Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Presentation Review: House of Worth Couture Lingerie

House Of Worth SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gareth A Hopkins.

As I had arrived at Claridges Hotel ridiculously early to see the House of Worth, approved Couture Lingerie Collection, purchase I was able to admire the interiors, more about the fresh flowers, the gold and white pillars and air of fragrance. With a click of my heels on the marble floors to the French Salon and the Drawing Room, I knew what I was about to see was special, and I wasn’t wrong.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
House of Worth by Claire Kearns
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Claire Kearns.

This was a static exhibition and catwalk with an opportunity to see up close the finest details and feel the fabric between my fingertips, not only on the mannequins, but on the models too. I also had an opportunity to talk to the Head Designer of House of Worth, Giovanni Bedin, about the collection.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
Head designer Giovanni Bedin talks with a model. All photography by June Chanpoomidole.

House of Worth Illustration By Kassie Berry
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Kassie Berry.

My reward for arriving early was the chance to see the models getting ready ‘backstage’. The models sported loose ringlet curls with nude lipstick and minimal smoky makeup that were applied right in front of me, making the space feel really intimate.

LFW house of worth phoebe kirk
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie S/S 2012 by Phoebe Kirk.

The lingerie collection features balconette and triangle style bras matched with full briefs and thongs, and many outfits shown at Claridges consisted of two layers: long sleeved leotards that covered the fingers combined with a basque or crinoline. There was virginal white lace, sensual black satin tulle and ravenously seductive velvet that featured a recurring circular boned motif in elegant bows and ribbon shapes. By combining the simplicity of a circle with the frills of satin and tulle Giovanni marries the feminine with a more modern aesthetic.

House Of Worth SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gareth Hopkins.

Giovanni Bedin told me that this lingerie collection is an evolution of the previous couture S/S 2011 collection in Paris whereby he became interested in the techniques required to make a jacket or a dress and how these could be applied to underwear. Giovanni strongly believes that Lingerie is Sexy and has so much to say about the wearer that it should not be hidden as mere underwear. He urges the wearers of Worth Lingerie to be versatile; to mix and match the ready-to-wear and couture lingerie with outerwear.

House of Worth by Lianne Harrison
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Lianne Harrison.

House of Worth by Kristina Vasiljeva
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Kristina Vasiljeva.

HOUSE OF WORTH by GEMMA TRAVIS
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gemma Travis.

Versatility is Giovanni Bedin’s strength; as in his previous summer collection the basques are all detachable and easily customisable so that they can be worn as outerwear. When I overheard the models talking they were discussing how comfortable the House of Worth lingerie is to wear, and how they might customise them to wear them on a night out. The House of Worth lingerie range plays with contrasting combinations of design detailing that would befit the modern sensual woman, and wearing one of these outfits as outerwear would definitely be a conversation starter.

LFW house of worth phoebe kirk
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Phoebe Kirk.

When I asked Giovanni Bedin what’s in store for the future he said ‘a development of ready-to-wear lingerie and couture‘ – thereby not letting on too much… but I think we can be assured that there will be more masterpieces from Giovanni Bedin in the near future. All in all, I felt suitably inspired and excited by this new venture for the House of Worth.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review

Categories ,balconette, ,basque, ,Bra, ,Claire Kearns, ,Claridges Hotel, ,Claridge’s Hotel, ,couture, ,crinoline, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Gemma Travis, ,Giovanni Bedin, ,House of Worth, ,illustrators, ,Inside Out Affair, ,Juliette Fazekas, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Kassie Berry, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,lfw, ,Lianne Harrison, ,lingerie, ,London Fashion Week, ,Melissa Bell, ,Nici Harrison, ,Phoebe Kirk, ,Ready-to-wear, ,RMG Public Relations, ,S/S 2012, ,Static exhibition, ,The Drawing Room, ,underwear

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Amelia’s Magazine | London Fashion Week A/W 2011 Presentation Review: House of Worth Couture Lingerie

House Of Worth SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gareth A Hopkins.

As I had arrived at Claridges Hotel ridiculously early to see the House of Worth, approved Couture Lingerie Collection, purchase I was able to admire the interiors, more about the fresh flowers, the gold and white pillars and air of fragrance. With a click of my heels on the marble floors to the French Salon and the Drawing Room, I knew what I was about to see was special, and I wasn’t wrong.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
House of Worth by Claire Kearns
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Claire Kearns.

This was a static exhibition and catwalk with an opportunity to see up close the finest details and feel the fabric between my fingertips, not only on the mannequins, but on the models too. I also had an opportunity to talk to the Head Designer of House of Worth, Giovanni Bedin, about the collection.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
Head designer Giovanni Bedin talks with a model. All photography by June Chanpoomidole.

House of Worth Illustration By Kassie Berry
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Kassie Berry.

My reward for arriving early was the chance to see the models getting ready ‘backstage’. The models sported loose ringlet curls with nude lipstick and minimal smoky makeup that were applied right in front of me, making the space feel really intimate.

LFW house of worth phoebe kirk
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie S/S 2012 by Phoebe Kirk.

The lingerie collection features balconette and triangle style bras matched with full briefs and thongs, and many outfits shown at Claridges consisted of two layers: long sleeved leotards that covered the fingers combined with a basque or crinoline. There was virginal white lace, sensual black satin tulle and ravenously seductive velvet that featured a recurring circular boned motif in elegant bows and ribbon shapes. By combining the simplicity of a circle with the frills of satin and tulle Giovanni marries the feminine with a more modern aesthetic.

House Of Worth SS12 by Gareth A Hopkins
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gareth Hopkins.

Giovanni Bedin told me that this lingerie collection is an evolution of the previous couture S/S 2011 collection in Paris whereby he became interested in the techniques required to make a jacket or a dress and how these could be applied to underwear. Giovanni strongly believes that Lingerie is Sexy and has so much to say about the wearer that it should not be hidden as mere underwear. He urges the wearers of Worth Lingerie to be versatile; to mix and match the ready-to-wear and couture lingerie with outerwear.

House of Worth by Lianne Harrison
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Lianne Harrison.

House of Worth by Kristina Vasiljeva
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Kristina Vasiljeva.

