOT.


Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

One guy, wearing an outfit only suitable for the front row, idled up and down the catwalk in the hope that someone lesser dressed would offer up his seat. Luckily they managed to squeeze him in a little further down from me. Thank God, I thought – imagine wearing a toilet seat on your head and having to sit fifth! Mortifying.

As I made eyes at Amelia across the catwalk, something rather dramatic happened in the photographer’s pit. A loud bang, as if somebody had fallen, came first – everybody spun to see what was going on. A girl was struggling to maintain her balance and let out a yelp and it was clear that there were some photographers missing. The guy sitting next to me was certain he’d seen fisticuffs; as the photographers vied for space, one had lamped another. It was all very confusing and a little distressing, not least to resist the urge to stand up and cry ‘FIGHT!‘ Ziad, being the gentleman that he is, took to Facebook post-show to offer any injured parties a free outfit. What a lovely man.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

There ain’t no better show suited to a bit of pre-start drama. After the hysteria had settled down and I’d lost a few more pounds in sweat (never a bad thing), the show commenced. This particular collection is inspired by profound Polish film Matka Joanna (Mother Joan); a dark tale of the demonic possession of nuns. Well, what were you expecting? Floaty floral dresses? I don’t think so.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Rukmunal Hakim

It’s hard to describe what really happens at a Ziad show. You can’t say ‘the dresses were long’ or ‘the skirts were short’ because every piece is unique and that’s just how Ziad does it. We had a couple walk first, the gent in a cropped white organza jacket, the lady in a glamorous pale pink dress, both with flowers atop their heads and big red eyes.


Photography by Tim Adey

We had performance artist Mr Pustra, who skipped in wearing an exaggarated black ensemble and red PVC gloves, and Marnie Scarlet, wearing one of Ziad’s bridal creations – layer upon layer of white silk and tulle, teamed as any bride would with white PVC leggings. Marnie entered the arena with a PVC umbrella that showered her with rose petals when she opened it.


Photography by Matt Bramford

Intense colours are always the flavour of these shows – this time around monochrome and red threaded the collection together. We had a floor-length translucent number, worn sans underwear. The funny thing is I was thinking I hadn’t seen any vaginas this season after VaginaGate a year ago, and I thought to myself I really wish I hadn’t thought to myself that I hadn’t seen any vaginas, because I suspect that’s why I did.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

The rest of the couture pieces celebrated Ziad Ghanem‘s exceptional talent when it comes to making clothes, and it wasn’t all about spectacle. A fishtail gown with incredible lace detail brought audible gasps from the audience and had that timeless quality like the grand dressmakers that precede him. Of course, it was sexed up with leather gloves. Then came a selection of paint-splattered pieces in allsorts of vibrant colours that would have made for a complete collection (and were borderline wearable) if this had not been the mighty Ziad.

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory


Photography by Amelia Gregory

The show featured the usual roll call of weird and wonderful models, including DJ Jackee Word, dancer Laura Cherry (who modelled the aforementioned fishtail dress) and singer Tanya Valensi who looked fiece in a less whacky micro dress with incredible embellishment. My favourite model in this show (and in any, for that matter) has to be Ziad‘s ‘favourite niece’ Janet Younan. A girl aged no more than 10 or 11 sashayed down the catwalk like a bridesmaid from a fairytale with as much confidence and swagger as any other model could muster. The crowd went NUTS for this, and quite rightly – Janet really werked it and looked overjoyed when she brought her uncle out for a post-show bow.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns

Amelia and I both remarked that this collection was a little less cohesive than previous seasons, but then this is Ziad Ghanem we’re talking about – master of craftsmanship, creator of drama and intensity and master couturier. Some of the shows you see begin with one outfit and change very little throughout, sometimes making you ponder if they’ve actually made a mistake and sent the same model in the same frock out twice. But you’d never get that at a Ziad Ghanem show – no way José. This was a celebration of haute fashion, of everybody’s beauty, and of a designer’s ability to do whatever the hell he likes.


Photography by Matt Bramford

Long live Ziad Ghanem.