HOUSE OF WORTH by GEMMA TRAVIS
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Gemma Travis.

Versatility is Giovanni Bedin’s strength; as in his previous summer collection the basques are all detachable and easily customisable so that they can be worn as outerwear. When I overheard the models talking they were discussing how comfortable the House of Worth lingerie is to wear, and how they might customise them to wear them on a night out. The House of Worth lingerie range plays with contrasting combinations of design detailing that would befit the modern sensual woman, and wearing one of these outfits as outerwear would definitely be a conversation starter.

LFW house of worth phoebe kirk
House Of Worth Couture Lingerie A/W 2011 by Phoebe Kirk.

When I asked Giovanni Bedin what’s in store for the future he said ‘a development of ready-to-wear lingerie and couture‘ – thereby not letting on too much… but I think we can be assured that there will be more masterpieces from Giovanni Bedin in the near future. All in all, I felt suitably inspired and excited by this new venture for the House of Worth.

HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review
HOUSE OF WORTH Worth Couture Lingerie ‘Inside Out Affair’ Collection Review

Categories ,balconette, ,basque, ,Bra, ,Claire Kearns, ,Claridges Hotel, ,Claridge’s Hotel, ,couture, ,crinoline, ,Gareth Hopkins, ,Gemma Travis, ,Giovanni Bedin, ,House of Worth, ,illustrators, ,Inside Out Affair, ,Juliette Fazekas, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Kassie Berry, ,Kristina Vasiljeva, ,lfw, ,Lianne Harrison, ,lingerie, ,London Fashion Week, ,Melissa Bell, ,Nici Harrison, ,Phoebe Kirk, ,Ready-to-wear, ,RMG Public Relations, ,S/S 2012, ,Static exhibition, ,The Drawing Room, ,underwear

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Amelia’s Magazine | Hetty Rose: how to create beautiful shoes from old kimonos

Tania Kowalski was a workshop manager at a well-known contemporary jewellery gallery in London when Synnove Saelthun arrived from New York to join the design team. They soon discovered that they had similar views on design and business ethics, more about cialis 40mg and became good friends. Several years later they started the Oria brand, prescription using Synnove’s design skills and Tania’s production expertise. Synnove is a technically brilliant goldsmith with a passion for design and an eye for detail. Tania is a trained jeweller, viagra with a wide range of experience in the jewellery industry, from design creation through to production. Her expertise includes sourcing ethical materials and ensuring fair business practice.

Tania’s passion for other cultures has led her to visit remote tribes in the Amazon of Brazil, hill tribes in Nepal and the Dogon people of Mali. It was during these travels that she became fascinated with the cultural importance and symbolic meaning of tribal adornment. When designing a new collection, the couple sit down together to discuss what the new collection will symbolise. They research and refine story boards, and after ensuring that the designs are technically feasible Synnove makes an initial prototype, the best of which will go into production.

The use of the phoenix is a symbol of honesty and justice in Chinese mythology, and is one of the inspirations for the Nina collection. The lotus symbolises purity and beauty in many different cultures, and it inspired their silver lotus collection.

Working in Nepal Tania discovered that the safe working conditions and fair living wages which we take for granted in the West are not necessarily the norm in other parts of the world. This early experience was important in persuading Tania to commit to fairtrade sourcing as a founding principle of Oria.

Vintage fashion, about it illustrated by Matilde Sazio

Kim Sklinar, viagra sale aka Preloved Reloved, cheap has set herself an interesting New Year’s challenge. For the duration of 2011, Kim isn’t going to buy any new clothes. No more high-street bargains, no more feeding corporate giants, no more fast-fashion waste, no siree. ‘Another one?’ I hear you cry – and you’d be right. But this one is a little different.

While Kim hopes to raise awareness about the amount of cheap clothing we purchase and what effects that has on the environment and people’s lives, there’s also a bigger reason closer to home. Kim’s father was diagnosed with cancer over 18 months ago, and she decided to set up the project to raise funds for Macmillan, the cancer care and support charity. Unfortunately, as of only last week, Kim’s dad won’t see the project through its fruition. But Kim will dedicate the project to his memory.

So, how do you do it? Well, Kim’s vowed to buy only vintage and from outlets like eBay, and she’ll spend more time in charity shops which also benefits all of the organisations that run them. I had a chat with her about the project and how she thinks she’ll manage it all…


Vintage shop, illustrated by Karolina Burdon

What gave you the idea for Preloved, Reloved in the first place?
Well I always like to dress a little differently. My style is mainstream with a retro edge, I suppose. I always seem to end up with a daft New Year’s resolution – last year I cycled from London to Paris for The Institute of Cancer Research. I like using my time to help others and spread awareness.

Were you a fan of vintage and upcycling before you started the project?
Yes! I always admire my friends’ outfits; well, those who wear vintage and second-hand fashion. Upcycling is something I have experimented with for ages at home and now is the time to make sure I actually finish some projects!

Where will you source your outfits?
Charity shops, vintage stores, eBay, my mum’s wardrobe…! I made a lined cape last night from linen and satin for balmy summer nights (booking a holiday soon!).


Charity shops, illustrated by Rukmunal Hakim

What does the project hope to achieve?
I want to raise awareness of numerous charities related to my Dad’s illnesses. I want my friends to know that too much of an unhealthy lifestyle is probably going to lead to an early demise. I also want to raise the profile of vintage and second-hand fashion; I remember as a kid we use to take the mick out of anyone who dressed from a charity shop. I myself as a student had a stigma against them. Now it’s become kitsch, cool and quirky. It’s good for the environment.

How much do you hope to raise and what are the funds likely to be used for?
£2500 is my Just Giving target – it goes directly to Macmillan. However, with my shopping at many different charity shops, my cash goes straight to them – win win all round! I have my thinking cap on about how to expand the project though.


eBay! Illustration by Avril Kelly

Why did you choose Macmillan?
My dad (and his dad) had cancer – he died last week unfortunately. And it wasn’t the cancer that killed him, it was his heart and his adult-onset diabetes. A poor lifestyle in his twenties and thirties caused it and he was only 57 when he passed. So as I said before, this project benefits other charities focussing on these causes too through me spending money at their outlets.

Not that far in, but have you come accross any problems so far? Has anything that happened that you weren’t expecting?
Avoiding shops is quite hard as I realised I can’t just pop into the Topshop sale and treat myself – which I suppose is good for my wallet and I’m going to do less impulse-buying on the way home from work.
With my Dad passing, I haven’t had as much time to go browsing shops as much as I’d like. This weekend, however, I’m going to the Girls of Guildford vintage fair and gig – for some serious retail therapy, cupcake-nomming and also to check out some great live music away from the bustle of London.


Vintage, illustrated by Jess Holt

What are you wearing today? Where’s it all from?
Dark blue skinny jeans, leather knee boots that I already owned with black and cream patterned blouse from River Island that I bought from Cancer Research UK. I’m also wearing red rose earrings from Magnolia Jewellery.

Do you plan to make or alter any of your clothes? If so, how?
Yes – I love sewing and making jewellery too – I made a cape last week and have upcycled a pair of old, torn jeans from my uni days into a denim mini. I have a small collection of retro patterns including a lovely dress with a pussy bow. I love being able to create something out of fabric I love: last year I went to a lovely Indian wedding and couldn’t find The Outfit – so I made a purple maxi-dress with a halterneck and glammed it up with ribbons dangling down my back. Saved myself a fortune too!


Illustration by Gilly Rochester

What else do you get up to?
I run Never Enough Notes – a music e-zine, and I’m cycling the London-Brighton this summer with my brother and friends to raise money for the British Heart Foundation.

What would be your perfect Preloved, Reloved outfit?
For daytime it would easily be vintage jeans, brown boots that look a bit worn-out, a floaty shirt or cheeky tee, a tweed jacket and a battered satchel.
For evening, I love ball gowns and retro dresses so would be something glam that I could wear with a pair of 1970s heels! Oh there’s way too much choice, I love it!


Photographs by Kim Sklinar

You can follow Kim’s efforts at the Preloved, Reloved blog; donate online here.
Junky Styling S/S 2010 by Aniela Murphy
Junky Styling S/S 2010 by Aniela Murphy.

Annika Sanders and Kerry Seager are self-taught fashion designers. They started up Junky Styling after they received lots of compliments for their deconstructed and restyled secondhand suits made to go out clubbing in during the 1990’s.

What prompted your approach to dressmaking?
Our approach was initially borne out of a lack of money but it soon became a necessity for individuality and quality. At first Annika’s mother did most of the sewing so our designs were heavily directed by her.

Have you seen many changes over the years?
Aside from all the wrinkles on our faces? We have seen the tangible development of a marketplace that never existed before. Education has enabled the sustainable movement to become more widely accepted and understood, approved and now many new brands think about sustainability before they even start designing.

Where did you go out in the past and do you still go clubbing?
We went to a wide mixture of venues that hosted a similar dressy scene. It was such a brilliant time, and we still enjoy socialising and a bit of a shuffle. But we always try to ensure that we are not the oldest at the bar…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Junky Styling’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
You’ve been going for a very long time. Have attitudes to ethical fashion started to change yet?
Consumers are starting to question the huge exploitation of people and the environment that permits their clothing to be so cheap, treat because it doesn’t add up. There is still a long way to go but the fashion industry is slowly changing the way it does business.

What has the People Tree brand achieved?
We support 5, website like this 000 farmers, case artisans and their families in developing countries by producing well designed fairtrade and sustainable products. For us it’s about creating sustainable livelihoods that put food on the table at the end of the day.

You’ve collaborated with both Bora Aksu and Karen Nichol. What have they brought to People Tree?
We’ve worked with Bora for four years because we share the view that good fashion design should last for years. He is a master of beautiful, feminine draped designs that we produce in organic and fairtrade cotton, and we’ve already started designing an exciting new collection for S/S 2012. Like me Karen is passionate about handicrafts and she loves traditional Japanese textiles and designs. She works with our hand knitters in Nepal to create beautiful appliquéd and hand embroidered embellishments
You’ve been going for a very long time. Have attitudes to ethical fashion started to change yet?
Consumers are starting to question the huge exploitation of people and the environment that permits their clothing to be so cheap, see because it doesn’t add up. There is still a long way to go but the fashion industry is slowly changing the way it does business.

What has the People Tree brand achieved?
We support 5, try 000 farmers, artisans and their families in developing countries by producing well designed fairtrade and sustainable products. For us it’s about creating sustainable livelihoods that put food on the table at the end of the day.

You’ve collaborated with both Bora Aksu and Karen Nichol. What have they brought to People Tree?
We’ve worked with Bora for four years because we share the view that good fashion design should last for years. He is a master of beautiful, feminine draped designs that we produce in organic and fairtrade cotton, and we’ve already started designing an exciting new collection for S/S 2012. Like me Karen is passionate about handicrafts and she loves traditional Japanese textiles and designs. She works with our hand knitters in Nepal to create beautiful appliquéd and hand embroidered embellishments
How did the idea of working with old porcelain come about? 
I was tired of producing other peoples’ ideas (as a stage producer) so in 2007 I decided to start working on my own project, dosage which soon developed into my rapidly growing label, stomach Sägen. I go to flea markets as often as I can for inspiration and to collect source material; I have amassed a huge collection of vintage buttons as well as piles of chipped and damaged porcelain that is no longer wanted. I like to work with my hands and I love turning items from the past into modern accessories. 

Sägen means Old Saga in Swedish – why did you chose this name for your brand?
I come from a small island called Gotland in the middle of the Baltic Sea and I have wonderful memories of listening to all the old myths when I was a kid. I came up with the idea for Sägen when I was there and the name reflects my interest in recycling a little bit of history into new treasures, so I find the name very suitable.

How do you cut the porcelain and set it in silver?
I cut and grind the porcelain with machines, which is a very dirty, dusty and dangerous job: I have been close to losing my fingers many times. When I am working in my basement studio I forget about everything else, instead focusing on the patterns that I am obsessed with. I decide what shapes to make up depending on the motifs in the porcelain, then I set the porcelain in silver (which is 98% recycled) so that it curves, bends and stretches around the shape I have cut out.
Ivana Basilotta S/S 2011 by Bex Glover
Ivana Basilotta S/S 2011 by Bex Glover.