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review

Watch the show in full here:

Categories ,Amelia, ,Aysim Genc, ,Claire Kearns, ,couture, ,Fight, ,film, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Front Row, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Jackee Word, ,Janet Younan, ,Laura Cherry, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Matka Joanna, ,Matt Bramford, ,Mr Pustra, ,Nuns, ,Organza, ,Photographers Pit, ,Polish, ,review, ,Rukmunal Hakim, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,Tanya Valensi, ,twitter, ,VaginaGate, ,Vaginas, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2012 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Aysim Genc

In the hotbox that is Vauxhall Fashion Scout’s Freemasons Hall venue, Ziad Ghanem was about to return to the catwalk in dramatic fashion, and we would not expect anything less. He’d already tweeted that he’d received up to 3000 ticket requests for his show, and while I’m not sure there were that many there, it was bloody packed. We were asked to make more and more room for new guests, to the point where I was almost spooning the girl sitting next to me. And it was SO HOT.


Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Gilly Rochester

One guy, wearing an outfit only suitable for the front row, idled up and down the catwalk in the hope that someone lesser dressed would offer up his seat. Luckily they managed to squeeze him in a little further down from me. Thank God, I thought – imagine wearing a toilet seat on your head and having to sit fifth! Mortifying.

As I made eyes at Amelia across the catwalk, something rather dramatic happened in the photographer’s pit. A loud bang, as if somebody had fallen, came first – everybody spun to see what was going on. A girl was struggling to maintain her balance and let out a yelp and it was clear that there were some photographers missing. The guy sitting next to me was certain he’d seen fisticuffs; as the photographers vied for space, one had lamped another. It was all very confusing and a little distressing, not least to resist the urge to stand up and cry ‘FIGHT!‘ Ziad, being the gentleman that he is, took to Facebook post-show to offer any injured parties a free outfit. What a lovely man.


Photography by Amelia Gregory

There ain’t no better show suited to a bit of pre-start drama. After the hysteria had settled down and I’d lost a few more pounds in sweat (never a bad thing), the show commenced. This particular collection is inspired by profound Polish film Matka Joanna (Mother Joan); a dark tale of the demonic possession of nuns. Well, what were you expecting? Floaty floral dresses? I don’t think so.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Rukmunal Hakim

It’s hard to describe what really happens at a Ziad show. You can’t say ‘the dresses were long’ or ‘the skirts were short’ because every piece is unique and that’s just how Ziad does it. We had a couple walk first, the gent in a cropped white organza jacket, the lady in a glamorous pale pink dress, both with flowers atop their heads and big red eyes.


Photography by Tim Adey

We had performance artist Mr Pustra, who skipped in wearing an exaggarated black ensemble and red PVC gloves, and Marnie Scarlet, wearing one of Ziad’s bridal creations – layer upon layer of white silk and tulle, teamed as any bride would with white PVC leggings. Marnie entered the arena with a PVC umbrella that showered her with rose petals when she opened it.


Photography by Matt Bramford

Intense colours are always the flavour of these shows – this time around monochrome and red threaded the collection together. We had a floor-length translucent number, worn sans underwear. The funny thing is I was thinking I hadn’t seen any vaginas this season after VaginaGate a year ago, and I thought to myself I really wish I hadn’t thought to myself that I hadn’t seen any vaginas, because I suspect that’s why I did.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Helena Maratheftis

The rest of the couture pieces celebrated Ziad Ghanem’s exceptional talent when it comes to making clothes, and it wasn’t all about spectacle. A fishtail gown with incredible lace detail brought audible gasps from the audience and had that timeless quality like the grand dressmakers that precede him. Of course, it was sexed up with leather gloves. Then came a selection of paint-splattered pieces in allsorts of vibrant colours that would have made for a complete collection (and were borderline wearable) if this had not been the mighty Ziad.

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review photo amelia gregory


Photography by Amelia Gregory

The show featured the usual roll call of weird and wonderful models, including DJ Jackee Word, dancer Laura Cherry (who modelled the aforementioned fishtail dress) and singer Tanya Valensi who looked fiece in a less whacky micro dress with incredible embellishment. My favourite model in this show (and in any, for that matter) has to be Ziad’s ‘favourite niece’ Janet Younan. A girl aged no more than 10 or 11 sashayed down the catwalk like a bridesmaid from a fairytale with as much confidence and swagger as any other model could muster. The crowd went NUTS for this, and quite rightly – Janet really werked it and looked overjoyed when she brought her uncle out for a post-show bow.