Ivana Basilotta is Italian but has lived in Germany as well as the UK. She channels her observations of different cultures into her work, treatment sometimes the ideas flowing so fast that her pen can’t keep up and her scissors can’t cut the fabric fast enough. Quite often she only realises she was inspired by a certain idea once the collection has been finished. Having previously studied business Ivana is well placed to run her label, prostate and feels that a good business knowledge is as important as the creative force of a design house.

A committed vegetarian, she designs with peace silk, which is made in India without the killing of the silk moth. Because peace silk is spun as a fibre rather than reeled as a thread it is warmer and softer than ordinary silk. “I cannot imagine eating meat,” she says. “I find it strange that people eat dead animals.” She feels that being a vegetarian brings a great sense of freedom and well being, and it is an easy way to lead a greener life. “Farm land that could directly produce food for humans is used to farm and feed animals for slaughter, which uses up far more resources.” She does not like to imagine the stress and sorrow that farmed animals must experience, and wants no part in it…

Read the rest of this interview with Ivana Basilotta in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
bex_glover_howies_collection
Howies by Bex Glover.

Howies has since 1995 pioneered the creation of ethical active clothing with a strong design aesthetic. Based in Cardigan Bay, case Wales, remedy the company has built up a devoted fan base via its affiliation with outdoor sports such as surfing, order mountain biking and skateboarding. Products are made from high performing sustainable fabrics that will last, with a proportion of profits ploughed back into grassroots social and environmental projects via the Earth Tax. Although some clothes are made in China and Turkey they ensure best practice by employing the same factories as other companies they trust, such as M&S…

Read the rest of this interview and see more illustrations of Howie’s clothing in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.
Hetty Rose by Lesley Barnes
Hetty Rose by Lesley Barnes.

You make bespoke shoes… if I wanted a pair of shoes for myself how would the process work?
I create a collection each season from which clients can choose a design, ailment then they decide which vintage Japanese kimono fabric they would like their shoes made up in. Clients can alter the shape and height of the heel so that the shoes are totally unique to them. I usually meet them personally if they are UK based, and we have tea whilst I measure their feet and bring them fabric samples to muse through. It’s a very interactive purchase, with the client involved in every step of the design because I want them to have an emotional attachment to the shoes so that they will treasure them and love wearing them. I email them photos during the process of making the shoes so they can see them being created. At the halfway point they are ready for a fitting and after that I finish off the sole and attach the heels. The whole process takes around six to eight weeks and prices start from £350. With international clients everything is done via email – it’s exciting for them to receive a pair of shoes all the way from a little workshop in England.

How else can someone get a pair of your shoes?
Following increased sales and press attention we have decided to extend the Hetty Rose brand to a wider audience, who will be able to own a precious piece of designer footwear at a more affordable price point and without the long wait for a pair of bespoke shoes. Our Ready to Wear collection features some of our best selling styles in kimono fabrics, and can be bought directly from our website. In the future I plan to add more accessories such as bags, baby shoes, homewares and ties for men…

Read the rest of this interview with Hetty Rose in Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, alongside interviews with 44 other ethical fashion designers and 30 fabulous fashion illustrators. You can buy the book here.

Categories ,ACOFI, ,Amelia’s Compendium of Fashion Illustration, ,bespoke, ,Eco fashion, ,Essex, ,Ethical Fashion, ,footwear, ,Henrietta Samuels, ,Hetty Rose, ,japanese, ,kimono fabric, ,Lesley Barnes, ,menswear, ,Ready-to-wear, ,recycling, ,shoes, ,Ties, ,Upcycling

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Amelia’s Magazine | Designer Spotlight: Brooke Roberts- Part One

Rob-Hopkins
Illustration courtesy of Valerie Pezeron

Nothing satiates a foodie quite like the first forkful of their best-loved grub, try but reading about it comes close. For those gastronomes who believe that food’s role reaches far beyond basically fuelling our existence – that it’s integral to community bonds, economies of every scale and our relationships with our environment, as well as our physical wellbeing – the new book from Tamzin Pinkerton and Rob Hopkins (yes, he of Transition Culture fame) will have you salivating over the nosh-related possibilities that a little ambition, curiosity and organisation can create close to home.‘Local Food: How to Make it Happen in Your Community’ (Transition Books) shadows Hopkins’ inspiring ‘Transition Handbook’, training the spotlight on the integral subject of our food and what we can do to go back to the literal roots of the good life – and stay there. While written against the unnerving but inescapable global backdrop of peak oil, food security and climate change crises, ‘Local Food’ incites excitement about the potential of a carefully considered future, both long and short term, rather than fear of a hopeless one. With the onus on the ‘local’ part of its title, the book encourages a proactive, fun approach to sustainability by profiling a huge and diverse range of CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) initiatives based all over the world.

 

LOCAL_FOOD_cover 
Image courtesy of Transition Culture

“The kind of community engagement facilitated by CSAs generates and harnesses passionate enthusiasm among the people who participate in it,” write Pinkerton and Hopkins, “and this is due, in no small part, to the sheer thrill that comes from being able to shape and engage with the food system that feeds us.” From legitimate legume growers to dig-by-night guerrilla gardeners, the teams and organisations featured in ‘Local Food’ not only explain their motivations for picking up tools, but reveal the thrills, difficulties, surprises and benefits that they have faced since they did.

 Hopkinspic
Image courtesy of Stephen Prior

Unsurprisingly, the majority of these people are driven by a passion for good food, and a respect for and desire to greater understand the environment that provides it. However deeply they’re involved in the food production within their community – be it founding community gardens or filling their fridges with farmers’ market fodder – the individuals highlighted in ‘Local Food’ prove how attainable a sustainable lifestyle is, whether you want to get muddy or not. And, if you do want to have direct involvement in and influence over what ends up on your plate, there’s even a contacts section to introduce you to your nearest initiatives. As the authors put so succinctly, “We can have our affordable, local, organic cake, and eat it too”.
3Zorb catsuit in exclusive silk/ glassino jacquard knit and silver and red gold stacked skull rings and spinning skull slice ring.

Last week I was lucky enough to meet a fashion designer whom I would describe as one of the most innovative, sildenafil visionary and hard working designers of the moment; Brooke Roberts. Brooke’s self named women’s wear label is heavily influenced by radiology and juxtaposes the worlds of science and fashion to great technical effect. I caught up with Brooke in her Hackney based studio to find out more….

PB242089Brooke Roberts SS10 collection, taken in designer’s studio.

Where were you born and raised?
I grew up in rural Australia and went to university in Sydney and at that point I was studying to become a radiographer as I loved science and the anatomy. Whilst I was there I tried a bit of styling and then moved to London. I temped for a while then ended up going to LCF and Central St. Martin’s after deciding I wanted to be a tailor.

How long ago did you graduate?

It feels like decades ago but I finished at Central St. martin’s at the end of 2005.

15Zagna dress in skull python printed georgette and ortho suede belt.

PB242086Close-up of skull python printed georgette.

What have you been up to since graduating?
In four years I’ve been juggling everything. I’m still working as a radiographer and I’ve been doing that all the way through even when I was studying. At the same time I’ve worked with people like Giles Deacon and Louise Goldin. I’ve also been keeping busy doing some freelance bits here and there, the most recent of which was a job for Daphne Guinness with Jens Laugesen. I’ve been travelling a lot as well working at factories in Italy and developing links in India, just trying to immerse myself in the industry and developing contacts. In the last year specifically I’ve been focusing on trying to build my label.

4Zagna dress in printed waffle georgette with embroidered ortho trim and ortho georgette belt.

How does your job as a radiographer influence your designs?
You can’t really separate the two because everything I do in terms of my design links directly back to my work as a radiographer. I’m very scientifically minded and I think what I do looks more at the technology side of science. From technique to materials to imagery it all goes full circle. All the artwork, the shapes the way I cut it all relates to it. It’s different because it’s not purely aesthetic and I really like to think about function. When I design I think about how it’s going to be cut and put together even down to which seams I’m going to use which is why I thought about becoming a tailor.  Stay tuned for the second installment…

Categories ,Brooke Roberts, ,Central St Martins, ,Daphne Guinness, ,Designer Spotlight, ,Giles Deacon, ,Jens Laugesen, ,London College of Fashion, ,Louise Goldin

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Amelia’s Magazine | An interview with couturier Ziad Ghanem


Immodesty Blaize wearing Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Krister Selin

At Fashion Week in February, flailing after a weekend of shows and struggling to even stand up, I was dragged to a late evening show by previous fashion editor Sally Mumby Croft. ‘You’ll LOVE it!’ she exclaimed. I couldn’t say no, could I? So off we popped to see the Autumn/Winter 2010 collection of one Ziad Ghanem.

Wow. I had never seen anything like it in my life, and it was, by and large, the highlight of my fashion week (and my year, probs.) Ziad Ghanem is a trained couturier, which smacks you in the face when you first see his clothes. It almost feels a little disrespectful to call Ghanem’s creation ‘clothes’ – such a meaningless word to describe these works of art.


Photography by Matt Bramford

I couldn’t wait to find out more about the designer. The name sounded so familiar; it turned out I’d bought a Ziad Ghanem t-shirt a few years ago in a sample sale. I was delirious!

The show featured the most beautiful creations, modelled by tattooed models of all shapes and sizes, with a breathtaking finale featuring Immodesty Blaize. The show was a lesson in how to undress, and Immodesty certainly did – with the final show piece being three dresses, each removed to reveal the next. The audience went crazy, as did I.

I’ve been waiting since February to have a chat with Ziad about his collection and what the future holds, and last week, I finally got the chance.


Ziad Ghanem, illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

Hi Ziad! What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on my new collection for spring/summer 2011. I am making a film for it…

What is it about fashion and making beautiful clothes that keeps you hooked?
I love to dress people. I am ever so grateful to my models and to my supportive clients. They are my muses. I also love the fact that I can do what ever I wish and I don’t have to listen to any fashion ‘rules’ that the industry forces on other designers.

You work both in ready-to-wear and couture. Do you have a preference?
I would rather work in couture. I understand it more.


Ziad Ghanem couture, illustrated by Joana Faria

What techniques do you use? Are the array of embellishments and features handmade?
Most features are hand made, especially in couture – we always use traditional methods.I love printing and beading. I am a trained couturier.

Your astounding AW2010 show was the highlight of my fashion week, by far. Can you tell us a bit about it? Were you pleased with the outcome?
Thank you, I was very pleased – I am so happy with all the positive feedback. I want everybody to know that you made my day.

The finalé featuring Immodesty Blaize and the 3-piece ensemble was incredible. How did this collaboration come about?
My collection was about the art of dressing and undressing. On catwalks, particularly in the fashion shows of the 1950s, models really worked the outfits. I wanted a burlesque artist to undress – they do it best. I didn’t want it to be about nudity – it is about the art of undressing. I met Immodesty and asked her to model in my show and I am very grateful that she did. She is an amazing performer and artist.






Photography by Matt Bramford

The models you used were incredibly diverse, as if each piece had been tailored to an individual. We also see recurring models, like Jme and Polly Fey, throughout your work. What’s the story behind your models?
I love working ‘in family’ I only use models that understand and read my work. My models are artists that want to wear and perform in my clothes. I let the model be themselves and I ask and take their opinion into consideration.
My shows are a platform and a chance for people I love to show off. I love helping and I love getting help back. It is the secret of a healthy society.

Going back to your SS2010 collection, there was a strong sustainability ethic with recycled couture and a reaction to consumerism. Are these issues important to you?
Yes. I respect the world and the planet I live in. I am anti-fur and anti-cruelty to people and animals. I want happy people to work with my clothes so I am anti-sweatshop labour. But, I am realistic in knowing where to draw the ethical line.

Your inspiration over the past few seasons has been cited as anything from Victoriana to the Middle East. Can you talk us through where your inspiration comes from, and how it translates to the catwalk?
I am inspired by many cultures and I love music and films.I want be a film maker when I grow up. At the moment I’m still a baby playing dressing up… hahahahaha!