Ziad Ghanem S/S 2012 by Claire Kearns

Amelia and I both remarked that this collection was a little less cohesive than previous seasons, but then this is Ziad Ghanem we’re talking about – master of craftsmanship, creator of drama and intensity and master couturier. Some of the shows you see begin with one outfit and change very little throughout, sometimes making you ponder if they’ve actually made a mistake and sent the same model in the same frock out twice. But you’d never get that at a Ziad Ghanem show – no way José. This was a celebration of haute fashion, of everybody’s beauty, and of a designer’s ability to do whatever the hell he likes.


Photography by Matt Bramford

Long live Ziad Ghanem.

Ziad Ghanem SS 2012 review

Watch the show in full here:




Categories ,Amelia, ,Aysim Genc, ,Claire Kearns, ,couture, ,Fight, ,film, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Front Row, ,Gilly Rochester, ,Helena Maratheftis, ,Jackee Word, ,Janet Younan, ,Laura Cherry, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Matka Joanna, ,Matt Bramford, ,Mr Pustra, ,Nuns, ,Organza, ,Photographers Pit, ,Polish, ,review, ,Rukmunal Hakim, ,S/S 2012, ,SS12, ,Tanya Valensi, ,twitter, ,VaginaGate, ,Vaginas, ,Vauxhall Fashion Scout, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week S/S 2011: Presentation and Film Review: Ziad Ghanem

Menswear day usually brings out the most stylish men, cialis 40mg buy more about whether sharp sartorial, ask post-punk or borderline ridiculous. Here’s a very quick look at what some of them were wearing for your delectation…

Love this Christopher Shannon print:

I love this guy’s boots. Bang on trend.

These AREN’T men – they are Amelia Gregory and Amelia’s Magazine illustrator Naomi Law!


Illustration by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

I have to say that I was more than a little disappointed when cult couturier Ziad Ghanem revealed, look when I interviewed him last month, that he would be showing a film for ‘Mother Russia’, his S/S 2011 collection, rather than producing a show. How would I cope without Ziad on the catwalk line-up? It was the highlight of my A/W 2010 fashion week by far.

Well, true to form, Ziad still managed to dazzle at swanky Shoreditch haunt Avalon on Monday night. I thought I might miss this one because I had hotted it from central London after the FAD Awards, and it turns out I did miss the live presentation of the collection. Gutted.


Photographs kindly courtesy of Masayo Matsuda

The venue, though, was packed full of the intriguing breed of person that Ziad’s visionary work attracts – people with antlers on their heads, for example. It’s a delight to simply stand and admire these people, who always seem to look amazing no matter what they are wearing. I had a job on trying to distinguish who was in the presentation and who was a guest!

The presentation featured a selection of the outfits from Ziad’s S/S 2011 collection, modelled by some familiar faces who have wurked his dramatic ensembles before. They were, inevitably, incredible.


Illustrations by Michelle Urvall Nyrén

As per usual, the sense of drama in Ziad’s collection was palpable. Models with painted white faces leaped around one of Avalon’s many rooms, wearing theatrical numbers that enveloped them. Enormous a-line dresses that models held up by their sides to create the illusion of wings featured and fabrics were adorned with exotic patterns in all sorts of vibrant colours (some of which I recognised from Ziad’s A/W 2010 collection and are quickly becoming a signature). One-shoulder capes featured on the guys who cavorted and writhed with busty ladies in strapless numbers.


Photographs kindly courtesy of Masayo Matsuda

Alongside this ferocious performance, in another room, the film was screened. The room featured grand antique armchairs and had zero lighting, creating yet more drama that the film would inevitably bring.

Directed by Marnie Hollande, fashion filmmaker who we interview recently, this encapsulated what Ziad Ghanem’s eponymous label has come to represent. Dramatic, Russian-inspired music played like a haunting melody as the models, again firm Ziad favourites, pranced around what looked like an old theatre. It had masses of drama and style, as always, as models leaped across the screen and cavorted with each other.

Enjoy:

‘Mother Russia’ by Ziad Ghanem on Vimeo.

Stills from the film:

The good news is that Ziad revealed on his Facebook page that, due to the generosity of a private buyer who has snapped up the entire collection, the Grand Master and his works of art will return to the catwalk next season. A/W 2011 can’t come some enough.