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Naomi Law

We’ve recently had a chat with Marnie Hollande about the film on which she collaborated with you. Where you happy with the result? What was the aim of this film?
Marnie is a wonderful artist and a lovely person. I am more than happy and thankful for her work and talent. There will be more and more to come. She is a lady… and I want apologise about the dirty talk in my studio. I blame Aiden Connor, my assistant…!

What can we expect from Ziad Ghanem SS2011?
Romance and a carnival of print and a performance. I love it when my clothes perform and my models always do a great job. 
Plenty of organic silk. A very simple silhouette

What does the future hold for Ziad Ghanem?
The present is wonderful I can hear and feel my self breathing and nothing can replace that. The future is a bonus and I welcome it with open arms.


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illuustrated by Amy Martino

To see our review of Ziad’s autumn/winter show, click here, and to see more photographs, click here.



Categories ,1950s, ,A/W 2010, ,Aiden Connor, ,Amy Martino, ,Burlesque, ,couture, ,fashion, ,film, ,Immodesty Blaize, ,Jme, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Hollande, ,Middle East, ,Naomi Law, ,Nudity, ,performance, ,Polly Fey, ,print, ,Ready-to-wear, ,Romance, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Undressing, ,Victoriana, ,Ziad Ghanem

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Amelia’s Magazine | Pre-London Fashion Week S/S 2011 Interview: Ziad Ghanem

JASPER GARVIDA lfw s/s 2011 Rachel Clare Price
A selection of Jessie’s corsarges

Walking around Broadway Market, approved one cold wintery Saturday, feeling hungry and looking at all the delicious food I could ill afford, (oh the joys of being a student!). I came across a treasure trove of a stall run by the delightful Jessie and Buddug and instantly fell in love with their charming designs. Since this initial visit, I have returned time and time again to buy unique necklaces as birthday (incredibly successful!) gifts.

So you can imagine my delight coming across their Columbia Road shop, originally located in the upstairs of one the picturesque houses adorning the street. Jessie and Buddug have recently expanded ‘downstairs’, and in celebration of their success, I had the pleasure of interviewing the talented textile artists for Amelia’s Magazine.

I first noticed your designs at Broadway Market on Saturday, was this your first venture?

Buddug: We started broadway market after we graduated 5 years ago and got the shop 2 years ago.

What was your experience of the market? Do you still have a stall there?

Buddug: We still have a stall at Broadway Market, we feel it has grown so much since we started. It’s been cold and wet at times but it’s been great learning what people buy. Its been great socially too, speaking with our friends and customers.

As friends from home, what has it been like to work together?

Buddug: We met when we were on art foundation and always said we we would like to collaborate together in the future. We find it easier that we both do our own work and then display together because we both have different working hours.

You previously occupied an upstairs room in Columbia Road, how did the opportunity to expand into a downstairs space arise?

Buddug: We got offered a place at ground level by Bev who had the shop before us, she made handmade clothes and toys etc, she offered it to us before anyone else which was an honour and we jumped at the chance.

What was your experience of the Goldsmiths Textiles course (which sadly no longer exists?)

Jessie: I was at Goldsmiths, at a very tricky time, the course was going through a real denial period, as they were finding the debate about what to do with textiles and fine art really hard. Which made it hard for us as students and as someone who is passionate about cloth and textiles and most of all making, I found the course incredibly frustrating!

But I had very supportive parents; Primmy Chorley and I am close friends with Audrey Walker and Eirian and Denys Short. So I always had a huge back up behind me in the textile world. I did feel incredibly pulled between the two worlds though and I was lucky enough to come out fighting, determined to set up my own business and to carry on my making process.

Overall I am pleased I went through the Goldsmiths experience, as the academic and written side of it, (for me) has helped me today to think the way I do and pushed me in other ways.

What course did you study Buddug and what was your experiences?

I studied at London Guildhall (now London Metropolitan University)in Jewellery, silversmithing and other crafts. I enjoyed the experimenting with different materials. It was very much a hands on course.

Buddug’s designs for Urban Outfitters.

Buddug, what was it like to work for Urban Outfitters?

It was quite difficult working for URBAN OUTFITTERS, due to the ammount i had to make! and I waited a long time for payment!

Jessie, what role does recycling play in your practice? Why is it important to you and how did you first become interested in using recycled materials?

Recycled materials has and I believe will always be a huge part of my work, I like it that it creates a timeless feeling, I guess it started from the scrap books I made with my Mum when I was young and colleting and using found and recycled items for me creates a story, old clothes and books hold some kind of story and depth to them.

A detail from Jessie’s seating plan for her Wedding Collection.

And how did the wedding collection develop?

I was asked to create a whole wedding theme for a lady who used to buy my cards at Broadway Market, I handmade her invites, table names and a seating plan and really from here I got other customers and then early this year I designed some invites which were slightly quicker to make and I did a huge wedding show in London and its kind of gone from here I have made for several weddings this summer and I am already making for 2011-2012 weddings.

An enamel plate by Buddug.

Buddug, how did you start designing the Home Ornaments collection?

I’ve always been interested in developing the enamel process since university and always liked/inspired by objects mother and grandmother had in the kitchen, I invested in a bigger kiln, which was a challenge to make bigger things!

What materials do you like working with and why?

Jessie: Fabrics, worn clothing, paper they all hold such a good quality and are embedded with an excisting narrative

Designs by Jessie Chorley

Buddug: I’ve always tried to use things that are around me and be inventive with the materials i already have/been thrown away and in old/secound hand things, there’s such a quality in materials and making process and a added charm in old things and it’s actually nicer to use…

Broach by Buddug

I like to combine different materials metal and fabric. fabric and paper or wood…but i mostly enjoy metal and enamel. I really like the solidness of metal and the duribility of it as a raw material.

What was it like to make the stage set for: the launch of Laura Dockrill’s book Ugly Shy Girl and how did you became involved in this?

Buddug: I can’t remember were we met Laura Dockrill, but she asked if we were interested in doing the stage for her. It was quite a challenge because we didn’t know the size of the stage but the best thing was Jessie’s bunting it was really big and yellow!