Categories ,Avalon, ,couture, ,drama, ,fashion, ,film, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Hollande, ,Presentation, ,review, ,S/S 2011, ,shoreditch, ,Vibrant, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem (by Amelia)

This spring, sales the V&A presents a unique exhibition dedicated the Grand Master Japanese couturier, stuff Yohji Yamamoto. The exhibition will celebrate his life and work, and is the first of its kind in the UK. 30 years after Yamamoto debuted in Paris, the V&A has brought together rare examples of his visionary designs.

Here’s an exclusive interview with the exhibition’s curator, Ligaya Salazar. You can also read some of Salazar’s thoughts below, too.
On process
With this project I started roughly two and a half years ago to work on the idea and the concept behind the exhibition, its also a very particular project because you are working with a living designer who you are doing a single retrospective with, working with their team very closely, so in terms of curating, there is much more of a dialogue there than you would probably normally have with a slightly more thematic show.

The focus was more on to find a concept that would work for him, as a designer, because Yohji Yamamoto is very special in the deign world in terms of the way he approaches designing, so the way you want to show his work should be quite different as well….I spent more time looking at ways of displaying his work, ways of showing his work…

On garment selection
I had the incredible honour to be able to go into both his Paris and his Tokyo archives, the Tokyo archives no curator had ever been to, I had all of his archive to look at and to choose from, which made the editing process incredibly hard…it is something you spend a long time doing, talking to Yohji’s team, talking to the designer, making sure you have covered the iconic parts of his career, but also chosen pieces that are most emblematic of the themes that you want to bring out…I stated with an object list that was about six hundred pieces, and that was already a selection of the pieces I saw in the archive and then I had to bring it down to ninety, it was a long and quite arduous process.

On themes
Because it is an installation based exhibition, there isn’t a prescriptive story to tell, or a chronology, it was much more about how people would encounter the garments, for the first time what we are doing is to show everything on open display, on the same height as the viewer, so you are meeting your other, rather than looking up and behind glass, it’s a very different experience of the clothes.

Yohi Yamamoto is at the V&A and at The Wapping Project until 10th July 2011. Look out for a full review coming soon!

Marnie for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice
Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice.

Ziad Ghanem‘s Never End, sick Never End, Never End was one of those hotly tipped shows that all my contributors were desperate to go to, so I was promised performance catwalking at its best. What I hadn’t expected was to land a prime seat right opposite Boy George, looking remarkably svelte next to Daniel Lismore.

Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I remember the allure of Karma Chameleon, back when a dodgy video was sufficient accompaniment for pop songs of such genius. Colour by Numbers was actually the VERY FIRST album that I owned, given to me by my aunt on good old cassette tape.

YouTube Preview Image

But then, ah, the show!!! This collection was inspired by a horror video game called Silent Hill and the work of Romantic painter John Henry Fuseli, and it explored themes of gothic romance. The press release states that the same garment viewed in a dark, gothic context by one viewer will be interpreted as romantic and liberating by the next.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt.

The show opened with a stunning piece of performance, as a red-headed model appeared in gothic Tim Burton-esque make up, black skirts tumbling as she grew before our eyes into a 12 foot monster burlesque bride waving great green feathered fans. Thereafter followed a series of printed, billowing capes and tightly corseted dresses, all accessorised with veils, reddened eyes, cracked cheeks and Joker smiles. Apparently Ziad asked each model to choose their own favourite horror film make up for the show.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor.

Androgynous models wore chiffon and beaded dresses, a spooky ghost couple trailed rumpled netting behind as they faced the photographers together. Amidst the drama cleverly made outfits showcased traditional haute couture skills using bias cut vintage silk chiffons and duchess satin that flowed around the body.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A white faced creature smeared its face with black paint and make up took a turn towards our feathered friends: blue winged eyes echoing the giant bird prints on winged dresses. Out stepped a ballet dancer on pointe, edging down the catwalk in frilled lilac, her skull face shrouded in grey. As she retreated backwards a series of busty ladies swept down the catwalk in eminently wearable multi coloured chiffon dresses: amongst them walked transvestites, burlesque artists and a giant lady in grey. I particularly adored the bustle backed electric fuchsia number that emphasised every womanly curve.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Taking the art of the catwalk to fantastical heights, Ziad Ghanem proved that his shows really are worth the hype, with or without the added bonus of an 80s pop idol in a fabulous yellow fedora. You can read more about his unique selection of models here.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can also read Florence Massey’s review of the Ziad Ghanem show here.

Categories ,ballet, ,birds, ,boy george, ,Burlesque, ,Chiffon, ,Colour by Numbers, ,couture, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,gothic, ,Helen Crawford, ,Horror, ,Jamie McGregor, ,Jessica Holt, ,John Henry Fuseli, ,Karma Chameleon, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Never End, ,Romantic, ,Silent Hill, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Tigz Rice, ,tim burton, ,Transvestite, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem (by Amelia)

This spring, sales the V&A presents a unique exhibition dedicated the Grand Master Japanese couturier, stuff Yohji Yamamoto. The exhibition will celebrate his life and work, and is the first of its kind in the UK. 30 years after Yamamoto debuted in Paris, the V&A has brought together rare examples of his visionary designs.

Here’s an exclusive interview with the exhibition’s curator, Ligaya Salazar. You can also read some of Salazar’s thoughts below, too.
On process
With this project I started roughly two and a half years ago to work on the idea and the concept behind the exhibition, its also a very particular project because you are working with a living designer who you are doing a single retrospective with, working with their team very closely, so in terms of curating, there is much more of a dialogue there than you would probably normally have with a slightly more thematic show.

The focus was more on to find a concept that would work for him, as a designer, because Yohji Yamamoto is very special in the deign world in terms of the way he approaches designing, so the way you want to show his work should be quite different as well….I spent more time looking at ways of displaying his work, ways of showing his work…

On garment selection
I had the incredible honour to be able to go into both his Paris and his Tokyo archives, the Tokyo archives no curator had ever been to, I had all of his archive to look at and to choose from, which made the editing process incredibly hard…it is something you spend a long time doing, talking to Yohji’s team, talking to the designer, making sure you have covered the iconic parts of his career, but also chosen pieces that are most emblematic of the themes that you want to bring out…I stated with an object list that was about six hundred pieces, and that was already a selection of the pieces I saw in the archive and then I had to bring it down to ninety, it was a long and quite arduous process.

On themes
Because it is an installation based exhibition, there isn’t a prescriptive story to tell, or a chronology, it was much more about how people would encounter the garments, for the first time what we are doing is to show everything on open display, on the same height as the viewer, so you are meeting your other, rather than looking up and behind glass, it’s a very different experience of the clothes.

Yohi Yamamoto is at the V&A and at The Wapping Project until 10th July 2011. Look out for a full review coming soon!

Marnie for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice
Marnie Scarlet for Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Tigz Rice.

Ziad Ghanem‘s Never End, sick Never End, Never End was one of those hotly tipped shows that all my contributors were desperate to go to, so I was promised performance catwalking at its best. What I hadn’t expected was to land a prime seat right opposite Boy George, looking remarkably svelte next to Daniel Lismore.

Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Boy George and Daniel Lismore. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

I remember the allure of Karma Chameleon, back when a dodgy video was sufficient accompaniment for pop songs of such genius. Colour by Numbers was actually the VERY FIRST album that I owned, given to me by my aunt on good old cassette tape.

YouTube Preview Image

But then, ah, the show!!! This collection was inspired by a horror video game called Silent Hill and the work of Romantic painter John Henry Fuseli, and it explored themes of gothic romance. The press release states that the same garment viewed in a dark, gothic context by one viewer will be interpreted as romantic and liberating by the next.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jessica Holt.

The show opened with a stunning piece of performance, as a red-headed model appeared in gothic Tim Burton-esque make up, black skirts tumbling as she grew before our eyes into a 12 foot monster burlesque bride waving great green feathered fans. Thereafter followed a series of printed, billowing capes and tightly corseted dresses, all accessorised with veils, reddened eyes, cracked cheeks and Joker smiles. Apparently Ziad asked each model to choose their own favourite horror film make up for the show.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by Jamie McGregor.

Androgynous models wore chiffon and beaded dresses, a spooky ghost couple trailed rumpled netting behind as they faced the photographers together. Amidst the drama cleverly made outfits showcased traditional haute couture skills using bias cut vintage silk chiffons and duchess satin that flowed around the body.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

A white faced creature smeared its face with black paint and make up took a turn towards our feathered friends: blue winged eyes echoing the giant bird prints on winged dresses. Out stepped a ballet dancer on pointe, edging down the catwalk in frilled lilac, her skull face shrouded in grey. As she retreated backwards a series of busty ladies swept down the catwalk in eminently wearable multi coloured chiffon dresses: amongst them walked transvestites, burlesque artists and a giant lady in grey. I particularly adored the bustle backed electric fuchsia number that emphasised every womanly curve.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 by The Lovely Wars.