Have you made or participated in Set Design before? Is this something you will continue to participate in?

Jessie: Yes for me it is a real passion, I love to create things and watch others create a story with the objects I make. A lot of quite random masks and house like boxes which I display in the shop are often borrowed for shoots, and I always like the outcome. For me styling our shop is like creating a stage set I love making it all different each week and then watching the customers come in and their response to it!

My degree show was also about staging and the response of the audience and the creator, for this I made a huge seven foot book which you could walk inside.

Buddug: I haven’t done much set design before, but wold love to, it’s been quite good having practice doing the shop window.

What are the inspirations for your collections?

Jessie: Story telling, people places and preserving memories creating beautiful things from lost or found objects.

Buddug My inspiration for my work is a collection of things I find and come across, I usually collect and draw in sketch books. Nature, a sense of home comforts and memories/naustalgic sences. It’a quite a mish mash of ideas and influencs.

Design by Buddug

We have a few pieces in the shop were we bring things together such as the fabric bows with enamel buttons, but we find it easier to make our own work and display together.

Do you both run and participate in the organisation of the workshops?

Jessie: No I run the workshops I have done for quite a few years now. For me I love to go out and meet other people and hopefully change the way they see the world through making, I have worked with a lot of charities, which is both frustrating and very rewarding at the same time, I am always touched by certain characters which can feed directly in to my work.

The whole workshop trend has gone huge now though and people expect so much more, and have so much more since places like hobby craft became so big and shows like The Knit and Stitch.

I am currently organising my Christmas workshops which will be in November in North London. I will have some day workshops creating simple gift wrap and gifts.

Jess Chorley

Buddug Jess does a lot of workshops, I’m yet to start, but it might be something I would be interested in doing when I’m a bit older.

What’s next for Jess Chorley and Buddug?

Buddug: At the moment we are preparing for christmas, thinking of making stocking filler ideas and promoting our little shop. Nothing too big, taking up projects as they come along…

To find out more please visit: www.jessiechorley.com, www.buddug.com and www.jandbtheshop.com

We started broadway market after we graduated 5 years ago and got a shop 2 years ago.

We still have a stall at Broadway Market, medical we feel it has grown so much since we started. It’s been cold and wet at times but it’s been great learning what people buy. Its been great socially too, prescription speaking with our friends and customers.

We got offered a place at ground level by Bev who had the shop before us, she made hand made clothes and toys etc, she offered it to us before anyone else which was an honour and we jumped at the chance.

We met when we were on art foundation and always said we we wold like to collaborate together in he future.We find it easier that we both do our own work and then display together because we both have different working hours.

What was your experience of the Goldsmiths Textiles course (which sadly no longer exists?)

Jessie
I was at Goldsmiths at a very tricky time the course was going through a real denial period they were finding the whole debate to do with textiles and fine art very hard which made it hard for us a students so as someone who is passionate about cloth and textiles and most of all making I found the course incredibly frustrating! But I had very supportive parents Primmy Chorley and I am close friend with Audrey walker and Eirian and Denys Short so I always had a huge back up behind me in the textile world. I did feel incredibly pulled between the two words though and I was luck enough to come out fighting and to be determined to set up my own business and to carry on my making process. But overall I am please I went through the Goldsmiths experience as the academic and written side of it for me has helped me today to think the way I do and pushed me in other ways.

BUDDUG
I studied at London Guildhall (now London Metropolitan University) Jewellery, silversmithing and other crafts. I enjoyed the experimenting in different materials, it was very much a hands on course.

BUDDUG

it was quite difficult working for URBAN OUTFITTERS, due to the ammount i had to make! and I waited a long time for payment!

What role does recycling play in your practice? Why is it important to you and how did you first become interested in using recycled materials?

Jessie

Recycled materials has and I believe will always be a huge part of my work I like it that it creates a timeless feeling, I guess it started from the scrap books I made with my Mum when I was young and colleting and using found and recycled items for me creates a story, old clothes and books hold some kind of story and depth to them.
How did the wedding collection develop?
I was asked to create a whole wedding theme for a lady who used to buy y cards at Broadway Market, I hand made her invites, table names and a seating plan and really from here I got other customers and then early this year I designed some invites which were slightly quicker to make and I did a huge wedding show in London and its kind of gone from here I have made for several weddings this summer and I am already making for 2011-2012 weddings.

BUDDUG
(home ornaments)
I’ve always been interested in developing the enamel process since university and always liked/inspired by objects mother and grandmother had in the kitchen, i invested in a bigger kiln, and was a challenge to make bigger things!

What materials do you like working with and why?
Jessie
Fabrics, worn clothing, paper they all hold such a good quality and are embedded with an excisting narrative

BUDDUG
I’ve always tried to use things that are around me and be inventive with the materials i already have/been thrown away and in old/secound hand things, there’s such a quality in materials and making process and a added charm in old things and it’s actually nicer to use…

I like to combine different materials metal and fabric. fabric and paper or wood…but i mostyl enjoy metal and enamel. i really like the solidness of metal and the duribility of it as a raw material.

BUDDUG
I can’t remmeber were we met Laura Dokrill, but she asked if we were interested in doing the stage.It was quite a challenge because we didn’t know the size of the stage but the best thing was jessie’s bunting it was really big and yellow!

Have you made or participated in Set design before? Is this something you will continue to participate in?

Jessie:

Yes for me it is a real passion I love to create things and watch others create a story with the objects I make a lot of quite randon masks and house like boxes which I display in the shop and people ofter borrow them for shoots, and I always like the outcome. For me styling our shop is like creating a stage set I love making it all different each week and then watching the customers come in and there responsis to it!
My degree show was also about staging and the response of the audience and the creator, for this a made a huge seven foot book which you could walk inside of.

BUDDUG
I haven’t done much set design before, but wold love to, it’s been quite good having practice doing the shop window.

What are the inspirations for your collections?

Jessie:
Story telling, people places and preserving memories creating beautiful things from lost or found objects.

BUDDUG
My inspiration for my work is a collection of things I find and come across, i usually collect and draw in sketch books. Nature, a sense of home comforts and memories/naustalgic sences. It’a quite a mish mash of ideas and influencs.

We have a few pieces in the shop were we bring things together such as the fabric bows with enamel buttons, but we find it easier to make our own work and display together.

Do you both run and participate in the organisation of the workshops?

Jessie
No I run the workshops I have done for quite a few years now for me I love to go out and meet other people and to hopefully change the way they see the world through making, I have worked in a lot of charities which is both frustrating and very rewarding at the same time, I always touched by certain characters which can feed directly in to my work.
The whole workshop trend has gone huge now though and people expect so much more, and have so much more since places like hobby craft got so big and shows like the Knit and Stitch.

I am currently organising my Christmas workshops which will be in Nov in North London I will have some day workshops creating simple gift wrap and gifts.

BUDDUG
Jess does a lot of workshops, I’m yet to start, but might be something I would be interested in doing when I’m a bit older.


Immodesty Blaize wearing Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, buy illustrated by Krister Selin

At Fashion Week in February, flailing after a weekend of shows and struggling to even stand up, I was dragged to a late evening show by previous fashion editor Sally Mumby Croft. ‘You’ll LOVE it!’ she exclaimed. I couldn’t say no, could I? So off we popped to see the Autumn/Winter 2010 collection of one Ziad Ghanem.

Wow. I had never seen anything like it in my life, and it was, by and large, the highlight of my fashion week (and my year, probs.) Ziad Ghanem is a trained couturier, which smacks you in the face when you first see his clothes. It almost feels a little disrespectful to call Ghanem’s creation ‘clothes’ – such a meaningless word to describe these works of art.


Photography by Matt Bramford

I couldn’t wait to find out more about the designer. The name sounded so familiar; it turned out I’d bought a Ziad Ghanem t-shirt a few years ago in a sample sale. I was delirious!

The show featured the most beautiful creations, modelled by tattooed models of all shapes and sizes, with a breathtaking finale featuring Immodesty Blaize. The show was a lesson in how to undress, and Immodesty certainly did – with the final show piece being three dresses, each removed to reveal the next. The audience went crazy, as did I.

I’ve been waiting since February to have a chat with Ziad about his collection and what the future holds, and last week, I finally got the chance.


Ziad Ghanem, illustrated by June Chanpoomidole

Hi Ziad! What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on my new collection for spring/summer 2011. I am making a film for it…

What is it about fashion and making beautiful clothes that keeps you hooked?
I love to dress people. I am ever so grateful to my models and to my supportive clients. They are my muses. I also love the fact that I can do what ever I wish and I don’t have to listen to any fashion ‘rules’ that the industry forces on other designers.

You work both in ready-to-wear and couture. Do you have a preference?
I would rather work in couture. I understand it more.


Ziad Ghanem couture, illustrated by Joana Faria

What techniques do you use? Are the array of embellishments and features handmade?
Most features are hand made, especially in couture – we always use traditional methods.I love printing and beading. I am a trained couturier.

Your astounding AW2010 show was the highlight of my fashion week, by far. Can you tell us a bit about it? Were you pleased with the outcome?
Thank you, I was very pleased – I am so happy with all the positive feedback. I want everybody to know that you made my day.

The finalé featuring Immodesty Blaize and the 3-piece ensemble was incredible. How did this collaboration come about?
My collection was about the art of dressing and undressing. On catwalks, particularly in the fashion shows of the 1950s, models really worked the outfits. I wanted a burlesque artist to undress – they do it best. I didn’t want it to be about nudity – it is about the art of undressing. I met Immodesty and asked her to model in my show and I am very grateful that she did. She is an amazing performer and artist.






Photography by Matt Bramford

The models you used were incredibly diverse, as if each piece had been tailored to an individual. We also see recurring models, like Jme and Polly Fey, throughout your work. What’s the story behind your models?
I love working ‘in family’ I only use models that understand and read my work. My models are artists that want to wear and perform in my clothes. I let the model be themselves and I ask and take their opinion into consideration.
My shows are a platform and a chance for people I love to show off. I love helping and I love getting help back. It is the secret of a healthy society.

Going back to your SS2010 collection, there was a strong sustainability ethic with recycled couture and a reaction to consumerism. Are these issues important to you?
Yes. I respect the world and the planet I live in. I am anti-fur and anti-cruelty to people and animals. I want happy people to work with my clothes so I am anti-sweatshop labour. But, I am realistic in knowing where to draw the ethical line.

Your inspiration over the past few seasons has been cited as anything from Victoriana to the Middle East. Can you talk us through where your inspiration comes from, and how it translates to the catwalk?
I am inspired by many cultures and I love music and films.I want be a film maker when I grow up. At the moment I’m still a baby playing dressing up… hahahahaha!


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illustrated by Naomi Law

We’ve recently had a chat with Marnie Hollande about the film on which she collaborated with you. Where you happy with the result? What was the aim of this film?
Marnie is a wonderful artist and a lovely person. I am more than happy and thankful for her work and talent. There will be more and more to come. She is a lady… and I want apologise about the dirty talk in my studio. I blame Aiden Connor, my assistant…!

What can we expect from Ziad Ghanem SS2011?
Romance and a carnival of print and a performance. I love it when my clothes perform and my models always do a great job. 
Plenty of organic silk. A very simple silhouette

What does the future hold for Ziad Ghanem?
The present is wonderful I can hear and feel my self breathing and nothing can replace that. The future is a bonus and I welcome it with open arms.


Ziad Ghanem AW 2010, illuustrated by Amy Martino

To see our review of Ziad’s autumn/winter show, click here, and to see more photographs, click here.

Categories ,1950s, ,A/W 2010, ,Aiden Connor, ,Amy Martino, ,Burlesque, ,couture, ,fashion, ,film, ,Immodesty Blaize, ,Jme, ,Joana Faria, ,June Chanpoomidole, ,Krister Selin, ,London Fashion Week, ,Marnie Hollande, ,Middle East, ,Naomi Law, ,Nudity, ,performance, ,Polly Fey, ,print, ,Ready-to-wear, ,Romance, ,Sally Mumby-Croft, ,Undressing, ,Victoriana, ,Ziad Ghanem

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