Taking the art of the catwalk to fantastical heights, Ziad Ghanem proved that his shows really are worth the hype, with or without the added bonus of an 80s pop idol in a fabulous yellow fedora. You can read more about his unique selection of models here.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011. Photography by Amelia Gregory.

You can also read Florence Massey’s review of the Ziad Ghanem show here.

Categories ,ballet, ,birds, ,boy george, ,Burlesque, ,Chiffon, ,Colour by Numbers, ,couture, ,Daniel Lismore, ,Fashion Scout, ,Florence Massey, ,gothic, ,Helen Crawford, ,Horror, ,Jamie McGregor, ,Jessica Holt, ,John Henry Fuseli, ,Karma Chameleon, ,Marnie Scarlet, ,Never End, ,Romantic, ,Silent Hill, ,The Lovely Wars, ,Tigz Rice, ,tim burton, ,Transvestite, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Catwalk Review: Ziad Ghanem


Ziad Ghanem by Avril Kelly

What an amazing show; Ziad Ghanem has trumped everything else I’ve seen this week. Opening with a model dressing in a dark, pharmacy dramatic floor length strapless gown, troche with green feathers, stilts and skull makeup the audience were cheering from the off.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory

The front row was packed out with the eccentrically dressed – Boy George almost blended into the background in a bright yellow hat and full face of makeup. Special mention has to go to the PVC clad, (and complete with blow up hair), London artist Pandemonia, sitting opposite me. Together with a matching blow up dog, she must have been boilin’!

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem by Alison Day

The loud show, with music changes more frequent than model changes provided clapping, laughing and unanimous approval – so much so that no one seemed to care that the show started an almost an hour late. Male and female models took to the catwalk in stunning creations – capes, gigantic earrings and tremendously tight dresses were wriggled, danced and glided down the runway on joker-style made-up faces.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory

The models came in all shapes and sizes but voluptuous curves and a heaving bosom was the order of the evening. Corset dresses that pushed said bosoms up and out were so tight that somewhere Scarlett Johansen was blushing. Full length floaty gowns in pale hues of blue, deep reds, sparkling gold and matte grey also allowed for plenty of swishing, and cloak spinning as the models made their way towards the waiting photographers.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia GregoryZiad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem by Madi

My favourite dress was the bright fuschia deep cut and backless cocktail dress that nipped in perfectly at the waist. The shiny nature of the material was so unashamedly trashy that it avoided (I think) being either tacky or quality street wrapper-esque. Other notable highlights of the show include a deathly bride and groom, solemnly showering the crowd with petals at the end of the show, and the model who pirouetted her way backwards after walking down the catwalk. All in all, a brilliant show – exciting, entertaining and some truly beautiful clothes.

Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory
Ziad Ghanem A/W 2011 photography by Amelia Gregory.

Categories ,Alison Day, ,Amelia’s, ,Avril Kelly, ,AW11, ,boy george, ,Freemasons’ Hall, ,Gowns, ,london, ,London Fashion Week, ,Madi, ,Pandemonia, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | LFW 09 – Ziad Ghanem – catwalk counterculture

ziad ghanem 7

The crowd at Ziad Ghanem was as much of a draw as the catwalk show, ailment as glitter, symptoms ruffles, corsetry, big hair and hats shuffled into the main room for a show based around counterculture and the ugly/stylish aesthetic.

ziad ghanem 2

“Real people” including students, artists, teachers and magazine editors modelled the clothes, which had a punky, chopped-up look. A nude bodysuit with built-up shoulders left little to the imagination on a male model in platform boots.

ziad ghanem 6

Ghanem apparently de- and re-constructed denim items from his sponsor Firetrap to build new clothes, like a mini corset dress with spike-shaped embellishments and the use of the material made sense within the “street-style” overall look of the collection, which was about self-expression far more than following trends or trying to look conventionally beautiful.

ziad ghanem 3

There were very wearable items as well, with colourful, geometric tunics in flippy cotton also bouncing down the catwalk.

ziad ghanem 1

At the end of the show, just such a conventionally beautiful creature took the stage to sing as the models took their final turn.

Ziad Ghanem singer

Categories ,Fashion Scout, ,lfw09, ,Ziad Ghanem

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